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English Language Test

Directions (Q. Nos. 41 to 43) Out of five alternatives choose the one which best
expresses the meaning of the given word
Q. 41 Impair
(a) immovable (b) divulge (c) despair (d) share (e) damage
Q 42. Effrontery
(a) rejection (b) effortless (c) arrogance (d) resilience (e) carefulness
Q.43. Ambience
(a) vogue (b) surroundings (c) ambitious (d) abundant (e) submissive
Directions (Q. Nos. 41 to 43) Out of five alternatives choose the one which is
opposite in meaning to the given word
Q. 44. Precocious
(a) bright (b) stupid (c) intelligent (d) mature (e) advanced
Q. 45 Inhibit
(a) impede (b) obstruct (c) forbid (d) encourage (e)constrain
Q 46. Punctilious
(a) ceremonious (b) careless (c) formal (d) painstaking (e) meticulous
Passage
A cloud of brown dust filled with rock doves rose over Kathmandu, the Nepali capital,
when the earthquake struck on April 25th. As the Indian tectonic plate lurched three
metres (10 feet) northward, the ground shook so violently that people struggled to
stand. The earthquake rattled windows in Delhi, Indias capital, 1,000 kilometres (620
miles) away. Older parts of Kathmandu are now rubble. A62-metre tower put up in
the 19th century, Dharahara, collapsed. More buildings fell down in Durbar square, a
UNESCO world heritage site that is home to old temples. Both sites had been thick
with locals as well as foreign visitors. Many were trapped and died. At least one
newish hotel also folded, killing dozens. But for the most part, the citys glass-andconcrete structures stayed standing, despite notoriously poor enforcement of
building codes. Credit is due to public campaigns by NGOs and the UN. They have

trained builders to strengthen the joints of concrete beams. Hundreds of schools


have been reinforced in recent years. Thanks to that, experts worst fears of a big
earthquake attening three-fths of the capital and killing 100,000 were not borne
out. Luck also played a part: the main earthquake (there were aftershocks) came at
noon on a Saturday, when schools and offices were closed and people were outside.
Even so, the suffering was horrific. By mid-week over 6,000 were confirmed dead.
The prime minister, Sushil Koirala, predicts a final toll of 10,000. It could go quite a
bit higher. Most victims were in the Kathmandu valley, which has seen rapid and
haphazard urban growth over the past couple of decades, partly because a civil war
that ended in 2006 pushed villagers towards the capital. The valleys buildings are
especially vulnerable since they rest on sediment layers that are prone to
liquefaction. Rebuilding the stricken areas could cost $10 billiona huge bill for one
of Asias poorest countries. In a radio address, Indias prime minister, Narendra Modi,
vowed to wipe the tears of every Nepali, adding that Nepals pain was also Indias.
Millions of Nepali migrants live and work in India, sending remittances home. These
will now be even more badly needed. Mr. Modi wants to be seen to be in charge. He
appears to be guiding the relief effort better than Nepals own leaders. Within hours
of the first jolts, the Indian army began delivering aid. There is a geopolitical
dimension to the help. A Modi adviser talks of an Indian strategy of becoming more
confident abroad. That starts with winning influence in the region. Mr Modi has twice
visited Nepal since he came to office a year ago, after a gap of 17 years during
which no Indian prime minister deigned to pay a bilateral visit. He promotes Indian
investment in Nepali hydropower. And Nepal is a main beneficiary of Indias trebling
of aid over the past three years, to 94 billion rupees ($1.5 billion) a year.
As for Nepals own government, it faces huge challenges. Rescue and immediate
relief operations are now making way for more sustained help for the survivors.
Distributing materials for proper shelter and ensuring good sanitation are urgent
priorities before the monsoon rains arrive in a couple of months. The sowing season
also starts soon, so distributing seeds and farm supplies is pressing.
Q. 47. What is the meaning of the word notoriously as used in the given passage?
(a) gloriously (b) conspicuously (c) infamously (d) eminently (e) fleetingly
Q. 48 Which of the following is not true in the context of the given passage?

(a) Due to tremors in Delhi and other parts of North India, India was slow to react.
(b) Indias prime minister vowed to wipe the tears of every Nepali, adding that
Nepals pain was also Indias. (c) Monsoon is fast approaching. Providing proper
shelter and sanitation are urgent needs. (d) Indian Army and Air Force did a
commendable job of helping affected Nepalese (e) The tourism Industry of Nepal is
grossly affected, because many heritage buildings are destroyed.
Q. 49. What is the antonym of the word horrific as used in the given paragraph?
(a) abominable (b) disquieted (c) eerie (d) delightful (e) alarming
Q. 50. At first, it was feared that the number of human casualties would exceed
100000, but somehow it was less than feared. The reason for lower casualty was
(a) the main earthquake happened at 12 noon on Sunday (b) most of the buildings
were of RCC (c) The valleys buildings are not vulnerable since they rest on solid
rock. (d) NGOs and UN have trained builders to strengthen the joints of concrete
beams and hundreds of schools have been reinforced in recent years. Also, it
happened at 12 noon on Saturday, when many schools and offices were closed and
people were outside (e) Rescue and immediate relief operations were undertaken
immediately.