You are on page 1of 12

Kids

Sports

Barts Big
Brain turns
Blue

Little
League
team pics

Page 8

Page 6

Your Local Weather


Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

7/29

7/30

7/31

8/1

89/64

84/61

85/64

84/61

85/

Intervals of
Mainly
More sun
More sun
Abunda
clouds and
sunny. Highs
than clouds.
than clouds.
sunshin
sunshine in
in the mid
Highs in the
Highs in the
Highs in
the morning
80s and
lows Delphos
mid 80s and
80s and
mid 80s
Media
Publication
serving
& Areamid
Communities
with more
in the low
lows in the
lows in the
lows in
clouds for
60s.
mid 60s.
low 60s.
mid 60s
later .

The Delphos Herald


A DHI

Su

8/

2009 American Profile Hometown Conten

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Established in 1869

www.delphosherald.com

$1.00

Edelbrock
pleads guilty
DHI Media Staff Reports

Delphos water main erupts


A water main break on Fifth Street in front of the Delphos Medical Center had maintenance crews wading
through turbulent waters Monday afternoon. (DHI Media/Steven Coburn-Griffis)

KALIDA Jennifer A.
Edelbrock, Kalida, has pled
guilty in Putnam County for
embezzling money from the
Kalida Band Boosters.
A bill of information was
filed against Edelbrock late
last week charging her with
taking $17,250 owned by the
Kalida Band Boosters without their consent. Putnam
County Prosecutor Gary
Lammers said Edelbrock
was in a designated position
of authority to handle the
funds when the money was
taken.
After meeting with her
counsel, Lammers said
Edelbrock on Monday pled
guilty to a charge of grand
theft, a felony of the 4th
degree, which carries with it
a maximum 18 month prison sentence and a $5,000
fine.
In a deal struck with the

Edelbrock
Putnam County Prosecutors
office, Edelbrock has the
opportunity to avoid a prison sentence provided she
makes full restitution to
the Kalida Band Boosters
within 30 days. If she does,
Lammers said he will recommend community control,
which includes a wide variety of residential, non-residential and financial options
used in criminal sentencing,
including traditional probation supervision.
See GUILTY, page 12

Village passes junk ordinance


BY STEVEN COBURN-GRIFFIS
DHI Media Staff Writer
sgriffis@delphosherald.com
OTTOVILLE Emotions ran high
Monday night as members of the Ottoville
Village Council heard and ultimately passed an
ordinance affecting appearances in the village.
Council listened to the third and final reading of an ordinance to control junk and/or
inoperable vehicles, which establishes a definition of junk vehicles and how the village may
legally respond to such an offense. After the
reading, but before the vote, Mayor Ron Miller
opened the meeting to discussion from the floor,
addressing village resident Matt Fiedler directly.
Matt? You got something to say? Miller
asked.
You know I do, Fiedler responded.This
is a BS ordinance. It all started because of me.
Thats why Im fighting this so hard.
Fiedler then proceeded to raise issues with
specific aspects of the ordinance, which imposes various levels of misdemeanor charges
minor misdemeanor for a first offense; third
degree misdemeanor for a second; and first
degree for a third for violations of the ordinance. He took particular note of the phrase
any vehicle not capable of legal operation,
which includes, as the ordinance states, improper or inadequate licensing.
My whole gripe goes back to the license
plate thing, he said. The State of Ohio doesnt
require me to keep a plate on it, but you do.

Thats not right.


Fiedler also took council to task for provisions within the ordinance that allow exceptions
for businesses, potentially holding them to a
different, lower standard than residents.
Matt, we just want a little common sense,
Councilor Carl Byrne replied, reiterating an
appeal made at previous meetings.
With Councilor Darren Leis absent, council
then voted four to one to approve passage of the
ordinance. Joe Morenos was the one dissenting
voice.
Why not create an ordinance that says no
blue shutters, Fiedler commented. Its the
same damn thing.
After asking, Fiedler was advised that the
ordinance will go into effect on August 6.
I need to know, Fiedler said. Ill have
(Chief of Police Jay Herick) on my doorstep
because Ill be the first one.
Council also met with trustees from
Monterey Township. The trustees proposed
continuing to support the Ottoville branch of
the Putnam County District Library at a rate of
$1,400 for the year. The trustees also proposed
that the township assume a two-thirds financial
responsibility for the sealing of blacktop around
the library. While still investigating options, the
trustees presented council with two estimates
for the work which were virtually the same at
$825 and $850, respectively. Council agreed to
both proposals.
See JUNK, page 14

Jeffersons competition cheer squad includes, front from left, Shayna Sanchez, Lauren
Grothaus and Madison Geise; Sarah Fitch, Lindsey Jettinghoff, Megan Cooley, Abby German,
Kyrstin Warnecke and Sami Klint; and back, Taylor Coronado, Brooke Rice, Kiersten Teman,
Maddy Smith, Kaitlyn Ward and Bria McClure. Absent is Sophie Wilson. (Submitted photo)

Cheerleaders to host competition


BY NANCY SPENCER
DHI Media Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com

DELPHOS The Jefferson Competition


Cheer Team, absent from the schools ros-

ter since 2002, is back with a vengeance. The squad will host a competition
at 6 p.m. Friday at Jefferson Middle School
Auditorium.
See CHEER, page 14

Tax holiday to benefit back-to-school shoppers


BY ERIN COX
DHI Media Staff Writer
news@delphosherald.com
COLUMBUS Back-to-school shoppers may want to consider planning a trip to the store on August 7 through 9 during Ohios
first ever state tax holiday.

The Ohio Tax Holiday allows consumers in Ohio to buy school


supplies, instructional material, clothing, and footwear without
paying the sales tax.
Ohio Council of Retail Merchants President and CEO Gordon
Gough expects families and students to take full advantage of the
tax break and stock up on back-to-school items.
Taking an additional seven percent off one notebook might not

seem like much, but when youre spending hundreds of dollars on


everything from diapers and shoes to books and school supplies,
the savings add up big, Gough said in a statement. Nationwide,
consumers are expected to spend more than $68 billion for back-toschool items. This is a significant annual event for Ohio families.
See HOLIDAY, page 14

Classifieds 11 | Entertainment 9 | For The Record 2 | Local-State 3-4 | Obituaries 2 | Sports 6-7 |
Delphos American Legion Post 268 will hold a Ride for
the Vets poker run on Sunday.
Registration is at noon with the first bike out at 1 p.m. and
check-in at 5:30 p.m.
The cost is $20 for singles and $25 with a rider and includes
a meal.
Dueces Wild will play at 8 p.m.
Proceeds will benefit the Legions Veterans Appreciation
Festival.

Weather 2

The annual Run for the Marbles 5K will be held at 8


a.m. Aug. 8 at St. Johns Annex.
Registration is at 7:30 a.m.
Preregistration is $15 and includes a Marbletown
Festival T-Shirt or $10 with no T-shirt. Race day registration is $18 with no shirt guarantee.
Contact Deann Heiing 15 419-230-2963 or Larry
Heiiing at 419-30-2-9624 or email ldheiing@hotmail.
com.

DHI MEDIA
2015 Published in Delphos, Ohio

Volume 145, No. 13

2 The Herald

For The Record

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

VW COA The Delphos


Herald
offering
free legal
aid services

OBITUARIES
George Joseph
Lubeley
May 23, 1919-July 28, 2015
OTTOVILLE George
Joseph Lubeley, 96, of
Ottoville died 1:34 a.m.
Tuesday at his residence.
He was born May 23,
1919, in St. Louis, Missouri,
to George A. and Cecelia
(Jergens) Lubeley, who preceded him in death.
On July 25, 1974, he married Marie Theresa Weber
at the Immaculate Heart of
Mary, Lansing, Mchigian.
She survives.
He is also survived by
a brother: Rev. Richard
J. Lubeley; two sisters:
Elizabeth Kuntz and Joan
Aherns, all of St. Louis; and
13 loving nieces and nephews. His family also includes
his in-laws, Stanley (Grace)
Weber, Patsy Weber, James
(Arleen) Weber, Ruth Weber,
Marilyn Weber and Virgil
(Nancy) Hohlbein.
George
is
preceded
in death by a sister, Mary
Demarins; brothers-in-law,
Anthony Demarins, Sylvester
Kuntz, Anthony Ahrens,
John Weber, Louis Weber
and Thomas Weber; and a
sister-in-law, Joann Weber
Hohlbein.
Mr. Lubeley retired from
the Department of Human
Services, Elder Services
Section, of the State of New
Hampshire. Previously he was
Director of Senior Services at
Northern Essex Community
Mental Health Services in
Haverhill, Massachusetts,
after having directed the
Senior Center in Tewksbury,
Massachusetts. He held leadership positions in social work
for the elderly with visiting
nurses in New Hampshire
and as the first director of
the Senior Nutrition Program
for three counties in Central
Michigan. In retirement, his
volunteer service included
day-care at the University
Center on Aging/Alzheimers
Association in Lexington,
Kentucky, and group work
at the Community Mental
Health Center in Alexandria,
Virginia. He worked as a
private caretaker for an
Alzheimer patient at the same
time. More recently he volunteered in Putnam County
hospice program. He held a
masters degree in counseling
from the University of New

inForMAtion
sUBMitteD

Gordon Patton
Hampshire and also held a
certificate in Retirement
Housing Management from
the Institute of Gerontology,
University of Michigan.
His work in elder services
spanned 20 years.
In an earlier 30-year career
as a member of the Society
of the Precious Blood and
an ordained priest, he taught
Theology at St. Charles
Seminary, Carthagena and
at St. Josephs College in
Indiana. His priestly ministry included Chaplaincy for
the Sisters of the Precious
Blood,
Dayton,
and
Supervision of the Societys
Theological Students at the
Catholic Theological Union
in Chicago. He held a graduate degree in Theology from
the University of Fribourg,
Switzerland. In his retirement, he continued his association with the Society of
the Precious Blood as a Lay
Associate in the Companions,
and as a friend of the Society
through later publications and
presentations on Precious
Blood Spirituality. At the
time of his death, he was
an active participant of the
Immaculate
Conception
Parish in Ottoville.
Mass of Christian Burial
will be 10:30 a.m. Friday
at Immaculate Conception
Catholic
Church,
with
Georges brother, The Very
Reverend Monsignor Richard
L. Lubeley, and Father
Jerome Schetter co-officiating. Burial will follow in St.
Marys Cemetery, Ottoville.
Visitation will be from
2-8 p.m. Thursday at LoveHeitmeyer Funeral Home,
Jackson Township, and again
Friday morning from 9:3010:30 a.m. at church. A scripture service will be held at 5
p.m. Thursday at the funeral
home.
For movie information, call

419.238.2100 or visit
vanwertcinemas.com
Van-Del Drive-In - NOW OPEN!
van-del.com 419.968.2178

Clyde Ed
Smith
September 2, 1946 August 4, 2014
Our tomorrow was
never promised
Love, K

Nancy Spencer, editor


Ray Geary,
general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Lori Goodwin Silette,
circulation manager

Feb. 4, 1950-July 21, 2015


SAN JOSE, California
Gordon Patton, 65, passed
away at 9:45 a.m. July 21
at his home in San Jose,
California, after an 18-month
battle with cancer.
Gordie was born Feb. 4,
1950, in Delphos to Louis
E. and Gertrude (Wieging)
Patton, who preceded him in
death.
He was a 1968 graduate of
St. Johns High School. He was
a student at Stautzenberger
College in Toledo, where he
studied architectural design.
He was also a talented leathersmith, which led him to
La Jolla, California, where
he opened his own business,
The Village Leathersmith, and
created the La Jolla Bag,
an exclusive handbag for the
area.
San Jose would be where
Gordie and his family would
call home This town would
be good to him. He began his
business, Primus Construction,
there and became very successful. Gordie was a hard
worker and loved everything
he did with great passion.
Gordie loved his family
and loved life itself; each day
was lived to the fullest. He
spent many hours coaching
his childrens teams in soccer
and baseball. He loved a good
game of golf and hanging
out with the guys afterwards.
His skill at the grill will be
remembered as he was quite
the chef. He had a standout
personality and did not know
a stranger.
Gordie is survived by his
wife, Nancy, and their three
children, Josh (Michelle)
Patton of Knights Ferry,
California, Christopher Patton
of San Jose and Katie (Mitch)
Katz of San Francisco; his oldest daughter, Michelle (Mike)
Guess of Holland; two sisters,
Cheri (Carl) Core of Delphos
and Elaine (Stephen) Sams of
Hamilton; and a special niece,
April Patton of Delphos.
In memory of Gordie, we
ask that you enjoy life to the
fullest and be kind to all. He
never tired of telling his family I love you. Please do the
same.
Memorials in Gordies
name can be made to Shriners
Hospital or St. Judes Hospital.
He would love nothing more
than to give every child a
chance at life.
A Memorial Mass will be
held at 8 a.m. Aug. 25 at St.
John the Evangelist Catholic
Church in Delphos.

Marcella sally A.
Wallenhorst
sept. 3, 1914-July 28, 2015
DELPHOS Marcella
Sally A. Wallenhorst, 100,
of Delphos passed away
Tuesday, July 28, 2015 at
Vancrest Healthcare Center,
surrounded by her loving family.
Her Family. She was
born Sept. 3, 1914, in Delphos
to Benedict and Josephine
(Saum) Knippen, who preceded her in death. On April
27, 1937, she married Gilbert
Wallenhorst, who preceded
her in death on Dec. 27, 1986.
She is survived by a
son,
Bernard
Bennie
(Connie) Wallenhorst of
Minster; a daughter, Valeta
M. Wallenhorst of Mentor;
a brother, Norman Knippen
of Delphos; three grandchildren, Eric Wallenhorst, David
(Jamie) Bradford and Robert
(Melissa) Bradford; and six
great-grandchildren, Christian
Wallenhorst, Danielle (Jordan
Simpson) Bradford, Aaron
Bradford, Jacob Bradford,
Hayley Bradford and Abbey
Bradford.
She was also preceded in
death by two sisters, Evelyn
Ricker and Ruby Miller; and
a sister-in-law, Alice Knippen.
Her Legacy. Sally was
a homemaker, growing up on
a farm and continuing beside
her husband with their family farm and raising their two
children. She was a very gifted baker, creating wedding
cakes, all kinds of specialty
cakes and decorated homemade cookies. Even when she
had her own family, farm and
business to care for, she was
always a very giving person.
Sally was a nurturing, compassionate and fun-loving person. She especially enjoyed
spending time with her family
and friends playing cards and
dancing. She was a member
of St. John the Evangelist
Catholic Church and belonged
to the CL of C.
Her Farewell Services.
Mass of Christian Burial will
begin at 11 a.m. on Friday
at St. John the Evangelist
Catholic Church, the Rev.
Daniel Johnson officiating. Burial will follow in
Resurrection Cemetery.
Visitation will be from 2-8
p.m. on Thursday at Strayer
Funeral Home, Delphos.
Memorial contributions
may be made to St. John the
Evangelist Catholic Church.
Online condolences may
be shared at strayerfuneralhome.com

VAN WERT Through


a partnership with Legal Aid
of Western Ohio the Van Wert
County Council on Aging
will be offering free legal aid
services. While the service is
available to anyone, emphasis
will be placed on the senior
population.
Rebecca Steinhouse will
serve as Legal Aids local liaison for the Van Wert County
Council on Aging. Steinhouse
has worked for Legal Aid of
Western Ohio for over 17
years and specializes in elder
law. However, Steinhouse and
Legal Aid of Western Ohio
can also offer legal expertise in the many other areas,
such as family law, domestic
violence, consumer law, and
public benefits. The services
will be offered on a quarterly
basis, and appointments are
very limited.
While all individuals aged
60 and older are eligible for
these services at no cost, those
under 60 must be low-income
eligible individuals. For those
interested, the next session will
be Aug. 13. Anyone interested
in meeting with Steinhouse or
who needs further information
on Legal Aid of Western Ohio
should contact the Van Wert
County Council on Aging at
419-238-5011.
The Van Wert County
Council on Aging is an advocate for independent living
in later years and is partially funded by the Van Wert
County Foundation.

BIRTHS
st. ritAs
A girl was born July
27 to Katelyn and Jeremy
Dendinger of Fort Jennings.
A boy was born July 27
to Sarah and Eric Peters of
Venedocia.

GRAINS
Wheat $4.61
Corn $3.75
Soybeans $10.33

The
Delphos
Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
Wednesdays and Saturdays.
The Delphos Herald is delivered by carrier in Delphos for
$0.96 per week. Same day
delivery outside of Delphos is
done through the post office for
Allen, Van Wert and Putnam
Counties. Delivery outside of
these counties is $72 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DELPHOS HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833

CorreCtions

The Delphos Herald wants


to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the newsroom of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.

Vendor
show set
inForMAtion
sUBMitteD

VAN WERT A quarter


auction, multi-vendor show
to benefit Jasmine Coleman,
Team Transplant, will be held
Thursday, July 30, at Trinity
Friends Church, 605 North
Franklin Street, Van Wert.
The doors open at 5 p.m.
with the auction to begin at
6:30 p.m. Cost to participate
is $3 per paddle. Food and
beverages will be available
for purchase. Vendors participating will include Origami
Owl,
Paparazzi,
Gold
Canyon, Pampered Chef,
Perfectly Posh, Tastefully
Simple, Mary Kay, The
Gourmet Cupboard, Pieces
of my heART, Baked Goods,
Le-Vel, CJs Merchandising,
do-TERRA. There will
be two tickets to see Lady
Antebellum.

Your Local Weather


Wed

Thu

7/29

89/64

Intervals of
clouds and
sunshine in
the morning
with more
clouds for
later .

Fri

7/30

84/61

Mainly
sunny. Highs
in the mid
80s and lows
in the low
60s.

Sat

7/31

85/64

8/1

More sun
than clouds.
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
mid 60s.

84/61

More sun
than clouds.
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
low 60s.

Sun

8/2

85/64

Abundant
sunshine.
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
mid 60s.

2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service

THANKS FOR
READING

MIDDLE POINT LIONS

Ice Cream
Social &
DELPHOS H
Auction DELPHOS HERALD
THE

Telling The Tri-Countys Story S

THE

FRIDAY, JULY 31ST

Telling The
Telling The Tri-Countys
StoryTri-Countys
Since 1869 Story Since 1869

Food Served at 5:00 pm, Auction at 6:00 pm

MIDDLE POINT COMMUNITY BUILDING

MOST SALE ITEMS ARE NEW


AUCTION SPECIAL: Club Cadet Rear Tine Rototiller
208cc OHV Engine, Recoil or Electric Start
7.5" Deep, 3 year warranty

28"x24" Framed Mirror, Case of 75w Bulbs, Car Care Kit, Ford Jacket and
Ball Cap, 18 holes of Golf at Hickory Sticks, Kinet Go Green Food Container
Set, Tote Bags, Smoke Alarm, Antique Wooden Railroad Message Hook,
Lincolnview Hoodie and T-shirt, Numerous Gift Certificates and Coupons.

And Much More!

405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833


www.delphosherald.com

Got a news tip?


Want to promote
an event or business?

Nancy Spencer, editor


419-695-0015 ext. 134
nspencer@delphosherald.com
Marilyn Hoffman, advertising
419-695-0015 ext. 131

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

The Herald 3

Local/State
Open forums on fate
of WBGU announced
BY STEVEN COBURN-GRIFFIS
DHI Media Staff Writer
sgriffis@delphosherald.com
BOWLING GREEN The Board of
Trustees at Bowling Green State University
has announced a series of public forums
regarding the potential sale of the spectrum
occupied by the universitys public television
station, WBGU.
In an effort to free up bandwidth to
meet a growing demand
from wireless providers, the
Federal
Communications
Commission, in May of last
year, established the general
rules for an incentive auction
that, according to the FCC,
will marry the economics of
wireless providers demand
for spectrum with the economics of television broadcasters
That BGSU was considering taking part in the auction
was made public earlier this
year in a barrage of media
reports from virtually all local
media outlets. At that time, David Kielmeyer,
BGSUs interim chief communications officer, reported that the FCCs valuation of the
WBGU spectrum is roughly $40 million.
Under the terms of the auction, BGSUs
trustees have four options, as outlined by
Kielmeyer:
Decline participation.
Sell the spectrum, but then partner with
an agreeable broadcaster and channel share.
Sell the spectrum and then move the
WBGU signal from the UHF to the VHF
spectrum at a cost of anywhere between 33
and 80 percent of the proceeds from the sale.
Sell the spectrum and go black; cease
broadcasting and abandon WBGU in its
entirety.
It is this final option that of shutting down the regions Public Broadcasting
System provider station that has generated
no small amount of concern among local
educators, governmental administrators and
fans of such PBS offerings as Downton Abbey
and Sesame Street. Last week, in a concerted
effort to sway the trustees away from simply
turning off the lights, the mayors of Lima,
Findlay and Bowling Green co-authored a letter suporting their preference for a continued
PBS presence in the region. The letter also
expressed frustration at what was described
as an impasse in direct communications
with Kielmeyer and BGSU President Mary

Ellen Mazey.
As elected officials for communities in
NW Ohio, we fully understand the economic
pressures created for public entities cities
and universities and others by decisions
being made by the Governor and Ohio legislature, the letter states. These negative decisions affecting local government funds and
higher education resources are causing all of
us to shrink our costs and sometimes services
in order to balance our budgets. While we do
not object to the sale analysis
for portions of the spectrum,
we absolutely believe that
consideration of a full sale and
the shut-down of WBGU are
not in the Universitys nor in
the regions fundamental long
term interests. The damage
that such a sale would do to
our communities, the region
as a whole, and the University
is serious and irreparable.
In order to avoid any sort
of escalating tensions and
related consequences, we are
posing the same request to
the Board as that which was
posed to Dr. Mazey: Please amend your resolution now, as we sincerely hope that you
will not consider the option of going dark
because of the serious detrimental impacts
on the region. The other three options, in our
view and in one fashion or another, would
continue to benefit the University, the region
and the State of Ohio.
In addition, the administrations of the
three cities issued an open letter to all BGSU
alumni requesting their support in their effort.
The letter, available on each citys website,
provides email addresses for Mazey and Dr.
Patrick Pauken, board of trustees secretary.
We ask that you engage immediately to
prevent WBGU from going dark, the letter
reads. The communities of our region have
been well served by WBGU public broadcasting services for over 50 years. The potential
that we would lose this service permanently
represents an enormous loss to the quality of
life of more than 2 million persons.
For their part, the board of trustees welcomes input at any one of the three public
forums:
July 29 at 7 p.m. in Findlay at Owens
Community College, Community Wellness
Building.
August 3 at 7 p.m. in Lima at Rhodes
State College, Keese Hall.
Bowling Green, late August, date, time
and place to be determined.

Elida Council discusses phone protocol


BY STEVEN
COBURN-GRIFFIS
DHI Media Staff Writer

sgriffis@delphosherald.com

ELIDA Residents
concerns were at the top of
the agenda when the Elida
Village Council met Tuesday.
Councilor
Mike
Siebenoler queried the village
administration as to how the
village handles phone calls
and complaints. He raised
the issue after receiving two
complaints as to issues related to, and a perceived slow
response from, village personnel.
Both said theyd called
the village and no one
returned their calls, he
explained. Do we have a
protocol in place?
Both Mayor Kim Hardy
and Village Administrator
Dave Metzger fielded the
question. Hardy explained
that when calls are received,
messages are written down
and the notes conveyed to the

appropriate individual. When


the questions are of a more
generic nature, the calls are
relayed to the supervisor of
the most likely department.
For his part, Metzger
assured Siebenoler that all
calls of which hes been
made aware receive a
response whenever possible.
Frequently, he said, callers
simply fail to leave a name
or number to which he can
respond or they arent available to take the call.
If someone leaves a
name and number, I go into
the utmost detail to return
those calls, he said. If they
dont he shrugged and left
the sentence hanging.
Metzger acknowledged
that another possible problem
is the amount of time the
village provides residents to
address issues. He reported
that, whenever a resident or
property owner is advised of
an issue, they then have 15
days to correct the problem.
Not everybody is aware

of that, Metzger said.


Metzger further reported
that while the village does
pay for the use of his cell
phone, it is his personal cell
phone and he does not provide that number to the public. When he calls, his number is blocked from view.
Council also heard the
second reading of a resolution adopting the villages
2040 Comprehensive Plan,
then met in executive session
to discuss matters related to
the hiring of personnel.
The next regular meeting
of the Elida Village council
is scheduled to take place on
August 11 at 7:30 p.m.

A little Leisure time


JJ Young (left) and his big brother, Christian, hoofed it down the slides in Leisure Park on
Monday. Higher temperatures and a much appreciated lack of rain has prompted a good
deal activity in the citys parks. (DHI Media/Steven Coburn-Griffis)

Sportsmen and women have


conservation options available
in the Lake Erie Watershed
Information Submitted

income from the conservation practice will be


similar to what is paid for cash rent on similar
FINDLAY Ohios Conservation soils in the county where the land is enrolled.
Lake Erie CREP is a voluntary program
Programs Advisory Committee reminds sportsmen and women owning land in the Lake that helps landowners protect environmentally
Erie watershed they can create quality wild- sensitive land, reduce sediment and nutrient
life habitat by participating in the Lake Erie runoff, prevent water pollution, minimize the
Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program risk of flooding, and create wildlife habitat
(CREP), according to the Ohio Department of and safeguard ground and surface water. The
program has a goal of enrolling 67,000 acres.
Natural Resources (ODNR).
Sportsmen and women can choose from Currently 47,000 acres have been enrolled.
a number of practices that provide unique There are presently only 20,000 acres left
wildlife habitat, including wetland restorations available for signup.
to attract waterfowl, grass buffer strips for
The program is focused on improving water
wild turkey production and white-tailed deer quality and soil conservation in the Lake
fawn-rearing areas, and multi-row windbreaks Erie watershed, with a special emphasis on
that can provide travel corridors for pheasant, the Blanchard and Tiffin rivers as importand bobwhite quail. Also available is a conser- ant tributaries on the Maumee River. The
vation practice to create pollinator habitat by Lake Erie CREP is available in 27 counplanting wildflowers that bloom throughout the ties: Allen, Ashland, Auglaize, Crawford,
growing season and will enhance an area for Defiance, Erie, Fulton, Hancock, Hardin,
many wildlife species. These habitat improve- Henry, Huron, Lucas, Lorain, Marion, Medina,
ment projects also work to prevent chemicals, Mercer, Ottawa, Paulding, Putnam, Richland,
soil, and other contaminants from running off Sandusky, Seneca, Shelby, Van Wert, Williams,
cropland and into waterways.
Wood and Wyandot.
Participants can earn money on less ecoThese conservation practices target environnomically viable cropland, such as areas of
mentally
sensitive areas in the Lake Erie waterland that historically lay wet, as well as cropshed
to
reduce
sediment and nutrient runoff,
land bordering ditch banks and streams. The
Lake Erie CREP annual soil rental payments prevent water pollution, minimize the risk of
average $249 to $362 per acre for 15 years flooding and enhance wildlife habitat.
Sportsmen and women who want to create
depending on the type of conservation practice
installed. FSA will also provide cost-share wildlife habitat and reduce soil erosion while
assistance to create the wildlife habitat. In providing cleaner water may contact ODNR
most cases this cost-share will be close to 90 Division of Wildlife private lands biologist
Mark Witt for
technical assistance
at (419)
REPRODUCTION
NOTE:
percent of the cost of the project. Some habitat NEWSPAPER
898-0960,
ext.
26.
133LPI
minimum
required,
150LPI NOTE:
recommended.
REPRODUCTION
practices also include a $150 per acre bonus NEWSPAPER
133LPIODNR
minimum
required,NOTE:
recommended.
ensures
a150LPI
balance
between wise
NEWSPAPER
REPRODUCTION
sign-up payment.
required,
150LPI recommended.
use and
protection
of our natural resources for
Landowners are required to maintain133LPI
the minimum
habitat according to a conservation plan devel- the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at
oped specifically for their property. The annual ohiodnr.gov.

ZERO
TURN
ZERO
TURN
ZERO
TURN
EFFICIENCY
EFFICIENCY
EFFICIENCY
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
ZERO
TURN EFFICIENCY
PERFORMANCE
PERFORMANCE
ZERO
TURN
PERFORMANCE
HIGH
PERFORMANCE
MOWING
MOWING
EFFICIENCY
MOWING
MOWING

NEWSPAPER REPRODUCTION NOTE:

133LPI minimum required, 150LPI recommended.

Congratulations
Katie &
Cameron!

HIGH
PERFORMANCE
MOWING

FINANCING
FINANCING
AVAILABLE*
FINANCING
AVAILABLE*
AVAILABLE*

HERALD

Since 1869

FINANCING
AVAILABLE*

Visit us on Facebook

ZT2500
ZT2500
ZT2500

VISIT YOUR LOCAL DEALER


VISIT YOUR LOCAL DEALER
*Subject to credit approval. Minimum monthly payments required. See dealer for details.
VISIT YOUR LOCAL DEALER
*Subject to credit approval. Minimum monthly payments required. See dealer for details.

J.L. Wannemacher Sales & Service


*Subject to credit approval. Minimum monthly payments required. See dealer for details.

2 miles west of Ottoville on Rt. 224, Ottoville, OH

419-453-3445
www.simplicitymfg.com
www.simplicitymfg.com
www.simplicitymfg.com

00132340
140179 N
140179 N

ZT2500
140179 N

212 N Main St, Delphos, OH

(419) 741-7022

Place Dealer Imprint Here


(Place
dealer
information
Place your
Dealer
Imprint
Here here)
your dealer information here)
Place(Place
Dealer
Imprint Here

www.heather-marie.com

(Place your dealer information here)

4 The Herald

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

Local/State
Anniversary

Beach Boys at NPAC Sunday


INFORMATION SUBMITTED
VAN WERT The Van Wert Area Chamber and Main Street
Van Wert are the only place to get Beach Boy tickets for the
Sunday performance at the Niswonger Performing Arts Center in
Van Wert.
Tickets are $60 with a portion of ticket sales going to the Van
Wert Area Chamber and Main Street Van Wert. Tickets can be
reserved tickets or drop off payment with check or cash preferred,

by Thursday or until sold out to:


Chamber office- 118 N. Washington St., Van Wert. Phone:
419-238-4390
Main Street Van Wert office- 136 E. Main St., Van Wert.
Phone: 419-238-6911
Orchestra is sold out. All seats sold by Chamber & MSVW will
be randomly assigned. Ticket pick up at will-call window at noon
on Sunday at the Niswonger.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS
TODAY
9 a.m. - noon Putnam County Museum
is open, 202 E. Main St. Kalida.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Delphos Museum
of Postal History, 339 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite at Delphos Senior
Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff St.
Noon Rotary Club meets at The Grind.
6 p.m. Shepherds of Christ Associates
meet in the St. Johns Chapel.
7 p.m. Bingo at St. Johns Little Theatre.

FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. Delphos Optimist Club, A&W
Drive-In, 924 E. Fifth St.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Delphos Museum
of Postal History, 339 N. Main St., is open.
11 a.m.-4 p.m. Interfaith Thrift Store is
open for shopping.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite at Delphos Senior
Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff St.

To celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary, the


family of Jerry and Pat Schmit requests a card shower
in their honor.
Jerome and the former Patricia Knebel were married
Aug. 7, 1965, in Delphos. Their family includes: Fr. Stan
Schmit, Renee Schmit, Chris and Missy Davis-Schmit,
Ernie and Cindy Medina and Bill and Mary Gregoski;
along with grandchildren Peyton and Ella Davis-Schmit;
Jacob, Hannah, Lizzy and Isaac Medina; and Eryn
Gregoski.
Cards may be sent to the couple at 4506 N. First St.,
Norfolk, Nebraska 68701.

July 30
Dylan Krendl
Kelly Cross
July 31
Laura Grogg
Karen Nomina
Baylee Lindeman
Sydney Hoehn
John Freund
Lexie Metcalfe
Abby Martz

SATURDAY
9 a.m.-noon Interfaith Thrift Store is
open for shopping.
St. Vincent dePaul Society, located at the
east edge of the St. Johns High School parking lot, is open.
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Delphos Postal
Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. Testing of warning sirens by
Delphos Fire and Rescue.
1-3 p.m. Delphos Canal Commission
Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open.
7 p.m. www.edwardjones.com
Bingo at St. Johns Little Theatre.

THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. The Delphos Canal
Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is
open.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Delphos Museum
of Postal History, 339 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite at Delphos Senior
Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff St.
3-7 p.m. The Interfaith Thrift Store is
open for shopping.

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Schmit

Aug. 1
Alison Spurlock
Jason Vogt
Ryan Lindeman
Hannah Hardesty

THRIFT SHOP VOLUNTEERS


Blood drive
Putting
You Put
Them Y
Inour
a Safe Place.
World inWas That?
set Aug. 5
Now, PWhere
July 30-Aug. 1
ersPective
THURSDAY: Sue Vasquez, Sharon Wannemacher, Eloise
www.edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com
Our local, national and international news
coverage is insightful and concise, to keep you in the
know without keeping you tied up. It's all the information
you need to stay on top of the world around you,
delivered straight to your door everyday.
If you aren't already taking advantage of our
convenient home delivery service, please call us at
419-695-0015.

THE DELPHOS HERALD


405 N. Main St. Delphos

Are your stock, bond or other certificates


in a
www.edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com
safety deposit box, desk drawer or closet
... or
are you not sure at the moment?

YouYou
PutPut
Them
Them
In aInSafe
a Safe
Place.
Place.

INFORMATION
Shumaker, Teresa Gilden, Lyn Rhoads and Helen Fischer.
SUBMITTED
FRIDAY: Dolly Mesker, Valeta Ditto, Millie Spitnale,
Lorene Jettinghoff and Ruth Calvelage.
DELPHOS The Knights
SATURDAY: Sandy Hahn, Nora Schulte and Judy Green.
THRIFT SHOP HOURS: 3-7 p.m. Thursday; 11 a.m.-4 of Columbus hall in Delphos will
host an American Red Cross Blood
p.m. Friday; and 9 a.m.-noon Saturday.
To volunteer, contact Volunteer Coordinator Barb Haggard Drive from 2-7 p.m. Aug. 5.
Blood is especially needed
at the Thrift Shop at 419-692-2942 between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.
this time of year.
Donors must be at least 17
years of age, weigh at least 110
pounds and be in good general
health.
Call 1-800-RED CROSS or
visit redcrossblood.org, sponsor
code kofcdel to schedule a
donation appointment.

So
Much
Planning
Now,
Now,
Where
Where
Was
Was
That?
That?
Having
More
Retirement
A lost or destroyed certificate can mean
Goes
intoisRetirement.
Accounts
Notforthe
Same
inconvenience and lost
money
you and
your
Are your
Are stock,
your stock,
bond bond
or other
or other
certificates
certificates
in a in a
Have
You
Thought
Taxes
As Well?
heirs. Let
Edward
JonesAbout
hold them
for you.

as Having
More
Money.
safetysafety
deposit
deposit
box, desk
box,
drawer
desk drawer
or closet
or closet
... or ... or

Wesleyan Men hold


breakfast meeting

Youlikely
still retain
ownership
make
the come
Its
thatare
your
income
may
you
areretirement
not
yousure
notand
at
sure
the
atmoment?
theall
moment?
When it comes to the number of retirement
decisions
while we
handle
all theSecurity,
paperwork.
from
manysources,
such
as Social
pension
accounts you
have,
the
saying
more
iscan
better
is
A lostAorlost
destroyed
or destroyed
certificate
certificate
mean
can mean
distributions,
a 401(k)
orfact,
IRAifwithdrawals.
Thats
not
necessarily
true.
In
you
hold
multiple
Well automatically
process
dividend
and
inconvenience
and
and
money
lost
for interest
you
forand
youyour
and your
why,
if taxes
arevarious
ainconvenience
concern
forlost
you,
itsmoney
important
INFORMATION SUBMITTED
accounts
with
brokers,
it
can
be
difficult
to
payments, mergers,
splits,
bond
calls
or
maturiheirs.
heirs.
Let
Edward
Let
Edward
Jones
Jones
hold
them
hold
them
for
you.
for
you.
to
choose
right investments
investments and
for your
portfolio.
keep
trackthe
of your
to see
if youre
DELPHOS The Delphos Wesleyan Church Mens Group
ties, and more.
Even
better,
youll
receive
a make
You
still
You
retain
still
retain
ownership
ownership
and
make
and
allcan
theall the
At
Edward
Jones, we have
many
that
met Saturday for its monthly breakfast.
properly
diversified.*
At the
veryoptions
least, multiple
Larry Basinger opened the meeting with prayer and shared
consolidated
account
statement
and
a single
form
decisions
decisions
while
while
we handle
we
handle
all
theall
paperwork.
the
paperwork.
accounts
usually
mean
multiple
fees.
give
you more
control
over
your
taxes,
so
you
can
Scripture from Luke 22: 13-15 and I Corinthians, the topic
at taxwhat
time.youve worked so hard to achieve.
being this passover is for individuals as well a the group.
enjoy
Bringing your accounts to Edward Jones could
Well Well
automatically
automatically
process
process
dividend
dividend
and interest
and interest One of the upcoming projects for the group is doing some

work at the parsonage.


Also attending the breakfast was: Wayne Heard, Chuck
Hammond, Dave Wessell, Ron Woods, Frank Rigdon and
Virgil Tarango.
form Basinger cooked the breakfast and he and Heard took care
of the cleanup.
Hammond provided the closing prayer.
All men are welcome to the prayer breakfast held the last
Saturday of the month.

Edward
Jones, its
employees
and financial
advisors cannot
provide
tax it
help solve
all
that.
Plus,
one
statement
make
payments,
payments,
mergers,
splits,
splits,
bondcan
bond
calls
or
calls
maturior maturiadvice. You should
consult
withmergers,
a qualified
tax specialist
for
professional
easier
if youre
advice
on to
yoursee
specific
situation.moving toward your goals.

Call or visit your local Edward Jones


ties, and
ties,more.
and more.
Even Even
better,better,
youll youll
receive
receive
a
a
financial
advisor
today.
*Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss.

consolidated
consolidated
account
account
statement
statement
and aand
single
a single
form

Call
how our unique, faceAndy today
North attotaxsee
attime.
tax time. Corey Norton
To
learn
why
consolidating
your
to-face
approach makes
us best
suited
Financial Advisor
Financial
Advisor
retirement
accounts
to
Edward
Jones
to
help
investors
meet
1122
Elida long-term
Avenue
1122 Elida
Avenuetheir
makes
sense,
call
your
local
financial
Call
or
Call
visit
or
visit
your
your
local
local
Edward
Edward
Jones
Jones
current
financial
Delphos, OHneeds
45833 and future
Delphos,
OH 45833goals.
.

advisor
today.
financial
financial
advisor
advisor
today.
today.
419-695-0660
419-695-0660

Andy North

Corey Norton

Andy North
Andy North Financial
Corey Corey
NortonNorton
Andy North
Corey Norton
Financial
Advisor
Advisor

.
Financial Advisor
Financial Advisor
Financial
Financial
AdvisorAdvisor
Financial
Financial
AdvisorAdvisor
.
.
1122
Elida Avenue
1122
Elida Avenue
.
.
.
.
1122 Elida
1122 Elida
Avenue
1122 Elida
1122Avenue
Elida Avenue
Elida
1122Avenue
Elida Avenue
Delphos,
OHAvenue
45833
Delphos,
OH1122
45833
Delphos, OH 45833
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660 Delphos,
419-695-0660
Delphos,
OH 45833
OH 45833
Delphos,
Delphos,
OH 45833
OH 45833
.

419-695-0660

OPR-1850-A

419-695-0660
419-695-0660

419-695-0660

419-695-0660
419-695-0660

Member SIPC

Check us out online: delphosherald.com

Fair exhibit,
parade entry
deadlines near
INFORMATION
SUBMITTED
LIMA The Allenn
County Agricultural Society has
announced the 2015 Exhibitors
Handbook for the 2015 Allen
County Fair is now available
at the fair office. Entries for
Open Class exhibits are available online at allencofair.com or
stop in the fair office. Entries are
due Saturday.
Additionally, the deadline
to enter the Allen County Fair
Parade is Aug. 5.
Season and membership
passes and ride vouchers are
also available at the office.
The fair office is open from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through
Friday. For further information,
call the fair office at 419-2287141.
The Allen County Fair will
be held Aug. 21-29.

5 The Herald

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

From the Archives


One Year Ago
It has been quite a
year for NOVFA Queen
Corinne Metzger. Since
winning
her
crown
in June 2013, Metzger
has been busy attending Northwest Ohio
Volunteer Firefighters
Association events with
local firefighters.
Jim and Anita Dunlap
took a spin on the dance
floor during Christmas in
July, Friday evening at
the Delphos Museum
of Postal History.
More than 40 guests
enjoyed wine and
hors doeuvres
by
twinkling
Christmas
lights
and
other decorations at
the museu m s
fundraiser.

Benning, Ga.
75 Years Ago 1940
Guiding
Hands
Capitol Theatre defeatLeague of the Ohio Child ed Lion Clothing in a
Conservation
League close and interesting
held a pool party and game at Waterworks Park
steak roast at Stadium by a score of 3 to 2 and
Park Saturday night. Mrs. Star Caf won easily from
Ralph Craig, outgoing Club Cigar Store at City
president, read the consti- Field, 8 to 1, in Delphos
tution and told the aims softball League games
of the League. Following played Friday evening.
the steak roast a scaven- Capitol came from behind
ger hunt was held with twice to win from the city
25 Years Ago 1990
prizes going to Mr. and softball leaders.
Today Allen County
Mrs. Gary Poling and Mr.
Exceptionally
fine
residents can be thankand Mrs. Vern Gonyea.
entries are expected in
ful for those industrious
Accumulation
golf the horse department at
early first settlers who
was the program for the annual Allen County
came here in the early
the 30 women golfers (Delphos) Fair to be held
1800s and worked hard
Tuesday, Ladies Day, here Aug. 20 to 24. L.
to make a life for themat the Delphos Country R. Stemen is superintenselves. To honor these
Club. Mrs. Richard Davis dent of the department
first settlers, special reccame in with the lowest with Frank McClure and
ognition ceremonies will
score and Mrs. Howard Edwin Davis as assisbe held Sunday at the
Huysman. Mrs. Ambrose tants. Premiums will be
Allen County Museum,
Wannemacher and Mrs. given in a number of
620 W. Market St., Lima.
Ed Wiecher tied for sec- classes including regisJerry Altstaetter of Elida,
ond place. Mrs. Huysman tered Belgians, light draft,
as a descendant of the
was captain for the day.
heavy draft, and matched
early pioneer, Peter
Dennis Koester, son of teams.
Altstaetter, will be recogMr. and Mrs. Ambrose
Five members of the
nized as a member of the
(Bud) Koester of Fort Epworth League of the
First Families of Allen
Jennings, has completed Methodist Church left
County.
his six-week basic train- Saturday for Lakeside to
Phil Hesseling of Elida
ing at Lackland Air Force spend the week. Those
and Greg Schulte of
Base in Texas. He is now who went from Delphos
Kalida will test their karastationed at Lowery Air are Robert Ervin, William
te skills against some of
Force Base in Colorado, Parrott, Louis Rozelle,
the nations best young
where he is assigned Norman Truesdale and
competition in early
to Lowery Technical Mary Heizer. Chaperones
August. The two
Training Center for a peri- for the week will be Mrs.
16-year-olds will
od of 29 weeks schooling O. J. Truesdale and Mrs.
compete in the
as a nuclear weapons spe- Ray Danner.
Amateur Athletic
cialist.
The
members
of
Unions Junior
Lana Rinehart of the Delphos Board of
Olympics Aug.
Delphos has earned a Education paid honor
3-4 in St.
place on the Deans list to E. W. Bell, retirPetersburg,
at Otterbein College. ing Delphos Public
Fla.
Rinehart earned a 3.5 School Superintendent,
Black
point
average.
The when they held a fareSwamp
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. well dinner for him at
Rifle/
Richard Rinehart, Lana the Beckman Hotel
Pistol
has completed her junior Wednesday
evening
Club
year at Otterbein.
preceding the reguMichael Moreo and lar monthly meeting
Bernard Will Jr., have of the board. In atten50 Years Ago 1965
completed their registra- dance at the dinner were
President
Johnson tion for the fall term in Roy Humphreys, Luke
announced Wednesday the College of Education Noonan, Orla Sawmiller,
that draft calls will be at Bowling Green State Edwin Williams and C.
doubled to 35,000 men a University. They are C. Laman, board memmonth to help build up both 1965 graduates of bers, and Robert Christy,
U. S. strength in South Delphos St. Johns High new Delphos School
Viet Nam from 75,000 School. Michael is the Superintendent.
to 125,000 troops. He son of Mr. and Mrs.
The installation of a
also disclosed that Raymond Moreo, and stock of electrical goods
he had ordered Bernard is the son of Mr. has been completed at
to Viet Nam the and Mrs. Bernard Will Sr. the store now being oper1st
Calvalry
Results of last Mays ated by Floyd Patton and
STOCK DESCRIPTION
COLOR
PRICE
Division,
a Future
Farmers
of Robert Kiggins on West
crack
air America State Judging Second Street. This new
8648 2013 BMW X3 xDrive28i AWD ...................... Silver.................................................$30,753
assault and contest held on campus store presents a pleasing
8698 2012 Buick LaCrosse .................................... Crystal Red Tintcoat ............................$18,900
i n f a n t r y at Ohio State University, appearance. It is located
8669 2010 Buick LaCrosse CXL ............................ Summit White ........................................ $14,898
outfit sta- have
been
received in the building at the
8677 2008 Chrysler Sebring Limited...................... Silver Steel Metallic Clearcoat/Black Vinyl Top . $8,270
t i o n e d here. The Delphos Meat northeast corner of the
8650A 2008 Ford Edge Limited AWD....................... Vapor Silver Metallic ................................... $12,685
at
Ft. Judging Team, composed Second and Canal streets
8652A 2011 Ford Edge Limited AWD ....................... Ingot Silver Metallic ...................................... $20,108
of Kenneth Hoersten, intersection.
Donald Fischer and
Under the auspices of
8604A 2012 Ford Edge SE ...................................... Dark Blue Pearl Metallic Ford Certified .......... $16,754
Gerald Hesseling, ranked the Landeck Council of
8689 2011 Ford Edge SEL AWD ............................ Mediterranean Blue Metallic ..............................$15,843
25th among 126 teams. the Catholic Ladies of
8702 2013 Ford Edge SEL AWD ........................... Kodiak Brown Metallic Ford Certfiied ................... $24,911
Kenneth Hoersten ranked Columbia, a social and
8668 2013 Ford Edge SEL..................................... Ingot Silver Metallic Ford Certfiied......................... $21,589
fifth in all classes and chicken supper will be
8645 2013 Ford Edge SEL..................................... White Suede Ford Certfiied ...................................... $21,326
first in wholesale cuts.
held at Landeck on Aug.
8562 2013 Ford Edge Sport AWD.......................... Ruby Red Metallic Ford Certfiied.................................$32,978
Sister Julitta, D.C., 18. The following are
8682 2014 Ford Edge Sport................................... Ruby Red Metallic Ford Certfiied...................................$33,677
daughter of Mr. and serving on the commitMrs. Forrest Hanser of tee: Rosella Kill, chair8662 2013 Ford Escape SEL ................................. White Platinum Tricoat Ford Certfiied ...............................$20,986
Delphos, will receive a man; Bernadine Mueller,
8708 2014 Ford Escape Titanium .......................... Tuxedo Black Ford Certfiied ...............................................$23,996
B. S. degree in Nursing assistant; Agnes Gengler,
8692 2012 Ford Explorer XLT ................................ White Platinum Metallic Ford Certfiied .................................$22,563
on Aug. 24 at Marillac Catherine
Luersman,
8674 2013 Ford F-150 Supercrew FX4 ................. Ruby Red Metallic Ford Certfiied............................................ $40,667
College, Normandy, Rosemary Grothouse,
8688 2013 Ford F-150 Supercrew Lariat 4X4........ Ruby Red Metallic Ford Certfiied...............................................$39,682
Mo. The Hansers L o r e t t a
Wr a s m a n ,
8714 2013 Ford F-150 Supercab Lariat 4x4 .......... Ruby Red Metallic Ford Certfiied.................................................$35,816
youngest
son, Alvera
Youngpeter,
8706 2006 Ford F-250SD Regular Cab XLT 4X4 .. Oxford White Clearcoat ..................................................................$11,736
James Richard, Isabel Gengler, Louis
will graduate Rahrig, Joseph Heitz,
8667A 2011 Ford Fiesta SEL ................................... Lime Squeeze Metallic Ford Certfiied...............................................$11,978
Aug. 1 from Alfred Lucius, Oliver
8637 2012 Ford Flex SEL ...................................... Dark Blue Pearl Metallic Ford Certified ..............................................$20,841
A l e x i a n Mueller, Albert A. Klaus,
8697 2014 Ford Focus SE ..................................... Oxford White Ford Certfiied ..................................................................$14,962
Brothers of Albert Sever and Elmer
8658 2014 Ford Focus SE ..................................... Ingot Silver Metallic Ford Certfiied...........................................................$14,714
N u r s i n g , Beckman.
8687 2012 Ford Focus SEL ................................... Ingot Silver Metallic Ford Certfiied............................................................. $13,999
Chicago.
The members of the
8676 2010 Ford Focus SES................................... Blue Flame Metallic ........................................................................................$6,327
Bernice Sewing Club
8713 2009 Ford Fusion S ...................................... Brilliant Silver Clearcoat Metallic ...................................................................... $8,075
convened Thursday afternoon at the home of Mrs.
8690 2013 Ford Fusion SE .................................... Tuxedo Black Metallic Ford Certfiied ................................................................ $15,653
Frank Dye, West First
8684 2013 Ford Fusion Titanium ........................... White Platinum Ford Certfiied..............................................................................$21,809
Street. Arrangements for
8703 2012 Ford Fusion Hybrid .............................. Ingot Silver Metallic Ford Certfiied......................................................................... $16,888
the annual bazaar to be
8641B 1995 Ford Mustang GT ................................. Sapphire Blue ............................................................................................................. $6,997
held in October were dis8712 2007 Ford Mustang GT Premium ................. Black Clearcoat ...........................................................................................................$15,500
cussed. First honors in
8659B 2010 Nissan Altima 2.5 SL ............................ Ocean Gray Metallic .......................................................................................................$11,966
the contest were award8696 2013 Ford Taurus Limited ............................. Deep Impact Blue Ford Certfiied ......................................................................................$20,907
ed Mrs. John Bryan and
Loraine Foster and
8711 2012 Ford Transit Connect XLT .................... Panther Black Metallic Ford Certfiied .................................................................................$15,464
second to Mrs. C. L.
8653A 2008 Lincoln MKZ ......................................... Light Sage Clearcoat Metallic ................................................................................................. $9,253
Odum and Mrs. Philip
8681 2013 Lincoln MKZ ........................................ Bordeaux Reserve Lincoln Certified ........................................................................................$24,815
Walther.
8679 2014 Lincoln MKZ ........................................ Ingot Silver Metallic Lincoln Certified.........................................................................................$26,935
8686 2007 Mercury Milan Premier AWD ................ Black .............................................................................................................................................. $6,999
8678 2011 Toyota Camry LE .................................. Classic Silver Metallic ......................................................................................................................$13,167
Its a party with a
purpose. The Wetzel
Motorcycle Club began
its annual party back in
1987 as a mostly private,
and by todays standards,
small affair. For the 28th
annual party, Wetzelland
will be crowded with
people spread over the
100 acres in northern Van
Wert County.

WE MAKE

BUYING OR
LEASING A
VEHICLE...EASY

. . . . . . ..

Wednesday pistol league


top shooters were Dana
Martin of Fort Jennings,
first, J. R. Schnipke of
Fort Jennings, second and
Fred Moreo of Delphos,
third. The Thursday rimfire rifle match top shooters were Bob Maloney
of Delphos, first, Paul
Wilson of Delphos, second, and Danny Haehn of
Delphos, third.
Three young fishermen hauled in a 16-inch
catfish Tuesday at the
Miami-Erie Canal. The
boys were Chad German,
13, son of Chuck and
Donna German; his brother Scott, 11, and Donny
Ardner, 10, son of Donny
and Marcia Ardner.
St.
Johns
High
School varsity basketball
cheerleaders attended a
Universal Cheerleaders
Association camp at
Wright State University,
Dayton. They garnered
seven first-place ribbons
and two second-place
ribbons. They were
also awarded a superior squad trophy and ribbon. The cheerleaders
were Kristi Klausing,
Chris Odenweller, Jenni
Fischer, Nicki Wienken,
Laura Gordon and Kerri
Wannemacher.
The Delphos Bass
Club held its third tournament on Webster Lake,
Indiana. Winners were
Dale Schleeter, third
place with six fish weighing seven pounds 11
ounces, Tim Mengerink,
second place with six fish
weighing nine pounds one
ounce, and John Moreo,
first place with five fish
weighing 11 pounds two
ounces.

8 Time
Presidents Award Winner
USED CARS

Its all about YOU. . .Your time, your happiness, your ease of purchase.
SALES HOURS:
Monday 8:00M-8PM, Tuesday-Friday 8AM-6PM
Saturday 9AM-2:00PM

SERVICE & PARTS HOURS:


Monday 7:30AM-8PM, Tuesday-Friday 7:30AM-6PM
Saturday 9AM-2:00PM

8 Time

RAABE

11260 ELIDA RD. DELPHOS, OH


(419) 692-0055 Toll Free 800-589-7876

Family Owned and Operated since 1922

FORD, LINCOLN, INC.

www.raabeford.com

6 The Herald

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Sports

www.delphosherald.com

Delphos Little League Team pics Now it gets interesting!

The Delphos Pirates of the Tri-County Little League for 2015 were made up of Cole Binkley, Kaleb Cutlett, Landon
Elwer, Blake Fischbach, Gavin Fittro, Jason Gillespie, Hunter Haehn, Derek Haggard, Logan Hubert, Jaylen Jefferson,
Trent Lindeman, Brady Parrish, Braxton Scalf, Brady Zalar and coaches Ray Geary, Scott Scooby Scalf and Kyle
Fittro. (DHI Media/Charlie Ashby)

The Delpha Chevy Reds consisted of Conner Burris, Dillon Cross, Nathan Ditto, Logan Gallmier, Austin Giesege,
Landon Grothaus, Andrew Miller, Jeffrey Odenweller, Wesley Schier, Jacob Simmons, Peyton Stabler, Trent Teman,
Troy Wolfe and coaches Eric Schier, MIke Will, Alan Kerns and Eric Schier.

OHSAA awards $54,200 in college scholarships


INFORMATION SUBMITTED

COLUMBUS The Ohio High


School Athletic Association will hand
out $54,200 in college scholarships to
48 recent high school graduates following selections made by each of the
OHSAAs six District Athletic Boards.
The OHSAAs annual college scholarship program is now in its 23rd year.
Of the 48 honorees, 41 will receive
$1,000 awards, including six (one
from each district) who will receive
an OHSAA Minority Scholarship. The
highest ranking scholarship recipient
in each district will receive a $2,000
OHSAA Spirit of Sport scholarship (a

tie in one district resulted in both graduates receiving $1,600).


The point system used in each district
is described below. Nike and Molten
have also contributed to the OHSAA
scholarship program.
In addition to being excellent students and athletes, these 48 young people have been leaders in their schools
and in their communities, said OHSAA
Commissioner Dr. Dan Ross. They
truly represent what it means to be a
student-athlete. Their futures are very

bright and their families, teachers and


coaches are to be commended for helping guide them to great high school
careers and now on to college. The
OHSAA is very proud of all of them.
More About the Scholar-Athlete
Selection Process
Scholar-athlete recipients are selected based on a point system which
rewards students for grade point averages; class rank; ACT or SAT scores;
varsity letters earned; and individual
and team athletic honors. The number of
scholarship recipients from each district
are based upon the number of schools
within the district. The recipients were
selected by special committees within each of the OHSAAs six
athletic districts. Individuals
who receive athletic scholarships from NCAA Division I
or II institutions or appointees
to military academies are not
eligible for an award.
2015 OHSAA ScholarAthlete
Scholarship
Recipients
- OHSAA Spirit of Sport
Scholarship goes to the highest ranking scholarship recipient in that district (based
on point system described
above) with a value of $2,000
each
- OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Scholarship value is $1,000
each
- OHSAA Ethnic Minority
Scholarship value is $1,000
each
Northwest District (9)
Taylor Arbogast, New Riegel
OHSAA Spirit of Sport (tie, $1,600)
Lauren Seas, Coldwater OHSAA
Spirit of Sport (tie, $1,600)
Dustin Rethman, Maria Stein Marion
Local OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Ellie Dackin, Lima Bath OHSAA
Scholar-Athlete
Cassie Jutte, Minster OHSAA
Scholar-Athlete
Jon Wenning, Coldwater OHSAA
Scholar-Athlete

Adam Henderson, Wapakoneta


OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Ryan Smith, Mansfield Christian
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
William Lawson III, Findlay LibertyBenton OHSAA Ethnic Minority
Scholar-Athlete
Southeast District (6)
Austin May, Wheelersburg OHSAA
Spirit of Sport
Meagan Pierron, Portsmouth Notre
Dame OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Nathan Campbell, Proctorville
Fairland OHSAA Ethnic Minority
Scholar-Athlete
Tristen Wolfe, Racine Southern
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Kaitlin Evans, Leesburg Fairfield
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Trey Moberly, Hillsboro OHSAA
Scholar-Athlete
Central District (6)
Kori Caughenbaugh, Newark Licking
Valley OHSAA Spirit of Sport
Donald Deep, Powell Olentangy
Liberty OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Rachel Bush, Mount Gilead
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Jacob Adkins, Johnstown Northridge
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Mitch Willis, Newark Catholic
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Renee Waters, Columbus Africentric
Early College OHSAA Ethnic Minority
Scholar-Athlete
East District (6)
Kerrie Dolick, New Concord John
Glenn OHSAA Spirit of Sport
Samuel Wentworth, Sugarcreek
Garaway OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Natalie Hart, Beverly Fort Frye
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Lucas Herrington, Steubenville
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Alex Milleman, New Philadelphia
Tuscarawas Central Catholic OHSAA
Ethnic Minority Scholar-Athlete
Brennan Coil, Berlin Hiland
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete

See OHSAA, page 7

I am referring to the DeflateGate decision of whether NFL


Commissioner Roger Goodell would uphold his 4-game suspension of the New England Patriot quarterback for his role in
that post-American Football Conference title game/pre-Super
Bowl fiasco.
I actually was going to write about this very topic this week,
wondering why it was taking so long for the Commish to make
his decision.
Was there some give-and-take horse-trading behind the
scenes going on?
Was Mr. Goodell simply wanting to make sure he had all his
ducks in a row all the evidence he needed for and against
Mr. Brady before he decided to uphold that suspension?
After all, with all the controversy that has seemed to dog
the commish since his taking over of the office domestic
violence, child abuse, concussions his stature has taken a
hint, if the actual game of football hasnt.
In his defense, the controversial actions didnt start with
him but years of overlooking and potentially covering up finally hit the fan with him at the helm.
It would have happened no matter who
Jim Metcalfe
filled the office.
He knows that
he has to walk a
sometimes fine line
between not coming
down hard enough
on bad behavior versus coming down too
hard.
After all, the commissioners role is to uphold the integrity
of the game.
I dont pretend to know about all the legal ramifications and
wrangling when it comes to the process that this involved
but seems to me that Mr. Bradys actions destroying the
cell phone were mighty suspicious (can we really believe
he thought the Wells investigation that had no real power
but concluded he likely was a cheat was the end of the
process and that cell phone was going to be asked for?) and
all but made it impossible for Goodell to arrive at any other
conclusion.
And of course his rep would claim that the appeal process
was a sham I suppose any agent/lawyers/representative in
this case would do the same but it was an appeal process
that his own client and the rest of the NFL players agreed to
give him in the last collective bargaining agreement.
Call it buyers remorse but you are reaping what you sowed
and you are reaping handsome rewards as well.
Does it mean that this is over by any means?
Perish the thought.
The Brady camp will, of course, sue the league and Mr.
Goodell and his suspension will be put on hold until the case
is resolved with all the motions, countermotions, caterwauling, stonewalling, stone masonry, casting of stones, crying to
the media, etc., etc., etc., will probably be sometime around
2020, when Brady is long gone.
By then, he will likely admit he did it and accept his
suspension!
Oy vay!
We knew not if but when.
I am referring to the beginning of the restructuring of the
Cincinnati Reds with the trade of ace and Cy Young-caliber
starter Johnny Cueto to the Kansas City Royals for three
minor-league prospects.
The Reds received left-handers Brandon Finnegan, John
Lamb and Cody Reed in exchange plus are sending moolah
to the Royals to help pay for Cuetos salary.
We all knew it was going to happen; we just had to hope
that GM Walt Jockety would get good value in the trade and
that those prospects would quickly develop into bona fide
major-leaguers sooner rather than later, if at all.
The idea of waiting years and years to develop players is
fast going the way of the dinosaur.
It seems theres too much pressure and money to have a
long-term plan of more than a year or two at most, three.

Metcalfes
Musings

See MUSINGS, page 7

Lima Junior Golf Association

On display is some of the hardware that was to be handed


out including for Mondays Tournament of Champions
to Lima Junior Golf Association event winners and
runners-up at the evenings banquet and awards ceremony
held at the same Shawnee Country Club. (DHI Media/Jim
Metcalfe)
INFORMATION
5 Harmon, Ethan 5 6 5 6 6
SUBMITTED
2 6 5 10 51 51
Shawnee
Country
6 Wisser, Alex 7 5 7 5 8 5
Club - Elks Invitational 7 4 6 54 54
Tournament of Champions
BOYS 14-15
Mondays Results
1 Nartker, Christian 6 5 6
Pos Name 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 5 5 2 5 3 4 41 5 4 7 4 4 5 6
9 Out 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 4 3 42 83
17 18 In Total
2 McKinley, Keaton 5 6 8
Black Par 4 4 5 4 4 3 5 3 5 5 3 6 4 4 46 4 2 6 5 6 5 5
4 36 4 3 5 4 4 4 5 4 3 36 72
5 3 41 87
BOYS 12-13
3 Lyons, Nicklaus 6 5 7 4
1 Harmon, Gavin 6 4 5 6 4 5 4 7 3 4 45 6 3 4 6 5 5 5 5
3 5 3 4 40 40
4 43 88
2 Ricketts, Ethan 5 6 6 4 5
4 Belcher, Aaron 4 5 5 4
4 5 4 4 43 43
6 3 7 3 5 42 6 4 5 7 5 5 6 5
3 Koesters, Reed 4 5 5 6 5 6 49 91
5 5 4 6 45 45
4 Harmon, Carson 5 5 6 6
See LJGA, page 7
6 4 10 3 5 50 50

www.delphosherald.com

Sports

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

The Herald 7

LJGA Banquet, Awards LJGA

(Continued from page 6)

OHSAA

(Continued from page 6)

Southwest District (9)


Alexa Jennings, Centerville
OHSAA Spirit of Sport
Jackson
Mantkowski,
Cincinnati Madeira OHSAA
Scholar-Athlete
Kathleen
McCarthy,
Middletown Bishop Fenwick
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Benjamin
Miller,
Covington OHSAA ScholarAthlete
Grace Stimson, Cincinnati
Indian Hill OHSAA
Scholar-Athlete
Trent
Hagenbuch,
Kettering Archbishop Alter
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Mark Hancher, Cincinnati
Sycamore OHSAA ScholarAthlete
Mark Andrew, Middletown
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Deepak
Indrakanti,
Cincinnati Sycamore
OHSAA Ethnic Minority
Scholar-Athlete
Northeast District (12)
Leah
Vasaharhelyi,

Lisa Strom is formerly a


Ladies Professional Golf
Association touring pro
who attended the Q
School for qualifying 11
times and Futures Tour
player. She is currently an
Ohio State University womens assistant golf coach. She
gave an encouraging and
inspirational message about
hard work and sacrifice in
the game of golf and in the
game" of life to the gathered players and their families at the Lima Junior Golf
Association season-ending
banquet and awards ceremony held Monday night at
the Shawnee Country Club.

Macedonia Nordonia
OHSAA Spirit of Sport
Aleah Hughes, Berlin
Center Western Reserve
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Jessica Isler, Windham
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Sam Skiljan, Kirtland
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Jennifer
Wisniewski,
Independence OHSAA
Scholar-Athlete
Parker
Carmichael,
Wooster Triway OHSAA
Scholar-Athlete
Victoria Glunt, Chardon
Notre Dame-Cathedral Latin
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Tessa Murthy, Shaker
Heights Hathaway Brown
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Alec White, Bay Village
Bay OHSAA ScholarAthlete
Teressa Hill, Massillon
Jackson OHSAA Ethnic
Minority Scholar- Athlete
Emily Russell, Solon
OHSAA Scholar-Athlete
Kathleen Shier, North
Canton Hoover OHSAA
Scholar-Athlete

Musings

(Continued from page 6)

When the other shoe(s)


drop: trades of starter Mike
Leake, intimidating and profusely-sweating closer Aroldis
Chapman and everyday players like Jay Bruce, Joey Votto
(less likely because of his salary) and others; will be in a
matter of days.
Again, you hope that
Jockety and his scouting staff
have done their homework
and their analytics and all the
other mumbo-jumbo that the
game has become and will
get maximum value.
We fans dont want to go
through another drought like
we did a few years back when
spring training hope sprang
eternal until the first of
June!
However, the other angle
in all of this is when will manager Bryan Price be canned?
Even though the injuries
are not his fault and the Reds
did trade away some pieces
like Mat Latos and others, its
the manager that is easiest to
let go when a team underperforms.
Lets face it: some of the
players we thought would be
All-Stars arent.
Its disappointing when you
DELPHOS The second annual Delphos Herald- consider they play 81 games
sponsored Tennis Camp will be held from 9 a.m. to noon on in a hitters park like Great
Aug. 4-5 at the Stadium Park tennis courts.
American and how many othThe instructors are members of the staff of Westwood ers in places like Wrigley, etc.
Tennis and Fitness Center in Lima and are experienced in
teaching tennis techniques and development to players of all
ages and experience levels. In addition to techniques, they will
learn courtesies and other courtside concerns. Any adult who
would like to help with the youngsters is encouraged to come
to the event and volunteer.
The event is open to all area school-age children and there
is no cost to participate. A racquet will be provided for those
who dont have one.
For more information, contact Tom Odenweller at 419 2302893.

Second annual Tennis


Camp set for Aug. 4-5

Lima Family Y offers youth camps


INFORMATION SUBMITTED
The Lima YMCA is offering soccer and
flag football events in the next month to provide for youth development, healthy living
and social responsibility.
A Soccer Camp for boys and girls ages
4-12 is set for the Lima Vine Street Soccer
Field 9-11:30 a.m. Aug. 13-15.
The fee is $40 for members and $45 for
non-members.
Registration continues through Aug. 12.
The Y is offering a Fall Soccer League for
boys and girls 4 years old to fourth grade at
the Vine and Collett streets fields.
Registration is from Aug. 3-29 at the
YMCA.
A coaches meeting is set for Sept. 8 and

Athlon Sports
1. Cardinals - Handled business
against lowly Braves and White Sox.
2. Royals - Johnny Cueto finally
gives them a bona fide ace.
3. Pirates - Taking three of four
from the Nationals is big.
4. Dodgers - A healthy Carl
Crawford adds to an already deep
bench.
5. Nationals - Hitting a cold spell,
just 46 since the All-Star break.
6. Angels - Mike Trout is back to
leading baseball in WAR.
7. Yankees - Second in the league
in scoring with 450 runs in 97 games.
8. Astros - Scott Kazmir is a solid
upgrade to the rotation.
9. Blue Jays - Mark Buehrle is
quietly having a career season.
10. Giants - Red hot, having won
11 of the past 12.
11. Twins - Top prospect Byron
Buxton still far from returning from
injury.
12. Cubs - Lost ground in the
wild card race, getting swept by the
Phillies.
13. Mets - Third in the league
in ERA.
14. Orioles - Getting swept by
the Yankees hurts division hopes.
15. Rays - Only three teams
strike out more often.
16. Tigers - Team may be ready
to sell off David Price and Yoenis
Cespedes.
17. Rangers - Nearly back to .500
after winning four of five.
18. Mariners - Treading water at

419-238-5902
Lift & Leveling Kits Available

the bottom of a tough division.


19. Padres - Ready to move
Justin Upton, James Shields, Craig
Kimbrel.
20. Red Sox - Playoff hopes fading after losing eight of 10.
21. Athletics - League-high 87
errors are nine more than any other
team.
22. Indians - League-high walk
rate makes up for abysmal .248 batting average.
23. Braves - Scoring just 2.4 runs
per game since the All-Star break.
24. Diamondbacks - Four players

Check us out online:


www.delphosherald.com

in
Bring

d
this a

ave

and s

.00

$10

Accessory Avenue

602 W. ERVIN ROAD VAN WERT, OHIO

games begin Sept. 26.


Fee is $25 for members and $50 non-members.
Finally, the Y is planning a Fall Flag
Football League for boys and girls 5-9 years
old at Limas Robb Park.
Registration is Aug. 3-29 at the Y.
Coaches meeting is Sept. 9 and games
begin Sept. 21.
Fee: $25 for members, $50 non-members.
For more information or to register, contact
Lima Family YMCA Program Director Alicia
Bell at the YMCA, 345 South Elizabeth,
Lima, Ohio 45801; by phone at (419) 2236045, ext. 114; at bell@limaymca.net; or
online @ HYPERLINK http://www.limaymca.net www.limaymca.net.

Athlon Sports Power Ranking

The heaT is on
The compeTiTion!

Full Line Of Truck & Auto Accessories


Complete Auto Detailing Inside & Out
Window Tinting & Remote Car Starters Installed
Rhino Spray-In or Penda Drop-In Bed Liners
Ranch & Swiss Truck CapsWeatherTech Liners
B&W Gooseneck, DMI Cushion, & Drawtite
Receiver Hitches & Trailer Harnesses Installed
New, Reconditioned & Used Rims & Tires

Mike Harmon and Doug Adams, two members of the


LJGA board of directors, discuss the evenings awards
ceremony. (DHI Media/Jim Metcalfe)
6 Spainhower, Megan 8 8
7 Nelson, Jared 5 5 5 4 5
3 7 3 6 43 7 5 4 3 3 4 7 5 4 5 10 9 6 9 7 8 70 70
GIRLS 16-18
42 85
1 Knouff, Emily 3 4 5 3
8 Richardson, Kayne 4 6
7 4 4 3 4 4 6 42 5 3 8 5 5 5 5 5 3 4 4 4 35 6 4 5 4 4 4 5 5
4 4 44 86
4 41 76
9 Reed, Sam 4 6 6 5 5 4 7
2 Schmitmeyer, Jill 5 5 6
4 5 46 5 4 7 5 4 4 6 4 4 43 89 4 4 3 5 4 6 42 5 10 4 4 5 3 5
5 3 44 86
GIRLS 15 & UNDER
3 Moon, Mariah 4 4 6 6
1 Mulcahy, Mary Kelly 7
5 3 5 4 5 42 6 6 7 6 6 5 6 4
5 6 5 4 3 5 5 7 47 47
2 Mulcahy, Meghan 7 6 7 3 49 91
4 Mitchell, Jennifer 4 5 6
6 5 3 6 4 5 49 49
3 Mulcahy, Erin 7 6 7 5 6 6 6 3 6 6 6 48 6 4 5 4 5 5 4
7 4 44 92
3 10 3 8 55 55
5 Rex, Sara 5 6 6 5 4 5 6
4 Miller, Grace 5 7 6 7 9 6
3 6 46 7 5 6 5 4 6 8 7 4 52 98
7 4 5 56 56
5 Owens, Erin 3 6 7 6 7 3 6
5 Paphanchith, Madilyn 5
4 5 47 6 4 7 6 7 6 5 5 5 51 98
7 8 6 5 6 8 6 7 58 58

Our rock-bottom prices and low financing rates have the


competition sweating it out! Come in and see for yourself
why our offers are too hot for other dealers to handle.

EASY AUTO CREDIT


906 W. Main Van Wert 419-238-5255

www.easyautocreditvw.com tracy@statewideford.com

00130722

The Lima Junior Golf Association held its season-ending banquet and awards ceremony
Monday night at the Shawnee Country Club. Winners of the special awards were, left to
right, Carter Bowman, a 3-time Male Player of the Year; Jill Schmitmeyer, the Female
Player of the Year; and Spencer Stubbs, the winner of the Oscar Scheuffler Sportsmanship
Award. As well, the Association announced a brand-new honor; the Distinguished Service
Award; for those who have given many years of faithful service to youth golf in the area.
The first two winners, both absent, were Oscar Scheuffler and Bob Cook. (DHI Media/
Jim Metcalfe)

5 Naumann, Kyle 4 6 5 5
6 4 6 4 6 46 8 5 5 5 5 4 5 5
5 47 93
6 Radcliff, Austin 6 4 10
4 5 3 5 4 6 47 3 4 8 8 3 6 7
5 3 47 94
7 Miller, Logan 5 6 8 5 6
2 7 3 6 48 4 5 8 5 5 4 6 6 4
47 95
8 Moody, Ryan 6 5 6 6 5
5 5 4 5 47 5 5 7 5 6 7 7 6 3
51 98
9 Sweede, Tanner WD
BOYS 16-18
1 Bowman, Carter 4 4 5 4
4 2 6 4 5 38 4 3 4 4 5 5 4 4
3 36 74
2 Rager, Joshah 5 5 6 4 4
2 5 4 4 39 4 3 4 4 4 4 5 4 4
36 75
3 Stubbs, Spencer 3 4 5 5
5 3 4 3 4 36 5 3 8 3 4 4 5 4 3
39 75 Rager defeats Stubbs in
a 1-hole playoff for 2nd.
4 Campbell, Chance 5 5 4
4 4 3 5 4 4 38 4 3 5 3 5 5 7
5 3 40 78
5 Mckee, Anthony 4 5 5 4
4 3 7 5 5 42 4 3 6 3 3 6 5 4
3 37 79
5 Hensel, Britton 4 6 5 5
4 3 5 3 6 41 4 2 7 4 3 5 5 6
2 38 79
6 Ricketts, Grant 4 5 4 6
4 4 5 3 4 39 5 3 6 4 4 4 7 5
4 42 81

have double-digit steals.


25. White Sox - A sweep of
Cleveland pulls them out of the cellar
of the Central.
26. Marlins - Jose Fernandez has
been excellent in his four starts.
27. Reds - More trades likely
after dealing Johnny Cueto.
28. Brewers - Aramis Ramirez is
the first of many players to be traded.
29. Rockies - Scored 17 runs on
the Reds, their highest output since
2012.
30. Phillies - Ben Revere is hitting .385/.418/.404 this month.

8 The Herald

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

Next Generation

Barts Big Brain Turns Blue

A history of potential events as chronicled by Steven Coburn-Griffis


Chapter One
Friday, March 16, 2018

Chapter Two
Friday, March 16, 2018

The students in Ms. Raczkowskis 7th


Grade Earth Sciences class at Gateway Middle
School werent themselves. They were quiet.
They were attentive. They were focused. That
is not to say that these were bad kids, troublemaking kids, just that they were kids: twitchy,
jittery, chatty, ready to jump and dance and
play kids with bodies that all too often outran
their brains. But not on this particular day.
Each sat up straight in his or her Smartt
chair, their faces awash in the glow from
their Smartt desks, eyes firmly fixed on the
big Smartt screen at the front of the room. If
asked for an example of anticipation, every
Smartt desk in the school would have burned
with a picture of Ms. Raczkowskis 7th Grade
Earth Sciences classroom as it was at that very
moment.
Clearly, this was unusual, but it was an
unusual day. You just had to look at the way
the big Smartt screen at the front of the room
was bubbling a silvery blue to know that.
A soft chime sounded and an image of a
turning Earth filled the big Smartt screen that
covered most of the front wall. The round ball
of Earth was blue and green and brown and
white and it spun against a black backdrop
of space. As it continued to turn, a familiar
voice began talking to anyone and everyone
listening.
Earth, the voice said, and then paused
for dramatic effect. During that pause, every
single boy and every single girl sitting at
every single Smartt desk in Ms. Raczkowskis
classroom felt the tickling itch of that familiar
voice and asked themselves, Who? Who is
that? I know that voice; know it almost as well
as my own.
Earth, the voice continued, is a wonder,
a unique and radiant jewel travelling in its
elliptical path around the sun. In the whole of
our solar system, from Mercury to Neptune,
there is no other planet like Earth.
On the Smartt screen, the Earth stopped
spinning and began to blur, distorting in form
from the round sphere of planet Earth to
something quite a bit more oval in shape.
And what is it that makes Earth so special? So rare? So blue?
The blurred blob on the screen continued to
change shape, gaining definition and becoming clearer and clearer until it had morphed
into the face of a man. And not just any man,
but a man who was very familiar to the kids in
Ms. Raczkowskis 7th Grade Earth Sciences
class: Bart Butterman, host and quizmaster of
the game show Bart :S Big Brain, filmed right

Yes indeed, Bart Butterman said through


his grin, Plain old water. Two parts hydrogen
to one part oxygen.
As Bart Butterman talked, more and more
of him came into view, including the patented
Bart Butterman Smartt tie. It worked just like
a Smartt screen, but it was a tie. Anybody
watching that tie closely enough would see
all manner of interesting things appear and
then disappear again: mathematical equations, quotes from famous philosophers and
even pictures of inventions, like Leonardo da
Vincis flying machine or some really strange
Rube Goldberg devices.
Even while the kids were focused on Bart
Buttermans Smartt tie, they began to hear a
new sound; a chuckling, happy, liquid sort
of sound. On the screen, Bart Butterman was
pouring water from a clear glass pitcher into a
crystal-clear glass. He took a sip, smacked his
lips and then looked serious.
But I misspoke; theres nothing plain
about water, he said. Water has changed
lives. Blind and deaf, Helen Kellers first
understanding of the world was through
water. Many religions, including Christianity
and Islam, draw a comparison between water
and life. And then there is the simple truth that
over half of the human body, what makes up
the greater part of all of us, is water.
Water has inspired poets and painters, artists like William Shakespeare and
Carl Sandburg, Claude Monet and Winslow
Homer. And water has held an important
place in music, giving musicians something
to write about, to sing about, whether its in
opera, rock or rap. Call Beyonce and ask her.
Im pretty sure Ive got her cell number here
somewhere.
With his one free hand, Bart Butterman
patted at his jacket pockets, then shrugged and
grinned his famous grin.
As the students in Ms. Raczkowskis 7th
Grade Earth Sciences class watched, the camera continued to pull back until it was clear
that Bart Butterman was standing out in the
open in front of a large, circular pool. Beside
him was a small round table and as he set
his glass down on its surface, a tremendous
jet of water erupted from the center of the
pool behind him. Bart Butterman jumped and
pretended to look startled before grinning and
talking some more.
Water covers 71 percent, nearly
three-quarters of the surface of planet Earth,
he said. But most of that is salt water, water
we cant drink unless it has gone through a
process to remove the salt, a process called
desalinization. In fact, there is really very
little fresh water on the planet at all; less than
four percent. And some of that is underground
or frozen in glaciers.
Bart Butterman raised the glass to his lips
to take a sip, but the glass was empty. He
tapped the glass with his forefinger, turned it
upside down and then rubbed his lips.
So that raises the question, Should we do
more to keep our fresh water safe? And,

Chapter One questions


I. Why do you think the word smart is
spelled with two letter ts in the story? Can you
think of other brand names that are deliberately misspelled?
2. Current classroom technology includes
smartphones and smartboards. In Ms.
Raczkowskis classroom three years from
now, students sit in Smartt chairs at Smartt
desks. Use your imagination to decide what
these chairs and desks can do and how they
might help you learn.
3. Look at a globe and a map of the United
States. Using the scale of distance, how far
are you from a large body of water (something
bigger than the nearest reservoir).
Chapter One vocabulary words
chronicled
Earth Sciences
anticipation
elliptical
distorted
morphed
quizmaster

MOTORCYCLES
WANTED

1903-CURRENT
ANY CONDITION-ANY LOCATION

Call 614-917-7878

TROUBLE BATHING?
We Can Replace Your Old Tub With A New, Easy-to-Use
Walk-In Bathtub or Walk-In Shower In Just One Day
Local Company.
Made in The U.S.A.

We Cost Less!
Get Our Price
By Phone!
No Gimmicks!
From $99 A Month
or One Year
Same As Cash!

EASYBATH

Toll Free 1-866-425-5591


www.easybathinc.com

Place a Classified Ad

TODAY!

Call

419-695-0015 ext. 122


to place your ad!

The Delphos Herald


419-695-0015 ext. 122

DIABETES OR
PROSTATE CANCER?
Your sex life and erection can now survive

$50

FREE booklet by doctor reveals what the drug VALUE!


companies dont want you to know!
For a limited time, Dr. M. S. Polsky, M.D. will mail all men that respond to
this ad a free copy of his new booklet Seven Secrets Doctors and Drug
Companies Wont Tell You About Erectile Dysfunction. Hes so sure
this booklet will change your life he will even pay the postage and handling.
If the popular pills dont work for you, regardless of your age or medical
history, you owe it to yourself and your lady to read this booklet now!
Call (800) 794-7974 24-hrs. and leave your name and address (only).

possibly more importantly, what can we do?


Is it already too late? I mean, like Benjamin
Franklin said, When the wells dry, we know
the worth of water. Is that where we are now,
why were even asking these questions?
Chapter Two questions
1. Bart Butterman said that water is two
parts hydrogen to one part oxygen. On the
periodic table of elements, the chemical symbol for water is H20. In chemistry, an element is a substance that cannot be separated
into simpler substances by chemical means.
Locate a copy of the the periodic table of
elements online. Look at the list and see how
many of them you recognize from foods or
somewhere at home. For instance, what foods
contain calcium?
2. Bart Buttermans Smartt tie, a device that
may be invented in the future, showed pictures of Leonardo da Vincis flying machine.
Da Vinci sketched his flying machine in the
15th century. It looked a lot like a modern-day
helicopter, the first of which was built in the
1940s. Think of three devices that we use
every day and research them. Did any of them
originate with a very old idea?
3. How much of you is water? Why is
getting enough water important to you? What
can you do each day to keep our water safe?
Chapter Two vocabulary
hydrogen
oxygen
patented
equations
philosophers
Rube Goldberg
Carl Sandburg
Claude Monet
Winslow Homer
Chapters 3 and 4 of this six-part serial
story will appear next Wednesday and conclude with Chapters 5 and 6 on August 12.

IVE NEVER BEEN ONE TO


SETTLE FOR AVERAGE.
VAN REGIONAL & OVER-THE-ROAD
TANKER INTERMODAL DEDICATED
COMPANY DRIVERS OWNER-OPERATORS
TEAM AND SOLO WORK AVAILABLE
TRAINING | MEDICAL/DENTAL/VISION | 401(K)

EOE M/F/D/V

nearby their very classroom in Ohio.


Bart Butterman was grinning his famous
grin, his face filled the big Smartt screen from
top to bottom and side to side.
So, do you know? Bart Butterman asked.
Do you know what makes Earth extraordinary? He paused for just a beat and
although if you had asked anybody watching
Bart Butterman in that classroom, they would
have said it was impossible his grin grew
even bigger.
Water! he crowed.

schneiderjobs.com/newjobs
800-44-PRIDE

PUTTING YOUR
WORLD IN
PERSPECTIVE

Our local, national and international news


coverage is insightful and concise, to keep you in the
know without keeping you tied up. It's all the information
you need to stay on top of the world around you,
delivered straight to your door everyday.
If you aren't already taking advantage of our
convenient home delivery service, please call us at
419-695-0015.

THE DELPHOS HERALD


405 N. Main St. Delphos

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

The Herald - 9

Arts & Entertainment


Movie Review

"The Straight Dope"

Terminator

Across

1 1983 Mr. T film

Directed by Alan Taylor


PG-13

Ill be back, Arnold


Schwarzeneggers
cyborg
promised in the original Terminator, back in 1984. And
now Ah-nold, THE Terminator, is indeed back, and hes the
biggest, baddest and best thing
in the new reboot of the iconic
sci-fi franchise.
That Terminator
envisioned a near future in a ruined, post-apocalyptic world
run by artificially intelligent
machines battled by a hearty
group of human resistance
fighters. Schwarzenegger was
cast in his first blockbuster
role as a virtually unstoppable assassin terminator sent
back in time to kill the mother
of the child who would grow
up to be John Conner, the fiery
leader of the resistance, before
he was conceived, ensuring
the opposition could never
take root.
Three sequels and a TV
spinoff played off that premise. And now, 31 years later,
Terminator Genysis backs up
and takes another run at it.
This time around, rebel
leader John Conner (Jason
Clarke) zaps his young protg
Kyle Reese (Jai Courtney)
into the past to intercept and
destroy the terminator thats
already there, programmed to
kill his mother. British actress
Emilia Clarke (dragon mistress Daenerys Taegaryen in
TVs Game of Thrones) does
a commendable job as the
young firebrand Sarah Connor.
But the big bang here is the
return of the former two-term
governor of California, with a
now-familiar terminator twist:

Crossword Puzzle

15 Hilo feast

18

24 Sale item abbr.

27

27 Lorem ipsum, e.g.

28

38

40

44

45

48

33 India/Pakistan region
36 Put on the payroll

54

37 Rocks, to a bartender
38 Farm vehicle
41 Bombast
42 Israel's Barak
44 Monopolist's portion
45 Moon of Saturn

31

32

52

55

56

59

60

41
46

50

49

51

35 "Bad idea"

30
36

39

43

47

29

35

34

42

25 Secure

13

24

26

37

23 Earnhart of NASCAR

12

22

33

22 Excellent

11

19

21

25

21 Store

10
16

23

17 Poultry appetizer
served Caribbeanstyle
20 Hooter

15

20

16 Every which way

future that looks even denser


and darkeras many movies
doin 3-D. Thank goodness
the characters seem to know
what theyre doing and where
theyre going, because not
only did I get lost, I lost my
patience trying to sort through
all the bangs, bams, crams and
slamsand the echoes and
clangs of previous Terminator
movies ringing in my ears and
through the years.
For all its motion and commotion, however, nothing can
compete with Schwarzeneggers iconic star power, even
when hes standing still and not
saying a word. The 67-year-old
actor seems to be having a ball
back in the swing and stride of
his venerable trademark character. Theres even a running
joke about the mileage on his
terminators odometer. Im
old, not obsolete, he says.
Too bad the rest of this
time-crunching, overstuffed,
underwhelming Terminator installment doesnt quite feel like
its aged nearly so gracefully.
Neil Pond,
Parade Magazine

17

14 Scarlett of Tara

Schwarzeneggers cyborg is
Sarahs guardian, not her killer, protecting her from other
terminators.
Characters meet up with
themselves coming and going
across the decades, in overlapping timelines. At one point,
Schwarzeneggers terminator
battles the younger version of
himself, thanks to modern-day
special effects, right out of a
scene from the first movie.
Oscar-winning J.K. Simmons
plays a police detective who
remembers the characters from
one of their previous eras.
As they zip back and forth
through time, our heroes outrun fireballs, shoot and blast
shape-shifting,
liquid-silver
pursuers, throw around phrases like mimetic polyalloy
and decay algorithms, try to
shut down a cloud-like operating system that will eventually quash all living things,
and eventually dangle over the
edge of the Golden Gate Bridge
in a hijacked school bus.
Its all very complicated and
convoluted, a muddled sci-fi
haystack of past, present and

14

6 Gone
10 Obscure

Robo Reboot New Terminator bangs, bams, crams


and slams across the years Terminator Genysis. Starring
Arnold Schwarzenegger, Emilia Clarke, Jai Courtney and
Jason Clarke.

53

57

58

61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

47 Racetrack reading
50 Math groups
51 Flying geese
formation
52 Police cry

Down

19 ___ a one

48 Leak slowly

1 Karate school

23 Atty. gen. agcy.

49 Knickknack

54 Turn tail

2 Prepare to swallow

24 Summer whine?

53 Branch

56 Sporty car, for short

3 Sandburg of poetry

25 Lots of, slangily

54 Farm young

58 Vital force of Chinese


medicine
61 It's guaranteed to
work
64 "Otello" baritone

4 Refuge

26 Better

55 Olympic rings, e.g.

5 Monte Carlo game

28 "I give!"

56 Lawn mower brand

6 Prepared tomatoes

29 Tangle

7 "That hurts!"

30 Prime-time time

8 Water-skiing locale

31 Roentgen's discovery

57 Obed's father, in the


Bible
58 China problem

9 Expected

32 1980 Best Picture


nominee
33 Motley

59 Cheat, slangily

34 Astronomer Tycho

62 16 1/2 feet

39 Draft variety

63 Play (with)

65 Kind of thermometer
66 Bing, bang or boom

10 English village that


was home to the
Bronts
11 Poker declaration

67 Icky stuff
68 Nod
69 Aggressive,
personalitywise

12 Exhausted

60 Mental flash
61 Whit

40 Live-in doctor

13 Hosp. test

43 Take shape

18 Computer in "2001"

46 One of the Kennedys

WebDonuts

Sudoku

Sudoku Puzzle #3685-M

Medium

Answers to Puzzle

Answers to Sudoku

B
O
A
Z

I
M
I
N

D E
O K
N G
E

E
I
G
H
T

X
R
A
Y
S

C
H
I
P

H I
O D
S E
E A

T
E
S
S

Sudoku Solution #3685-M

F
F O
I A
G L

U
N
C
L
E

L D
H
A U
A
K E N W
E
A O
I R R
M M Y T
A H
H
T O R
T E T
S E
T
R A I D
I R D
F M E T
L
N O
E
T Y

7
2
1
9
8
5
4
3
6

M
U
C
H
O

O
U
C
H

3
6
9
2
4
7
1
5
8

P
I
E
D

C A B
S
L
A R A
R K C H I
C A C
L
D A L E
O O R
D
N J A B
T R A
E
A L
U D
P E S H E
V E E
L E E
T
O L P R O
O R
G O
D O
O P

4
5
8
6
1
3
2
7
9

C
H
E
W

6
1
5
7
3
8
9
4
2

D
O
J
O

8
9
7
4
5
2
6
1
3

Answers to Word Search

2
4
7 5
1
3

9 5 1 2
3 7 8 4
4 2 6 3
5 8 3 1
7 9 2 6
6 1 4 9
8 3 7 5
2 6 9 8
1 4 5 7

2009 Hometown Content

2009 Hometown Content

1 2
3
4
5
2 6
7
8
1
6
5 8
9
1 4
8
6
2
7
9
4
4
2 9

10 The Herald

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

Business

The benefits and risks of cloud computing


BY STEVEN COBURN-GRIFFIS
DHI Media Staff Writer
sgriffis@delphosherald.com

Its been nearly a decade since Google


CEO Eric Schmidt talked about cloud computing at an industry conference in 2006.
Even then, the concept of network-based
computing was nothing new; researchers
speculated about the possibility back in the
1960s. Now, the infrastructure exists to make
yesterdays possibility todays common reality, generating business opportunities, as well
as a new spin on some old risks.
In essence, at its best, cloud computing
takes an internal, on-site network and makes
it global, exponentially increasing both data
storage capabilities and networking possibilities. For small and midsize businesses,
the benefits of cloud computing are virtually
infinite. Cloud computing saves businesses
time and money by boosting productivity,
improving collaboration and promoting innovation. Cloud hosting facilitates all types of
information-sharing; email services, application hosting, internet-based phone systems

Information Submitted
Allen County
City of Delphos
Delphos Properties to ATR
Property 1, LLC, 711 N. Main
St., and 833 N. Main St.,
Delphos, $355,000.
John Andrew Trentman,
John A. Trentman, Roger J.
Trentman and Jean A. Sroufe
to John T. and Marilyn A.
Kerner, 1304 Hedrick St.,
Delphos, $145,000.
Village of Elida
Kimberly A. Augsburger,
Kimberly A. Nott and Jettson
Enterprises, LLC. to State
of Ohio Department of
Transportation, Elida Road,
Lima, $2,755.
DNN Holdings, LLC.
to Patricia L. Hemmelgarn,
2275 N. Cable Road, Lima,
$78,000.
Scott W. Hofacker and
Sandra L. Groves to Troy L.
Green, 4781 Sycamore St.,
$230,000.
Craig A. and Kristina
K. Shepherd to Gregg K.

and data storage are all readily enabled in a


cloud platform. For all intents and purposes,
a cloud environment serves as a virtual office,
whether thats something as basic as simple
data storage, or as complex as multiple users
sharing a wide range of data and sofware
applications. In a cloud environment, users
can access all openly shared files, use software programs as if sitting at an office workstation and remotely interact with co-workers
on the other side of the country or the world,
collaboratively trouble-shooting emerging
issues in real time.
For start-ups, or even established companies upgrading their IT capabilities, capital
savings are at the top of the benefits list. A
host of available platforms from such recognizable players as Google, IBM, Windows
and Amazon essentially lease space at a rate
dependent on need. These rental opportunites
offered for literally pennies per hour
eliminate the need for large, upfront capital
investments; reduce software costs, as well as
the time and cost involved in upgrading apps;
and significantly curb IT expenses.
From a less immediately tangible per-

Real Estate Transfers

and Sandra K. Kunkleman,


122 Orchard Drive, Lima,
$210,000.
Dale M. Vandemark,
Edward Lewis Miller, II and
E. Lewis Miller, II to Shelby
L. Lutterbein, 3002 Freyer
Road, Lima, $79,900.
Spencerville
Richard W. and Amanda
K. Roof to Joshua E. Beery,
425 W. First St., Spencerville,
$84,000.
Putnam County
Jodi Whittaker and Carlota
Whittaker, Lot 123, Leipsic,
to Timoteo Salinas.
Elizabeth M. Simon,
Michael F. Simon and Agnes
C. Kreinbrink, 2.0 acres,
Union Township, to Ryan L.
Patrick and Carrie E. Patrick.
Arthur L. Neidert and
Doris M. Neidert, Lot 8, Fort
Jennings, to Cory Ream.
Arnold W. Schnipke LE,
23.75 acres and 7.11 acres,
Jackson Township, to Here
Today Gone Tomorrow LLC.
Raymond J. Steele and
Jean M. Steele, 14.22 acres,

Visit Ashtabula County and


the Historic Ashtabula Harbor
for the 7th Annual

August 21, 22 & 23


One-Day Pass - $15 advance ($20 at gate)
Weekend Pass - $25 (advance sale only)
Designated Driver - $5 (gate sale only)
For more information or to purchase tickets:

www.wineandwalleye.com
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business April 11, 2014
Last Price

American Electric Power Co., Inc.


55.89
AutoZone, Inc.
687.14
Bunge Limited
86.59
BP p.l.c.
37.29
Citigroup Inc.
58.37
CenturyLink, Inc.
28.22
CVS Health Corporation
111.64
Dominion Resources, Inc.
70.13
Eaton Corporation plc
61.49
Ford Motor Co.
14.83
First Defiance Financial Corp.
36.00
First Financial Bancorp.
18.42
General Dynamics Corporation
144.29
General Motors Company
31.32
The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company 29.58
Huntington Bancshares Incorporated
11.69
Health Care REIT, Inc.
68.65
The Home Depot, Inc.
114.84
Honda Motor Co., Ltd.
31.16
Johnson & Johnson
99.02
JPMorgan Chase & Co.
68.05
Kohls Corp.
61.41
Lowes Companies Inc.
67.80
McDonalds Corp.
97.33
Microsoft Corporation
45.34
Pepsico, Inc.
96.11
The Procter & Gamble Company
80.23
Rite Aid Corporation
8.75
Sprint Corporation
3.31
Time Warner Inc.
87.76
United Bancshares Inc.
15.49
U.S. Bancorp
44.73
Verizon Communications Inc.
45.89
Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
72.10
Dow Jones Industrial Average
17,630.27
S&P 500
2,093.25
NASDAQ Composite
5,089.21

Township, to Scott J. Winkle


and Patricia A. Winkle.
Ruhe Properties Inc., Lot
26, Ottawa Township, to
Matthew J. Langhals.
Alice E. Zimmerly, 50.0
acres and 20.0 acres, Ottawa
Township, to Timothy O.
Schroeder.
Kenneth Robert Wagner,
Joyce K. Wagner, Janet Joyce
Molitor and Sandra Mae
Zink, 40.565 acres, Palmer
Township, to Dennis L.
Vennekotter and Eileen M.
Vennekotter.
Esther Dorothy Myers,
dec., 17.50 acres, 6.0 acres,
137.0 acres, 80.0 acres and
79.0 acres, Perry Township, to
Gregory W. Myers.
Gregory W. Myers TR,
Lots 162, 159, 160, 223 and
224, Dupont and 16.0 acres,
17.50 acres, 21.86 acres, 6.0
acres, 137.0 acres, 19.25
acres, 80.0 acres, 79.0 acres,
Perry Township, to Gregory
W. Myers.
Mary J. Irvin, Donald E
Irvin, James C. Zachrich TR
and Carole A. Zachrich TR,
Lot 47, North Creek, to Karen
L. Donaldson.
Mary Kay Kennedy and
Karl Kennedy, 2.0 acres,
Jennings Township to Joshua
M. Upahus and Rebecca S.
Uphaus.
Ross M. Webken, 1.14
acres, Monterey Township,
to Jason Schnipke and Erin
Turner.
Donald J. Smith and
Connie K. Smith, Lots 345 and
346, Continental, to Chase R.
Sullivan and Tess K. Homier.
Robert E. Salisbury and
Kathy A. Salisbury, parcels
6 and 7, Ottawa, to Robert
E. Salisbury and Kathy A
Salisbury.
Paul D. Kersh, dec., Lot
439, Pandora, to Emily S.
Lucke, Brent P. Kersh and
Justin T. Kersch.

WEBB

INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.

STOCKS

Description

Monterey Township, to
Raymond J. Steele.
Jean M. Steele and
Raymond J. Steele LE, 14.22
acres, Monterey Township, to
Jean M. Steele.
Jean M. Steele LE and
Raymond J Steele, 14.22
acres, Monterey Township, to
Pond Digger LLC.
Walter J. Brickner and
Rose Ann Brickner, .135
acre, .50 acre and .2267 acre,
Monterey Township, to Walter
J. Brickner.
Walter J. Brickner LE
and Rose Ann Brickner, .235
acre, .50 acre and .2267 acre,
Monterey Township, to Rose
Ann Brickner.
Rose Ann Brickner LE
and Walter J. Brickner, .235
acre, .50 acre and .2267 acre,
Monterey Township, to Pete
Rose Place LLC.
Walter J. Brickner and
Rose Ann Brickner, .674
acre, 6.0973 acres, 1.0 acre
and 4.8623 acres, Monterey
Township to Walter J.
Brickner.
Walter J. Brickner LE
and Rose Ann Brickner, .674
acre, 6.0973 acres, 1.0 acre
and 4.8623 acres, Monterey
Township, to Rose Ann
Brickner.
Rose Ann Brickner LE
and Walter J. Brickner, .674
acre, 6.0973 acres, 1.0 acre
and 4.8623 acres,Monterey
Township, to Pete Rose Place
LLC.
Barbara A. Shalter, 19.72
acres, Palmer Township, to
Rex A. Shalter and Barbara
A. Shalter.
Mark J. Steele, 2.0 acres,
Monterey Township, to Mark
J. Steele and Jennifer L.
Hodge.
Ila L. Combs LE, Lots
31, 40 and 3, Kieferville,
to Cynthia Brown, Carson
Combs and Corwin Combs.
Scott J. Winkle and Patricia
A. Winkle, 2.06 acres, Union

spective, the benefit of staying abreast or


even ahead of the technology curve is readily
apparent, as is maintaining a predictable and
fixed cost on IT expenses. Cloud computing
offers the further benefit of enabling nontraditional work environments, eliminating the
need for extravagant and expensive brick
and mortar office space. The synching of
information across all manner of devices
allows mobile access from laptops and tablets, enabling client meetings in as informal
an environment as the backseat of a cab. At
the same time, this very same user-friendly,
immediate access allows for the implementation of an equally nontraditional work force.
On the downside, all that ready access creates a not insignificant security risk. Turning
over confidential, proprietary information to
a third party provider, cyber attacks, insider
threats, the potential for governmental incursions, as well as any legal liability that may
result from any unintended distribution of
data are all serious concerns. While cloud
providers are diligent in creating new and better security measures as each new cyber risk
crops up, these efforts are by necessity reac-

Change

+0.15
+12.77
+1.03
+1.24
+0.41
+0.10
+1.87
+0.99
+0.92
+0.28
+0.01
-0.10
+1.88
+0.27
+0.56
+0.09
-0.04
+1.77
+0.01
+0.74
+0.04
-0.37
+0.76
+1.29
-0.01
+0.45
+0.26
+0.16
+0.21
+1.22
0.00
-0.07
+0.06
+0.72
+189.68
+25.61
+49.43

HOME AUTO BUSINESS LIFE HEALTH

1-800-727-1113

212 W. High - Lima, 419-228-3211


138 N. Main - Bluffton, 419-358-4015

tionary. And theres always the concern about


the security of data in transmission, as it is
uploaded from a device to where it resides in
a cloud environment. At its most vulnerable,
this is when the security of the data stream is
most easily compromised.
Despite these concerns, surveys commissioned by cloud providers assert that
more than half and as much as 70 percent
of American businesses are currently using
cloud computing for everything from simple
data storage to its more complex elements.

10 ways to become
financially independent
BY NATHANIEL SILLIN
After the 2008 economic
crisis, many people assumed
they would never be able to
reach true financial independence the ability to live
comfortably off ones savings
and investments with no debt
whatsoever.
However, individuals willing to use their time horizon to plan and adjust their
spending, savings and investment behaviors might just find
financial independence is possible. Here are 10 ideas to get
started.
Nathan Sillin
1. Visualize first, then plan.
Start by considering what your
vision of financial independence actually looks like and then
get a reality check. Qualified financial experts can examine
your current financial circumstances, listen to what financial
independence means to you and help you craft a plan. The
path to financial independence may be considerably different
at age 20 than it is at age 50; the more time you have to save
and invest generally produces a better outcome. But at any age,
start with a realistic picture of your options.
2. Budget. Budgeting the process of tracking income, subtracting expenses and deciding how to divert the difference to
your goals each month is the essential first task of personal
finance. If you havent learned to budget, you need to do so.
3. Spend less than you earn. It might be obvious, but its one
of the most difficult financial behaviors to execute. Adhering
to a lower standard of living and expenses will help you put
more money into savings and investments sooner.
4. Build smarter safety nets. Emergency funds and insurance are rarely discussed in combination. The traditional
definition of an emergency fund is a separate account for cash
that can be used instead of credit to repair a broken appliance
or other expense that may run a few hundred dollars. However,
many people keep insurance deductibles high to keep premiums low. Would you have enough cash on hand to cover an
insurance deductible if you had a sudden claim? If not, build
your deductible amounts into your emergency fund.
5. Eliminate debt. Though consumer debt levels have generally fallen since the 2008 financial crisis, the Federal Reserve
Bank of New York reported in February that home, student
loan, auto and credit card debt began creeping up again in
2014. Getting rid of revolving, non-housing debt is one of the
most effective ways to free up money for savings and investment.
6. Consider your career. Financial independence doesnt
require you to quit a career you love, but you really cant get to
financial independence without steady income to fuel savings
and investments that will build over time. Speak with qualified
advisors about your income, benefits and retirement picture
first, and see if you might be able to expand your sources of
work-related income, such as consulting part time. Also keep
in mind that over the age of 50, the Internal Revenue Service
allows you to make catch-up contributions to both 401(k) and
IRA accounts.
see INDEPENDENCE, page 12

00132168

Their Price

CelebrexTM
$

832.60
Typical US Brand Price

for 200mg x 100

Our Price

Celecoxib*
$

75.56

Generic equivalent of CelebrexTM


Generic price for 200mg x 100

ViagraTM $4,287.27
Typical US Brand Price for 100mg x 40

Call Now 800-618-5313

Are You Still


Paying Too Much
For Your Medications?
You can save up to 93% when
you fill your prescriptions with
our Canadian and International
prescription service.
vs Sildenafil*

132.00

Generic Price for 100mg x 40

Get An Extra $15 Off & Free Shipping On Your 1st Order!
Call the number below and save an additional $15 plus get free shipping on your first prescription order with Canada Drug Center. Expires December 31, 2015. Offer is valid for prescription
orders only and can not be used in conjunction with any other offers. Valid for new customers
only. One time use per household. Use code 15FREE to receive this special offer.

Call Now! 800-618-5313

Please note that we do not carry controlled substances and a valid prescription
is required for all prescription medication orders.
Use of these services is subject to the Terms of Use and accompanying policies at www.canadadrugcenter.com.

11 The Herald

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Classifieds
100 ANNOUNCEMENTS
105
235Announcements
HELP WANTED
110 Card Of Thanks
115 Entertainment
120 EXPERIENCED
In Memoriam
125 Lost
And Found
PLUMBER
130orPrayers
individual with a
135 School/Instructions
mechanical
140
Happy Ads aptitude
Contact
145needed.
Ride Share

Hoffman Plumbing
200 EMPLOYMENT
& Heating
205 Business
Opportunities
922 E Main
St.
210 Childcare
Van
Wert,
215 Domestic Ohio
419-238-5628.
220 Elderly
Home Care
225 Employment Services
230 Farm And Agriculture
235OTR
General
SEMI Driver

Home weekends and


most nights, with benefits, vacation, 401K.
AWC Trucking
419-692-3951

320

www.delphosherald.com

240 Healthcare
LAWN AND
245
Manufacturing/Trade
570
GARDEN
250 Office/Clerical
255 Professional
260 Restaurant
265 Retail
270 Sales and Marketing
275 Situation Wanted
280 Transportation

Friedrich

Lawn Service

300 REAL ESTATE/RENTAL


305 Apartment/Duplex
Specializing in
310 Commercial/Industrial
Weed
Control & Fertilization
315
Condos
Lawn
Fertilization &
320
House
Weed
Control
325
Mobile
Homes
New
Lawn
Installation
330 Office Space
Lawn
Over-seeding
335 Room
Lawn
Mowing
340
Warehouse/Storage
Phone:

419-695-0328 or
419-235-3903
577 MISCELLANEOUS

HOUSE FOR
RENT

BLACK & DECKER


edge cutter, 16" cut.
Leaf blower/shredder vaSEVERAL MOBILE cuum. Both in very good
Homes/House for rent. condition. Ph. 419 695View homes online at 1441.
www.ulmshomes.com or
FOR SALE: Used set of
inquire at 419-692-3951
kitchen cabinets, great
for garage. $100. Call
419-286-2078.
515 AUCTIONS
AUCTION AT Delphos
Self Storage, Gressel
Drive Monday, August
3rd, 6:00 p.m. Golf clubs
& bag, desk hutch, propane tanks, luggage,
cabinet, chair, misc.
items. Property of Randy
Metzger, 710 E. Second
St., Delphos.

555

GARAGE SALES/
YARD SALES

627 JENNINGS St (off


Erie St.), 7/30 4pm-8pm,
7/31 9am-5pm, 8/1 8am12pm. Womens, Juniors,
Mens Clothing, Scrubs,
Evening Dresses,
Shoes, Purses, Books,
lots Amish books, Truck
Tool Box, Knick-Knacks
& misc.
HUGE
MULTI-FAMILY
Garage Sale
130 N West St., Delphos
Wednesday 5pm-7pm
Thursday 8am-5pm
Friday 8am-12pm
Bathroom Sink in Cabinet, Super Chips Programmer/Duramax,
New Milwaukee Cordless drill cases, Equipment Cooling Fans,
Car Seat Sofa, College
Items, Twin Girls Bedspread, Prom Dresses,
Older Sports Illustrated
Magazines (late 1990s2000s). Child Toys, TV,
Clothing & Household
Items, Books, Luggage

ONE DAY ONLY


POST MOVING SALE
July 30th 8:00am
1010 Silverado Drive,
Van Wert
Flexsteel conversation
sofa, loveseat, accent
chairs, sofa table, glider
rocker. Small appliances, 2 sets of Village
Pfaltzgraff dishes,
serving
pieces,
Sony/Onkyo whole
house sound equipment,
HP Printer, ESPN game
center, set of tools and
much, much, more - this
sale will not disappoint!

small! Free estimates,


call David in Willshire,
Ohio 1-260-706-3494.

655

HOME REPAIR AND


REMODEL

POHLMAN
BUILDERS
Specializing in

ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES SIDING ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED

SOCCER GOAL 12'


wide x 6' high, like new,
$50. 7-Piece patio set,
great shape, $75. 158
quarry tile 6'x6', $10.

Residential
& Commercial
Agricultural Needs
All Concrete Work

GESSNERS
PRODUCE

CONCRETE WALLS

Mark Pohlman

419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460

INDIANA MELONS
OHIO SWEET CORN

TENNESSEE TOMATOES
Available Now!

Taking

Freezer Corn
Orders!

OPEN AT 3
LOCATIONS:

939 E. 5th St., Delphos


714 E. Main St., Van Wert
9557 St. Rte, 66, Delphos
419-692-5749 or 419-234-6566

586

SPORTS AND
RECREATION

Geise

Transmission, Inc.

automatic transmission
standard transmission
differentials
transfer case
brakes & wheel bearings

665

LAWN, GARDEN,
LANDSCAPING

Mueller Tree
Service

Tree Trimming,
Topping & Removal,
Brush Removal

419-203-8202

bjpmueller@gmail.com
Fully insured

2 miles north of Ottoville

419-453-3620
Newspapers provide a
daily source of information from around
the globe. Expand your
horizons.

Subscribe today!

The Delphos Herald

419-695-0015

L.L.C.

Trimming & Removal


Stump Grinding
24 Hour Service Fully Insured

KEVIN M. MOORE

(419) 235-8051
TEMANS
OUR TREE
SERVICE

Trimming Topping Thinning


Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
Since 1973

419-692-7261

Bill Teman 419-302-2981


Ernie Teman 419-230-4890

Do you need to know


what is going on before
anyone else?
Do you have a desire to
know more about the
people and news in the
community??
The Times Bulletin
DHI Media company with newspapers, website
& niche products in Van Wert, Ohio is looking for
an energetic, self-motivated, resourceful

REPORTER

670 MISCELLANEOUS

COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY

419-692-0032
Across from Arbys

to join its staff.

The right candidate will possess strong grammar


and writing skills, be able to meet deadlines and
have a working knowledge of still photography. A
sense of urgency and accuracy are requirements.
Assignments can range from hard economic news
to feature stories.

Send resumes to: The Times Bulletin


Attn. Kirk Dougal
PO Box 271, Van Wert, Ohio 45891
or email to: kdougal@timesbulletin.com

Telling The Tri-Countys Story Since 1869

To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122

Find the best method of


treating warm weather insects

520 Building Materials

930 LEGALS
525 Computer/Electric/Office

AMISH
CONSTRUCTION
CREW

POHLMAN
POURED

585 PRODUCE

HERALD

DELPHOS
THE

670 Miscellaneous
675 Pet Care
355 Farmhouses For Rent
530 Events
680 Snow Removal
360 Roommates Wanted
535 Farm Supplies and Equipment
685 Travel
NOTICE540
TOFeed/Grain
BIDDERS
690 Computer/Electric/Office
400 REAL ESTATE/FOR SALE 545 Firewood/Fuel
Sealed
proposals
will
be
695 Electrical
600 SERVICES
405 Acreage and Lots
550
Flea
Markets/Bazaars
700 Painting
605 Auction
received by Delphos City
410 Commercial
555 Garage Sales
705 Plumbing
610 Automotive
School District
at the
Ad415 Condos
560 Home
Furnishings
Homeowners
know
that
the
arrival
of
spring
710 Roofing/Gutters/Siding
615
Business
Services
420 Farms
ministrative
Offices,
234
565
Horses,
Tack
and
Equipment
New425
Home
ConstrucnotBlacktop/Cement
620 Childcare of insects. While715
Houses
570 Lawn Street,
and Gardenalso marks the re-emergence
North
Jefferson
625 Construction
tion, 430
Home
every insect is harmful,
if an infestation grows 720
con-Handyman
MobileRemodHomes/
575
Livestock
Delphos, 577
Ohio
45833 un630 Entertainment
eling, Pole
Barns,Homes
Manufactured
Miscellaneous siderably or if insects
begin to move from the725
out-Elder Care
635 Farm Services
August
6,
580 Musical
Instruments
435 Vacation
Property til 2:00pm
Garages,
Concrete
doors into a home,
it
may
be
time
for
homeowners
800 TRANSPORTATION
640 Financial
582 Pettime
in Memoriam
2015 at which
and
440 Want
To Buy
Floors,
Roofing,
Reto call in a professional.
805 Auto
645 Hauling
583 Pets and
place proposals
willSupplies
be
side 500
& MERCHANDISE
Storm Dam810 Auto Parts and Accessories
The Entomological
Society of America points
650 Health/Beauty
Produce
opened 585
publicly
and
age, 505 Antiques
Window/Door
and Collectibles
655
Home
Repair/Remodeling
586
Sports and
Recreation
out that homeowners cannot count on bitterly 815
coldAutomobile Loans
read aloud.
Proposals
510 Appliances
Replacement,
much
820in
Automobile Shows/Events
588 Tickets
660
Homethe
Service
winters
to
help
control
numbers
of
insects
515 No
Auctions
Tool 2:00pm
and Machinery
more!
job too
665 Lawn, Garden, Landscaping 825 Aviations
received590
after

Wanted To Rent
625 350
CONSTRUCTION

LAMP REPAIR, table or


floor. Come to our store.
Hohenbrink
TV.
419-695-1229

FREE BENCH Press,


LANDECK, VENEDO- Weight Lifting. 435 E.
CIA and Elgin Area Gar- Cleveland St.
age Sales. July 30, 31:
9am-5pm. Aug. 1: 9am- 610 AUTOMOTIVE
12pm. For info: Phone
419 692-9753.
MULTI FAMILY Garage
Sale. 8510 W. State
Road. Fri. 8am-5pm,
Sat. 8am-5pm. Kids and
adult clothes, toys,
household items.

345 Vacations

www.delphosherald.com

SAFE &
SOUND

DELPHOS

SELF-STORAGE
Security Fence
Pass Code Lighted Lot
Affordable 2 Locations
Why settle for less?

419-692-6336

will be returned unopened. Proposals shall


be for the furnishing of
materials and the performance of labor necessary for the:
Delphos City Schools
Middle School
Restroom Renovations
227 North Jefferson St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
All in accordance with
the Contract Documents
p r e p a r e d
b y
Garmann/Miller & Associates, Inc., 38 S. Lincoln Drive, P.O. Box 71,
Minster, Ohio 45865:
A Lump Sum bid for the
project will be received.
A Bid Security in the
form of a certified check,
cashier's check, irrevocable letter of credit, or
surety company bond
p u r s u a n t to Ch a p ter
1305 of the Ohio Revised code in the amount
of 10% of the total bid
shall accompany each
bid; or a bid guaranty
bond in accordance with
Chapter 153.571 of the
Ohio Revised Code in
the amount of 100% of
the total bid shall accompany each bid.
If a bid security in the
amount of 10% of the full
bid amount is submitted
with this bid, each successful bidder is required to furnish a Performance Bond and
Labor and Material Bond
from an acceptable
surety in the amount of
100% of the full contract
amount in accordance
with Section 153.571 of
the Ohio Revised Code.
If a bid guaranty bond in
the amount of 100% of
the total bid is submitted
with the bid, no additional Performance and
Labor and Material Bond
is required to be furnished by the successful Bidder.
The Contract Documents, including Drawings and Specifications,
are on file for public inspection at the office of
the
Architect:
Garmann/Miller & Associates Inc., 38 South Lincoln Drive, Minster, Ohio
45865, Phone 419-6284240, Fax 419-6284299: the Administrative
Office of the Delphos
City Schools; Construction News Corporation,
Middleburg Heights,
Ohio: the McGraw Hill Dodge Plan Room in
Columbus, Ohio: and the
Builders Exchange in
Dayton, Ohio and
Toledo, Ohio.
Contract Documents and
a file on CD may be purchased from the printer
for $50.00; DC Reprographics, 1254 Courtland Ave, Columbus,
O h i o
4 3 2 0 1 ;
www.DCplanroom.com;
Phone 614-297-1200;
Fax 614-297-1300. Each
Bidder is responsible for
shipping cost.
Each bid must be submitted in duplicate on a
blank form furnished by
the Architect, in a sealed
envelope. Mark plainly
on the outside of the envelope, the branch of
work bid upon. No bidder may withdraw his bid
for a period of sixty (60)
days after the bid opening.
The owner reserves the
right to reject any or all
bids and to waive informalities, irregularities
and/or errors in the bids
to the extent permitted
by law. This includes the
right to extend the date
and time for receipt of
bids.
7/22/15
7/29/15

Shop the classifieds


and grab a great
deal on a great
deal of items!
Autos
Appliances
Clothing
Electronics
Furniture
Jewelry
Musical
Instruments
Etc.

THE DELPHOS
HERALD

(419) 695-0015

592 Want To Buy


593 Good Thing To Eat
595 Hay
597 Storage Buildings

their yards. Insect ecology is affected by various


factors and is not solely dependent on temperature.
Furthermore, what occurred one year certainly may
not be repeated the next, as homeowners who have
had various insect infestations in their yards can attest. One year a yard may be overcome with ants,
while the next year it may suffer through an earwig
infestation.
The first step homeowners looking to curtail insects in their yards can take is to determine if the
insects they see are genuine threats to their lawns.
Some bugs emerge and swarm early in the season,
but then gradually disappear as spring turns into
summer. Other insects may come out of hiding if
a homeowner is doing a lot of yard work or construction around a house. Practice a wait-and-see
approach to determine if you really have an insect
problem or just have stirred up activity.
Homeowners also must decide if it is bearable
living with the insects. If insects are not doing any
damage or if they can be controlled relatively easily, then you might be able to avoid calling in the
professionals. However, if critters like termites and
certain species of wood-eating insects are invasive
and damaging your yard, you may need to take action.
Anyone concerned with the side effects of pesticides and insecticides can first try to remedy the
problem naturally. Sometimes its just a matter of
making a yard less hospitable to insects. Remove
leaves and clean up debris close to the house, as
these can both encourage infestations. Piles of rotting wood or leftover firewood can be a food or
shelter source for a number of insects. Inspect water
spigots for leaks and improve suspect drainage on
your property, as these things can be welcoming to
bugs that like moist surroundings. Remove standing water whenever possible to eliminate spots for

830 Boats/Motors/Equipment
835 Campers/Motor Homes
840 Classic Cars
845 Commercial
850 Motorcycles/Mopeds
855 Off-Road Vehicles
860 Recreational Vehicles
865 Rental and Leasing
870 Snowmobiles
875 Storage
880 SUVs
885 Trailers
890 Trucks
895 Vans/Minivans
899 Want To Buy
925 Legal Notices
950 Seasonal
953 Free & Low Priced

mosquitoes to incubate larvae.


Natural remedies also may do the trick. Mint,
bay leaves, catnip, and garlic can repel insects like
roaches and ants. Citrus can be a natural flea deterrent. Some homeowners have had success planting
marigolds around their yards to serve as a natural
bug repellent because the flowers produce a scent
that many insects find repulsive. Thai lemon grass
plants also can be used to keep mosquitoes at bay.
Remember, natural predators, such as birds,
bats, spiders, and larger insects, feed on nuisance
bugs. Keeping these helpful predators around may
be an effective and natural way for homeowners to
control annoying pests.
If an insect problem seems out of control or if
you need a professional opinion about the damage
being done to your home or landscape, consult with
an exterminator. Licensed exterminators have the
training and expertise to assess insect concerns and
create a plan of action that will minimize the risk to
inhabitants of your home and nearby wildlife. An
exterminator will know what it takes to treat insects
and maximize the chances of removing the problem
promptly and effectively.
Warm weather is synonymous with many
things, including the return of insects. Homeowners
may be able to treat unruly bugs on their own, but
especially problematic infestations may require the
help of experienced exterminators.

Horoscopes
ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20
You are ready to take charge
of your finances, Aries. Visit with
a financial consultant or explore
various investment opportunities
to start growing your nest egg.
TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21
Now may be the perfect time
to start anew, Taurus. Embrace
the excitement that comes with
change and dont be afraid to express your newfound confidence.
GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
Expect some pretty interesting conversations and ideas this
week, Gemini. Enjoy this new
way of looking at things and
consider if it is whats best for
you going forward.
CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
Cancer, explore all of your
opportunities for networking.
You do not want to overlook
someone who can push your career ahead, so be on the lookout.
LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23
Leo, you find yourself in a
position to lead this week and
that is a lot of responsibility.
Dont worry too much, as you
were born to lead and find your

new role suits you fine.


VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22
Virgo, some new friends
bring a lot to your life in the
weeks ahead. Enjoy their company and embrace their can-do attitude. You will be glad you did.
LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
Focus on what is beneath the
surface, Libra. Material things or
appearances are of little concern
to you. Find ways to know others
more deeply.
SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22
Keep things simple this week,
Scorpio. Friends and loved ones
do not need a big buildup and
explanation to get on board with
your ideas. Simplicity is best.
SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21
Sagittarius, some suspicious
thoughts prove to be unfounded.
Its good to examine things more
closely, but this week your instincts will prove on point.
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
Your nerves may be tested on
some level, Capricorn. Remain
calm and do your best to be cool
under pressure. Take a few deep

breaths and you will get through


it.
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
Focus on making yourself
feel more secure and comfortable, Aquarius. Take pride in
your home and family and worry
less about other aspects of your
life for the time being.
PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20
Pisces, youre more inclined
to reach out and communicate
with people you have not seen
in some time. Reconnect with
others.
FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS
JULY 26
Sandra Bullock, Actress (51)
JULY 27
Alex Rodriguez, Athlete (40)
JULY 28
Cher Lloyd, Singer (22)
JULY 29
Josh Radnor, Actor (41)
JULY 30
Lisa Kudrow, Actress (52)
JULY 31
Zac Brown, Singer (37)
AUGUST 1
Bastian Schweinsteiger, Athlete
(31)

OHIO SCAN NETWORK CLASSIFIEDS

Misc.
Our Hunters will Pay
Top $$$ to hunt your land.
Call for a Free Base Camp
Leasing info packet &
Quote.
1-866-309-1507
www.BaseCampLeasing.
com

Misc.
HOMEOWNERS WANTED!!! Kayak Pools is
looking for demo home
sites to display our maintenance-free pools. Save
thousands of $$$ with this
unique opportunity. CALL
NOW! 800-315-2925 kayakpoolsmidwest.com discount code: 897L615
Misc.
VACATION
CABINS
FOR RENT IN CANADA.
Fish for walleyes, perch,
northerns. Boats, motors,
gasoline included.
Call
Hugh 1-800-426-2550 for
free brochure.
website
www.bestfishing.com
Real Estate
74+
ACRE HORSE FARM
AUCTION August 19,
6pm On-site: 3419 St Rt

743, Moscow, OH 2 Tracts,


2800+ sq ft home, Indoor
riding arena, 34 horse stalls
United Country - Real Estate and Auction Services
866-538-0333 UCRealEstateandAuction.com
Sales
TROUBLE BATHING?
We can replace your old
tub with a new, Easy-toUse Walk-In Bathtub or
Shower IN JUST ONE
DAY. Price by Phone!
From $99 a Month or
One Year Same As Cash!
EASY BATH 1-866-4255591

Sales
ENJOY 100% guaranteed, delivered-to-the-door
Omaha Steaks!
SAVE
78% PLUS 4 FREE Burgers - The Happy Family
Banquet - ONLY $49.99.
ORDER Today 1-800615-0980 use code FZH or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/
sp85
Sales
Dish Network? Get MORE

NOTICE 0F EXAMINATION
The Delphos Civil Service Commission will be
conducting an open examination for a Library Aide
position for the Delphos City Schools. The examination will be held at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday,
August 5, 2015. It will take place in the Jefferson
High School cafeteria.
A grade of 70% is required to successfully pass
the examination. The passing scores will also
serve as an eligibility list. This eligibility list shall be
valid for a period of one year.
CLASSIFICATION
POSITION: Library Aide, Delphos City Schools
STARTING SALARY: $11.73/hr - 12.44/hr
depending on Experience
HOURS: Hours 4-6 hours /day
JOB DESCRIPTION: Perform clerical tasks. Assist
with the distribution, utilization and maintenance of
school library resources. Process information and
materials using computers and designated programs. Assist in operation and minor maintenance
of audio-visual equipment and computers.
Applications and job descriptions can be obtained at the Delphos Jefferson Administrative
Building located at 234 North Jefferson Street July
27 through July 31, during regular business hours.
Please bring the application with you the night of
the test along with a valid Ohio Drivers license and
proof of military service if applicable.

for LESS! Starting $19.99/


month (for 12 months.)
PLUS Bundle & SAVE
(Fast Internet for $15
more/month.) CALL Now
800-379-4590

Aviation Technician. Financial aid if qualified Nationwide Job placement


assistance. Call Aviation
Institute of Maintenance
1-877-676-3836

Sales
Stop OVERPAYING for
your prescriptions! Save
up to 93%! Call our licensed Canadian and International pharmacy service
to compare prices and get
$15.00 off your first prescription and FREE Shipping. 1-800-618-5313

Training/Education
Can you dig it? Heavy
Equipment Operatror Career! We Offer Training
and Certifications Running
Bulldozers, Backhoes &
Excavators. Lifetime Job
Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497

Sales
Protect Your Home with
Alarm Advisors - Your
Home Security Advocate.
Compare Providers in Your
Area. This Month, Get a
$100 Visa Gift Card With
a New System! Call 1-800731-7925
Sales
DIRECTV Starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE Installation. FREE 3 months of
HBO SHOWTIME CINEMAX Starz. FREE HD/
DVR Upgrade! 2015 NFL
Sunday Ticket Included
(Select Packages) New
Customers Only. CALL
1-800-878-7421
Sales
CPAP/BIPAP supplies at
little or no cost from Allied
Medical Supply Network!
Fresh supplies delivered
right to your door. Insurance may cover all costs.
800-518-3216
Training/Education
AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Get started by
training as FAA Certified

Training/Education
Werner Enterprises is HIRING! Dedicated, Regional & OTR opportunities!
Need your CDL? 3 wk
training available! Dont
wait, call today to get started! 1-866-203-8445
Training/Education
MEDICAL
BILLING
TRAINEES
NEEDED!
Become a Medical Office
Assistant! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online
Training can get you jobready! HS Diploma/GED
& PC/Internet needed!
1-888-528-5176
Vacation Rental
CABIN
RENTALS!
GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS Pigeon Forge / Gatlinburg Tenn From $89/
nt Local dinner shows &
attractions 888-473-9455
DRIVERS
WANTED
Schedule home time,
steady miles. Newer equipment. No East Coast. Call
800-645-3748 for more
details

2006 DODGE DAKOTA

SOLD

Quad Cab
V-8
Excellent
Condition
Great Buy!

10,995

419-773-1314

12 The Herald

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

Tax
(Continued from page 1)

Beatles tribute band draws


biggest crowd this year
Hundreds of music lovers packed Stadium Park Sunday evening for the
best-attended concert to-date this summer. A Hard Days Night was the final
July offering of the Delphos Rotary Music in the Park Series. Perfect weather
brought out the record crowd that forced the refreshment stand to restock hot
dogs. Above: The crowd enjoys a minute to stretch while the band takes a break.
Below: Members of A Hard Days Night play to a packed Stadium Park Sunday
evening. Resembling the cover of the Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band
album, the group presented a spot-on version of With a Little Help from My
Friends. The series continues on Aug. 9 with Polly Mae at 6 p.m. and refreshment at 5:30 p.m. (DHI Media/Nancy Spencer)

With 1.1 million children


in Ohios K-12 education system and over 500,000 students
enrolled in Ohio colleges, more
than one in seven Ohioans and
their families can benefit. The
average family with children
in grades K-12 plans to spend
$630 on back-to-school shopping on average, according to
the National Retail Federation.
The average college student
plans to spend $899 on backto-school shopping.
This sales tax holiday benefits all Ohioans, Gough said,
but it has a special appeal to
families getting ready to go
back to school. This is truly

a tax break that every Ohio


consumer can enjoy.
Senate Bill 243, which
was passed last year, exempts
Ohio consumers from paying
sales tax this August 7-9 on
all clothing and footwear up
to $75 per item as well as
school supplies and instructional materials up to $20
per item. There is no limit
on the amount of the total
purchase, it is based on each
item, according to the Ohio
Department of Taxation.
Ohio retailers know that
consumers value every dollar of savings, Gough said.
We applaud State Senator
Kevin Bacon for sponsoring
the legislation and his leader-

ship throughout the legislative


process and Governor John
Kasich for signing the bill into
law.
Bacon introduced the legislation in November 2013 and
Kasich signed the bill into law
in December 2014.
It covers all retailers that
sell these goods to Ohio residents, even online.
These tax holidays have
triggered Black Friday-style
crowds in other states, Gough
said. Consumers love to save
money and we expect Ohioans
to really enjoy this tax break in
August.
To get more information,
visit www.tax.ohio.gov

Cheer
(Continued from page 1)
The Stage will see more than 300 cheerleaders dance, jump and flip their way through routines in four categories: All-Star (mini to senior), Mini, Junior High and High School.
Co-coach Maureen Teman says her girls are ready to welcome the competitors.
Its been a long time since the school had a team and these girls have worked hard and now
they want to host a competition, she said. It will be a great experience for them and well get
to see the competition for upcoming meets.
Teman said the interest in a competitive team resurfaced last year.
We tested the waters with the traditional seasonal cheerleaders and we did really well so the
school board approved a competition squad, Teman said. We are totally self-sufficient. We
hold fundraisers and have parent/guardian support. We dont get any money from the school.
Sixteen girls are under the tutelage of Teman and co-coach Beth Geise. Both are volunteers.
The team has practiced six hours a week since the first week in June.
The girls work hard and we expect them to keep a certain code of conduct, Teman said.
We expect higher standards and a high leadership level from them. They represent themselves
and their school very well.
Upcoming competitions for the freshmen local squad include Lincolnview, the Aulgaize
County Fair, the Ohio State Fair, New Bremem Fest, Pioneer Days, Canal Days, Attica and the
Van Wert County Fair.
Teman said Fridays event should move pretty quickly with a little space in between groups
for uniform changes for those who participate on more than one squad.
Jeffersons team will perform for points and exhibition Friday. Being the hosts, they are not
eligible for trophies.

Guilty
(Continued from page 1)
If she does not make restitution within that
time, Lammers said he will recommend 18
months jail time.
My goal is to get this case resolved while
she has assets to make restitution, Lammers
said, commenting that Edelbrocks attorney
has indicated that such a resolution is possible. I want the victim made whole.
The Delphos Police Department and
the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification
and Investigation began an investigation
into Edelbrocks Delphos accounting firm,
Edelbrock-Reitz, after receiving multiple
complaints alleging criminal financial activity. Following a raid on her office on May 19,
Edelbrock was arrested in her Kalida home
on May 29.
As a consequence of BCI&Is ongoing
investigation, Edelbrock was arraigned in
Lima Municipal Court on June 3 on a single

Junk

The best relationships


are always the most
rewarding.
1

You refer
someone

Your friend
opens an account

You both
select a reward

Select a VISA $50 prepaid card or Reward of Your Choice.

bankatfirst.com/refer

202 North Main Street


419.692.2055

...................................................................
Open to existing First Financial Bank clients in Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana who
successfully refer an eligible individual in Ohio, Kentucky, or Indiana to open an eFree
account* online or any checking account at a First Financial banking center AND
complete eligible Direct Deposit and Bill Payment within 90 days of account opening.
Minimum balance requirements may apply on a checking account. New account holder
must not hold any current account at First Financial and must not have closed any First
Financial accounts within the previous 90 days. First Financial Bank employees, Directors
and Executives are not eligible to participate. May not be combined with any other
special offer. A valid email address is required for program participation. Referred
individuals who have opted out of marketing emails from First Financial Bank will not
receive the referral invitation. The rewards selection will begin only after the new eligible
Another step on
account holder opens an account and establishes both Bill Payment and Direct Deposit.
the path to success
If a new account holder received multiple referrals, only the most recent referral source,
as determined by First Financial, will receive the reward. The new account holder may
receive only one reward for opening an account and completing the requirements, but
that individual then becomes an existing account holder who is eligible for rewards for future successful referrals made to new
account holders. Eligible First Financial clients may make an unlimited number of referrals, though only one reward per successful
referral is permitted. Reward selections are limited to the reward offerings available at the time of redemption. The latest reward
offerings can be found at https://refer.bankatfirst.com. Rewards have the approximate retail value of $25- $50. Rewards will be
mailed within 4-6 weeks of reward selections. Reward recipients are subject to 1099-INT, and are solely responsible for any federal,
state, or local taxes incurred as a result. This program may be discontinued or changed at any time without notice.

first financial bank

*eFree checking account: $100 minimum balance required to open account. Account holder must set up eStatements or a $4
monthly fee for paper statements will apply.
By participating, participants in this promotion authorize future communications,
including emails, from First Financial Bank, unless they opt out by following the link in
any program email.
Important Privacy Notice: Keep in mind, because you're making referrals, your friends
and family will know you have accounts with First Financial Bank.

bad check charge. The charge alleges that she


knowingly presented Bowersock Brothers
VFW Post 6772, Spencerville, with a bad
check in the amount of $12,192.82. On July
22, Edelbrock entered a written plea of notguilty on two grand theft charges stemming
from the initial charge. Pretrial on those
charges is scheduled for August 10.
Edelbrock is also named as the principal
defendant in a civil suit filed in Allen County
Common Pleas Court. Toledo attorney James
L. Schuller filed the suit, which seeks over
$1 million in damages, on behalf of James
Niedecken and Niedecken Insurance Agency
(NIA), Ottoville. Two other civil suits filed
earlier this year were settled out of court.
According to a Delphos Police Department
spokesperson, as of Tuesday afternoon, investigators with BCI&I continue to sift through
the records seized from Edelbrocks Fifth
Street, Delphos, office, leaving open the possibility of more criminal indictments.

Independence

(Continued from page 1)

(Continued from page 10)

Council also briefly discussed


brush and limb pickup within
the village. Moreno brought to
councils attention a complaint
hed received from a resident
regarding a large limb that village
workers failed to pick up in what
the complainant described as a
timely manner. Miller explained
that the village has no responsibility for such, but offers pickup
as a courtesy.
We offer a spot to put that
and we dont even have to do
that, Miller said. If we wanted
to, we could just say that were
not doing this anymore. Period.
Council discussed bringing
the administrations stance on
the subject to residents attention
by posting written advisements
in public places.
In other business, council:
was advised that negotiations pertaining to Dollar Street
are ongoing and that the village received an estimate of
$74,000 for the repaving of
the street. Smith suggested that
more concrete plans to address
any remaining issues should be
available by the next meeting.
agreed to a temporary insurance policy for the duration of
the Ottoville Park Carnival at a
cost of $586.

7. Downsize. Youll generally reach wealth financial goals


faster if you can cut your overall living expenses. For some,
that means selling your home and moving to a smaller one or
to an area with lower living costs and taxes. You can also sell
or donate property you dont need and use those proceeds to
extinguish debt or add to savings or investments.
8. Invest frugally. Become a student of investment fees
and commissions because they can cut significantly into your
principal. Make a full evaluation of fees you are paying on
every investment account you have and if youre working with
a licensed professional who sells you financial products, know
what fees theyre charging for their investment and advisory
services.
9. Buy assets that generate income. Stocks, real estate, collectibles or cash investments all have up and down markets.
But do your homework and focus on investments bought at
attractive prices that are likely to appreciate over time. Also,
dont forget to study the tax ramifications of any investment
transaction you make.
10. Always know where you are financially. Financial
planning isnt about making one set of financial decisions and
assuming youre set. Lives and situations change and your
financial planning must be flexible enough to withstand both
positive and negative changes without derailing your hopes for
financial independence. If your forte is not investment, financial planning or tax matters, by all means bring in qualified
experts to help. But financially independent people generally
have their money issues at their fingertips not only for their
own use, but for estate purposes as well.
Bottom line: Financial independence involves diligence
and a bit of sacrifice, but even the smallest moves can yield
big outcomes.
Nathaniel Sillin directs Visas financial education programs.
To follow Practical Money Skills on Twitter: www.twitter.com/
PracticalMoney.

Trivia

Answers to last Saturdays questions:


Childrens book author Theodor Geisel better known as Dr. Seuss collected outlandish hats and kept them in a hidden closet in his home. He would frequently put one on for
inspiration when he was writing and hed often have guests wear them at parties.
The cameo role Marvel comics co-creator Stan Lee had in the 2005 film Fantastic Four
was the first role in which Lee portrayed a character he had created friendly, bespectacled
mailman Willie Lumpkin.
Todays questions:
How did Humpty Dumpty define the nonsense word brillig to Alice, in the Lewis Carroll
classic Through the Looking-Glass?
When it comes to ice hockey, whats a Gordie Howe hat trick?
Answers in Saturdays Herald.