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VOLUNTEERS, CITY EMBARK ON SAVE THE TREES EFFORT/PAGE 3


Friday, September 4, 2015 u $1.50

Claremont

claremont-courier.com

Who will lead the Pack?


The Claremont High School boys cross country team runs along
Thompson Creek Trail during practice on Tuesday. The four top runners PAGE
on last years boys team graduated, which has created a fair amount of competition
for the seven spots on the varsity squad.

15

Vista welcomes its new principal/PAGE 5

Enjoy the three-day, Claremont.

Visit claremont-courier.com.

BLOTTER/ PAGE 4
LETTERS/ PAGE 2, 7, 8

HERITAGE/ PAGE 9
CALENDAR/ PAGE 18

Water system eminent domain case


trial date set for March 7/PAGE 3

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

READERS COMMENTS

On second thought
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Claremont, CA 91711
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one hundred and seventh year, number 36

Dear Editor:
Pomona College has an endowment of
over $2 billion, and can buy whatever it
wants. It risks losing the good will of the
Claremont community if it muscles another oversized building on to the edge of
the Village. South campus on First Street
is better suited for the colleges architectural ambitions, especially in light of its
transportation advantages.
If Pomonas commitment to sustainability is anything more than windowdressing it will think twice before
demolishing serviceable buildings.
David Cressy
Claremont

City of Dollar Trees and PhDs?


Dear Editor:
A tenant has finally been lured to the
long-vacant Pepper Tree Square, but I was
disappointed to learn from last weeks
COURIER that the new anchor is a Dollar Tree store.
Dollar Tree is a chain store of the sort
that Claremont has generally eschewed,
with no roots in or commitment to the
community. Dollar Tree has also recently
come under fire for its poor labor practices.
According to Huffington Post, the
stingy payroll required by the dollar store
business model leaves many employees
overworked, underpaid and even injured,
according to workers and litigation filed
over labor practices.
Dollar Tree is currently trying to fend
off a Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)
class action case involving 4,000 to 6,000
current and former employees. The lawsuit
alleges that Dollar Tree required or permitted its hourly associates and assistant
store managers to work off the clock and

overtime without compensation.


Part of the problem is that Dollar Tree
stores appeal to the absolute bottom of the
consumer market. According to Business
Insider, 40 percent of Dollar Trees shoppers have a household income of less than
$25,000 (only slightly higher than the
poverty level for a family of four), and the
average Dollar Tree household has an annual income of just under $45,000
(roughly half Claremonts median household income), and spends just $11 per visit
to the store.
Who exactly is going to shop at this
Dollar Tree, and how long is it going to last
when the 99 Cents Only store that used to
be in that location couldnt make it?
The sad truth is that Dollar Tree is at the
leading edge of a deplorable trend in
America, as national mass market chain
stores race to the bottom of the market by
paying workers less in order to cut costs so
that they can sell cheap goods at razor thin
margins. Its sad to see Claremont jumping on that bandwagon. But this is what
happens when land is bought up by foreign
investors who live thousands of miles
away (in this case someone from China),
and when business decisions are made by
drawing circles around locations on a map
to see whether there is a match between the
business model and the surrounding population.
Instead of bringing to town a business
that makes Claremont less unique and
more like its neighbor to the south, it
would have been nice to see a commercial
establishment that aligns more closely with
the special character of this community.
Jeffrey Auerbach
Claremont
READERS COMMENTS/page 7

ADVENTURES
IN HAIKU

Night time in Claremont


Notice the full, glowing moon
It lit up the sky.
Nancy Arce
Haiku submissions should reflect upon life
or events in Claremont. Please email entries
to editor@claremont-courier.com.

GOVERNING
OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us
Tuesday, September 8
City Council
Council Chamber, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, September 9
Committee on Aging Meeting
Joslyn Center, noon
Architectural Commission
Council Chamber, 7 p.m.

READERS COMMENTS
Send readers comments via email to
editor@claremont-courier.com or by mail
or hand-delivery to 1420 N. Claremont
Blvd. Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA 91711.
The deadline for submission is Tuesday at
5 p.m. Letters are the opinion of the
writer, not a reflection of the COURIER.
We reserve the right to edit letters. Letters should not exceed 250 words. Viewpoints should not exceed 650 words.
We cannot guarantee publication of
every letter. Letters will be published at the
discretion of the editor.

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

Trial date set for city, Golden State eminent domain case

he citys fight for ownership of the local water


system took another
step forward last week, with a
trial date set for spring 2016.

Attorneys for the city of Claremont


and Golden State Water Company appeared in court on August 27 for a case
management hearing and were given the
green light to move forward with the
eminent domain case.
We requested a trial date on the condemnation and the judge granted it, explained Best, Best & Kreiger attorney
Ken MacVey, representing the city of
Claremont. Its full-steam ahead from
this point.

A final status conference is scheduled


for February 26, 2016, with trial to follow on March 7, 2016.
The city first filed its 43-page eminent
domain complaint against the water
giant in Los Angeles Superior Court on
December 9. An amended complaint
was filed June 27, as ordered by Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Richard
Fruin on April 30.
Golden State Water sought to dismiss
the case, stating that the property description and the citys pre-litigation
offer to purchase the water system were
inadequate. Judge Fruin gave the city 60
days to re-file its amended complaint
following the water companys request
for dismissal.
Before the New Year begins, attorneys

will once again appear in court on October 15 for a scheduled status conference.
Until then, legal counsel for both Claremont and Golden State Water will proceed with discovery in preparation for
their impending trial.
As of mid-July, the city has spent
about $2.2 million on issues related to
the Claremont water system acquisition.
Claremont City Council appropriated an
additional $1 million from the water system acquisition reserve fund on July 14
for expenses related to the case. The
funds, allocated from the 2013-14 General Fund Surplus, were set aside by
council in October 2014 to address
water-related expenses, including additional legal and expert consultant fees.
The Claremont water system serves

the entire city of Claremont and small


areas within the cities of Pomona, Montclair and Upland as well as unincorporated Los Angeles County.
On November 4, 2014, 71 percent of
Claremont voters approved the issuance
of revenue bonds to finance the purchase
of the system, despite Golden States
declaration that the system was not for
sale. Shortly thereafter, the Claremont
City Council determined that acquisition
of the water system is in the publics best
interest and unanimously approved two
resolutions of necessity, laying the
groundwork for the potential acquisition.
For more information, visit the citys
website at www.ci.claremont.ca.us/living/water.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com

Volunteers, city to address drought-stressed trees

s the old saying goes, a friend in


need is a friend indeed. And when
the city recently called for volunteers to join its tree outreach program,
there was no shortage of residents ready
to lend a hand.
City officials met at the Hughes Center Tuesday
night to launch the Claremont Tree Outreach program,
asking the 50 or so people gathered in the aptly-named
Grove Room to take a few days this week to begin a
door-to-door endeavor alerting Claremonters that their
city tree is on the critical list.
City staffwho have dubbed the undertaking case
management for our treesare providing more than
just lip service with this latest effort. Theyve purchased about 600 water bags and soaker hoses combined to make it as easy as possible for the community
to care for its city trees.
Weve sent out official notices, which people have
ignored, said Tony Ramos, Claremont city manager.
Some folks just arent understanding the need here.
As the first step in implementation of the mandatory
watering of city trees by homeowners, city staff has recruited as many as 35 volunteers to act as care managers for Claremonts stressed urban forest. The first
stage aims to address 101 trees deemed critical by
the city arborist. Volunteers are armed with a tree toolbox, which includes either a 25-foot soaker hose or a
water bag, like those used by the city to water parched
trees in the Village merchant area.
We dont want to debate or argue with residents,
said Paul Cranmer, Claremonts arborist and community services manager. We just want to make it as
easy as possible for people to water city trees in the
parkways.
Mr. Cranmer went through the door-to-door process
step-by-step. A variety of scenarios were addressed,
from approaching unwilling residents to those who
dont speak English to disabled or senior residents
who may not be watering because of a physical limitation.
Volunteers will report to the city after meeting with
residents to detail exchanges and, if the resident accepts the tree toolbox, to follow up in seven days and
do a soil-check.
Interim Community Services Director Pat Malloy
said that of the 688 trees deemed stressed last September, 489 have recovered because of the efforts made
by the city through proper assessment and initiating
use of the water bags. With 101 city trees currently
deemed critical and 533 identified as severe, Mr. Malloy explained that more would be done to address the

COURIERphoto/Steven Felschundneff
Paul Cranmer, community services manager and staff arborist, reviews the contents of toolboxes on Tuesday during a drought-stressed tree outreach meeting at the Hughes Center. City officials called the meeting
to recruit volunteers to contact homeowners who have street trees that are critically stressed and in danger
of dying.

good health of Claremonts trees. The city will ask the


council to do a park tree assessment as well, he said, to
identify and make action plans for any droughtstressed trees.
At the Tuesday, September 8 council meeting, city
staff will present findings from several tree assessments done over the last year. The report will include a
final tally of critical and stressed trees, as well as actions needed to keep Claremonts leafscape thriving.
In addition to the soaker hose or water bag, the tree
toolbox includes instructions on how to adequately
water critical trees. Once a week for four hours is recommended for the soaker hose and filling the water
bag once a week is enough water to rescue a tree, according to the citys arborist. Mr. Cranmer said
whether residents will be given a bag or hose depends
on the level of stress and kind of tree.
After a four-hour slow drip, the 25-foot soaker hose
will water 12 inches below the surface, if the hose is

properly placed at the trees roots ends located at the


outside of the canopy. The bag, which holds 15 gallons
of water, will provide deep watering as the water trickles for about a two-hour duration. The city estimates it
will cost residents a couple of dollars a month on their
water bill to revive a stressed tree.
For three-year Claremont resident John Bradley,
who left the meeting with five toolboxes, offering to
help with the door-to-door campaign was a pretty simple decision.
We have a tree thats a little sad-looking. So, wed
like to help it, he said, adding, and the other trees,
too.
Volunteers will report back to the city by Tuesday,
September 8 with information on the first 101 trees.
Next week, more volunteers will receive toolboxes to
visit 535 homes with severe city trees. Those results
will be returned to the city by September 28. Until
TREE OUTREACH PROGRAM/next page

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

TREE OUTREACH PROGRAM/from previous page

then, the city manager explained that watering in city parks


will be increased to three times a week.
He recognizes the need to be compliant with the governors water reduction proclamation. But considering the
town boasts the moniker City of Trees and holds a 30year designation as a Tree City USA, staff and volunteers
have no plans to ignore the issue.
We love our trees. This is who we are, Mr. Ramos said.
Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com

Editors note: Look for a special tree supplement in next


Fridays edition, September 11. With the help of Claremonts Tree Action Group and Claremont Heritage,
COURIER staff will offer tips, advice and explanation of
policies on keeping Claremonts trees healthy.
ATRIGHT: Potential volunteers packed the Grove Room at
the Hughes Center for a drought-stressed tree outreach
meeting called by the city. City officials, like Interim Community Services Director Pat Malloy, were looking for help
saving some of the endangered street trees in the city.

LaConte, Bingham to take school board seats; no elections will be held

his year, the terms of two members of the


Claremont Unified School District Board of
EducationHilary LaConte and Sam Mowbrayexpired. Candidates were expected to vie for
the two empty seats in the local and municipal election set for November 3.
However, as of the August 7 deadline for the election, only two candidates had thrown their hats in the
ring. As a result, there will be no election.

While Sam Mowbray has opted not to run for office again, Hilary LaConte, who first joined the board
in 2007, will once again take to the dais. The second
spot will be filled by Beth Bingham, who served on
the school board previously from 2007 to 2010.
What a difference a couple of years makes. In
2013, three seats were open and five hopefuls declared their candidacy. After a hotly contested race,
school board stalwart Steven Llanusa was re-elected,

POLICE BLOTTER
Wednesday, August 26
A Claremont resident with a keen
eye alerted police to a suspicious car in
the area that resulted in the arrest of its
occupants. A white Jaguar devoid of license plates was spotted driving near
Hollins Avenue and Lamonette Street at
approximately 10:25 a.m. Officers located the car, conducted a traffic stop
and, following a consent search of the
vehicle, arrested the driver, Pomona
resident Carol Frost, and her passenger,
Timothy Sloat of Claremont. The 51year-old woman was arrested for an
outstanding warrant while Mr. Sloat
was found to be in possession of drug
paraphernalia and booked for the offense.
Thursday, August 27
Claremont officers responded to a location north of the city maintenance
yard at Mt. Baldy and Padua Avenue
after receiving a call of an abandoned
vehicle. Upon their arrival, police discovered a 97 black Ford Mustang
badly damaged by some sort of chemical, possibly acid. A records check revealed the car had been reported stolen
out of Upland. The investigation remains ongoing.
****
A senior McDonalds employee
caught a break today with minor injuries after a Pomona woman unknowingly struck him with her SUV.
According to Claremont Detective Hector Tamayo, Juan Negrete was going
about his morning duties and sweeping

the parking lot of the fast food joint


when a Chevy Suburban hit him at approximately 8:36 a.m. The 61-year-old
driver told police that she was blinded
by the sun and did not see the 73-yearold man in her path. Mr. Negrete received a small abrasion to his left
elbow as a result of the accident, but
otherwise appeared to be fine.
****
Three residential burglaries occurred
in North Claremont, with the culprits escaping arrest. Thieves entered a home
on the 4000 block of North Garey Avenue through an unlocked rear window
sometime between 10:50 a.m. and 2:30
p.m. Numerous pieces of jewelry and a
Hummel music box were taken from
the residence. There were no witnesses.
A second home, on the 1000 block of
Fuller Drive, was also burglarized between 1 to 11 p.m. after thieves shattered a glass door and ransacked the
residence. More than $25,000 in
watches, jewelry and cash was removed
from the home. A third abode, located
on the 900 block of Brigham Young
Drive and equipped with both a security
system and surveillance cameras, was
also targeted by thieves who stole various items including costume jewelry
and watches before fleeing the scene.
The theft occurred between 7:15 and
9:10 p.m. after the homeowner failed to
activate the home security alarm before
leaving the residence. Surveillance cameras were not working at the time. The
investigation remains ongoing in all
three cases.

with newbies Nancy Treser Osgood and Dave Nemer


also gaining the communitys vote of confidence.
Ms. Bingham will have her first school board meeting in December. In the meantime, she has been seen
in the crowd at the last several board meetings, helping to ensure that she is up to speed on the latest issues and decisions facing CUSD.
Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

****
A Claremont resident called police
after a suspicious person knocked on
her door and covered up the peephole
so she couldnt see who was there. Officers responded to the 400 block of
Middlebury at approximately 3:56 p.m.
and discovered a man had entered the
womans backyard, drank from her
hose and taken a pomegranate from her
tree before leaving the location with a
suitcase in hand. Police made contact
with 32-year-old Michael Fox, who
was combative with officers and tried
to flee during detainment. After exhibiting signs of instability, Mr. Fox was
transported to a local hospital for observation. On August 30, he was released
to the custody of Claremont police,
who booked him for attempted burglary
and prowling as well as resisting and
escaping arrest. He was later released
on $50,000 bond with a notice to appear in court.

in the vehicle. With a BAC of more


than two-times the legal limit, Mr. Jackson was arrested and booked at Claremont jail. He was later released on
$5,000 bond.

Friday, August 28
A Claremont resident was arrested
for DUI after his drinking buddy called
the police on him. According to Det.
Tamayo, Michael Jackson and his
friend had downed a few beers at a
house when the 41-year-old plumber
decided he was leaving and got behind
the wheel of his newly-acquired company vehicle. Police received a description of the van, outfitted with the
business logo, and located Mr. Jackson
driving on the wrong side of the road
near Bucknell and San Jose avenues.
Officers made contact with the driver,
who exhibited signs of alcohol intoxication and had an open can of Bud Lite

Sunday, August 30
Burglars continue to take their exploits to new heights, gaining entry into
homes through a second-story access
point. Officers responded to the 3000
block of Elmira Avenue after a thief
broke a glass sliding door to an upstairs
bedroom, entered the residence and
ransacked the home. Property loss is
undetermined at this time. The homeowner discovered a patio chair had
been placed under the balcony that was
not previously in that location. Although the home was equipped with a
home alarm system, it was not set to activate at that time.
Angela Bailey

Saturday, August 29
Two vehicles collided in the Village,
resulting in one driver being transported a local hospital. An 18-year-old
Ontario man pulled his 95 Toyota
Corolla into the path of a 97 Honda
Civic at approximately 2:30 a.m on
First Street and Indian Hill Boulevard.
Following the collision, the 23-year-old
driver of the Civic complained of pain
to her face and was taken to Pomona
Valley Medical Center for treatment
while her passenger refused treatment,
for a cut to his upper lip. The driver of
the Corolla complained of pain to his
face and left forearm but refused treatment, as did his passenger who complained of a ringing in his ears.

news@claremont-courier.com

EDUCATION

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

New principal dons Viking helmet, brings experience to Vista

hile new Vista del


Valle principal Brad
Cuff has a full plate
getting up to speed, theres one
thing he doesnt have to worry
about: the commute.
Mr. Cuff, a longtime Claremonter,
only has to drive about five minutes to
get to his job. His roots run deepat
Vista, at the Claremont Unified School
District and in the community at large.
His story started a bit further north.
Mr. Cuff was born in Montana and was
raised in a tiny town called Deer
Lodge, which boasted a population of
only 5,000. When he was 17, his family
moved to California, settling in Montclair.
Mr. Cuff didnt get the typical school
administrators start. He wasnt terribly
enthusiastic about school when he was
younger and, on graduating from high
school, he entered the workforce.
He spent some time working in the
food and retail industries and married
his wife Sharon, a Claremont High
School graduate, when they were quite
young. The couple moved to Washington state where they welcomed two
children and bought a house before deciding they wanted to go to college.
They moved back to California and
Mr. Cuff attended Riverside Community College and UC Riverside. He
began a long foray into education and
taught fifth and sixth grades at Vista
from 1993 to 1999, which at the time
was under the leadership of then-principal Lea Yeager.
After leaving Vista, he again headed
north, albeit only slightly. He got an
offer to teach junior high at Mt. Baldy
School, with his students ranging from
sixth through eighth graders. Being a
science and nature buff, he couldnt resist the chance to try his hand at a
school with a pond and a majestic
mountain view just outside the classroom.
Ive never been in a classroom that

Clarification
There were some errors in an article that appeared in the last edition of
the COURIER regarding the school
districts move towards solar power.
Proposition 39 was approved by voters in 2012, not 2000.
The Claremont Unified School
District received $130,000 for planning purposes. The first year schools
were able to apply for funding was
2013/14, and from that fiscal year the
district has $307,481 available. For
fiscal year 2014/2015, the district has
$270,297 available. This is a total of
$447,778. The amounts for additional
fiscal years have not yet been set.
Thank you to Amber Pasricha
Beck from the California Energy
Commission for providing these correct numbers.

COURIERphoto/Steven Felschundneff
Claremont Unified School District has hired longtime Claremont resident Brad Cuff to be the new principal at Vista del Valle.
Mr. Cuff replaces Dave Stewart who took a new job as executive director of professional development for the Capistrano
school district.

had its own fireplace, he said. The


kids would come in and say, can I light
the fireplace? And Id say, you know
where the matches are.
During his time at Baldy, Mr. Cuff
threw himself into the job. One of his
especially creative endeavors even
made it into the 2011 book, The Instructional Leader and the Brain: Using
Neuroscience to Inform Practice, as an
example of Authenticity in the Classroom.
I once watched as a group of seventh graders from Brad Cuffs history
class in Mt. Baldy, California created a
dig for third and fourth graders after
creating their own civilization, complete with an economy, a political system, religion, and so forth, author
Margaret Glick wrote. Engagement
during this process was off the charts.
Mr. Cuff next moved to the Upland
Unified School District, where he spent
nine years as an administrator at the elementary, junior high and high school
levels. His most recent post was principal of Monte Vista Elementary School
in the Mt. View District.
Mr. Cuff wasnt actively looking for
a new job. However, when it came to
light toward the end of the school year
that Vista principal Dave Stewart was
leaving, he couldnt resist the opportunity to lead the team at a school he
loves and in the place he lives.
Mr. Cuff emphasized how much he
enjoyed his first tenure at Vista. It was
one of those situations where you find a
place that feels really good, he said.
It feels like home.
It should be noted that his kids,

Brandon and Brittanythe latter of


whom is a math teacher at Claremont
High Schoolalso attended Vista. It
makes for a full-circle experience that
gives true meaning to the schools
motto, Once a Viking, always a
Viking.

r. Cuff has two main


priorities as he embarks on his new
job. He plans to throw his support behind the programs already in effect at the school.
The AVID college-readiness
program, which this year will
be offered to all students beginning in third grade, is one
of these. I think its great, he
said. Theres a lot of research
behind AVID that shows its
long-term success.
Project Championa running program initiated by Mr. Stewart in conjunction with The Brian Clay
Foundationwill likely no longer be in
effect because the schools participation
was anchored in the former principals
friendship with the Olympian. However, Vista will still have a 100-mile
club encouraging kids to get fit while
striving for rewards such as T-shirts and
medals.
Mr. Cuff will also have another focus
right off the bat: Cultivating strong relationships with his staff, the students
and Vista families.

Mr. Cuff has spent most of his adult


life in education and, nowadays, most
of his reading revolves around teaching
and school leadership. He does, however, occasionally turn his attention to
other matters. These include spending
time with his family, especially his onemonth-old grandson, who recently
made him a first-time grandpa. He also
enjoys woodworking in his garage
workshop. Two wooden clocks hes
made over the years grace his Vista office.
Theres another cool conversation
piece in Mr. Cuffs new digs. Two pictures sit side-by-side in a frame, both
featuring the school bus his paternal
grandfather used to drive. His mom
grew up in Minnesota, and her dad
used to pick up a group of kids each
morning via a horse-drawn wagon.
In the winter, the wheels were removed and runners were installed to
help the wagon glide through the snow.
During the bitter winters, the passengers feet were kept warm via hot coals
placed in a metal box in the wagons
floorboards.
Mr. Cuff is clearly fond of history,
but hes also embracing his future as
one of CUSDs newest administrators.
Needless to say, Mr. Cuff is a fan of the
local elementary school.
Vista has always met the needs of
the community it serves. That was a
focus of Leas, and it has continued,
he said.

Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

Waiting for something monumental to happen


by John Pixley

t makes sense. I was explaining to a


couple friends that there were lots of
students in town, being dropped off
by parents and moving into the dorms
with computers and swivel chairs and an
extra pair of bed sheets bought at the local
Target, even though classes at the Colleges wouldnt start for a week or so.
I actually wasnt sure what day classes were starting,
but I knew it was time for the freshmen to start orientation. It was getting to be late August, after all, and
classes usually start shortly before or around Labor Day.
According to what I have heard and read in past
years, I told my friends, the students spend about a
week at orientation. It is more than taking assessment
tests and getting to know the campus. The students also
go on camping trips, do service projects, and even read
a book together (last year, the book at Pomona College
was Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie). It is
a total immersion thing, so that the students have a
bond, or at least know each other to some extent, by the
time classes get underway.
My friends agreed that this is a good idea, that it
makes sense. That way, one of them commented, the
freshmen can concentrate on their classes once they
start, instead of also worrying about trying to fit in and
get along with each other, much less making friends.
At least, thats the theory. No doubt the freshmen and
also the rest of the students will take most of the rest of
the school year figuring out the social thing, perhaps
spending considerable time and energy stressing over it.
And the orientation week, with being thrown into social
situations and having to get along, no doubt wasnt easy
for some (it certainly wasnt easy for me, as shy and
awkward as I was, even with the orientation at UC
Riverside being much shorter and less intense).
Then theres the fact that the colleges start classes before or around Labor Day, not to mention the Claremont schools starting more than a week before Labor
Day, during one of the hottest few days of the summer.
Although this has been the case for several years and
much longer at the longer at the colleges, I still cant
get used to itnot when I grew up with school starting
after Labor Day. And school starting in early August,
in the dead of summer, in Pomona and Montclair is
something I may never get my head around. It is all the
weirderschool started even earlierwith Labor Day

observer
coming so late this year.
So even though its late, with school well underway,
there is still Labor Day coming up, and I still have two
camping trips lined up. No, summer isnt over, no matter what the school bells bode.
And if those freshmen did go camping during their
orientation week, where did they go? Im wondering.
Ive been going camping mostly up the coast, north of
Santa Barbarathe Central Coast. I am going to try a
place near Lake Arrowhead, but otherwise, Im going a
few hours away.
I dont want to go any further; these camping trips
are supposed to be short, inexpensive getaways. It
would be great if there were nice places to camp in the
shady, cool mountains that are near ussay, up on Mt.
Baldy, not far from the village there, or along the creek
above Azusa. Unfortunately, there arent, or at least
there arent places that look attractive for camping.
Or for anything, really. I used to enjoy going on the
easy, paved trail along the creek in the mountains above
Azusa, but I got tired of seeing all the graffiti on the
rocks and trees and the junk floating and stuck in the
creek, not to mention people doing their wash there. (I
also went during the week, which got to be difficult, because I heard that it was so crazy there on the weekend.)
From what I saw in a recent article in the Los Angeles
Times, things arent much better now. On the front page,
there was a picture of plastic bottles floating in a stream
and another of a sign all but obscured by tagging.
Such is the case nearly a year after President Obama
designated the mountain range from Rancho Cucamonga to Santa Clarita. As Abby McCrea, a 34-year-old
marriage and family therapist who rides her bike in the
mountains at least once a month, is quoted as querying,
New monument? Where is it? Indeed, the article by
Louis Sahagun, which opens with descriptions of
overflowing trash cans, broken marijuana pipes, graffiti and roadkill in the area, along with broken beer
bottles and other blight...present in abundance, is headlined, In the San Gabriel Mountains, theyre asking:
What monument?

Have you seen any National Football League


scouts hanging around checking us out?

Activists and elected officials who lobbied for the


monument status are concerned that when Obama
signed the declaration last October under the Antiquities
Act, it was just window dressing, largely a ceremonial
act, as Tim Brick, managing director of the nonprofit
Arroyo Seco Foundation, put it. There is disappointment that there is no new federal money allocated for
the mountains and that the US Forest Service doesnt
plan to change the way it manages the 346,000-acre
wilderness.
Jeffrey Vail, the monuments superintendent, counsels patience. He said that although the monument
doesnt have its own budget, he has secured $3 million
from other federal sources to help pay for California
Conservation Corps work crews and to hire additional
staff, including half a dozen field ambassadors to patrol tourist hot spots.
Sometimes theres a misperception in terms of how
long it takes before a new national monument can be
fully formed, Vail said. We need to be somewhat realistic about creating a management plan that is in line
with contributions.
The same advice is given by Daniel Rossman, senior
representative for California at the Wilderness Society,
pointing out that Obama gave the Forest Service three
years to come up with a management plan for the monument and that only the first round of public comment
is complete. This means there is still time for the Forest Service to listen to the many voices calling for a better management plan, one that includes cleanup of trash
and graffiti, improves trails and offers education programs.
Why belittle the great achievement of permanent
protection, won less than a year ago when our backyard
mountain range became a national monument? Rossman admonished in his letter.
Heres hoping that he and Vail are right and that the
government critics and Tea Party types, with their crying out about unfunded mandates and not treading, are
wrong and that the San Gabriel Mountains National
Monument is more than window dressing, more than
a sign on the highway. Lets look forward to being able,
after making our concerns known, to enjoy a cleaner
and safer wilderness, not only to cool off in the summer
but any time we want a pleasant, quick getaway, in another couple years.
Meanwhile, with classes well underway in Claremont, including at the Colleges, there may well be
something monumental happening here in the coming
months.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

Water-wise Claremont

Dear Editor:
Congratulations, Claremont! The latest statistics show that our cumulative
water consumption from June 2015
through July 2015 is down 45 percent
compared to the same time period in
2013. Collectively, we are all doing our
respective parts in a big way to conserve
water during this severe drought.
That said, many of the trees in our
community have been severely stressed
by the drought and the changes in our
watering habits. Some have died.
It is undeniable that our trees are very
much a part of the heritage and character
of our community. A few have questioned the wisdom of having some of the
species of and number of trees that we
do in the arid climate in which we live.
The fact is that many of these trees have
been in our community for decades. The
oak and sycamore trees are actually native to southern California.
Short of this extreme period of
drought, these trees have weathered the
local climate for years and have served
us well in shading our community, filtering the air, and providing the aesthetic
charm that they do. Trees add to the market value of our properties, and if one
were to purchase and transplant a mature
tree, the cost to do so is in the tens of
thousands of dollars. It is a wise and
sound investment to maintain and preserve the mature trees that we have.
We have many experts in the community, including volunteers from Sustainable Claremont Tree Action Group and
Claremont Heritage, who are working
hard to educate our residents as to how
they can water and maintain their trees
without a significant increase in their
water usage.
I implore all of our residents to educate themselves on this topic and invest
the same amount of effort that they have
in water conservation to help us maintain
and preserve our trees in Claremont. I
make this appeal to you humbly and out

READERS COMMENTS
of love and concern for the city that we
have all chosen to call our home.
Corey Calaycay
Claremont Mayor

Chess in Claremont

Dear Editor:
The Joslyn Senior Center regularly announces its ongoing activities in the
COURIER, one of which is chess on
Wednesday afternoons at 1 p.m. However, for the past couple of years only two
of us have shown up regularly to play. We
certainly would welcome newcomers for
more variety and competition. R. Haas
R. Harrington
Claremont

Donald Trumps side show

Dear Editor:
I realize that in a sophisticated city
such as Claremont, there are unlikely to
be many Donald Trump supporters.
However, in order that we recognize
what is at stake in his popularity among
Republican voters, it is necessary to
make a public comment.
Trump is not funny. Oh, yes, he is a
buffoon, but being a buffoon has not prevented others elsewhere from being
elected to high public office. It is impossible to tell at this point whether, if
Trump were president, he would more
resemble Mussolini or Berlusconi. In either case, as both were disasters (for Italy
surely but for the world also), so would
Trump be both for us and for the world.
He is a racist, a misogynist (women
are acceptable only as arm candy), and
someone who has no vision about this
country and its place in the world. Those
who positively respond to him are a
species of nihilist: destruction of what
America has grown to be is their aim.
They want a country and a world in
which they can feel superior. Trump has

mastered the art of speaking to those


with that kind of disaffection.
The rest of us must strongly resist.
Dont laughcry that there are so many
of our fellow citizens who respond to
demagoguery.
Merrill Ring
Claremont

Claremont, City of Trees

Dear Editor:
If you go to Google Earth and start
navigating to a point over southern California, something very interesting happens. Claremont is easy to locate from
quite a distance because it is greener than
any of the communities surrounding it.
Closing in on the image of our fair city,
the reason becomes apparent: mature
trees. Parks and playing fields aside, the
trees of Claremont distinguish us from
our neighbors even from space.
As more and more turf areas throughout southern California are replaced with
decomposed granite and gravel, I wonder about the potential consequences
from increased heat-island effects.
Decreased humidity and fewer insulating turf surfacesall the more reason
for each of us to pay close attention to
the condition of our shade-providing
trees this summer and going forward.
They are an irreplaceable asset well beyond the value they add to any one persons property.
Brian Worley
Claremont

Planned Parenthood

Dear Editor:
On August 22, I, along with six other
elderly Claremont residents, participated

in a counter-protest in Pomona against


those who wish to dismantle Planned
Parenthood and stop the important, livesaving reproductive health services they
provide to women and men.
Although we were outnumbered by
50:1, our presence was significant and
noticed. The coalition of anti-choice
forces who are leading the latest assault
against Planned Parenthood are calling
for 40 days of uninterrupted protests.
They claim that Planned Parenthood engages in the selling of fetal body parts for
profit; that abortions constitute 97 percent
of their service operations; and that the
organization is nothing short of a charnel
house used for the torture and killing of
innocent babies. All of this has been
demonstrated to be completely false by
the findings of six state legislative bodies
and the New England Journal of Medicine.
Nonetheless, they persist in their
claims and will not be satisfied until
Planned Parenthood is destroyed. Voices
in opposition to those wishing to annihilate planned parenthood are needed.
Rose Ash
Claremont

Tree trouble

Dear Editor:
I received in the mail a flier that explained the best ways to keep our trees
alive and how to keep watering.
On my property, we have 27 trees that
are between 20 and 100 feet tall, and
many more smaller ones. Without extra
allocation of water, there is no way I can
keep them all alive. Youre damned if
you do and youre damned if you dont.
John Schwartz
Claremont
COMMENTS/continue on page 8

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

Wilderness Park Master Plan

[Editors note: The following letter was


sent to the Claremont City Council and
City Manager, with a copy forwarded for
publication. KD]
Dear Editor:
The League of Women Voters of the
Claremont Area has a long history of
supporting the protection and preservation of our local hillsides. It was with
great interest that a committee of our
local League studied the draft of the
Wildness Park Master Plan. After several
weeks of review, we offer the following
recommendations:
1. More attention must be given to
water and its conservation. The watershed
must be conserved and protected for the
benefit of the whole San Gabriel Valley.
2. Preservation of the hillsides and
their natural resources must be a main
priority. Claremont must take primary responsibility for planning, management,
protection and policing, and for acquisition of additional areas in the hillsides
around the park. The park is a regional
resource, so working with federal, state
and county agencies is appropriate and
beneficial.
3. The management of the Wilderness
Park must be coordinated with the longrange sustainability goals of the city, so
acquisition choices, funding sources,
rules for public usage, maintenance responsibilities, volunteer development
plans and options for governance must
be left open with no limitation on options
such as the use of general fund monies.
4, There must be careful, thorough,
well-informed and ongoing oversight of
the hillsides. Management will require a
new city committee with status, a routine
meeting schedule and a carefully balanced, knowledgeable membership selected from the whole community.
5. The parking situation dominated this
report and its solution is still elusive. Options must avoid privatizing public roads.
Requiring parking permits for public
streets is not the answer and sets a dan-

READERS COMMENTS
gerous precedent. Will parking be restricted around all schools, churches,
parks and public spaces for fear that noise,
congestion and possible property damage
might occur in surrounding neighborhoods? One option might include making
parking free, while charging an admission
fee to help maintain the park.
6. The League strongly supports the
wise use of public funds. Spending
$10,000 on a minor name change is not
a wise choice.
As you may know, the League makes
recommendations and takes action based
on positions formed after thorough study
and membership consensus.
Tressa Kentner
President
Elizabeth Smith
Director of Natural Resources

Whats in a Name?

Dear Editor:
America is blessed with a rich assortment of National Parks, ranging from
Mount Rainier in Washington to the
Florida Everglades, and including the
Grand Canyon, Yellowstone, Yosemite,
Death Valley and all the rest. These are
places of great natural beauty whose protected status ensures environmental conservation while still allowing access for
hikers, campers, photographers and nature lovers. Similarly, our California
State Parks offer public access to diverse
protected open spaces including beaches,
mountain sites and desert locations.
I was surprised to discover that one of
the recommendations in the recently released draft of the master plan is to
change the name from the Claremont
Hills Wilderness Park (CHWP) to the
Claremont Hills Wilderness Area
(CHWA).
The reason given for the recommended change is that the term park

may connote conditions contrary to natural open space areas. This seems to me
a narrow and shallow vision of the concept of a park.
As illustrated above, the word park
encompasses far more than just playgrounds, sports parks and amusement
parks. The city of Claremont General
Plan lists different categories of parks including pocket parks (e.g. Shelton),
neighborhood parks (Higginbotham),
community parks (Memorial), sports
parks (La Puerta) and Natural/Wilderness Parks (CHWP).
Although these differ in nature and
function, they share the greater purpose
of providing beauty and opportunities
for mental and physical recreation (p. 52 of the General Plan). Understanding
this connotation, the word park, when
preceded by the adjective wilderness,
seems to me the most accurate way to
describe our local hillside treasure.
The name Wilderness Park is also
more appropriate than Wilderness
Area, because the latter designation, as
established in the Wilderness Act of
1964, has a specific, narrow meaning
within the US National Park and Forest
Service community. It refers to areas
(such as the Sheep Mountain Wilderness
Area in the Angeles National Forest) of
near-pristine condition that lack roads
and buildings, are usually difficult to access, require permits for entry, and have
been minimally impacted by humans.
That is certainly not an accurate description of the CHWP, existing as it does at

the interface between the newly-designated San Gabriel Mountains National


Monument and the densely-populated
urban San Gabriel Valley. Our local hillsides have felt the impact of human activity for centuries.
As a final point, the draft master plan
states that the name change is related to
the goal of environmental preservation
and is expected to result in increased
environmental stewardship. It is not
clear to me how the proposed name
change would accomplish this.
In our surveys last summer at the Mills
Avenue entrance to the most heavily-impacted section of the park, we discovered
that many of the visitors werent even
aware that it is part of Claremont Hills
Wilderness Park; they know it simply as
the loop. Neither the number of visitors, nor the frequency of their visits, nor
their behavior when they arrive will be
affected by changing the official name
from park to area.
If we are serious about the goal of increased environmental stewardship, we
will get a lot more bang for the buck if
the estimated $10,000 allocated for
changing the official name from park
to area is used instead for habitat
restoration, trail repair and maintenance,
or public outreach and education.
A TAC meeting to discuss the Wilderness Park master plan will be held Thursday, September 10 at 6:30 p.m. at
Hughes Center. The draft is available online on the city website and also at city
hall, the library and the Hughes Center.
Meg Mathies
Member of the board of
Claremont Wildlands Conservancy

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

The Great Flood of 1938


by John Neiuber

cientists and meteorologists are predicting a Godzilla El Nio that


could bring record-breaking rain to
southern California this winter. There are
predictions that the record 13.68 inches of
rain that fell in February of 1998, could be
eclipsed.
The ocean temperatures indicate the current conditions are tracking closely to what happened in the
summer of 1997, which led up to the strongest El
Nio on record.
The other much less scientific factors indicating
that we will have an El Nio are all around us. I call
this the car wash effect. Readers will readily understand this. Your car is dirty and you have been putting
if off because there was a prediction of rain. The prediction did not hold true. Okay, you wash your car. Of
course, it rains!
We see the city completely redoing city hall with a
low water, drought-tolerant landscape. The grass on
the Indian Hill medians is being replaced and drip
systems are being installed. Everywhere, homeowners have replaced lawns. My wife and I have had drip
systems installed and are replacing grass with a lowwater substitute that looks like grass, but is not. That
should do itwe should have, as a city, ensured that
the car wash effect is in place.
Claremont sits on the western edge of a large alluvial flood plain. Those large rocks we encounter when
building and landscaping, also known as Claremont
potatoes, are the result of thousands of years of rains
washing them into the valley from the canyons above.
Periodic flooding is a normal event in southern
California. Since records have been kept, dating back
to the late 1700s, there have been a number of flood
events. Not all record rainfall has led to flooding;
such is the fickle nature of rain in southern California.
1983 saw total rainfall of 34.04 inches, and 1978 had
30.57 inches, and there was no major flooding.
Yet, in 1969 there was 26.32 inches of rain and there
was major flooding. The same was true for 1980, 1998
and 2005, which saw about as much rain as 1969.
One of the Southern California Great Floods that

impacted Claremont was the flood of 1938. A total of


9.18 inches of rain occurred in February/March 1938,
marking the heaviest prolonged rainstorm in the history of southern California. On February 27 and 28,
1938, a Pacific storm moved inland into the Los Angeles Basin, moving eastward to the San Gabriel Mountains. The rain was constant for those two days,
bringing over four inches of rain to the inland valleys.
Minor flooding occurred that affected only isolated
canyons and low-lying areas along rivers.
On the evening of March 1, a second storm rolled
in. It brought gale-force winds along the coast and
poured down rain until it ended on March 3. In the
lowlands, the rainfall totals reached 10 inches and
there was as much as 32 inches in the mountains. The
resulting damage was huge, as the mountains and
canyons funneled the water into the valleys.
In Claremont, the series of small dams and levees
in the Pomona Valley Protective Association spreading grounds were no match for the rains. The flood
waters came across Padua Avenue, sweeping away
rock walls built to protect properties. They flowed
across the area that is now the Claremont Club. Much
of the eastern part of Foothill Boulevard was destroyed. Amherst Avenue on the Pomona College
campus became a river. The Santa Fe Railroad tracks
east of Indian Hill Boulevard were undermined and
swept away. Arrow Highway at College Avenue was
decimated. Water rushed through the college buildings and flooded basements. Two to three feet of mud
could be found in the courtyard of Clark Hall at the
Scripps College campus. The greatest damage was to
the street system.
Throughout southern California, the flood destroyed 5,601 buildings, damaged another 1,500 and

stranded over 800 cars. The floods carried a tremendous amount of debris and sediment from the mountains. Roads were buried and traffic was impacted for
days. The most severe damage occurred along the
Santa Ana River in San Bernardino, Riverside and
Orange counties. There were no flood control dams at
the time, and the river swelled to almost half the flow
of the Mississippi River.
The town of Agua Mansa in Riverside County,
population 200, was completely swept away. In addition to the Santa Ana River, the flood caused the Los
Angeles and San Gabriel Rivers to burst their banks.
The flood stranded hundreds of people and washed
away roads, bridges and buildings.
The Great Flood of 1938 resulted in $40 million in
damage. It was estimated at the time that Claremont
had $350,000 in damages. The Red Cross called it the
fifth largest flood in history. There were four fatalities
in Claremont and 115 in total across all of the region.
It became one of the most catastrophic natural disasters in the history of southern California.
The aftermath of the flood resulted in heightened
initiatives to tame the rivers of Southern California. In
response to the 1938 flood event, there were a number of state and federal legislative acts enacted to
channel local streams and build more flood control
dams. San Antonio Dam, Sepulveda Dam, Prado
Dam and the Whittier Narrows Dam were all a result
of these initiatives, although San Antonio, having
been authorized by the Flood Control Act of 1938,
was not completed until 1956. These dams have
helped protect Claremont and all of southern California from subsequent flood events.
Of interest is that the storms of 1969 and 2005 actually had larger rain volumes than the 1938 flood, and
still caused damage and evacuations of low-lying areas.
As much as we may be looking forward to an El
Nio bringing rain to help alleviate some drought conditions, we could also be in for a major flood event.
Sun-baked earth that repels water, hillsides denuded
by fire and stunted plant growth could exacerbate the
problem. But still, I am holding out hope that the car
wash effect will prove trustworthy. I am hoping,
however, that the new roof on our house is not going
to contribute in a big way as a karmic offset!

Every Friday in print.


Every day online.
claremont-courier.com 621 4761

Courier
Claremont

claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY


accounting
Christiansen Accounting
Corina L. Christiansen, CPA
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Claremont, CA 91711

architect

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attorney
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Client-conscience, Design-conscience,
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Kendall &Gkikas LLP

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Attorneys at Law
134 Harvard Avenue, 2nd Floor
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(909) 482-1555

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Certified Specialists in Trusts, Probate


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Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

Linda Heilpern

OUR TOWN

tip. The lunch is from noon to 1 p.m.; the speaker has


the floor from 1 to 2 p.m. All are invited to attend this
event.

Economy Shop reopens for the


82nd year in the Village

Photo courtesy of John Forney

Rally in Claremont on the


National Day of Action on Iran
About 60constituents of Rep. Judy Chus district visited her Claremont office Wednesday, August 26 as part
of the National Day of Action on Iran.
Ms. Chuhas been signaling uncertainty about whether
to support the Iran nuclear treaty in Congress. The group,
comprised ofPilgrims from Pilgrim Place, members of
Progressive ChristiansUniting and members of the local
chapter of MoveOn.org, presented Ms. Chu with 65
pages of signed petitions supporting the treaty. About
1100 constituents signed the petition, with DCC President John Forney serving as organizer for the rally.
After meeting with an aide, it was determined that
Congressmember Chu was not in her office. The petitioners went to the four corners of Foothill and Indian
Hill and spread the word to passing motorists coming
home in afternoon rush-hour traffic.

Democratic Club tackles social


security at first fall meeting
The Democratic Club of Claremont will hold its first
luncheon following its summer recess on Friday, September 11. Speaker Ernie Powell, an experienced public policy advocate, will discuss protecting Social
Security as a guaranteed social insurance program. Mr.
Powell is currently a public policy and campaign consultant specializing in issues impacting Americans over
the age of 50.
The luncheon will be held at Darvish restaurant at
946 W. Foothill Blvd. in Claremont.The meal is $17,
which includes a buffet, non-alcoholic drinks, tax and

11

The Economy Shop, a nonprofit located at 325 W.


First St., will reopen on Wednesday, September 9.
Opened in 1933, The Economy Shop is Claremonts
longest-serving downtown thrift shop.
Re-opening for the 2015-2016 season marks 82 years
of offering decorative items, adult and back-to-school
clothing, books, home and kitchen accessories and much
more. The shop has undergone extensive refurbishing,
with new clothing racks and hundreds of new treasures.
Almost 100 percent of the profits provide help to
local agencies assisting those in need. Donations are accepted every Wednesday, Thursday and Friday between
9 a.m. and 4 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Now is a good time to clean out your closets and
shelves and help others at the same time.

Fun for the over fifty crowd at


Mingle and Munch event
Start brushing up on your small talk and get ready to
bring your appetite as the City of Trees prepares to welcome its newest group to Claremonts social scene.
The Mingle & Munch Social Group will meet
monthly, beginning Friday, September 11 at The Garner
House from 6 to 8 p.m. Sponsored by the city of Claremont through the Committee on Aging, the event will
offer appetizers, refreshments, music and conversation
as well as provide guests with the opportunity to meet
new and more friends.
The coed event is open to both couples and individuals over the age of 50 and will be held the second Friday of each month, beginning in September. Admission
is free.
The Garner House is located within Memorial Park
at 840 N. Indian Hill Blvd. For more information or to
RSVP, call (909) 399-5488 or visit www.claremontca.org.

San Dimas Mountain Rescue


Team searching for former
members, volunteers
The San Dimas Mountain Rescue Team would like
to contact former team members regarding its 60th an-

Linda Giana Heilpern died on August 27, 2015


following an unexpected hospital stay. She was 65.
A memorial service is being planned, with the
date and time to be determined. In lieu of flowers,
condolence cards may be sent to her home and donations made to Sustainable Claremont or to the Inland Valley Humane Society.
A full account of Ms. Heilperns life will be featured in a future edition of the COURIER.

niversary celebration. If you are a former team member,


contact Lois Grossman at (909) 593-3752 or visit
www.sdmrt.com/alumni.
The SDMRT is a nonprofit, all-volunteer team that is
on call 24/7 and responds to such emergencies as lost,
injured or stranded hikers, vehicle accidents in the San
Gabriel Mountains, fire and flood evacuations, swiftwater rescues and searches for downed aircraft.

Boy Scout Troop 402 planning


50thcelebration
Boy Scout Troop 402 is celebrating its 50thanniversary in September and is looking for past scouts, leaders and families to join the fun.
The community event will be held Saturday, September 19 at El Roble Intermediate School and will include a dinner and program commemorating the troops
first 50 years.
We recently recognized our 105th Eagle Scout since
the troop was first chartered in 1965, said Kevin Ward,
Troop 402s current scoutmaster. Our troop is led by
scouts with the guidance of excellent trained parent volunteers, governed by a parent council and sponsored by
Claremont American Legion. Wed love a chance to
connect with past scouts or leaders to hear some of their
stories and adventures.
Troop 402 is inviting anyone who would like to attend the celebration to contact Suzy Tineo or Sandy
Lopez, co-chairpersons of the committee organizing the
event, atboyscoutstroop402.claremont@gmail.com.
Were especially interested in hearing from people
who would like to share stories, photos or memorabilia, Ms. Tineo said. But wed love for everyone
who has had any kind of connection to our troop to
come celebrate with us.
Tickets for the event are $5 per person and can be reserved online at www.claremontboyscouttroop402.org

NEW CAR GUIDE


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Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

Inland Pacific Ballet to hold


open auditions for childrens
roles in The Nutcracker
Inland Pacific Ballet will hold auditions on Friday,
September 11 and Saturday, September 12 for all childrens roles in its annual production of The Nutcracker. Auditions take place at IPB studios, located at
5050 Arrow Hwy. in Montclair.
Dancers ages 6 to 20 from any school or studio in
southern California are invited to audition. Individuals
selected for roles must be available for every rehearsal
and all performances for their cast. There will be from
two to four casts of children selected to perform. A $20
audition fee and additional production and rehearsal
fees for those who are offered a role are required. Casting and rehearsal schedules will be announced by September 28, with childrens rehearsals beginning on
October 2 and 3. The audition schedule is as follows:
Friday, September 11:
7:15 to 8:30 p.m.: 14- to 20-year-olds with a minimum of three years on pointe (audition is on pointe;
IPB Academy Level 5A & up). For those who wish to
be considered, this audition also serves as the apprentice/trainee audition for the 2015-2016 season.
Saturday, September 12:
1:30 to 2:15 p.m.: 6- to 8-year-olds (IPB Academy
Level 1A-1C), minimum one year of ballet.
2:15 to 3 p.m: 8- to 11-year-olds (IPB Academy
Level 2A-2B), minimum two years of ballet.
3 to 3:30 p.m: Boys, 6- to 13-year-olds, no minimum
requirements.
3:45 to 4:30 p.m.: 9- to 12-year-olds (IPB Academy
Level 3A-3B-3C), minimum three years of ballet (3C
bring pointe shoes)
4:30 to 4:45 p.m.: 11- to 12-year-olds (IPB Academy
Level 3C contd), dancers who are on pointe.
4:45 to 5:30 p.m.: 11- to 15-year-olds (IPB Academy

OUR TOWN

Level 4A-4B), minimum four years of ballet (bring


pointe shoes).
Performances take place at the Arcadia Performing
Arts Center from November 28 to 29; Bridges Auditorium in Claremont from December 3 through 6; Fox
Performing Arts Center in Riverside from December
11 through 14; and the Lewis Family Playhouse in Rancho Cucamonga from December 17 to 20.
For information, visit ipballet.org, call Jill Voznick
at (909) 482-1590 ext. 13 or email jill@ipballet.org.

Temple Grandin to speak at


Casa Colina event at Candlelight Pavilion
Casa Colina Foundation will host An Evening in
Casablanca on Friday, September 11 at the Candlelight Pavilion to present the Casa Colina Ambassador of
the Children Award to autism advocate, Dr. Temple
Grandin.
Incorporating many themes from the beloved 1940s
celluloid classic, An Evening in Casablanca will be a
night of wonderful food, casino gambling, auctions and
live entertainment.
Honoree and guest speaker Dr. Grandin is a strong
advocate for children, adolescents and adults on the
autism spectrum. Her achievements are remarkable because she was diagnosed with autism as a child. At age
two, she had no speech and all the signs of severe
autism. Many hours of speech therapy and intensive
teaching enabled her to learn to speak. Mentoring by
her high school science teacher and aunt motivated Dr.
Grandin to pursue a career as a scientist and livestock

12

equipment designer. In addition to earning her bachelors, masters and PhD, Dr. Grandin has received numerous awards and honorary doctorates from Carnegie
Mellon University and Duke University.
An award-winning authorsome of her popular
books are Thinking in Pictures, Emergence Labeled
Autistic, The Way I See It and The Autistic Brain
HBO produced a movie about Temples early life and
career, which received seven Emmy awards, a Golden
Globe and a Peabody Award. Dr. Grandin was also honored in Time magazines 2010 The 100 Most Influential People in the World.
Casa Colina Foundation provides over $150,000 in
treatment and visit subsidies each year to Childrens
Services. Proceeds from An Evening in Casablanca will
go directly to supporting this cause. Individual tickets
are $150 and sponsorship packages are available. For
information, call (909) 596-7733, ext. 2223 or visit
www.casacolina.org/casablanca.

Assemblymember Holdens
office seeks interns for fall
The office of Assemblymember Chris Holden (AD
41) is looking for individuals who would like to intern
in the Claremont and Pasadena district offices.
The office is currently accepting applications for the
California State Assembly District Office Internship
Program for the 2015- 2016 school year. This program
offers high school and college students an opportunity
to participate in and experience the work of a state assembly office.
Internships are available to full- or part-time students
who are at least 15-and-a-half years old. Depending on
their school, students may also receive school credit.
To apply, visit asmdc.org/members/a41/ or call the
Pasadena office at (626) 351-1917.

13
PVHMC sports medicine center
raises funds for high schools
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

Claremont Chorale recruiting


singers, especially men
The Claremont Chorale, the premier community
choral group in the greater Claremont area, is seeking to
add new singers, especially men, to its current membership.
Founded in 1968, the Chorale is an independent community chorus of experienced singers from all walks of
life. Members are selected by audition and are committed to excellence in performing all types of choral
music. The Chorale currently rehearses at 7:30 p.m.
every Monday evening from September through May
in Decker Hall at Pilgrim Place in Claremont.
Singers interested in auditioning are encouraged to
email Gregory Norton, chorale director, at
director@claremontchorale.org or call (626) 797-3656.
Visitors are invited to attend the first rehearsal scheduled for Monday, September 21 to get a feel for the
group before scheduling an audition.

Art sale and jazz in the park


Claremont Heritage will host its semi-annual art
show on Friday, September 4 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the
Ginger Elliott Exhibition Center, Garner House Courtyard, 840 N. Indian Hill Blvd.
The sale includes donated works by significant
artists, including locals Millard Sheets, Milford Zornes,
Phil Dike, James Strombotne, Barbara Beretich and
Martha Underwood , as well as internationally
renowned artists such as Joseph Muruska, Tuson Grum,
Jan Wagstaff and Harold Hollingsworth. Proceeds will
benefit Heritages third grade history program.
The Art Show & Sale is free and open to the public.
For a $20 donation, guests can also enjoy an evening
of live jazz, libations and culinary delights in the beautiful Garner House courtyard.

OUR TOWN

Golden State Water launches


Golden Lawn contest
Golden State Water Company and its conservation
partner Save Our Water, Californias statewide conservation education program, are teaming up to host a
Golden Lawn Contest during the month of September.
Given the drought emergency in California, the
Golden Lawn Contest is designed to further promote
outdoor conservation by highlighting customers who
have limited or stopped irrigating their lawns to help
preserve water supplies depleted by four consecutive
dry years.
The contest encourages Golden State customers to
share photos of their golden lawns through September
29 for a chance to win up to a $100 credit toward their
water bill. Photos can be submitted via email at contest@gswater.com or to @GoldenStateH2O on Twitter
using the #GoGoldCA hashtag.
All photos submitted are eligible to be highlighted
on the Golden State Water (gswater.com) and Save Our
Water (saveourwater.com) websites, as well as the organizations Twitter and other social media channels.
Prizes will be awarded on September 30 for the top two
photos submitted, with bill credits rewarded for first
($100) and second place ($50).
For more information on the contest guidelines and
submission details, customers are encouraged to visit
gswater.com/contest or saveourwater.com. For contest
updates and information about the drought and conservation, follow Golden State Water (@GoldenStateH2O) and Save Our Water (@SaveOurWater) on
Twitter.

In 2015, physicians, physical therapists and associates from the Sports Medicine Center at Pomona Valley
Hospital Medical Center performed 484 sports physicals, raising a combined total of $12,050 for the five
local high schools participating in its $$$ for Physicals program, which acts as a fundraising outlet for the
underfunded athletic budgets of the schools.
Each year, physicians from the Sports Medicine Center donate their time by providing student athletes from
Claremont, Bonita Damien, San Dimas and Charter
Oak high schools with comprehensive, pre-participation exams equired by the California Interscholastic
Federation (CIF). This year, Claremont High received
$2,750 for its athletic department through the program.
During the event, athletes make their way through
height, weight, blood pressure, vision, ear-nose-throat,
cardio and orthopedic check stations. Those who pass
the exams receive clearance for participation in summer practices, training camps and high school sports for
the upcoming school year. Before the screening event
occurs, athletic trainers and coaches establish a set fee
for exams. After the physicals are performed, 100 percent of the fees are donated back to the schools athletic
training department.
PVHMC has been providing physicals to local high
school students since 1983, when the Sports Medicine
Center first opened. Over the last nine years, more than
5,000 student athletes have been given physicals, raising $114,255 for the schools. The SMC physicians also
work closely with schools to provide complimentary
game coverage and support throughout the school year.
The SMC offers free sports injury screenings at its
physician clinic each Monday and Thursday from 5 to
7 p.m. in PVHMCs Rehabilitation Services Clinic. For
information, visit www.pvhmc.org/sportsmedicine.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

14

Wilderness Park Master Plan review is next week


by Freeman Allen

wanted to visit homes on Forsyth


Place to talk about the Claremont Energy Challenge, but there was no
place I could park. All the spaces were vacant but all were posted Residence Permit Required, even on nearby streets.
Thats Claremonts response to complaints about
the Claremont Hills Wilderness Park attracting noisy
visitors, and I wonder what the city will say to others
who may now want similar restrictions because they
live near places that frequently attract a crowd.
Forsyth Place is a small street on the west side of
Mills Avenue, a few blocks from the entrance to the
park. Even parking spaces with no homes nearby are
posted. That seemed bizarre. I knew there had been
complaints about park visitors disturbing residents,
but this was the first time I had experienced how it
felt to drive by blocks of empty spaces before finding
a place to park.
I hear restrictions are planned to just above Base
Line Road. I wondered if there isnt a better solution.
I looked to the newly-drafted Claremont Hills Wilderness Park Master Plan, now being reviewed by the

Demystifying
SUSTAINABILITY
city, for that better solution. I was disappointed.
There is emphasis on parking in the plan, perhaps
too much so. The proposal is to increase the $3 parking fee on the park lots to $5and to $10 when use is
particularly popular such as on Saturday and Sunday
mornings. That didnt seem like much of a solution.
Perhaps it would be an incentive to park even further away, and it might even discourage use at those
peak times, but I wondered if there is a better way.
For example, why not charge an entrance fee instead
of a parking fee? That way everyone would share in the
expense of maintaining the park, and it would present a
good opportunity to remove some of those parking restrictions. Of course, there are many things to be considered to find the best solution. A study group could be
appointed with members from across the community to
be sure of a broad perspective.
This draft plan has little about other important issues. This land is our watershed, but there is little

about that except on soils. The main purpose of the


wilderness park, as determined by the city, is preservation, but that is not emphasized. The draft plan does
not mention the $200,000 Feasibility Study for the
project Thompson Creek Spreading Grounds: Acquire, Restore, Preserve. This land at the top of Mills
Avenue that holds the dam would be added to the
park as a low-impact recreational area where storm
water capture would be enhanced and endangered
natural habitat preserved. The draft plan claims to
look forward 20 years, but does not consider such additions or include a plan for governing the park in the
future.
The draft plan is posted on the city of Claremonts
website. There will be an opportunity for public comment at the Technical Advisory Committee meeting at
the Hughes Center at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, September 10.
Demystifying Sustainability is a project of Sustainable
Claremont (sustainableclaremont.org). Follow us on
Facebook at facebook.com/sustainableclaremont and
on Twitter #GreenClaremont, and consider becoming
a member

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

15

Strong cross country team readies for new season, new coach

laremont High Schools cross country team has a lot to be excited


about as they prepare for the upcoming season.
First, they were the undefeated 2014 Palomares
League champions. Second, they have a new coach with
a long track record of producing championship teams.
Third, with 104 runners, they have the depth to dominate
at the varsity level, as well as among the JV and freshman teams.
This past spring, Claremonts
SPORTING
longtime cross country coach Rob
Lander left to lead Chaffey Colleges
LIFE
program. Coach Lander had been
with the Pack since 1993, as head coach since 2005. During his tenure, the team has developed into a true powerhouse in the very competitive southern section.
Claremont has hired veteran coach Bill Reeves to take
over the Pack. Coach Reeves has been an assistant in
Claremont for two years, a position he took in part because he liked Coach Landers approach.
Coach Reeves has 25 years of experience, including
two different stints leading the South Hills High School
cross country program. Under Coach Reeves, both the
boys and girls teams qualified for the California state
championship meet three years in a row.
In 1999, both teams won the CIF southern section
championship, and were also the individual CIF southern
section champions. This was only the third time in California state history that four titles have been won in cross
country on the same day, a feat that earned Coach Reeves
the California Cross Country Coach of the Year title.
He worked at Azusa Pacific University from 2000 to
2005, earning cross country GSAC conference coach of
the year separately for mens and womens teams a total
of seven times. In his five years at APU, the womens
cross country teams national placing was the highest of
any NAIA school, never finishing below sixth place.
A La Verne resident, Coach Reeves played basketball
and ran track in high school and is a third-generation
coach, with both his father and grandfather leading basketball programs. But he likes cross country because
there are no individual positions and it lacks the politics
seen in other sports programs.
If a parent comes to me and asks why their kid is not
in the top seven [places on varsity team] I say, Well,
seven kids ran faster.
The Packs depth of talent will be tested this weekend
at the Cool Breeze tournament in Chino. The event,
which includes 54 teams, is held at night on the El Prado
Golf Course with 4000-watt lights illuminating the race.
The girls team looks very good; we only lost one girl
in our top seven and added a freshman who is at number
three, said Coach Reeves. We will find out more this
weekend. The meets got some big schools.
Unfortunately, last years top four male runners all
graduated, creating a bit of a vacuum at the top and a fair

COURIERphotos/Steven Felschundneff
ABOVE: The Claremont High School girls cross
country team is widely regarded as one of the best
in southern California this year. They only lost one
runner from last years varsity team and have a
freshman who has stepped in at the number three
spot.
ATLEFT: Bill Reeves has been hired as the new
head coach of the CHS cross country team. Coach
Reeves has a 25-year career leading cross country
teams including a stint at South Hills, where the
team got several CIF titles.

amount of competition within the ranks. All summer, the


boys battled for the seven positions on the varsity team.
Coach Reeves added two more travel meets this year,
one to Washington State and another to Clovis, which
also ramped up the competition.
Were having a runoff of 10 boys on Saturday to see
whos going to Washington, because its been switching
back and forth all summer. The first seven [runners]
across the finish line are going, he said.
With Palomares League action set to start next week,
runners and coaches alike are anxious to see where they
stand.
You never know until you race. They have been training hard this summer. They have some lofty goals and
have been working hard to achieve them, Coach Reeves
said.
Assistant Coach John Thalman added, As Coach Rob
always said, All will be revealed [at the race].
Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com

claremont-courier.com
We cover Claremont news, 24/7

Courier
Claremont

claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

16

COURIERphotos/Steven Felschundneff
Charles Boghosian, who goes by the snappy name Chicken Charlie, proudly displays his pineapple chicken on Wednesday during a special fair food preview
event at the Los Angeles County Fair. Chicken Charlie has become famous for his deep-fried concoctions, and this year is no exception, with fried guacamole,
Slim Fast bars and peanut butter-stuffed pickles.

LA County Fair offers creative, delectable food


for the entire family

abor Day weekend signifies the


last hurrah of summer for many
Claremont folks. While some residents may gather around the grill with
family and friends, others around town
will put on their stretchy pants and walking shoes and head over to the Pomona
Fairplex for another annual traditionthe
Los Angeles County Fair.
Now in its 93rd year, the 2015 Los Angeles
County Fair (LACF) will kick off Friday, September
4 and will feature more than three weeks of fun and
gluttony for guests who enter the gates in search of
the latest mind-blowing fair food west of the Mississippi.
Preparations were well underway this past
Wednesday, as nearly 100 vendors got ready to dazzle fairgoers with their crazy culinary creations.
Whether youre into ooey-gooey, barbecued, deepfried or healthy, the 2015 LA County Fair is a gastro-

The local television stations came out in full force


for the special preview party for the Los Angeles
County Fair. The fair runs from September 4-27.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

17

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff


ABOVE: A television crew from KTLA interviews employees of Riccos Italian Ice about their
new michelaguas which are made with all natural ingredients and sweetened with agave pulp.
Their featured flavor is made with pineapple and spinach.
ATLEFT: Vendors set up a display of their special offerings during a party to preview the food
offerings for this years Los Angeles County Fair.

LA COUNTY FAIR/from the previous page

nomical playground that has something for everyone.


Never one to disappoint with his creations, Charles
Chicken Charlie Boghosian debuted his newest
concoctions: deep-fried guacamole and a baconwrapped chicken leg served on top of a syrup-drizzled waffle. Served with ranch dressing, the
avocado-licious ball of battered goodness seems to be
the favorite among guests.
The deep-fried guacamole could be the next Los
Angeles County Fair classic, Mr. Boghosian said of
his latest creation. The LA County Fair takes its food
very seriously, so we knew we wanted something
amazing. Since Angelenos love their chicken and
waffles, a deep-fried, bacon-wrapped version seemed
like a no-brainer.
Previous Chicken Charlie creations such as the
deep-fried peanut butter pickle and the ironic deepfried Slim Fast bar are also on the menu, as well as
the best-selling fair food item of all time, the Krispy
Kreme Triple-Decker Cheeseburger.
Cornocopia Foods pushes the food boundaries this
year with their Spicy PB&J Burger, a hotter, meatier
version of the classic American food enlivened by the
addition of Sriracha sauce.
For those seeking a healthier alternative, San
Dimas-based eatery Twisted Sage is making its fair
debut this year and offers some delicious options. Located on the shady patio of the Millard Sheets Building, guests can enjoy fresh fare like a curried chicken
sandwich served on a croissant or an apple and goat
cheese chicken salad that is both light and full of flavor.
Were excited to bring a fresh, healthy alternative
to the traditional fair food, says Twisted Sage chef
and manager Jolyn Thompson.
Fairgoers searching for something cool and refreshing to drink will find it at Riccos. Their all-natural
Michelaguas come in flavors such as pineapplespinach, lemon-cucumber and mango. Try the pineapple-spinach. Trust me, you wont be disappointed.

Claremont Day at the Fair


All Claremont residents are invited to Claremont
Day at the Los Angeles County Fair on Thursday,
September 17. Claremont community members have
planned a day that will include a Business Expo,
Community Day parade, high school marching band
competition and the Community Hero awards ceremony.
Claremont community heroes are Jasmine Lyn,
who was named a Young Hero. Jasmine is a third
grader at Condit Elementary School who, at age
three, was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic
leukemia. Jasmine and her Team Jazzy supporters
have been an active members of the leukemia lymphoma society.
Shea Seery is also a Young Hero. Shea, who
founded Claremont High Schools literary journal, is
a member of the schools forensics team in policy debate. As a National Charity League member, Shea has
registered more than 125 hours of community service.
Mike Alpert is Claremonts Adult Community
Hero. As president of the Claremont Club, Mr. Alpert
has helped open several health programs including
Living Well with Cancer, a free program offered in
partnership with Pomona Valley Hospital Medical
Centers Robert and Beverly Lewis Family Cancer
Care Center, and is active with the Be Perfect Foundation helping people with spinal cord injuries.
Claremonts Senior Community Hero is Eleanor
Pierson, a founding parent of Foothill Country Day
School. Ms. Pierson retired from the school earlier
this year after being the longest-serving staff member
of the school. Ms. Pierson is also active in Claremont
city affairs, serving on several boards of community
groups.
The fair will be open from noon to 11 p.m. on
Thursday and admission for Claremont residents will
be $5. Purchase tickets online at www.lacf.com/buytickets using promo code: claremont or pick up a discount coupon at Claremont City Hall and present it to
the admission gate upon your arrival. Proceeds benefit the Claremont Big Yellow Bus Program.

Granny Smith and goat cheese salad is available as


a healthy alternative to typical fair food at the
Twisted Sage Caf booth during the Los Angeles
County Fair.

Admission and Hours


When: Friday, September 4 through September 27,
2015. Closed Monday and Tuesday except for Labor
Day.
Opening weekend hours: noon to midnight today;
10 a.m. to midnight on Saturday and Sunday; 10 a.m.
to 10 p.m. on Monday.
General hours: Wednesdays, noon to 10 p.m.;
Thursdays, noon to 11 p.m.; Fridays, noon to midnight; Saturdays, 10 a.m. to midnight; Sundays, 10
a.m. to 10 p.m.
Where: Pomona Fairplex, 1101 W. McKinley Ave.,
Pomona.
General Admission Tickets: $12 weekdays; $20
weekends. Admission for children 6 to 12 are $8; seniors 60 and older on weekdays are $10, $15 on weekends. Luminasia requires an additional $5 fee for ages
6 and up; children ages 5 and under are free.
For more information, visit the 2015 Los Angeles
County Fair website at www.lacountyfair.com.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com

Friday, September 4 through Saturday, September 12

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

CALENDAR
YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

September
Friday

FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Enjoy free


live music throughout the Village from
6 to 9 p.m.

September
Saturday

CLAREMONT ART WALK Visit art


galleries in the Claremont Village from
6 to 9 p.m. for opening receptions of
this months exhibitions. This event has
changed from the first Friday of the
month to the first Saturday of the
month. For more information, visit
claremontartwalk.com.
ART WALK AT THE PACKING
HOUSE The inaugural arts festival as
part of the Claremont Art Walk. Visit
the Claremont Packing House between
6 and 9 p.m. for art vendor booths and
live entertainment. Participants in this
months event include I Like Pie, Olive
Shea Vintage, Inland Valley Repertory
Theatre and a performance by local

viola and guitar duo Habes. This event


is free and open to the public. The
Claremont Packing House is located at
532 W. First St., Claremont.
ALMANAC LAUNCH PARTY Celebrate the release of this years
COURIER Almanac and an exhibition
of Claremont aerial photography by
Peter Weinberger. This event is sponsored by The Whisper House, Packing
House Wines, Scoops on Tap and
Augies Coffee House. 6 to 9 p.m. during the Claremont Art Walk. The
Colony at Loft 204, 532 W. First St.
#204, Claremont.

September
Sunday

DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE


Marking the 150th anniversary of the
publication of Alices Adventures in
Wonderland, this exhibition draws
from Denison Librarys rich collection
of illustrated editions of Lewis Carrolls much interpreted story. One can
view the original illustrations by John
Tenniel along with images created by
late 20th and early 21st century artists.
Artists books by four artists will be
prominently displayed. Open from

Crossword puzzle

Galleries

Check out this weeks puzzle by


Myles Mellor.

Claremont Art Walk listing


and map.

Page 20

Page 21

18

noon to midnight. Located at Denison


Library, 1090 N. Columbia Ave.,
Claremont.
VINO + VINYASA Enjoy a complimentary one-hour Vinyasa yoga session at 3:30 p.m. in the Hotel Casa 425
courtyard, followed by Happy Relaxation Hour in the Lounge from 4:30 to
9 p.m. Bring your yoga mat and plan to
arrive 15 minutes prior, because spots
are limited. Ages 21 and up. 425 W.
First St., Claremont.

share her experience with transforming


schools from asphalt to ecosystems
and how that transformation supports a
change in children. Can Claremont
schools benefit from San Franciscos experience? Located at Pomona Colleges
Hahn Hall, Room 101, 420 N. Harvard
Ave., Claremont.

September

SEED SAVING Claremont Garden


Club answers questions about heirloom, open-pollinated and hybrid
plants, along with breeding for particular traits, packaging and whether
seeds are even worth saving. Free to the
public. Pilgrim Place Napier Center,
660 Avery Rd., Claremont.

Monday

MONDAY NIGHT CONCERTS 7


p.m. at Memorial Park, 840 N. Indian
Hill Blvd., Claremont.

September
Tuesday

September
Wednesday

8 August
Thursday

SAN GABRIEL MOUNTAINS NATIONAL MONUMENT University


Club program. 11:30 a.m. $13 includes
buffet lunch. Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont.
GREENING
CLAREMONT
SCHOOLS Lynne Juarez, a retired educator from San Francisco USD, will

10

MAPPING THE PACIFIC COAST


Mapping the Pacific Coast, 16001900 features original maps that depict the west coast of North America,
early exploration, and voyages and
9-DAY CALENDAR
continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

9-DAY CALENDAR
continued from the previous page

travels of Europeans to the New World.


Maps from the Wagner Collection of
Western Americana are featured, along
with other maps from Honnold/Mudd
Library Special Collections. This exhibit can be viewed during all hours the
library is open. Located at Honnold Library, 800 Dartmouth Ave., Claremont.

August
Friday

19

RESTAURANT ROW

11

FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Live music


throughout the Village from 6 to 9 p.m.

August
Saturday

12

THE COMMODORES The Commodores, one of the most iconic funk and
soul bands to ever hit the music scene,
bring their signature hits to the Lewis
Family Playhouse for a special one-night
only performance. 8 p.m. at the Lewis
Family Playhouse, 12505 Cultural Center Drive, Rancho Cucamonga. Tickets
for Gold Level Seating are priced at $65
or $63 for seniors. Tickets are available
online at lewisfamilyplayhouse.com or
through the box office at (909) 477-2752.

Claremont COURIER Swag


Purchase COURIER mugs,
hoodies and prints from
The Colony at Loft 204
upstairs in the Claremont
Packing House.
532 W. First St. #204, Claremont

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

NIGHTLIFE
EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. Open from 11 a.m. to midnight,
Sunday through Thursday; closes at 1 a.m. Friday and
Saturday. Hoppy Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. (909)
445-8875.
Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros.
Brewery pints.
Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass.
Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the week.

Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every month.


Thursdays: All Titos Vodka drinks $2 off and Eureka Thursday Night Music.
FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. 18 and over. Show times: Friday at 8 and 10 p.m., Saturday at 7 and 9:30 p.m. and
Sunday at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or
at the door.
Friday, September 4: Debra DiGiovanni from Single Awkward Female. 8 and 10 p.m.
Saturday, September 5: Debra DiGiovanni from
Single Awkward Female. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, September 6: Claremont Comedy Contest
with Ryan Stout. 7 p.m.
Thursday, September 10: Flappers Funnies with
The Show at 8 p.m. and Open Mic Audition Show at
10 p.m.
Friday, September 11: Thomas Dale from Adam
Devines House Party. 8 and 10 p.m.
Saturday, September 12: Thomas Dale from

Answers to last weeks puzzle #330

COURIER CROSSWORD

20

Adam Devines House Party. 7 and 9:30 p.m.


Sunday, September 13: Two Milk Minimum at
4:30 p.m. and Claremont Comedy Contest at 7 p.m.
THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave.,
Claremont Village.
Open mic night, the last Sunday of every
month. Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances
run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $2. (909)
624-2928 or folkmusiccenter.com.
THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave.,
Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until
2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21 and over
after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. (909)
625-4808.
Friday, September 4: City of Trees (rock). 10 p.m.
Saturday, September 5: Squeakin Wheels
(folk). 10 p.m.
Sunday, September 6: Sunday piano at 6 p.m. followed by Super Awesome Open Mic Night with Josh
at 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, September 8: King Trivia Night. 9 p.m.
Wednesday, September 9: J-Birds (Rock/Americana Trio). 9:30 p.m.
Thursday, September 10: Teryn Re (jazz) at 8:30
p.m. and DJ Ghandy (hip hop/dance) at 11 p.m.
Friday, September 11: Dont Kick Jimmy (Rock
Prog). 10 p.m.
Saturday, September 12: Future Force Records
Night with Light Thieves. 10 p.m.
PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont.
Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and
Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8
p.m. to 1 a.m. 21 and over. $5 cover charge on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with
student ID). (909) 547-4266.
Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with
the band.
Wednesdays: Rockstar Karaoke. Rock the mic
or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka
Rockstars. 9 p.m.

Crossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #331


Across
1. Airs
6. Reverse
10. Moral weakness
14. Unreactive
15. Hospital fluids
16. Genesis garden
17. Beauty pageant wear
18. Mideast bigwig
19. Tear to bits
20. Pomona College
president, David ____
22. Dusk
23. Feed bag contents
24. "Blame it on __"
25. Roomy vehicle
27. World view
30. Purple flower
32. Gadget
36. Symbol on an
Australian coin
37. Camera part
38. Orangish yellow
39. Watch brand
41. Jerusalem native
43. Unfinished
44. Drink
45. Spanish law
46. By order of
47. Girl on a wall

48. Where the cows graze


49. Daisylike bloom
51. Density symbol
53. Roundish
56. Creature in a Sinbad tale
57. Number 1 college on
Forbes list of America's
Top Colleges
61. Place to play
old records
62. Piece
64. Neighbor of Nigeria
65. Roman god of war
66. Mixed bag
67. Klutzy
68. Miniature racer
69. Darlings
70. Very (musical
direction)
Down
1. Latin bandleader Puente
2. Alternative to Windows
3. Whiskey order
4. Fielder's blunder
5. They help keep
planes aloft
6. It may be fair
7. Ruin
8. Pushed back

9. Rowed in a regatta
10. Archie's heartthrob
11. Brainchild
12. Lincoln penny
13. Odds and ___
21. "___ So Vain"
26. Fear of open places
27. Pilgrimage site
28. Eastern V.I.P.'s
29. Shut up or ___ ___
31. ATM access
requirement
33. Beach souvenir
34. Bar fight?
35. Indic language
40. Dreamer
41. Suffix with ''invent''
42. Float drinking sound
44. Complete current path
47. Citizens
50. Military company
52. Black cats and broken
mirrors, by tradition
53. Current measures
54. Test tube, e.g.
55. 1960s do
58. This __ for you!
59. Pacific palm
60. Opposing
63. Help request

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

3 BUNNY GUNNER GALLERY:


254 W. Bonita Ave., Claremont. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (909) 6247238.
Through September 30: Still,
paintings by Athena Hahn. Opening
reception: Saturday, September 5
from 6 to 9 p.m. featuring refreshments, musical guests and a first
viewing of the rough cut of Heavy
Balloon, an animated piece.

4 CLAREMONT COMMUNITY
FOUNDATION ART GALLERY:
205 Yale Ave., Claremont Chamber of
Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. (909) 398-1060.
Through September 25: The Claremont Community Foundation art
gallery presents a solo exhibition featuring the innovative mixed-media
works of First Street Gallery studio
artist Joe Zaldivar. This one-man-show
will feature Mr. Zaldivars captivating
drawings, which utilize Google Maps
Street View photographs as reference
material and depict many local landmarks, homes and businesses. Several
of these works were created on commission specifically for this exhibition
in a collaboration between First Street
Gallery and The Claremont Commu-

Saturday, September 5
Foothill Blvd.

8
3

Bonita Avenue

Second Street

10

5 6 1

Harvard Avenue

First Street
Yale Avenue

1 AUGIES COFFEE HOUSE/


LA MINUTE: 536 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. Open daily. (909)
798-2255.
Through September 30: Oil and
acrylic paintings on wood panels by
Annie Marquis. Opening reception:
Viola and guitar duo HABES will perform at 8 p.m.
2 BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM:
134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily
from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. buddhamouse.com. (909) 626-3322.
Through September 30: Invisible
Energies. Grace Comisso explores the
unseen energies that are constantly
moving between us. She graduated
with a degree in visual communications from The Art Institute of Pittsburgh. Opening reception: Saturday,
September 5 from 6 to 9 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

Claremont Art Walk:

Indian Hill Blvd.

GALLERIES

nity Foundation including The Historic


Garner House, The Good Luck Gallery
and private Claremont residences.
Other notable Claremont landmarks
recreated by Mr. Zaldivar include
Bridges Auditorium, City Hall and the
Packing House. Mr. Zaldivar began
using his iPad to access Google Maps
when he first started the First Street
Gallery art program in 2011 and,
shortly thereafter, incorporated the
Street View creations into his body of
work, adding fascinating new dimensions to his already unique artistic perspective. Opening reception: Saturday,
September 5 from 6 to 9 p.m.
5 CLAREMONT FORUM BOOKSHOP & GALLERY: 586 W. First St.,
Claremont Packing House. Sunday
through Thursday, noon to 7 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon to 9 p.m. (909)
626-3066.
Through September 30: A native
Californian, Steven D. Clark attended
the Chouinard Art Institute (now the
California Institute of the Arts), was the
art director of several agencies and has
published four books. He lives and exhibits in St. Paul, Minnesota. Opening
reception: Saturday, September 5 from
6 to 9 p.m.

21

Claremont Art Walk takes place on the first Saturday of the month between 6 and 9
p.m. and an arts festival featuring vendor and information booths takes place at the
Claremont Packing House, 532 W. First St., Claremont.

THE COLONY AT LOFT 204:


532 W. First St., #204, Claremont
Packing House. Open Wednesday
through Saturday, 2 to 7 p.m. Extended
hours on weekends. Visit loft204.com.
Email info@loft204.com for information about purchasing monthly wall
space for artwork display or to inquire
about event rental of gallery space.
Through September 30: Birds Eye
View: 91711 showcasing Claremont
landmarks in an art exhibition featuring
aerial photography by COURIER publisher Peter Weinberger. Opening reception: Meet and greet with the artist
on Saturday, September 5 from 6 to 9
p.m. Refreshments sponsored by The
Whisper House, Packing House Wines,
Augies Coffee and Scoops on Tap.
6

FIRST STREET GALLERY


ART CENTER: 250 W. First St., Suite
120, Claremont. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (909) 626-5455.
Through November 13: Tile Show
2015 featuring Jackie Marsh. The 25th
annual Tile Show continues to build on
the tradition of community exchange
and inclusion that have made the Tile
Show such a unique and successful
7

event. This years iteration of the Tile


Show features new ceramic sculpture
by Jackie Marsh. Marsh produces
small-scale figures decorated with gestural carvings and loosely applied
glazes. These delightful and sometimes
ambiguous creatures exude a sense of
Buddha-like contentment, which
leaves the viewer longing to spend time
with them. Their palm-sized scale encourages handling and the intimate engagement of a teacup. In fact, many of
these creatures combine animal with
vessel to make hybrid forms, which are
reminiscent of traditional face jugs or
pre-Colombian pottery. Opening reception: Saturday, September 5. Enjoy
catering donated by Trader Joes and
Spaggis Restaurant. The public reception runs from 6 to 8 p.m. and Friends
of First Street members will get early
access to tile shopping from 5 to 6 p.m.
You can make a donation at the event
if you want to become a new member
or renew your membership and shop
during the members preview. This
event is sponsored by Casa Colina.
8 HILLSIDE FINE ART: 445 W.
Foothill Blvd. Suite 101, Claremont.
Open Wednesday through Saturday
noon to 5 p.m. hillsidefineart.com
(909) 268-4526.
Through October 3: Focused on the
Ordinary and Spectacular: The Art of
Rita Pacheco. Opening reception:
Saturday, September 5 from 4 to 7 p.m.
9 LAST DROP CAF: 119 Harvard Ave., Claremont. Monday
through Friday 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Sat-

urday, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday 8


a.m. to 6 p.m. thelastdropcafe.com.
(909) 482-1870.
Through September 30: Featuring
Sam Arevalo.

SQUARE i GALLERY: 110


Harvard Ave., Claremont. Tuesday
through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.,
or by appointment. Square i is an
annex of the Artist Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approximately every six
weeks. Call (909) 621-9091 or email
info@squareigallery.com.
Through September 30: Fine Art
Estate Sale featuring more than 200
original and limited edition fine art
prints on display including works by
Rita Dibert, Susan Hertel, Hal Lambert, Ernest Pohl, Millard Sheets and
Milford Zornes. Opening reception:
Saturday, September 5 from 5 to 9 p.m.
10

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

22

:Back to School
Animal plan-it
his past summer, kids at the
Project Think enrichment program studied the rainforest.
After learning about the plants and animals there, third through eighth grade
students in a class called Think Tank
were asked to create their own.

Maze
Help this fish find his way
back to his school!

Every creation had to include three structural and


two behavioral adaptationsthings about their bodies and behavior that help them survive
First grader Brianna came up with a Diamond
Tiger. It has claws to scratch with, a tail for whacking predators and whiskers to help it sneeze. Diamond tigers jump while traveling around the
rainforest and use the diamonds on their coats to
blind their enemies.
Lets give a hand to this zoologist of the imagination. What strange living thing can you come up with?
Sarah Torribio
kids@claremont-courier.com

What are these groups of animals called?


Its a murder of crows.
Its a shrewdness of apes.
Its a zeal of zebras.
Its a cauldron of bats.
Its a parade of elephants.
Its a tower of giraffes.
Its a shadow of jaguars.
Its a conspiracy of lemurs.
Its a leap of leopards.
Its a cackle of hyenas.
Its a pod of whales.
Its a romp of otters.
Its a prickle of porcupines.

You did it! A group of fish


is called a school.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

23

eet Wolfie, a Pomeranian


with a penchant for pancakes and a heart of gold.

Wolfie belongs to COURIER office manager


Vickie Rosenberg and her husband Art. His full
name is Wolfgang Amadeus Rosenberg. Hes
named after the famous composer Wolfgang
Amadeus Mozart.
Wolfie came to the Rosenberg family 10 years
ago, when he was less than six weeks old and no
bigger than the palm of Vickies hand. Considering
that shes less than five feet tall, thats a small hand
and an even smaller pup. He was a little puffball
with two little brown eyes, Vickie remembers.
Wolfie has grown since then but, at seven and a
half pounds, hes still just a little guy. His family
keeps him looking good with a professional grooming every three months or so. In the spring through
the summer, his family opts to give him the teddy
bear cut. With his hair cropped short except on his
face, he looks likeyou guessed ita teddy bear.
This canine cutie can be cuddly like a teddy bear
when he wants, too, but hes pretty independent.
Sometimes he wants to keep to himself. Other
times, when hes craving attention, he plops himself next to Vickie on the couch for some quality
time or follows Art around while hes trying to
mow the lawn.
Wolfies family includes another dog, a Dachshund named Rosie. They get along well enough,
sleeping together in an area of the living room
thats penned off by furniture and a baby gate.
Wolfie had a tough time starting out. He was
born in a litter of three and he was the runt, meaning he was the smallest puppy. When he was born,
he was stuck in his moms birth canal for a while
and even stopped breathing. Doctors were able to
revive him and, a decade later, this miracle dog is
still going strong.
He enjoys a good game of fetch with his human
family and playing with a plush Eeyore doll hes
had since he was a puppy. The Rosenbergs tell

School

Word search

books
class
crayons
desk
friends
library
music
pencil
playground
principal
reading
science
spelling
teacher
writing

Old photographs:
Where are the smiles?
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff

Wolfie, Go get your baby, and hell retrieve his


stuffed animal. If theyre not around to toss Eeyore
to him, Wolfie will pick it up with his teeth and
fling it, then go get it and fling it again. His Eeyore
is in amazing condition considering its age and all
the wear-and-tear. It isnt even missing an eye,
Vickie notes.
Along with the occasional pancake, Wolfies favorite treat is a walk. If he hears the word walk
or sees Vickie putting on her sneakers, hes ready
to hit the road. During his walks, he has a very nononsense approach. He stares straight ahead and
walks like hes on his way to an appointment, never
stopping to sniff around or tinkle on the grass.
One other standout quality is that hes more of a
talker than a barker. Hell look you in the eye and
say something like Row-low-ro-rowl. No one
knows quite what hes saying, except maybe Rosie,
but were willing to bet its pretty interesting.
Sarah Torribio
kids@claremont-courier.com

ave you ever seen an old photograph and wondered why


everyone, even the kids, seem
so darn serious?
Its not that everyone was depressed in the olden
days. One reasons for all those straight faces is
that in the early days of photography, film used to
have a much longer exposure time. People posing
for the camera had to remain absolutely still for
several minutes if they didnt want their picture to
come out blurry. It wasnt until shortly before
1900 that the exposure time was shortened enough
so that quick snapshots could be taken.
Theres more to it than the time factor, however.
Many people used to think there was something
undignified about a smile. And since it was so rare
to be photographed, sitting for a portrait was considered a fancy occasion.
Even Tom Sawyer author Mark Twain, who
was known for his sense of humor, had this to say:
A photograph is a most important document, and
there is nothing more damning to go down to posterity than a silly, foolish smile caught and fixed
forever.
Nowadays, someone can snap a dozen photos
before you have time to blink. And smiling in a
picture is considered a sign that you are enjoying
yourselfthat youre healthy and happy.
So the next time someone wants a picture of
you, dont be surprised if they try to coax a smile
out of you by asking you to say, Cheese!
Sarah Torribio
kids@claremont-courier.com

CLAREMONTKIDS/continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 4, 2015

r ee
t
e
Po
How Many, How Much
How many slams in an old screen door?
Depends how loud you shut it.
How many slices in a bread?
Depends how thin you cut it.
How much good inside a day?
Depends how good you live em.
How much love inside a friend?
Depends how much you give em.
Shel Silverstein

Image courtesy of MGM Studios

Notable Quotables:

Always be a first-rate version of yourself and


not a second-rate version of someone else.
Judy Garland

Book Nook
The Tales of Beedle The Bard
by J.K. Rowling

Q. Why did the kid study in the airplane?


A. He wanted a higher education.

Q: Why did the clock in the cafeteria run slow?


A. It always went back four seconds.

Q: Why does it take pirates so long to learn


the alphabet?
A. Because they spend years at C.

Q: Why was the math book sad?


A. Because it had so many problems.

Review by Claremont Kids correspondent Eden Yu, an eighth grader at El Roble


Intermediate School.

Q. How do you get straight A's?


A. Use a ruler.

Are you a Potterhead? Did you read any


of the Harry Potter books? If so, this book
is definitely for you.
The Tales of Beedle the Bard is a compilation of some classic fairy tales that serve
as famous bedtime stories for young wizards and witches. There are five short tales:
The Wizard and the Hopping Pot, The
Fountain of Fair Fortune, The Warlock's
Hairy Heart, Babbitty Rabbitty and Her
Cackling Stump and, last but not least,
The Tale of the Three Brothers.
Each of the stories comes with its own
commentary from Hogwarts headmaster
Albus Dumbledore and notes from author
J. K. Rowling. Recommended for ages 9 12. Some mildly graphic scenes.

24

909.621.4761

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

Friday 09-04-15

CLASSIFIEDS

25

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

rentals........25

Rentals

Rentals

Rentals

Marketplace

Bulletins

legals...........26

Condo for rent

House for rent

Townhome for rent

Garage sale

Hotlines

TWO bedroom, two bathroom condo. Stainless steel


appliances, attached garage,
pool, greenbelt. Walk to
restaurants, shops, schools.
$2,395 monthly. Dogs okay.
No smokers. 951-205-7488.

CLAREMONT home for rent.


Three bedrooms, two bathrooms, pool, central air, laundry hookup, fresh paint,
carpet. Walk to Colleges,
Chaparral school. Available
October 1. $2,400 gardener,
pool service included. (909)
921-7381.

THREE bedrooms, two-anda-half bathrooms, 1900 sq. ft.


Two-car garage, central heat
and AC. $2,000 monthly.
WSPM 909-621-5941.

MONDAY, September 7Labor Day! Mid-Century Modern furniture, oak dining room
set, patio table and chairs,
books, videotapes, DVDS,
household items. 8 to 3 p.m.
3006 Lansbury Ave., Claremont.

HOUSE of Ruth Domestic Violence Services. If you have


been abused or beaten by
your intimate partner and
need help for yourself or your
children, please call our 24hour hotline, 988-5559.
NAMI HELPLINE National Alliance on Mental Illness,
Pomona Valley Chapter, provides information and referral
in a supportive spirit. Call any
day or time. 399-0305.

services......29
real estate....31

House for rent


THREE bedrooms, one bathroom with fireplace, hardwood
floors,
detached
garage, pool, quiet cul-desac. Walk to Village, Colleges. $1,995. 909-624-6547.

Office space for rent


VILLAGE, several offices,
historic building, parking, 419
Yale Avenue, weekdays 9
a.m. to 4 p.m.

Marketplace
Antiques
A barn and house full of antiques,
furniture and smalls. Refinishing
too! 909-593-1846. Kensoldenoddities.com. La Verne.

Bulletins
Hotlines
PROJECT Sister Sexual Assault Crisis Prevention Services. If you have been
sexually assaulted or victimized by child sexual abuse
and need help for yourself or
your children, call the 24-hour
hotline 626-HELP (4357).

Are you having a


garage sale?
Place your ad
in the Claremont
COURIER
Classifieds!
909-621-4761

Internships
M A R K E T I N G i n t e r n s
needed. Must be familiar with
social media and advertising
and be a capable writer for
press releases and email
blasts. Perfect for students
looking for college credit. Call
626-388-6248.

GE

GARAES
SAL

EMPLOYMENT

SC Sustainability Coordinator
Sustainable Claremont is seeking a part-time employee
to work 20-25 hours per week at an hourly rate between
$15-$19. The employee shall have a keen interest in sustainability and will staff the Sustainability Resource Center office and support the activities of the organization.
Desired capabilities include: organizational skills, ability
to interact effectively with the public, a background or
demonstrated interest related to sustainability, media and
computer skills, a creative perspective and a can-do attitude. BA or BS preferred. Send CV and cover letter to
info@SustainableClaremont.org by September 26.

Rates and deadlines are subject to change without notice. The publisher reserves the right to edit, reclassify,
revise or reject any classified advertisement. Please report any error that may be in your ad immediately. The
Courier is not responsible for any unreported errors after
the first publication. It is the advertisers obligation to verify the accuracy of his/her ad.

All new accounts and


Garage Sale ads must be
prepaid. Payment by
cash, check. Credit cards
now accepted.
Sorry no refunds.

DEADLINES

PRICING

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each additional word $1.25
Display Ad:
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Service Ad:
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Real Estate:
Tuesday by 5 pm
Service Pages:
Tuesday by 5 pm

LEGAL TENDER
T.S. No.: 2014-04739-CA A.P.N.:8315-015-005
Property Address: 150 Buena Vista Drive, Claremont, CA 91711
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE 2923.3(a),
THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERRED TO BELOW IS NOT ATTACHED
TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR.
NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE
INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT
ATTACHED
IMPORTANT NOTICE TO
PROPERTY OWNER:
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF
TRUST DATED 08/16/2007. UNLESS YOU
TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE.
IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE
NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST
YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.
Trustor: LILLIAN ARELLANO, A MARRIED
WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE
PROPERTY
Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive,
LLC
Recorded 08/24/2007 as Instrument No.
20071986960 in book ---, page--- and of Official
Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California,
Date of Sale: 10/01/2015 at 11:00 AM
Place of Sale: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, 400
CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA
Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other
charges: $ 784,563.55
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIERS CHECK
DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A
CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A
STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION, A SAVINGS ASSOCIATION
OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION
5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE:
All right, title, and interest conveyed to and now
held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust de-

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
scribed as:
More fully described in said Deed of Trust.
Street Address or other common designation of real
property: 150 Buena Vista Drive, Claremont, CA
91711
A.P.N.: 8315-015-005
The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for
any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above.
The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining
principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of
Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the
obligation secured by the property to be sold and
reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances
at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of
Sale is:
$ 784,563.55.
If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any
reason, the successful bidders sole and exclusive
remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the
Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no
further recourse.
The beneficiary of the Deed of Trust has executed and
delivered to the undersigned a written request to commence foreclosure, and the undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in
the county where the real property is located.
NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you
are considering bidding on this property lien, you
should understand that there are risks involved in
bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on
a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically
entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being
auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the
highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien
being auctioned off, before you can receive clear
title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding
liens that may exist on this property by contacting
the county recorders office or a title insurance
company, either of which may charge you a fee for
this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender
may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust
on this property.
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to

bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that


at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less
than the total debt
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale
date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed
one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary,
trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the
California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made
available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to
those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn
whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if
applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the
sale of this property, you may call (866)-960-8299
or visit this Internet Web site http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.aspx using the file number
assigned to this case 2014-04739-CA. Information
about postponements that are very short in duration
or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may
not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way
to verify postponement information is to attend the
scheduled sale.
Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee for beneficiary
C/o 30 Corporate Park, Suite 450
Irvine, CA 92606
Automated Sale Information Line: (866) 9608299 http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.aspx
For Non-Automated Sale Information, call:
(866) 240-3530
______________________________
Trustee Sale Assistant
Date: August 14, 2015
WESTERN PROGRESSIVE, LLC MAY BE
ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED
FOR THAT PURPOSE.
Publish: September 4, 11 and 18, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015206659
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
CLAREMONT MARKET PLACE, NITROS
GALLERY, CLAREMONT MARKETING
GROUP, 206 West Bonita Ave., Claremont, CA
91711. Mailing address: 140 N. Harvard, #1781,
Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Katherine A.
Hatcher, 1273 N. College Ave., Claremont, CA
91711.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 4, 2015

This business is conducted by an Individual.


Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names
listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Katherine A. Hatcher Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
08/07/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date
on which it was filed in the office of the County
Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any
change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the
residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the
Fictitious Business Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business
Name in violation of the rights of another under
federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411
et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: September 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015220133
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
STRATEGIC SOLUTIONS CONSULTING,
532 West First Street, #213, Claremont, CA 91711.
Registrants: 1.) Eloisa Perard, 532 West First Street,
#213, Claremont, CA 91711. 2.) David Scott Perard, 532 West First Street, #213, Claremont, CA
91711.
This business is conducted by Copartners.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names
listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Eloisa Perard Title: Partner
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
08/25/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date
on which it was filed in the office of the County

26

Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any
change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the
residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the
Fictitious Business Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business
Name in violation of the rights of another under
federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411
et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: September 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015220114
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
BOULDERHAUS ATHLETICS, 532 West First
Street, #213, Claremont, CA 91711. Registrants: 1.)
Eloisa Perard, 532 West First Street, #213, Claremont, CA 91711. 2.) David Scott Perard, 532 West
First Street, #213, Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by a Married Couple.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names
listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Eloisa Perard Title: Wife
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
08/25/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date
on which it was filed in the office of the County
Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any
change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the
residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the
Fictitious Business Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business
Name in violation of the rights of another under
federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411
et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: September 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2015

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LEGAL TENDER
NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK
SALE
(Division 6 of the Commercial Code)
Escrow No. R-012015-HK
(1) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to
creditors of the within named Seller(s) that
a bulk sale is about to be made on personal
property hereinafter described.
(2) The name and business addresses of
the seller are: YOUNG RAN KIM, 21080
GOLDEN SPRINGS DR, DIAMOND
BAR, CA 91789-3894
(3) The Location in California of the chief
executive office of the Seller is: N/A
(4) The name and business address of the
Buyer(s) are: SOK CHOL KIM, 22104
POMMEL CT, WALNUT, CA 91789
(5) The location and general description of
the assets to be sold are: FURNITURE,
FIXTURE, EQUIPMENT, COVENANT
NOT TO COMPETE, GOODWILL,
TRADENAME, LEASE, LEASEHOLD
IMPROVEMENTS of that certain business located at: 21080 GOLDEN
SPRINGS DR, DIAMOND BAR, CA
91789-3894
(6) The business name used by the
seller(s) at said location is: COMBO
HOUSE
(7) The anticipated date of the bulk sale is
SEPTEMBER 23, 2015, at the office of
TOWER ESCROW INC, 1709 S. NOGALES ST, STE 208, ROWLAND
HEIGHTS, CA 91748, Escrow No. R012015-HK, Escrow Officer: HELEN
KIM
(8) Claims may be filed with Same as 7
above.
(9) The last date for filing claims is: SEPTEMBER 22, 2015
(10) This Bulk Sale is subject to Section
6106.2 of the Uniform Commercial Code.
(11) As listed by the Seller, all other business names and addresses used by the
Seller within three years before the date
such list was sent or delivered to the Buyer
are: NONE
DATED: AUGUST 13, 2015
TRANSFEREES: SOK CHOL KIM
LA1578386 CLAREMONT COURIER
9/4/15
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to the Municipal Code of the City of
Claremont and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), that the Planning Commission will consider a request
by Alexander Ruiz for a Conditional Use
Permit (File #15-C06), to allow a new
childrens tutorial classes business to relocate to an existing tenant space at the Old
School House at 415 W. Foothill Boulevard.
The hearing will be held on Wednesday,
September 16, 2015, 7:00 p.m., in the
City Council Chamber, located at 225 W.
Second Street. At this time, all interested
persons are invited to appear and be heard.
Copies of the application are available at
Claremont City Hall, Planning Division,
207 Harvard Avenue, Monday through
Thursday, 7 a.m. until 6 p.m. For more information on the proposal, please contact
Assistant Planner Nikola Hlady at (909)
399-5470, or send written comments to
P.O. Box 880, Claremont, CA 91711-0880
or via email. If you would also like to be
notified electronically about this specific
project in the future, please provide your
email
address
to
nhlady@ci.claremont.ca.us, and your
email will be added to our project file.
NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that
City staff has determined that the Conditional Use Permit for the proposed use is
categorically exempt from the provisions
of the California Environmental Quality
Act (CEQA) pursuant to Section 15301 in
that the proposal entails no expansion of
use beyond what currently exists as the applicant is proposing to occupy an existing
lease space.
Therefore, no further environmental review is needed at this time.
Finally, in compliance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990, any person
with a disability who requires a modification or accommodation in order to participate in a City meeting should contact the
City Clerk at 909/399 5461 VOICE or
1-800/735-2929 TT/TTY at least three
working days prior to the meeting, if possible.
PLANNING COMMISSION
CITY OF CLAREMONT
Publish: Friday, September 4, 2015

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
T.S. No.: 9448-4341 TSG Order No.: 1603335
A.P.N.: 8315-019-001 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S
SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A
DEED OF TRUST DATED 04/26/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT
YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A
PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD
CONTACT A LAWYER. NBS Default Services,
LLC, as the duly appointed Trustee, under and
pursuant to the power of sale contained in that
certain Deed of Trust Recorded 05/01/2006 as
Document No.: 06 0950000, of Official
Records in the office of the Recorder of Los
Angeles County, California, executed by:
MICHELLE MONTRESE HENSON, A SINGLE WOMAN, as Trustor, WILL SELL AT
PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable in full at time of sale
by cash, a cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal
credit union, or a check drawn by a state or
federal savings and loan association, savings
association, or savings bank specified in section
5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do
business in this state). All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said
Deed of Trust in the property situated in said
County and state, and as more fully described in
the above referenced Deed of Trust. Sale Date
& Time: 09/17/2015 at 09:00 AM Sale Location:
Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, Vineyard Ballroom, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650 The street address and other
common designation, if any, of the real property
described above is purported to be: 633 CONVERSE STREET, CLAREMONT, CA 91711
The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability
for any incorrectness of the street address and
other common designation, if any, shown herein.
Said sale will be made in an AS IS condition,
but without covenant or warranty, expressed or
implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of
the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust,
with interest thereon, as provided in said
note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the
Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit:
$846,942.71 (Estimated). Accrued interest and
additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. It is possible that at the
time of sale the opening bid may be less than
the total indebtedness due. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering
bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a
trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not
on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at
a trustee auction does not automatically entitle
you to free and clear ownership of the property.
You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the
highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be
responsible for paying off all liens senior to the
lien being auctioned off, before you can receive
clear title to the property. You are encouraged to
investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by
contacting the county recorder's office or a title
insurance company, either of which may charge
you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that
the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE
TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown
on this notice of sale may be postponed one or
more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary,
trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of
the California Civil Code. The law requires that
information about trustee sale postponements be
made available to you and to the public, as a
courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you
wish to learn whether your sale date has been
postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled
time and date for the sale of this property, you
may call, 1-800-280-2832 for information regarding the trustees sale or visit this Internet
Web site, www.auction.com, for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file
number assigned to this case, T.S.# 9448-4341.
Information about postponements that are very
short in duration or that occur close in time to the
scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected
in the telephone information or on the internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled
sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for
any reason, the successful bidders sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid
to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall
have no further recourse. NBS Default Services,
LLC 301 E. Ocean Blvd. Suite 1720 Long
Beach, CA 90802 800-766-7751 For Trustee
Sale Information Log On To: www.auction.com
or Call: 1-800-280-2832. NBS Default Services, LLC, Kim Coker, Foreclosure Associate
This communication is an attempt to collect a
debt and any information obtained will be used
for that purpose. However, if you have received
a discharge of the debt referenced herein in a
bankruptcy proceeding, this is not an attempt to
impose personal liability upon you for payment
of that debt. In the event you have received a
bankruptcy discharge, any action to enforce the
debt will be taken against the property only.
NPP0255601 To: CLAREMONT COURIER
08/28/2015, 09/04/2015, 09/11/2015

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to the Municipal Code of the City
of Claremont and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), that
the Planning Commission will consider
a request by Samantha Humphries for a
Conditional Use Permit (File #15-C05),
to allow an existing acupuncture business to relocate to the existing business
park located at 1420 N. Claremont
Blvd.
The hearing will be held on Wednesday, September 16, 2015, 7:00 p.m.,
in the City Council Chamber, located at
225 W. Second Street. At this time, all
interested persons are invited to appear
and be heard.
Copies of the application are available
at Claremont City Hall, Planning Division, 207 Harvard Avenue, Monday
through Thursday, 7 a.m. until 6 p.m.
For more information on the proposal,
please contact Assistant Planner Nikola
Hlady at (909) 399-5470, or send written comments to P.O. Box 880, Claremont, CA 91711-0880 or via email. If
you would also like to be notified electronically about this specific project in
the future, please provide your email
address to nhlady@ci.claremont.ca.us,
and your email will be added to our
project file.
NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 4, 2015

City staff has determined that the Conditional Use Permit for the proposed
use is categorically exempt from the
provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) pursuant to
Section 15301 in that the proposal entails no expansion of use beyond what
currently exists as the applicant is proposing to occupy an existing lease
space.
Therefore, no further environmental review is needed at this time.

Finally, in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, any
person with a disability who requires a
modification or accommodation in
order to participate in a City meeting
should contact the City Clerk at
909/399 5461 VOICE or 1-800/7352929 TT/TTY at least three working
days prior to the meeting, if possible.
PLANNING COMMISSION
CITY OF CLAREMONT
Publish: Friday, September 4, 2015

REALTORS!

Place your ads in the most


widely read real estate
section in the area.

Claremont COURIER
Classifieds

CALL JESSICA
AT 621-4761

NOTICE OF SPECIAL EVENT PERMIT


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to the Claremont Municipal Code, that Janice ONeill, Conference & Event
Planning Coordinator for Pomona College, has petitioned for approval of a Special Event Permit (#15-SEP06) for
Pomona Colleges Founders Day Event and dedication of Millikan Hall. The event will be held on Saturday, October 3, 2015, between the hours of 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 pm. The event will require the closure of Sixth Street as indicated on the associated map. The affected streets will be closed between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m., on
the day of the event.
NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Director of Community Development has determined that this proposal is exempt from the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) in accordance with Chapter 3 of Claremonts Local Guidelines for Implementing CEQA (2012). This is exempt because the Special Event is of a short duration (approximately
13 hours) and will not create long-term physical impacts to the City of Claremont. Therefore, no further environmental review is necessary.
The public review period for this application will conclude on Monday, September 14, 2015. All interested persons
are directed to contact Assistant Planner, Nikola Hlady, Department of Community Development Planning Division,
207 Harvard Avenue, or by calling (909) 399-5353 for further information.
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT
CITY OF CLAREMONT
Publish: September 4, 2015

27

LEGAL TENDER
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015204898
The following person(s) is (are) doing
business as GOLDEN AGES SENIOR
CARE, 2186 N. Orange Grove Ave.,
Pomona, CA 91767. Registrant(s): H &
Y ELDERLY CARE CO., 1731 Shenandoah Drive, Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by a Corporation.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names
listed above on 07/25/2012.
I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct.
/s/ Hui Zhang Title: President
This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 08/06/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious
Name Statement generally expires at the
end of five (5) years from the date on
which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in
subdivision (b) of section 17920, where
it expires 40 days after any change in the
facts set forth in the statement pursuant
to section 17913 other than a change in
the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name
Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the
Fictitious Business Name Statement
must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of
Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of
itself authorize the use in this state of a
Fictitious Business Name in violation of
the rights of another under federal, state,
or common law (see Section 14411 et
seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 14, 21, 28 and September 4, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015205535
The following person(s) is (are) doing
business as THE CENTER FOR FINANCIAL STUDIES, 2389 W. Silver
Tree Road, Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: P.O. Box 518, Claremont,
CA 91711. Registrant(s): Michael J.
Fontanetta, 2389 Silver Tree Road,
Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names
listed above on 01/01/2015.
I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct.
/s/ Michael J. Fontanetta Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 08/06/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious
Name Statement generally expires at the
end of five (5) years from the date on
which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in
subdivision (b) of section 17920, where
it expires 40 days after any change in the
facts set forth in the statement pursuant
to section 17913 other than a change in
the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name
Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the
Fictitious Business Name Statement
must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of
Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of
itself authorize the use in this state of a
Fictitious Business Name in violation of
the rights of another under federal, state,
or common law (see Section 14411 et
seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 14, 21, 28 and September 4, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015205540
The following person(s) is (are) doing
business as 1.) WATERWISE LANDSCAPE COMPANY, 2.) WATERWISE LANDSCAPE SERVICES,
8221 Windmar Road, Oak Hills, CA
92344, San Bernardino County. Registrant(s): John W. Cook, Jr., 8221 Windmar Rd., Oak Hills, CA 92344.
This business is conducted by an Individual.

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
Registrant has not yet commenced to
transact business under the fictitious
business name or names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct.
/s/ John W. Cook, Jr. Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 08/06/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious
Name Statement generally expires at the
end of five (5) years from the date on
which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in
subdivision (b) of section 17920, where
it expires 40 days after any change in the
facts set forth in the statement pursuant
to section 17913 other than a change in
the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name
Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the
Fictitious Business Name Statement
must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of
Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of
itself authorize the use in this state of a
Fictitious Business Name in violation of
the rights of another under federal, state,
or common law (see Section 14411 et
seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 14, 21, 28 and September 4, 2015
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MARIE
HICKEY
Case No. BP165516
To all heirs, beneficiaries,
creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in
the will or estate, or both, of MARIE
HICKEY
A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Maureen L.
Hickey in the Superior Court of California, County of LOS ANGELES.
THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Maureen L. Hickey
be appointed as personal representative
to administer the estate of the decedent.
THE PETITION requests the
decedent's will and codicils, if any, be
admitted to probate. The will and any
codicils are available for examination in
the file kept by the court.
A HEARING on the petition
will be held on Sept. 14, 2015 at 8:30
AMK in Dept. No. 9 located at 111 N.
Hill St., Los Angeles, CA 90012.
IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at
the hearing and state your objections or
file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be
in person or by your attorney.
IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR
or a contingent creditor of the decedent,
you must file your claim with the court
and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within
the later of either (1) four months from
the date of first issuance of letters to a
general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California
Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the
date of mailing or personal delivery to
you of a notice under section 9052 of the
California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and
legal authority may affect your rights as a
creditor. You may want to consult with an
attorney knowledgeable in California law.
YOU MAY EXAMINE the
file kept by the court. If you are a person
interested in the estate, you may file with
the court a Request for Special Notice
(form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of
any petition or account as provided in
Probate Code section 1250. A Request
for Special Notice form is available from
the court clerk.
Attorney for petitioner:
SCOTT A BOURDELAIS ESQ
SBN 105496
BOURDELAIS LAW OFFICE
2060 N TUSTIN AVE
SANTA ANA CA 92705
CN914996
Publish: August 21, 28 and September 4, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME


File No. 2015206209
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as RANDLES EDUCATIONAL
CONSULTING, 414 Yale Avenue, Unit B,
Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: P.O.
Box 6, Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s):
Shelley Grant Randles, 789 W. 11th St.,
Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant commenced to transact business
under the fictitious name or names listed
above on 03/10/2015.
I declare that all information in this statement
is true and correct.
/s/ Shelley Randles Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles
County on 08/07/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision
(a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5)
years from the date on which it was filed in
the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920,
where it expires 40 days after any change in
the facts set forth in the statement pursuant
to section 17913 other than a change in the
residence address of a registered owner. A
new Fictitious Business Name Statement
must be filed before the expiration. Effective
January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by
the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself
authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious
Business Name in violation of the rights of
another under federal, state, or common law
(see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 21, 28, September 4 and
11, 2015
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF LYNN T. JACKSON
Case No. BP165897
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who
may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of LYNN T. JACKSON
A PETITION FOR PROBATE
has been filed by Steve F. Jackson in the Superior Court of California, County of LOS
ANGELES.
THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Steve F. Jackson be appointed as personal representative to
administer the estate of the decedent.
THE PETITION requests the
decedent's will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are
available for examination in the file kept by
the court.
THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This
authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining
court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to
interested persons unless they have waived
notice or consented to the proposed action.)
The independent administration authority will
be granted unless an interested person files an
objection to the petition and shows good cause
why the court should not grant the authority.
A HEARING on the petition will
be held on Sept. 24, 2015 at 8:30 AM in Dept.
No. 29 located at 111 N. Hill St., Los Angeles,
CA 90012.
IF YOU OBJECT to the granting
of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hearing.
Your appearance may be in person or by your
attorney.
IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a
contin-gent creditor of the decedent, you must
file your claim with the court and mail a copy
to the personal representative appointed by the
court within the later of either (1) four months
from the date of first issuance of letters to a
general personal representative, as defined in
section 58(b) of the California Probate Code,
or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal
authority may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
YOU MAY EXAMINE the file
kept by the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the
filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate
assets or of any petition or account as provided
in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for
Special Notice form is availa-ble from the
court clerk.
Attorney for petitioner:
NICOLE M PEARL ESQ
SBN 197976
MCDERMOTT WILL & EMERY LLP
2049 CENTURY PARK EAST
STE 3800
LOS ANGELES CA 90067-3218
CN915227
Publish: August 28, September 4 and 11, 2015

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 4, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME


File No. 2015215483
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as ER AUTO CARE, 151 S. Eucla Ave.,
San Dimas, CA 91773. Registrant(s): ER
AUTO CARE LLC, 151 S. Eucla Ave., San
Dimas, CA 91773.
This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement
is true and correct.
/s/ Patricia Sanchez Title: Manager
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles
County on 08/19/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a)
of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement
generally expires at the end of five (5) years
from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided
in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it
expires 40 days after any change in the facts
set forth in the statement pursuant to section
17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious
Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014,
the Fictitious Business Name Statement must
be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity
Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself
authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious
Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see
Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 28, September 4, 11 and
18, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015219585
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as DIVINE PROPERTIES AND INVESTMENTS, 4374 Tocoa Falls, Claremont, CA
91711. Registrant(s): Ekhator Osagiede, 4374
Tocoa Falls, Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Ekhator Osagiede Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 08/24/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business
Name in violation of the rights of another under
federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411
et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 28, September 4, 11 and 18,
2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME


File No. 2015204731
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as 1.) VOICE WORKS STUDIOS, 2.)
VOICE WORKS, 743 W. Baseline Road,
Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Micah
K. Dahlberg, 743 W. Baseline Road, Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement
is true and correct.
/s/ Micah K. Dahlberg Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles
County on 08/06/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a)
of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement
generally expires at the end of five (5) years
from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided
in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it
expires 40 days after any change in the facts
set forth in the statement pursuant to section
17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious
Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014,
the Fictitious Business Name Statement must
be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity
Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself
authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious
Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see
Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 14, 21, 28 and September 4, 2015

28

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE

(UCC Sec. 6105)


Escrow No. 28669-PC-1
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk
sale is about to be made. The name(s), business address(es) to the Seller(s) are: VALLEY GAS & DIESEL, INC, 1053
CHEKHOV DR, RIVERSIDE, CA 92506
Doing Business as: VALLEY GAS &
DIESEL
All other business name(s) and address(es)
used by the Seller(s) within three years, as
stated by the Seller(s), is/are:
The location in California of the Chief Executive Officer of the Seller(s) is:
The name(s) and address of the Buyer(s)
is/are: MISSION GAS N GO, INC, 1053
CHEKHOV DR, RIVERSIDE, CA 92506
The assets to be sold are described in general as: BUSINESS, GOODWILL,
COVENANT NOT TO COMPETE, FURNITURE, FIXTURES AND EQUIPMENT
and are located at: 295 E. MISSION
BLVD, POMONA, CA 91766
The bulk sale is intended to be consummated at the office of: CITYWIDE ESCROW SERVICES INC, 12501 SEAL
BEACH BLVD, STE 130, SEAL BEACH,
CA 90740 and the anticipated sale date is
SEPTEMBER 23, 2015
The bulk sale is subject to California Uniform Commercial Code Section 6106.2.
[If the sale subject to Sec. 6106.2, the following information must be provided.] The
name and address of the person with whom
claims may be filed is: CITYWIDE ESCROW SERVICES INC, 12501 SEAL
BEACH BLVD, STE 130, SEAL BEACH,
CA 90740 and the last day for filing claims
shall be SEPTEMBER 22, 2015, which is
the business day before the sale date specified above.
Dated: 08/14/15
BUYER: MISSION GAS N GO, INC
LA1577997 CLAREMONT COURIER
9/4/15
NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK
SALE AND OF INTENTION TO TRANSFER ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
(UCC Sec. 6101 et seq. and B & P Sec.
24073 et seq.)
Escrow No. 15-29396-JS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale
of assets and a transfer of alcoholic beverage license is about to be made. The name(s) and
business address of the Seller(s)/licensee(s) are:
HARNEK SINGH KUNDAN AND SAHIB
SINGH, 800 NOGALES AVE, WALNUT,
CA 91789
Doing Business as: LIQUOR STATION
All other business names(s) and address(es)
used by the seller(s)/licensee(s) within the past
three years, as stated by the Seller(s)/licensee(s), is/are:
The name(s) and address of the Buyer(s)/applicant(s) is/are: VICTOR M. YOUNAN
AND FADI NASER ACHOUR, 736 W.
BAGANALL ST, GLENDORA, CA 91740
The assets being sold are generally described
as: ALL STOCK IN TRADE, FIXTURES,
EQUIPMENT, GOODWILL, TRADENAME, LEASE, LEASEHOLD IMPROVEMENTS, AND COVENANT NOT TO
COMPETE, AND ABC LICENSE and is/are
located at: 800 NOGALES AVE, WALNUT,
CA 91789
The type of license to be transferred is/are:
Type: OFF SALE GENERAL License No. 21526724 now issued for the premises located at:
SAME
The bulk sale and transfer of alcoholic beverage license(s) is/are intended to be consummated at the office of: TEAM ESCROW, 6025
BEACH BLVD, BUENA PARK, CA 90621
and the anticipated sale date is OCTOBER 6,
2015
The purchase price of consideration in connection with the sale of the business and transfer of the license, is the sum of $150,000.00,
including inventory estimated at $30,000.00,
which consists of the following: DESCRIPTION, AMOUNT: CASH $150,000.00
It has been agreed between the Seller(s)/licensee(s) and the intended Buyer(s)/transferee(s), as required by Sec. 24073 of the
Business and Professions code, that the consideration for transfer of the business and license is to be paid only after the transfer has
been approved by the Department of Alcoholic
Beverage Control.
HARNEK SINGH KUNDAN AND SAHIB
SINGH, Seller(s)/Licensee(s)
VICTOR M. YOUNAN AND FADI NASER
ACHOUR, Buyer(s)/Applicant(s)
LA1579112 CLAREMONT COURIER
9/4/15

Friday 09-04-15

SERVICES

1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711


Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Acoustical

Chimney Sweep

QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor, specializing in


acoustic removal, texture,
painting, acoustic re-spray
and
drywall
repairs.
Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.

Quality Fireplace
& BBQ
Chimney sweeping.

AC/Heating
STEVES HEATING
& AIR CONDITIONING
Serving your area for over
25 years. Repairs all
makes/models. Free
service call with repair.
Free estimate on new units.
MC/Visa. 100 percent
financing. Senior discounts.
Lic.744873
909-985-5254

Complete fireplace,
woodstove installation,
service and repair.
Spark arrestor supply
and installation.
Call 909-920-6600
392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland

Gash Chimney Sweep


Dust free chimney cleaning.
Repairs, chimney covers,
dryer vent cleaning,
masonry and dampers.
BBB. Please call
909-467-9212.

Concrete
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES

SAME DAY SERVICE


Free service call with repair
Only $69.50 diagnostic fee
without repair
We repair all brands
SCE quality installation
approved
Great prices
Friendly service
909-398-1208
www.novellcustom.com
Lic.958830

Art Lessons
ONE-ON-ONE art lessons
with Jordan. The Colony at
Loft 204 gallery and store.
For more information email
jords.kelly@gmail.com.

Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite
authorized dealer.
Bathtubs and sinks.
Showers, tile, countertops.
Refinish - Reglaze - Restore
Porcelain, ceramic,
fiberglass.
Quick and affordable.
Please call 909-945-7775.
www.bath-brite.com

Caregiver
CAREGIVER and housekeeping available week nights
and weekend mornings. 14
years experience. Great references. 909-297-6385.

Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED rough to
finish remodeler. Kitchens,
porches, doors, decks, fences,
painting. Lots more! Paul,
909-919-3315.

Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service.
Claremont resident serving
Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck-mounted cleaning
units. Expert carpet repairs
and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency
water damage service.
Please call 909-621-1182.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

CONTACT US

Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly


Stamped, broom,
color finishes.
Slate, flagstone, planters,
walls and walkways.

Call 909-599-9530 now


Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area
30 years!
Lic.323243

Contractor
THE Wood Dr. Specializing in termite and dry-rot
repairs. Fascia boards,
eves, patios, decks. 909262-8649.
WENGER Construction. 25
years experience. Handyman
Services. Cabinetry, doors,
electrical, drywall, crown
molding. Lic.707381. 951640-6616.

ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
New and repairs.

Drywall

THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA
Lic.742776. Please call 909816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

Electrician
MOR ELECTRIC &
HANDYMAN SERVICES
Free estimates
and senior discounts.
909-989-3454
909-767-0062
Residential * Industrial *
Commercial. We do it all.
No job too big or small!
24/7 emergency services.
Reasonable and reliable.
Lic.400-990
30 years experience.
Haydens Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
No job too big or small!
Old home rewiring specialist.
24-hour emergency service.

* Senior Discount *
Lic.359145
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service
changes, repairs, service calls,
outdoor lighting and room additions. Lic.258436. Call 909241-7671, 909-949-8230.
SPARKS ELECTRIC
Local electrician for all your
electrician needs!
909-946-8887
Lic.922000

909-599-9530

Excellence in building
and customer satisfaction.
Kitchen and bath.
Remodel.
Best of Houzz 2015.

Lic.763385

909-626-3019
KOGEMAN
CONSTRUCTION
Room additions.
Kitchen/bath remodeling.
Custom cabinets.
Residential/commercial.
909-946-8664
Lic.B710309
Visit us on Facebook!
PPS General Contractor.
Kitchen and bathroom remodeling. Flooring, windows, electrical and plumbing. Serving Claremont for
25 years. Lic.846995. 951237-1547.

A FICTITIOUS Business Name


Statement (D.B.A.) is required
if you're in business. You are
required to file and publish a
DBA in the local newspaper.
You must renew your FBNS
every five (5) years. You must
file and republish if any
changes have been made to
your business. If your business
is located in LA COUNTY, The
COURIER will help you file
your FBNS with L.A. County
Clerk, publish the statement
and provide you with proof of
publication. Fees start at $26
to the County and $95 to the
Courier. Notary Public available
to help notarize your Affidavit
Of Identity for your FBNS for
an additional fee. Claremont
COURIER: 1420 N. Claremont
Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont.
Call Vickie, 909-621-4761.

Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com.
Taking the time to care for
Courier readers complete
restoration needs since 1965.
La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.

Gardening

909-982-8910
909-767-0062

Serving Claremont
for 30 years!
Lic.323243
REX ROMANO
BUILDERS

Fictitious Name

Serving Claremont
Since 1995. Residential,
Commercial.
Recessed lighting and
design, breaker replacement,
service panel upgrades,
ceiling fans, troubleshooting,
landscape lighting, rewires
and LED lighting. Free
estimates. 24-hours emergency service. References.

Handyman
Claremont
Handyman Service
Carpentry, repairs,
gates, lighting,
small painting projects.
Odd jobs welcome!
Free consultations.
909-921-6334
HOME Repair by Ken. Electrical, plumbing, lighting, irrigation, tankless maintenance.
Local and experienced. 12
years. 909-374-0373.
A-HANDYMAN
New and Repairs
Inside, outside, small,
large, home, garage, yard.
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243
30 years experience!
Claremont area.

Hauling

Garden Maintenance
Hand-pull weeding, mowing,
trimming, sprinkler work,
monthly service, cleanups
and junk removal.
Free estimates.
David, 909-374-1583

Girl Friday

909-900-8930
909-626-2242
Lic.806149

I'M here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands.


Senior, pet, house sitting.
Jenny Jones, 909-6260027, anytime!

Fences & Gates

Handyman

ADVANCED
DON DAVIES

Kendall Restoration

Veteran
New, repairs.
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

Home Improvement Projects

909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691

Landscaping/Garden Boxes

Lic.323243

Trash Removal/Hauling

909-367-8282
Carpentry/Painting

Ironing
Impeccable Ironing. Affordable, professional, diligent.
Pick-up and delivery optional.
Est. 1968. 909-620-5945.

Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS
EXPERT REPAIRS
DRIP SYSTEM
SPECIALISTS
C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

909-621-5388
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.
Call 909-599-9530 Now
Cell: 626-428-1691

Haydens Services Inc.


SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates.
Senior discount!
WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE!
909-382-1210
626-383-1442
sameday-haulaway.com

ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Same Day
One call does it all!
Garage, yard, home,
moving!

909-599-9530
Eco-friendly landscaping.
We will get you a $3000
grant to remove your lawn!
Why mow when you can
grow? From the creators of
The Pomona College
Organic Farm.
Specializing in native
and edible landscapes.
909-398-1235
www.naturalearthla.com
Lic.919825
*$2 sq. ft. rebate*

29

House Cleaning
20 YEARS experience. Free
estimates. Excellent references.
Tailored to your individual
needs. Senior care, day or
night. Call Lupe, 909-236-2236.
TERESA'S House Cleaning.
Honest, reliable, experienced,
deep cleaning. References
available. Free estimates. 909621-0896 or 909-762-3198.
ROSIE'S Spic Span Cleaning
Service. Residential, commercial, vacant homes, apartments, offices. Free estimate.
Licensed. 909-277-4215.
Shirley's Cleaning Service
28 years in business.
Office/residential.
No job too small.
Free estimates.
We do spring cleaning!
909-803-0074
CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning.
Family owned for 26 years. Licensed, insured. Senior rates.
Professional services including: cleaning, windows, senior care, fire damage, move
in/out, closet organization. 10
percent discount to Claremont College faculty. Check
us out on Angies List. Robyn,
909-621-3929.
Established, upbeat,
licensed house cleaning
service. Organic
cleaning supplies used.
26 years of experience.
Jeanette 909-224-1180,
909-803-0074.

Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
No job too big or small!

24-hour emergency
service.
909-982-8910
* Senior discount *
Lic.359145
Expert Repairs
Retrofit Experts
Ask us how to save water.
Allen Cantrall Landscape
909-224-3327
Lic.861685
Serving the area
since 1983.

Landscaping
GREENWOOD
LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for
complete landscaping,
irrigation, drainage,
designing and gardening.
Lic.520496
909-621-7770
DLS Landscaping and Design.
Claremont native specializing
in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting.
Artistic solutions for the future.
Over 35 years experience.
Call: 909-225-8855, 909-9825965. Lic.585007.

Dale's Tree &


Landscape Services
Drought tolerant planting
and design. Drip irrigation.
Maintenance specials.
Over 30 years experience.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381

DANS GARDENING
SERVICE
Sprinklers/drip installed, repaired.
Lawn removal. Cleanup,
hauling. Drought landscapes,
planting, sod, lighting,
drainage. Insured.
References. Since 1977.
Lic.508671.

Please call 909-989-1515.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 4, 2015

Landscaping

Eco-friendly landscaping.
We will get you a $3000
grant to remove your lawn!
Why mow when you can
grow? From the creators of
The Pomona College
Organic Farm.
Specializing in native
and edible landscapes.
909-398-1235
www.naturalearthla.com
Lic.919825
*$2 sq. ft. rebate*
Put the wow back in your
yard and meet water
restrictions. Call now!
Taylor Landscape
909-519-4027
Lic#541078

Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
BONDED and INSURED
Many references.
Claremont resident.
35 years experience.
Lic.315050
Please call: 909-624-5080,
909-596-4095.
COLLINS Painting &
Construction
Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and
commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 909-985-8484.

STEVE LOPEZ
PAINTING
Extensive preparation.
Indoor, outdoor, cabinets.
Offering odorless green
solution. 33-year master.
Lic.542552

Please call
909-989-9786

Sunset Gardens Landscaping

C-27Lic.#373833.
John Cook- Specializing in
Desert Landscaping.
Designed
Installed
Maintained

909-231-8305
Drought tolerant and
California native design.
Water conserving irrigation.
Lighting and maintenance.
Allen Cantrall Landscape
909-224-3327
Lic.861685
Serving the area
since 1983.
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, refurbish or repair.
Design, drainage, concrete,
slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243

Learn Japanese

RESIDENTIAL/Commercial.
Quality work at reasonable
prices. Free estimates.
Lic.541469. 909-622-7994.

AFFORDABLE. Traditional or
green options. Custom work.
No job too big or too small.
20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates.
Lic.721041. 909-228-4256.
www.vjpaint.com.

Patio & Decks


ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair.
Concrete, masonry, lighting,
planters and retaining walls.

909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243

Plastering & Stucco

TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at


the Claremont Forum in the
Packing House. Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday afternoons/evenings. All levels welcome. Excellent brain exercise
for seniors! 909-626-3066.

Painting
KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting,
40 years experience!
Competitive rates.
Small repairs.
No job too small.
References available.
We work our own jobs.
Carrie or Ron
909-615-4858
Lic.778506
D&D Custom Painting.
Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior
or exterior. Free estimates.
909-982-8024.

Plumbing

FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATES


Free Leak Detection,
$49-Drains, $199-Water
Heaters, $499-Slab Leaks
Insurance Approved Contractor
24-7 Emergency Service
All Credit Cards Accepted
CALL TODAY 909-466-6237

Haydens Services Inc.


Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL!
24-hour emergency service.

909-982-8910
* Senior discount *
Lic.359145
STEVES PLUMBING
24-hour service* Low cost!
Free estimates. All plumbing
repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection,
water heaters.Your local
plumber for over 25 years.
Senior discounts. Insured,
Lic.744873.
* 909-985-5254 *

Roofing
Custom Construction
Reroof Specialist
All types of roofing.
Dry rot, flat roof,
tile repairs.
Insured and bonded.
Lic.630203.

Mark 909-996-2981
GORDON Perry Roofing.
Reroofing, repairs of all
types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976.
909-944-3884.

Sprinklers & Repair


WASTING WATER?
Poor Coverage?
Sprinkler repair.
Installations
and modifications.
C.F. Privett
909-621-5388
Lic.557151

ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran,
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly

Tree Care
Johnny's Tree Service
Tree trimming
and demolition.
Certified arborist.
Lic.270275, insured.
Please call:
909-946-1123
951-522-0992
MANUELS Garden Service.
General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming,
general maintenance, tree
trimming and removal. Low
prices and free estimates.
Please call 909-391-3495 or
909-239-3979.
Dale's Tree Service
Certified arborist.
Pruning and removals.
Drought tolerant planting
and design. Maintenance
specials. Over 30 years
experience.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381
TOM Day Tree Service. Fine
pruning of all trees since 1974.
Free estimate. 909-629-6960.
MGT Professional Tree Care.
Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree
care needs. Certified arborist.
Lic.836027. Matt Gray-Trask.
Call 909-946-7444.

Wallpaper
WALLPAPER
hanging and
removal by
Andrea. Environmentally
friendly.
30
years local experience. Free
estimates. Lic.844375. 951990-1053.

Weed Abatement
JOHNNY'S Tree Service.
Weed abatement/land clearing. Disking and mowing.
Please call 909-946-1123,
951-522-0992. Lic.270275.
TIRED of dealing with weed
problems on your lot or field?
Help control the problem in an
environmentally safe manner.
To receive loads of quality wood
chips. Please call 909-2146773. Tom Day Tree Service.

PLASTERING by Thomas.
Stucco and drywall repair
specialist. Licensed home
improvement. Contractor
Lic.614648. 909-984-6161.
www.wall-doctor.com.

New, repairs.
Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.

Plumbing

Call 909-599-9530 now


Cell: 626-428-1691

Veteran
Weed eating, mowing,
tractor fields,
manual slopes, hauling.

DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install,


repair, automate. Since 1982.
Free estimates. Lic.540042.
Call 909-982-1604.

Window Washing

EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated.
30 plus years experience.
Expert plumbing repairs and
drain cleaning. Water
heaters, faucets, sinks,
toilets, disposals,
under slab lead detection,
sewer video inspection.
Licensed, bonded and
insured. Lic.917874.
909-945-1995
RENES Plumbing and AC. All
types residential repairs,
HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working
familys budget. Lic.454443.
Insured professional service.
909-593-1175.

Tile

ADVANCED
DON DAVIES

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care
service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal
hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house
keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are
available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance.
Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114
Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691

NACHOS Window Cleaning.


For window washing, call nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Number one in LA
County.

MASTER tile layer. Quick

PROFESSIONAL window
cleaning. Serving Claremont/Upland since 1989.
Over 4,000 repeat customers.
100 percent guaranteed.
Dave, 909-920-0606. Empire
Window Cleaning.

and clean. Stone and granite work. Residential, commercial. Lic.830249. Ray,
909-731-3511.

SUNLIGHT Unlimited. Window and solar panel cleaning


team. Since 1979. Mike and
Greg 909-753-9832.

REGROUT, clean, seal, color


grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888764-7688.

30

909-621-5626

909.621.4761

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

Friday 09-04-15

REAL ESTATE

31

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY


Sunday, September 6
12-2 p.m. 909 Deep Springs Drive, Claremont.
Wheeler Steffen Sothebys International Realty.
1-4 p.m. 219 Eagle Grove Ave., Claremont.
Wheeler Steffen Sothebys International Realty.
1-4 p.m. 680 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont.
Mile One Real Estate.
2-5 p.m. 8562 Salina St., Rancho Cucamonga.
Antoinette Gower, Tarbell Realtors.

Want to advertise an open house?


The COURIERs open house directory is Claremonters
go-to guide for upcoming open houses in the area.
And the best news? If you are already advertising a
property, your listing is complimentary! Otherwise,
the cost is simply $25 per listing.

Selling, Buying or Renting? Advertise in the Claremont


Courier! Call Jessica, Courier Classifieds at 621-4761.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 4, 2015

Mason Prophet, Voted Top Local Realtor

REAL ESTATE

in the COURIERs Best of the Best Contest

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES


909.447.7708 Mason@MasonProphet.com

Read what my clients are saying. Visit www.MasonProphet.com


and click on Testimonials, or find me on www.Yelp.com.

750 W. 8TH STREET, CLAREMONT


OLD CLAREMONT VILLAGE - $680,000
Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, nearly 2000 sq. ft.
Sycamore Elementary. Eco-friendly and money saving
solar, extensive oak hardwood floors and fireplace. Central air and heating. Nearly 1/4-acre lot with fire pit, twocar garage. (E750)

Open House Sunday 1-4PM


219 EAGLE GROVE AVENUE, CLAREMONT
NORTH CLAREMONT 4-BEDROOM - $675,000

New
Listing!

FULL ASKING PRICE IN 4 DAYS!


UPDATED 4-BEDROOM SINGLE STORY - $615,000
Great location across from Cahuilla Park. This bright
and airy home enjoys an open floor plan. Recent updates with both bathrooms remodeled, a new roof, new
heat and air with new ducting, dual-pane sliding doors,
recessed lighting and new flooring. (O1725)

Rare, 1938 Village duplex in a prime location. Near Claremont Colleges and Village. Built as a duplex but it could easily
be converted to a single-family residence
or you could live in one unit and rent the
other. Spacious living room with fireplace
and library with French doors to the brick
patio. A formal dining room adjoins the
kitchen which has a cozy breakfast area.
There is a second entrance and staircase
in the rear for the upstairs. Wonderful
backyard, 3-car garage and 2 uncovered
parking spaces. $1,049,000. (C1041)

Enjoy Claremont living in this affordable Claremont PUD. This home has 2
master suites, one with a walk-in closet
and half bathroom downstairs. Open
floor plan, vaulted ceilings and a cozy
rock fireplace. Living area leads to a
patio with small yard. Newer carpet and
paint. Two-car attached garage with direct access. This complex has only 35
units and has been recently renovated
on the exterior. Walking distance to
Claremont Village, Colleges, MetroLink
and pooch park. $335,000. (W573)

704 E. HARVARD PL., ONTARIO


Charming California bungalow
walking distance to schools and
parks. The lovely living room has a
wood burning mid-century fireplace, distinctive beaded paneling
and hardwood floors. Remodeled
kitchen, closet organizers and covered patio for entertaining in the
private backyard. $309,000. (H704)

Just
Sold!

FOR LEASE:
Club Terrace Condo - 3 Bedrooms - $2,400
Village West Condo - 3 Bedrooms - $2,495
Walk to Village - 2 Bedroom House - $1,500

FULL ASKING PRICE IN 6 DAYS!


CRILEY & MCDOWELL CUSTOM DESIGN - $550,000

Built in 1959 on a tranquil and secluded cul-de-sac in


Claremonts Padua Hills neighborhood. Bursting with
potential, this one-of-a-kind home features clean lines
and a classic mid-century modern feel. Walls of glass
and multiple balconies highlight westerly views of the
local foothills and dramatic sunsets. (O4077)

Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!

573 WAYLAND CT., CLAREMONT

New
Listing!

Nestled nicely into a quiet neighborhood and highlighted by lush landscaping in the front and back yards.
Open floor plan of over 2000 sq. ft. with upgrades including recessed lighting and dual-pane windows.
Backyard is a very pleasant setting for outdoor entertaining and relaxation. Three-car garage. (E219)

(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com

1041 COLLEGE AVE., CLAREMONT

www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034

32

Just
Sold!

COMING SOON
Claremont Village Adjacent Three Bedroom Pool Home - $580,000
Charming North Claremont Mid-Century Three Bedroom - $470,000

Carol Curtis, Broker

Sales Associates: Irene Argandona, Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills,


Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese

Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947

107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711

(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com

SELLING, BUYING OR RENTING? Advertise in the Claremont COURIER! Call Jessica at 621-4761.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 4, 2015

33

Would you like to know what


your home is worth? Visit:
ClaremontCAHomeValues.com.

(909) 260-5560
madhups@aol.com
www.callMadhu.com
BRE#00979814

Mason Prophet, Voted Top Local Realtor


in the COURIERs Best of the Best Contest

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES

909.447.7708 Mason@MasonProphet.com
The recent sale of our Claremont home presented some very
unique challenges. Carlos and Pat handled my former home
as if it were their own. They kept me informed,
responded with professionalism and reassurance, and made
sure that as their customers, my ex-husband and I were their
top priority. The house ended up selling for higher than
asking price. I recommend Carlos and Pat Samuelson with
complete confidence and a heart full of gratitude.
Janet Price, Claremont

www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034


Read what my clients are saying.Visit
www.MasonProphet.com and click on "Testimonials,"
or find me on www.Yelp.com.

Mason is an excellent realtor. We commend him


for his diligence throughout the entire process of
selecting and purchasing our new property. We're
sure with his thoughtfulness and kindness he will
do very well in his chosen field of endeavor.
Garry & Dorothy L.

CARLOS, 909-964-7631
PAT, 909-214-1002
Do you want to know what your home is
worth today? Visit our website at:
CarlosandPatSamuelson.SmartHomePrice.com
BRE# 01326104 & 01733616

Residential Investment Historical Green Short Sales

Your trusted resource as you transition


through the new stage in your life...
Pamela Bergman-Swartz
REALTOR, Transition Living Consultant,
Seniors Real Estate & Certified Probate Specialist

8311 Haven Ave. Suite #180, Rancho Cucamonga


pamelabergman@ymail.com

(909) 636-2744
BRE#01899295

GEOFF T. HAMILL

Tell a Friend...

Broker Associate, ABR, CRS, e-PRO, GREEN, GRI, SFR, SRES

GEOFF IS #1 IN CLAREMONT SALES & LISTINGS SINCE 1988

Celebrating over 25 years of service 1988-2015

"Best Possible
Price Achieved,
Every Time!"

New
Price!

COMING SOON:
Claremont Village Heritage House - $995,000

FOR LEASE:
Claremont Village Walk Loft - $2,400 monthly
North Clarmeont Condit School - $2400 monthly
Two Bedroom Condo Close to Village - $1,350 monthly

New
Listing!

OLD CLAREMONT VILLAGE


RANCH-STYLE - $675,000
Custom built home recently remodeled boasts redone kitchen with newer wood cabinets, granite
counters and eating area. Three potential bedrooms, two bathrooms and approximately 1850
sq. ft. Third bedroom used as office/den (missing
an entry door) with wood paneled walls and bookshelves. Oak hardwood floors plus tile floors in
kitchen and bathrooms. Central air and heat.
Two-car garage plus carport. Approximately 1/4acre lot with grassy yard areas, tall mature trees
and attractive field stone wall. (T683)

NORTHEAST CLAREMONT CLUB


GALERIE HOME - $725,000
Absolutely gorgeous home perfectly nestled on a
serene cul-de-sac. Convenient to the Claremont
Club, Chaparral Elementary School, neighborhood park, walking trails and shopping center.
Largest two-story Rembrandt Model with four
bedrooms, three bathrooms, over 2600 sq. ft.
Three fireplaces. Spacious kitchen with center island opens to friendly family room. Three-car
garage. Beautiful grassy and private lush gardens with block walls, spa plus patio area.
$750,000. (G756)

NEWLY RENOVATED NORTH CLAREMONT


CRAFTSMAN MASTERPIECE - $998,000
Quality rebuilt by Pruitt Construction in 2004.
Completely remodeled home with downstairs
guest quarters. Prime Chaparral Elementary
School district. Custom features include granite
kitchen and bathroom countertops, oak kitchen
cabinets and stainless steel kitchen appliances.
Plantation shutters, dual-pane windows, oversized crown and base moldings, hand-scraped
wood floors in the great room, dual CAC/FAH,
solar electric system, salt water pool and spa
plus RV/boat parking with hook-ups. (M358)

WEBB CANYON CRILEY & MCDOWELL


ARCHITECTS DESIGNED ESTATE - $998,500
Enjoy mid-century magic in this one-level, hillside
home boasting spectacular views. Situated on
over two-acres of picturesque grounds with a
swimming pool and multiple patio areas. Main
house includes six bedrooms and 3.25 bathrooms. Features a light filled floor plan with high
vaulted wood beamed ceilings and walls of glass
throughout plus travertine flooring in main rooms.
Updated granite counter kitchen. Guest house
with two bedrooms and one bathroom. Includes
two water shares. Potential lot split. (W4703)

CUSTOM GATED LIVE OAK CANYON


ESTATE - $1,185,000
Luxurious redwood contemporary residence offering privacy and serenity with picturesque
views among one-acre of lush grounds. Open
floor plan. Dramatic family great room with floorto-ceiling fireplace faced with redwood and river
rock. Gourmet granite counter kitchen opens to
dining area. Enjoy saltillo tile flooring, solid raised
panel doors, Marvin tinted dual-pane windows,
dual air conditioning and cement tile roof. Attached three-car garage. One water share stock
included. (L4625)

LIVE OAK HILLSIDE VACANT LOT - $275,000


Secluded, wooded, private, one-of-a-kind lot.
1.21 gross acre horse property. Picturesque setting among majestic tall oak trees and native
landscape. There is a gradual level pad to build
on with lots of potential. Private driveway starts at
the northeast side of lot on Live Oak Canyon
Road. Adjacent home also for sale at 4625 Live
Oak Canyon Road shares driveway easement.
Beware of poison oak! Brush clearance completed April 2015. One water share goes with the purchase of the land. (LOlot)

SELLERS:
I have motivated and qualified buyers
looking for a Claremont home.
Please contact me today for a FREE
complimentary market analysis of your
property. Thank you!

909.621.0500
Geoff@GeoffHamill.com
D.R.E. #00997900

For more information, photos and virtual tours, please visit www.GeoffHamill.com or call 909.621.0500

Dino Andriani, GRI


BRE Lic.#01776387

Direct (909) 633-5528


Dino@MileOneRealEstate.com

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4 PM 680 N. INDIAN HILL BLVD.

Turnkey Claremont Village area duplex. Circa 1928 classic Tudor-style home
with separate potentially income-producing apartment. Walk to Village shops,
dining and Claremont Colleges. Price reduced to $775,000. (I680)

M ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE


1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711

EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
Celebrating Over 25 Years
Selling Real Estate in the Area

Move-in ready, three bedroom, three bathroom condominium. 1343 sq. ft.
convenient to Claremont Colleges, Village shopping and the MetroLink.
$380,000. (C589)

MALKA RINDE
Broker - Owner
BRE# 00545647

MileOneRealEstate.com 415 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite 305, Claremont, CA. 91711

Bus: 909-625-2407
Fax: 909-621-2842
www.malkarinde.com

Local Expertise with a Global Reach

EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOM BUILT

TUSCAN ESTATE

You must see this absolutely wonderful custom built home in San Antonio Heights!
This stunning residence has been meticulously maintained by the current owners and
was originally designed and built by the builder/contractor as his own personal residence. No expense was spared, exceptional appointments from the custom brick herring-bone walkway to the gleaming designer flooring to the custom cabinetry featured
throughout. There is a gourmet kitchen, downstairs master suite, bonus room and
lushly landscaped grounds. A separate upstairs unit is the perfect man cave, game
room, home office or guest quarters. Offering a beautiful view this is a great amenity
offering many flexible uses. $1,198,000. (P2439)

Magnificent Tuscan-like estate tucked away behind landscaping that is a horticulturist's delight! You will find a rare combination of old-world charm and impressive architectural features like the multiple sets of balconies that expand the living space of the property.
Designed for multi-family, generational living while also being an intimate and family-friendly
home with its full guest house and another separate living area with limitless options. Understated charm is evident from the crown molding and gleaming hardwood flooring to the
splendid chef's kitchen. Enjoy the rare and magical environment as you discover an excess
of 15 mature fruit trees including the much coveted Juju Bee tree. There are two out-buildings, energy-saving solar, a fire pit, outdoor BBQ fitted with a clay oven, serene koi pond
and patio canopied with mature wisteria. $1,650,000. (M615)

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BLAISDELL RANCH

LOOKS LIKE A MODEL

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

SPRAWLING RANCH HOME

Reminiscent of a French country home, there


are soaring, artist designed ceilings and
many versatile indoor and outdoor spaces
that make this home perfect for both memorable family moments and entertaining. Secluded gated outdoor area and luxurious yard
with pool and spa makes you feel that you
have entered into a charming French courtyard. $1,209,500. (D871)

This gorgeous home located in the Wyeth Cove


Community is filled with an abundance of natural light, accenting the neutral dcor. The kitchen
appointments are beautifully chosen and feature granite countertops, recessed lighting and
quality cabinets. Relax in the tranquil master
bedroom and enjoy a long soak in the large
sunken tub. Private paved patio is the perfect
outdoor space! $475,000. (B1593)

Tucked away on a tranquil cul-de-sac in


north Claremont. Lovely five bedroom
home near the Thompson Creek Trail. Remodeled kitchen, fireplaces in both the living area and master suite, ceiling fans,
fresh paint and carpet plus RV parking.
Relax under the covered patio in the tranquil yard. Dont delay this wont last!
$660,000. (S2425)

Beautifully tucked among the trees in Live


Oak Canyon, find this spacious yet intimate
family-friendly home. Special perks include
an office, media room and game room large
enough for a pool table, as well as a separate office or hobby room on an upper level
of the yard. Enjoy the sparkling pool and feel
as though you have been removed to a rural
escape. $735,000. (L4750)

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PARK-LIKE GROUNDS

INVESTOR OPPORTUNITY

MAKE IT YOUR OWN

ELEGANT VICTORIAN

Enjoy mountain views and peek-a-boo


city lights, surrounded by beautiful landscaping and multiple patios. Entertain
guests around the amazing outdoor
kitchen, BBQ and granite counter/bar
area on the stamped concrete patio. Find
high ceilings, curved walls, arched doorways, kitchen, separate guest room, fourcar garage and RV parking on a
cul-de-sac location. $998,750. (W10195)

Excellent opportunity in this real estate


owned single-family home! Great value
in this quaint fixer-upper that features
exterior brickwork siding and a spacious yard with lots of room for get-togethers. Convenient location near
schools, shopping and transportation.
Hurry, this one wont last, call now!
$189,900. (O5678)

This is not your average home! The beautiful setting opens to high ceilings and
magnificent natural lighting in a flowing
floor plan. Entertaining capabilities are beyond the typical residence with the modern kitchen boasting granite and a large
center island, generously-sized
family room and private yard equipped
with a private, lushly landscaped patio.
$687,500. (O1533)

Constructed in 1890 for the father of Upland, Charles E. Harwood. Magnificent rich
woodwork and period architectural detailing has been lovingly maintained. Upstairs,
a family room is located at the top of the
stairs and an adjacent library overlooks the
front garden. Grounds include saltwater
pool and spa, gazebo and a shared
north/south tennis court. $1,695,000.
(E1509)