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A JAM-PACKED AGENDA AT TUESDAYS CITY COUNCIL MEETING /PAGE 3


Friday, October 16, 2015 u $1.50

Claremont

claremont-courier.com

Home sweet home

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff


Senior Helene Thomas displays the Claremont sign she painted to go on top of her class float
at CHS. Helene says she plans to pursue a career in the arts. See page 15 for more photos and
the schedule of events for homecoming.

El Roble student gets newsy at Democratic debate/PAGE 14


CHS enjoys a
winning sports
season/ PAGE 22

Pass the time while you wait for rain.

Visit claremont-courier.com.

BLOTTER/ PAGE 4
LETTERS/ PAGES 2, 7, 8

OBITS/ PAGES 11
CALENDAR/ PAGE 16

Juliana Gomes hits out of


a sand trap on the fourth
hole of the Claremont girls
varsity golf match against
Ayala at Marshall Canyon
Golf Course in La Verne.
The girls finished up Palomares League play on
Thursday with a match
against Chino Hills.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

READERS COMMENTS

A lesson for teachers


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one hundred and seventh year, number 42

Dear Editor:
I just came across the obituary for
James Elliott Maynard while reading the
Claremont COURIER. I remember him
as Mr. Maynard, my sixth grade school
teacher at Lincoln Elementary in
Pomona. The year was 1975, 40 years
ago, yet my memories from this school
year will be with me forever.
Mr. Maynard was a quintessential yet
unconventional educator. His passion,
about almost anything, was infectious.
Whether it was his dance classes (the
only activity I feared during the year) to
building model rockets, you couldnt
help but join him in a Jumanji-style immersion in the topic.
He let the class build forts around our
desks from cardboard boxes. He would
read books (that would never be allowed
in a sixth grade classroom now) with
such fire that the whole class would be
on the edge of their seats. Thinking back,
I cant believe how much we did during
a single school year.
I smiled when reading about him
learning lock pickingyes, he even
shared this with us, and I still remember
how to do it. I cant believe how much
we all learned in a single year. Some of it
even involved schoolwork. We danced at
the LA Fair. I hated itat the time. But it
was a confidence boost that would serve
many of us well through life.
Mr. Maynard is what all educators, in
any form, should strive to be. From formal classroom teachers to parents, passionkindnessthe joy of sharing in
the learning experience, these are lessons
we can all learn from.
Tomorrow I will be in front of a class
all day and will do my best to honor his

lessons that have stayed with me, and I


bet thousands of others. Thank you Mr.
Maynard!
Will Funk
Salem, Oregon
(formerly of Claremont)

A park for everyone

Dear Editor:
In the same way that I am heartened
when I go to Super King and see people
with clearly limited means filling their
baskets with fresh herbs and vegetables
because they are affordable, I also love to
see diverse families walking and hiking
in the Wilderness Park.
Please dont raise the parking fees that
may exclude such families from this
healthy and meaningful activity, and
please continue to call it a park.
Wilderness area sounds forbidding;
park sounds inviting. Thank you.
Ellen Townsend
Claremont

A more modest proposal

Dear Editor:
I will not vote for Measure PS. I am in
favor of an upgraded police station; however, the one currently proposed is too
large and expensive by about one third,
and there are various sites that are more
appropriate. Moreover, the parcel tax
system contains many complications that
make it unfair. A bond issue would be
better. A more modest proposal would indeed better meet our needs.
Janet Macaulay
Claremont

P.S. If the proposal could assure us of


some relief from the depredations of the
squirrels, I might reconsider. JM.

ADVENTURES
IN HAIKU

Vote soon Yes or No


For a Special Parcel Tax
A BIG decision.
Nancy Arce
Haiku submissions should reflect upon life
or events in Claremont. Please email entries
to editor@claremont-courier.com.

GOVERNING
OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us
Tuesday, October 20
Planning Commission
Council Chamber, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, October 21
Tree Committee
Council Chamber, 6 p.m.

Safe or not safe?

Dear Editor:
Why are they planning to move the
police station to the pit on Monte Vista?
A lot of us like the police department
where it is, near the center of town.
It could use a little sprucing up, but I
dont believe the arguments that the
building is unsafe. If it is unsafe, it
ought to be closed immediately for the
safety of the employees. It hasnt been.
Why not?

Donna Lowe
Claremont

READERS COMMENTS/page 7

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

Key city issues addressed at busy council meeting

he Claremont City Council approved three important resolutions


during a busy Tuesday night council
meeting.

The council voted on an agreement with La Verne to


manage the water system, had a reversal of an Architectural Commission decision regarding the Serrano II housing project and granted ticket-writing powers to the city
arborist.
State Assemblyman Chris Holden was on hand to kick
off the meeting with a legislative update, which outlined
the bills Mr. Holden has sent to the governors desk.
These included a bill that lengthens the statute of limitations for victims of human trafficking and another that
increases the rights of small business franchisees when
dealing with their corporate owners.
As your representative, its my top priority to serve
this community and to be responsive to your needs, Mr.
Holden said. It is indeed my honor to serve Claremont
in the state assembly, and I look forward to our continued
partnership.
Two of Tuesday nights votes were carried over from
the last meeting on September 22 after being postponed
due to two councilmembers absences. The items included approval of plans for the Serrano II housing project and the water deal with La Verne.
Development hits a bump, but moves forward
The Serrano II housing project, a proposed housing
tract near the intersection of Base Line and Mountain,
took center stage Tuesday as councilmembers and the
public worked through their issues with the development.
The project is the sister development of the Serrano I
project, which is currently under construction. It had
come under fire from members of the citys Architectural
Commission for what the commissioners characterize as
flaws and inconsistencies in design. During their meeting
on July 15, the commission voted 3-2-2 to deny the Serrano II plans.
City staff recommended reversal of the commissions
decision with a few changes tacked on: revising the second-floor window location so adjacent windows dont
look into each other, replacing the window trim of 10 of
the 40 units on the lot and changing the color of one of
the houses to better conform with the developments
color palette.
During the meeting, Mayor Corey Calaycay pointed
out that the architectural commission members who
voted against the Serrano II project were not on the commission when Serrano I was approved in 2013.
Prior to Tuesdays meeting, the resolution had been
delayed twice, once during the September 8 meeting and
again during the September 22 meeting.
On September 8 and Tuesday night, emails highlighting alleged violations to the citys housing elementa
state-required document that demonstrates readiness and
ability to provide low-income housingwere delivered
at the 11th hour to try to persuade the council to vote
against Serrano II. The emails, penned by Claremont resident Jacob Patterson, claimed the project violates the
citys existing housing element in regards to the percentage of affordable housing required for each development.
Claremonts housing element was approved by the
planning commission in January 2014. Amid outcry from
residents over the rumored development of low-income
housing on a 5.9-acre parcel on Mills Avenue, the city
council opted to send the housing element back to the
commission for further review.
With a February 15, 2014 deadline looming, the council was aware of the penalties, which included the city
having to review and resubmit again in four years instead
of the eight years afforded to cities that met the deadline.
The housing element does not require cities to actually provide low-income housing, it only says that cities
must prove to the state of California that they have the
available land to do so. Since that January 2014 meeting,

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundeff


The council largely rejected the architectural commissions recommendations for changes to the proposed Serrano II development by builder DR Horton. The developer offered some changes, which included relocating
windows for privacy, as well as making the design more consistent with the existing development.

California Assemblyman Chris Holden watches a


presentation during the Claremont City Council meeting. Mr. Holden was in town to give the community an
update on the laws he helped author during the previous legislative session.

the city and city council have not addressed the Housing
Element Update.
City Attorney Sonia Carvalho explained at Tuesday
nights meeting that although there is currently a lack of
a housing element, it doesnt mean the city cant approve development projects.
Councilmember Sam Pedroza, after expressing his dismay at the piecemeal development along Baseline, acknowledged the need to update the housing element. The
councilmember then criticized Mr. Pattersons letter, calling it threatening.
Now in the meantime, I say bring it on, sue us already. Stop making threats, Mr. Pedroza said. Especially with these last-minute emails that, theyre just
meant for complete inside baseball.
The resolution passed 4-1, with Councilmember Opanyi Nasiali casting the only dissenting vote.
Council takes action for water partner
The deal with La Verne is a crucial step toward the
citys ultimate goal of claiming eminent domain over the
water system, which is currently owned and operated by
the privately-held Golden State Water Company. A Los
Angeles County Superior Court judge will review the
eminent domain case on March 7, 2016.
Under the deal, Claremont would own the system and
cover billing and other expenses, while La Verne would
provide staffing and general maintenance. Under the

agreement, La Verne will be paid 10 percent of the $1.5


million allocated toward the water system, should Claremont win the eminent domain claim.
During public comment on the resolution, Claremont
resident Douglas Lyons expressed skepticism over certain parts of the La Verne deal, including a passage that
gives Claremont the job of maintaining service vehicles.
Why will Claremont be responsible for the acquisition, maintenance, repair and replacement of vehicles and
equipment used to operate and maintain the water system? Mr. Lyons said. As an experienced operator,
would not La Verne be able to accomplish these functions in a more timely and efficient manner?
The council passed the resolution with a unanimous
5-0 decision. La Verne passed its side of the agreement
during its city council session on September 21.
City arborist can issue tree fines
The third resolution on the agenda dealt with giving
the city arborist the power to issue tickets and fines to
Claremont property owners who are not properly maintaining city-owned trees.
Under the new resolution, Claremonters who are in violation will first be subject to a visit from city volunteers,
followed by a Notice of Violation and, if the person is
still not taking care of the trees, a fine ranging from $100
to $500 per day for as long as the person is in violation.
The resolution passed by a vote of 4-1, with Mr.
Nasiali the only dissenting vote.
Emotions run high
Measure PS, a measure that allocates $50 million toward building a new police station, was a hot topic during the public comments session. Two Claremonters,
Sayeed Shaikh and Frank Bedoya, offered impassioned
speeches on the need for a new police station in the city.
Mr. Shaikh, who serves on the citys police commission, claimed the current station is, pretty much on the
verge of being dilapidated, and urged the passage of the
measure.
Mr. Bedoya also encouraged Claremonters to pass the
measure. The time is now, the need is great, he said.
A woman, who did not give her name, fired off a rebuttal to the proposed measure, calling it tyrannical and
stupid and quoting numerous bible verses until her time
ran out.
CITY COUNCIL/next page

CITY NEWS
CITY COUNCIL/from previous page

The public comments elicited a


strong reaction form the council, with
Mr. Pedroza offering up an idea to create an ad hoc committee dedicated to
informing the public about Measure PS
in the weeks before the election.
Councilmember Larry Schroeder also

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

offered his two cents on the steep cost of


the proposed public safety facility.
I can sit here and say the police station costs about half of that $50 million
and not include furnishings and radios
and LEED certifications and engineering and all the other costs, Mr.
Schroeder said. But were putting out
there what the top cost would be and

were putting everything out there.


Were doing the best we can to
make sure everyone has the information they need to have an educated
vote, Mayor Calaycay said. But nothing was done outside of the process. It
was very transparent, very open. It did
provide for people to provide feedback.

Mayor Calaycay added that the parcel tax, which has generated much of
the controversy, was voted on by the
people of Claremont as the best way to
finance the police station.
The council meets again on October
27.
Matthew Bramlett
news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont resident accused of shooting at an Upland elementary school

Claremont woman shot her


mother in the face with a
pellet gun at an Upland elementary school Friday before
shooting herself.
The woman, identified as 41-year-old Amy
Schaefer, reportedly shot her mother during a
domestic dispute at Pepper Tree Elementary
School at approximately 4:22 p.m., according
to Upland Police Lt. Cliff Mathews.
The shooting occurred in the day care center where Ms. Schaefers mother works. No
children were harmed in the incident, according to Lt. Mathews.
About an hour later, Ms. Schaefer shot her-

self with the pellet gun before calling the


Claremont Police Department and turning herself in.
Ms. Schaefer was released from jail early
Sunday morning at 12:36 a.m., records show.
Both Ms. Schaefer and her mother, who has
not been identified, had non life-threatening
injuries. The mothers condition is currently
not known, according to Lt. Mathews.
The area surrounding Pepper Tree Elementary was awash with helicopters and police
cars on Friday as authorities tried to piece together what happened.
Ms. Schaefer is currently facing charges of
assault with a deadly weapon.
Matthew Bramlett
news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont police arrest mail thief

Morning visitor

laremont resident Janine Slucter was enjoying her morning cup of coffee around
7:30 a.m. on Wednesday when she saw
something fly over her back fence.
Moments later, Ms. Slucter, who lives next to Jeager Park in
north Claremont, saw a healthy bobcat meandering through her
yard. The cat didnt stay too long but, fortunately for Ms. Slucter, he lingered long enough for her to capture this photo from
her kitchen window.

laremont police arrested a


Rancho
Cucamonga
woman who was in possession of stolen mail from a dozen
homes during a traffic stop Monday morning.
Monica Jaurigue, 39, was pulled over near
the corner of Edinboro Avenue and Base
Line Road, according to Sgt. David DeMetz
of the Claremont PD.
When authorities searched her vehicle,
they found multiple pieces of stolen mail
from different houses in the area. A further
search of her car revealed multiple stolen

POLICE BLOTTER
Friday, October 9
Claremont police arrested a local
transient after he pulled his pants down
and pleasured himself in full view of
the public. Anthony Cole, 29, was observed on the 100 block of Harvard Avenue masturbating outside a local salon
while staring at female employees and
customers, according to Lt. Mike
Ciszek. Mr. Cole continued to masturbate even after Claremont police arrived. Mr. Cole was arrested by
Claremont PD and charged with indecent exposure.
****
An Azusa man was caught leaving
his mark in front of the Claremont Library on Friday night. At approximately
11 p.m., Claremont police caught 22year-old Christopher Boyd urinating in
front of the library, located on the 200
block of Harvard Avenue. When officers asked Mr. Boyd why he was doing
the deed, he replied, I just have to go

really bad. When officers asked for his


ID, Mr. Boyd responded by repeatedly
struggling to reach for his wallet and
pull out his drivers license. At that
point, officers figured he was too intoxicated to care for himself and he was
escorted to the drunk tank.
Saturday, October 10
Sometime between 1:41 and 1:52
a.m. early Saturday morning, a number
of unknown suspects broke into classrooms at Chaparral School and stole
iMac computers. The suspects used an
unknown device to break the windows
on the doors and unlock them, gaining
entry. In all, four iMac computers were
taken from the school. If you have any
information regarding the whereabouts
of the thieves or the iMacs, call the
Claremont Police Department at (909)
399-5411.
****
A 52-year-old Claremont resident

credit cards in different names.


Ms. Jaurigue initially identified herself by
her sisters name to authorities, according to
Lt. Mike Ciszek.
In all, Ms. Jaurigue allegedly stole mail
from 12 different homesfive in Claremont
and seven from other cities, according to Sgt.
DeMetz.
Ms. Jaurigue was arrested for possession
of stolen property, identity theft, giving a
false name and having eight different warrants for her arrest. Her bail has been set at
$50,000 and she was arraigned at Superior
Court of Pomona on October 14.

was arrested for public intoxication


after yelling at another person for
charging his phone in public. Randall
Keifer noticed a man charging his
phone in front of city hall and began
screaming that he was not allowed to
charge his phone in a public area. The
phone-charger called the police, who
put Mr. Keifer in handcuffs for being
drunk in public. Mr. Keifer wouldnt go
down without a fight; the 6-foot-oneinch, 200-pound man kept arguing with
police and refused to enter the cruiser.
He was eventually subdued and taken
to jail to sober up.
Sunday, October 11
Claremont police were involving in a
pursuit with a stolen Toyota FJ Cruiser
Sunday morning. Officers located the
vehicle near the intersection of Foothill
and Claremont boulevards and attempted to pull the driver over. The
driver failed to stop and decided to
speed off. After a short pursuit, the Toyota crashed into a dirt embankment and
a metal signal pole, according to Lt.

Matthew Bramlett
news@claremont-courier.com

Ciszek. The driver and passenger tried


to flee the crash, but were quickly subdued by officers. The driver was identified as 23-year-old James Weaver of
Montclair and the passenger was identified as 23-year-old Wayne Wall of
Chino Hills. Mr. Weaver was booked
for evading a police officer, possession
of a stolen vehicle and hit and run,
while Mr. Wall was taken in for possession of liquid methamphetamine and
paraphernalia.
Monday, October 12
Sometime between 7 p.m. Sunday
night and 7:30 a.m. Monday morning,
an unknown burglar pried open the lock
of Podges Claremont Juice Company
on the 100 block of Yale and gained
entry into the business. The suspect
then opened the till and stole $300.
There are no suspects at press time. If
anyone has information on the incident,
please call the Claremont police.
Matthew Bramlett
news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

EDUCATION

CUSD reaps real estate profits, invests in facilities

ith escrow closed on


the Claremont Unified School Districts old service centerthe
second piece of surplus property
the district has sold in recent
yearsCUSD is in a position to
begin addressing some longstanding facilities needs.
The former service center and CUSDs
previous district office were both purchased by D.R. Horton, in May of 2013
and February of 2012, respectively. The
two parcels have yielded the district
$10,993,974. That number is comprised
of the homebuilding companys two bids
minus expenses such as title and escrow
fees and brokers commissions.
CUSD has already used $7,700,603 of
that money on some pressing needs, according to a district release.
These include payment of $1.5 million
CUSD committed towards Claremont
High Schools Theatre Renovation Project. The money was used to buttress a
$1.5 million matching Career Technical
Education Grant from the state, helping to
fund the $3 million Don P. Fruechte Theatre for the Performing Arts that opened
in March 2015.
Surplus property sales funded construction of another building, the current
service center located on the Richard
Kirkendall Education Center site at 170
W. San Jose Ave. Completed in time for
the 2014-2015 school year, its an 8,400square-foot steel manufactured building
with a customized interior and a
$2,412,047 price tag.
A third building will be a bit smaller,
but has been much needed by Sycamore
Elementary School students and staff.
For years, Sycamores multipurpose
room has doubled as the schools library.
The district saw a way to provide the
school with a real library when Baldwin
Park Unified offered CUSD a free
portable building in August of 2013.
Baldwin Parks gift of the modular
building, which is worth $250,000, was a
boon. Still, there are considerable costs,
$369,243 in total, associated with outfitting it as a library.
The portable had to be moved from its
old school site to Sycamore, and an architect was hired to design the building
and get it approved. Electrical connections had to be run from one side of campus to the other and the buildings
subfloors had to be prepared in compliance with state regulations.
Craftsman Construction, the company
that won the bid on the project, has just
finished pouring concrete outside of the
building. Theyve gutted the interior of
the structure and will be painting soon.
Completion is expected as soon as 30
days, according to Rick Cota, CUSDs
executive director of facilities.
Up on the rooftop
Another item pushed to the forefront of
the districts priorities is a roofing project
at CHS, finished this summer at a cost of
$1,830,822.

COURIERphotos/
Steven Felschundneff
Following the sale of the former CUSD
service center, the district moved its
facilities operation to this 8500square-foot structure located on San
Jose Avenue at the Richard Kirkendall
Education Center.
AT LEFT: CUSD closed escrow on the
former service center site, bringing in
close to $11 million to the district
when combined with the previous sale
of the former district offices at Base
Line Road and Mountian Avenue.

The district has known for some time


that the roofs at the high school have a
tendency to leak, particularly because
most of the buildings feature flat roofs
which was the norm at the time the campus was designedon which water tends
to pool.
CUSD staffers and the board of education felt even more pressure to ward off
leakage because meteorologists predict
exceptional amounts of rain starting as
soon as November, Mr. Cota explained.
All school districts statewide have been
given a notice to prepare for El Nino, he
said.
The project, which he called pretty
major, included renovations recommended by a roofing consultant. A few
structures, like the music buildings, were
complete tear-offs, while others only required refurbishment. Drains were also
installed on a number of the roofs.
The company that undertook the project, Garland, has provided a 10-year guarantee for every roof it repaired, according
to Mr. Cota. That number is on top of
whatever time was left on the roofs previous warrantees.
Price of technology
With the implementation of the Com-

mon Core curriculum and its accompanying Smarter Balanced assessment, districts across the state have had to pour
quite a bit of money into technology.
Students are now tested on iPads online, with many groups of kids taking their
tests at the same time. This has required
CUSD to invest in infrastructure such as
new servers, according to Assistant Superintendent of Business Services Lisa
Shoemaker.
Ms. Shoemaker said the district has
also purchased iPads so students can take
tests and benefit from the educational opportunities afforded by tablets. Of the proceeds from the districts real estate deals,
$1,588,491 has been spent on instructional tech, which includes equipment and
hardware.
Eye on the future
There is still some money from the
property sales left in district coffers. The
question is what CUSD will do with the
remaining $3,293,371.
In recent months, Mr. Cota and his
crew reviewed a list of capital projects
priorities drawn up by district staffers
last year. Theyve also interviewed administrators and school staffs to find out
what facilities needs are considered most

pressing.
This past June, the facilities department
drew up a new, multi-million dollar list of
vital projects, with those that concern
health and safetyincluding Americans
with Disability Act complianceat the
top.
Among the high-priority items is the
modernization of the El Roble Intermediate School pool, which is currently
drained and not functional. The Claremont High School pool is also in need of
updating.
A study, which would cost $45,000, is
required before the district can determine
the scope of the potential pool projects.
For instance, CUSD would find out
whether renovating one or both of the
pools is likely to trigger ADA requirements with regards to the pool-adjacent
locker rooms.
CUSD has created a releaseavailable
on the district websitedetailing the
money the district has from the sale of the
two properties, how much of this money
has already been spent, and how much is
left. This kind of clear communication is
important, according to Ms. Shoemaker.
We want people to know that were
using the property proceeds effectively,
she said. I think that sometimes, to you
and I, $11 million feels like a lot of
money. But its a drop in the bucket when
it comes to the districts facility needs.
Sarah Torribio
storrbio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

A tricky bag of treats


by John Pixley

h, Horror of Horrors! Oh, Terror


of Terrors! It is that time, that perfectly ghastly time, again! Yes, it
is that time of year when your night of
nights, when you rise up in all your ghoulish glory, approaches.
All Hallows Eve, that one night each year when
you reign and when your mad power is celebrated, is
drawing nigh, and, once again, I am most honored
and privileged to greet you on this auspicious occasion as your most humble minion and report to you on
the not-so-fair doings in the so-called fair town of
Claremont.
As is more often the case than not, oh, Master of
the Malignant, I am relegated to this not-so-prime
time, with Halloween being more than two weeks
away. Then again, as is the case here frequently, it
doesnt feel that much like Halloween, weather-wise,
anyway. It can often feel like Labor Day. In fact, as I
prepare this report for you, it is in the hundreds and
high 90s after some so-called pleasant cool days.
Hows that for a nifty trick? Indian Summer, indeed, with all the delightful political incorrectness
loaded in that old term. Besides, I prefer to think it an
honor to be one of the first in line to see you.
Actually, the weather has been a big issue here with
California now in the fourth year of drought and the
governor, in an unprecedented move, ordering a 25
percent cut in water use. Claremont had the added
embarrassment of having one of the highest rates of
water useright up there with Beverly Hillsand
had to cut its water use by something like 37 percent.
Anyway, there are many brown dead lawns, including
our prized parks. Everyone tries to put a smiley face
on this, saying that the lawns are golden(like the
Golden State, get it?), but I can tell you they look
wonderfully dreadful, even nightmarish.
Everyone is also worried about the trees. Despite
remarkable efforts to save them, including use of
slow-drip water bags, some trees are dying, and a few

observer
have had to be cut down. This is a big deal here, as
you know, oh, Amir of the Anxious. They really are a
touchy subject in this town. This spring, there was
some grumbling and bad-mouthing when the city
council allowed the parents of a severely disabled son
to remove two large trees in their front yard because
the pollen was giving the boy bad allergies. Never
mind that the parents are paying to have the trees replaced. Wow! Hows that for twisted priorities and
nastiness?
Theres a bit more bad news on the weather front,
youll be glad to hear. Everyone is looking forward to
the Godzilla El Nio that is predicted this winter.
But the thing is, this tropical rain system probably
wont bring the crucial slow-melting snow up north,
and it may well cause flooding, especially in the many
areas where there have been fire this year (caused by
the unusually dry, warm weather). But, anyway, experts are saying all this rain wont end the drought.
Do you really think that big international conference put on in June at Pomona College by John Cobb
and others about solving the climate change crisis will
get anything done? I thought not.
Speaking of water, oh, Prince of the Peeved, the citizens of Claremont did vote, by a huge margin, to buy
out the water company and manage its water supply.
But it will probably be years before this actually happens, with the Golden State Water Company fighting
it tooth and nail and the current court battle likely just
the beginning.
Whats more, there are still those who question the
venture, and its cost is a central concern to those now
against a property tax to fund a new police station on
the November 3 ballot. Dont you just love it when
people want thingspolice, control over water,

healthcare, you name itbut dont want to have to


pay for it?
It gets even more curious, oh, Czar of Contempt,
with Claremonters complaining about the Colleges,
even vowing to fight them. Yes, the Collegeswho
put this town on the map and present an astounding
array of performances and lectures in this small community (mostly for free)are now the big, bad
enemy. There was the letter in the paper a while ago
griping about the students and how they caused traffic
and congestion. Ghastly!
Lately, the grumbling has been about new buildings, particularly a new museum at Pomona College.
Never mind that the renderings, shown at a recent
community forum, look quite attractive and exciting
and could be a revitalizing addition to the Village
area. You would think it was a WalMart megastore.
One letter-writer stated it would violate the character
and destroy the history of Claremont if the museum
replaces a few small, pleasant but otherwise non-descript college-owned bungalows on the west side of
College Avenue. Nice how this street has become a
no-mans land, a battle line of sorts, at least south of
Fourth Street.
There are no doubt plenty of other things youd like
to hear about that have been going on here, like the
hot mess that the coveted Wilderness Park (or is it
Area?) continues to be, but I see my precious time
with you is just about up, oh Viceroy of the Vexed. So
Ill just mention one more thing. Perhaps it makes
sense, what with all this college-bashing, but I find it
quite curious that I keep reading in news reports that
this rabidly anti-immigrant group, We the People Rising, is based in Claremont.
Thats right. This group, which holds news-making,
confrontational demonstrations every chance it gets
like that anti-gay Westboro church group and aligns
itself up with the hate-spewing Donald Trump, is
headquartered right here in Claremont. Yes, right here
in this town, which is so proud of its welcoming, allhands-on-deck community spirit. Now theres a good,
creepy mystery for you to ponder.
DEMYSTIFYING SUSTAINABILITYpage 12

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

Colleges bound
Dear Editor:
I read in the September 25th issue of the
COURIER that the Claremont University
Consortium (CUC) has pledged $1 million
towards the costs of a proposed $50 million new public safety building (aka police
station) if Measure PS passes.
Whether one agrees with the proposed
cost for the buildings and improvements,
there is still a clear, demonstrated need
for a new police station to address the issues of the 21st century society.
On the surface this seems like a magnanimous gesture, but on further inspection it feels less than wholesome or altruistic.
Combined, the Claremont Colleges
or CUC (Harvey Mudd, Claremont
McKenna, Pitzer, Scripps and Pomona
Colleges, Keck Graduate Institute and
Claremont Graduate University) have endowments approaching $4 billion (based
on 2013 tax form 990 filings from the
schools).
Also, in 2013, the Colleges had combined net incomes of about $200 million.
All of this thanks to federal and state laws
that allow the schools to operate as nonprofit corporations. The universities are
exempt from taxes on this income and
pay no property taxes. In addition, buildings not directly related to educational
uses may also be exempt from property
taxes.
While there is no doubt that the Colleges enrich, and some might say make
Claremont what it is, the student population amounts to about 12.5 percent of
Claremonts total population most of the
year and relies heavily on a strong police
department and city/county public safety
services.
I think the $1 million should be con-

READERS COMMENTS

sidered as the Colleges first offer and


should be subject to further negotiation
with the city.
If I were on the Claremont City Council, I would say thanks for the offer, but
we think $6 million is a more appropriate
contribution. Heck, let them pay it off
over five to seven years, just like their
donors often do with their pledged gifts.
You dont have to have an advanced degree in mathematics to realize that this
equation does not compute.
Andy Weissman
Claremont

Cost of the great outdoors


Dear Editor:
Hillside parks and open space serve
much the same purpose as beaches in
southern California. While not everyone
is fortunate to live close to one or the
other, they are resources that should be
available to all. Californians have long insisted that beaches be public and that access be guaranteed. We should demand
similar treatment for publicly-owned open
spaces in our foothills.
Research for the Master Plan of our
Claremont Hills Wilderness Park affirmed
two key points. First, both Claremont residents and neighbors from the region
enjoy the park. Second, while usage has
increased, it has not significantly damaged
the flora and fauna. Increased access has
not compromised the goal of preservation.
My concern is that access will instead
be limited by the proposed increase of
parking fees detailed in the draft. It is unlikely that raising daily fees from $3 to $5,
annual permits from $100 to $140, and
fees on weekend mornings to $10 will

generate more revenue for the park, as


promised. Rather, it will discourage those
of modest means from visiting the park altogether.
The draft plan claims that these fees are
in line with other area parks, but that is not
the case. In Orange County, an annual
parking pass for all county regional and
wilderness parks is $55, and one for all
county parks and beaches is $80. Daily
parking in wilderness parks is $3.
A more sensible approach would be to
leave daily parking fees unchanged and
consider lowering annual fees to boost
sales among regular users.
Tom Ilgen
Claremont Wildlands
Conservancy Board Member

Parking problems
Dear Editor:
I like simple solutions. MIG consultants indicate that the Claremont Hills
Wilderness Park (CHWP) is not being
used at capacity. Visitors in the park are
not a problem. CHWP is a desirable destination and until there are other equally
desirable parks in the adjacent hillsides,
people will come to the CHWP, especially
the loop.
Visitors park their cars as close to the
loop entrance as possible but there is not
enough parking during peak hours on Saturday, Sunday and holiday mornings,
which results in disruption to neighbors
from visitors parking in front of or walking by their homes.
If we accept that people will continue
to enjoy the CHWP and we want to relieve disruption to adjacent neighborhoods, then the logical solution is to

provide sufficient, affordable parking


close to the loop entrance. Sufficient parking will minimize unnecessary driving in
search of or idling while waiting for
spaces. Revenues from parking fees will
support park amenities if the daily parking prices are affordable and annual parking passes easy to obtain at the park or
online.
The draft master plan suggests that fees
increase to $10 during peak periods. This
is likely to cause congestion as people
wait for hours with lower rates or avoid
fees by seeking to park in neighborhoods.
I encourage the city to aggressively investigate the use of overflow parking adjacent to existing parking lots. The
solution to neighborhood disruption is not
congestion pricing; it is sufficient overflow parking at affordable and consistent
prices.
Terry Grill
Claremont
Member of TAC; Member of
the CWC Board of Directors

A super-size station
Dear Editor:
I notice none of the letters and none of
the advertisements for Measure PS say
anything to justify the enormous cost and
size of the proposed police station. Do we
really need a police station the size of the
Super King market? I dont think so.
It is incomprehensible that this measure was actually placed before the voters.
I dont think the proponents can make an
affirmative case for their plan. If they can,
Id like to hear it. Its not about the problems with the existing police station, its
about the plans for the new one.
If the supporters cant do better than
this, Measure PS deserves to be voted
down.
Jay Kallsen
Claremont

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

The great outdoors


Dear Editor:
This response is in regard to Tony Hussons letter of October 9, Done with the
Wilderness Park. I am sorry there is such
bitterness in your mind.
In my many years of hiking the trail, I
have met some wonderful hikers from
many diverse backgrounds. We all agree
regular exercise built into our routine of
daily living makes for exceptionally
healthy aging. We hike with friends and
family to catch up on daily and worldly
news, and are thankful we live in an area
where we feel so safe. We all live nearby
and can escape the city life and noise within minutes.
The reason the trees, plants, insects,
birds and animals are feeling a wee bit distressed these days is more of a water issue than a people issue. Because I golf
every Tuesday, I know for a fact where all
the deer are hanging out. They have
wandered over to the Marshall Canyon
Golf Course where their water needs are
being met. They are lying under the trees
in the shade taking in all the funny
swings of the many golfers who pass by,
and they seem to be enoying life immensly. Hopefully, predicted coming
rains will bring some of them back to our
hiking area.
I would like to thank all the wonderful
people involved with the Wildlands Conservancy group who have spent countless
hours trying to preserve the park and finding solutions to problems that arise.
Life is good. Arent we lucky to live in
Claremont?
Karen Gastineau
Claremont
54-year resident

A Claremont park for Claremont


Dear Editor:
Tony Hussons October 9 letter highlights
the unforeseen problems that have come
from the acquisition of land for, and the creation of, the wilderness park. It has become
wildly popular. There is nothing like it in
the area. It seems to me there is a simple
solution to the problems.
Restrict access to the park, allowing only
Claremont residents to use it. We paid for
it and should be able to decide who can use
it. Require users to show proof of residency
then issue permits. Photo IDs would fa-

READERS COMMENTS

cilitate enforcement by park rangers. The


folks who are not citizens of Claremont will
be disappointed, but that should be of far
less concern than preservation of the park
and ensuring Claremont residents quiet enjoyment of it. Use could also be restricted
to hikers only, furthering the quietness aspects of this unique Claremont asset.
Jack Sultze
Claremont

My love affair with diesel


Dear Editor:
Peter Coyes letter, Has VW forfeited
its rights? (Claremont COURIER, October 2) vents righteous anger toward VW for
their blatant cheating scandal. It remains to
be known how many other companies have
falsified their EPA data or devised escapes
from the current diesel testing standards and
procedures.
The light diesel engines used in cars
(TDIs) are inviting for many of us. But the
anti-diesel sentiment, especially in California, has been encouraged by the clever
technical deceptions committed by VW.
The accidental discovery of their tricking
the system may be the diesels demise.
Recalls and fixes for these TDI vehicles
will cost billions. The fixes will decrease
efficiency and performance, and increase
costs and diesel antagonism. In California,
especially, is this goodbye to efficient, relatively clean diesels? Of course, hybrids and
electric cars will be given a big market
boost. Tesla and others are going to smile
all the way to the bank. Electric and hybrid
big rigs are being tested now.
What galls me is that Im a hydrocarbon
addict in withdrawal. Ive driven diesels for
years, large and small. I love diesels, even
with their quirks and complications. I
havent bought a spark plug in 50 years.
Also, Ive used much less fuel per mile for
years than any of my gasoline-dependent
friends.
Im unhappy about the end of our current diesels, but Im assured it is for the best.
I grew up breathing particulates, from
smudging days to warming up cold,
smokey diesel rigs at 3 a.m. for a long run.
Im guilty of being a contributor to global warming. There ought to be a punishment

for those of us who have caused the ozone


hole. Ive inhaled fumes from Malathion
to diesel exhaust and, surprise, Im still here
at 82! But, I do have empathy for asthmatics
who suffer from all kinds of pollutants.
I now drive a 1995 Mercedes E300
diesel, having had no engine problems in
270,000 miles. It yields 28 mpg local and
up to 36 mpg freeway. Thats relatively
cheap driving. Of the seven diesel cars Ive
owned over the years, this car is the best
one Ive had. Diesels dont produce carbon
monoxide and their particulate emissions,
with the new low-sulfur fuels, are very low
percentages per volume of air. But the nitrogen problem is the challenge.
Ive used 60 percent caf waste oil, a bit
less power but cleaner. Rudolph Diesel used
peanut oil. He would be pleased. There isnt any car I could have driven for less money. Ive driven well over a million miles in
diesels. (Im guilty. Sorry about that.)
Mr. Coye, you refer to VWs rights.
What rights? I guess VW has the same
rights that any corporation has: to find ways
to increase profits to the maximum by any
meanslegal, hidden and marketable.
Corporation ethics are to make money and
pay optimum dividends. Thats capitalism.
VW got caught.
Diesels are probably moribund, even the
newly-engineered, cleaner, opposed piston,
two-cycle diesels (OPOCs) that are becoming available. Even this new diesel engine design is going to suffer from the current slap from VWs scheming ways.
Well all pay the price, because of prejudiced consumers and lying marketers.
Goodbye diesels? Millions of diesel bigrigs make our economy run, each one going 10,000 to 22,000 miles per month transporting what we consume and sell. Whats
next?
Alas, I lived during the celebration of the
internal combustion engine, but those
days are waning. Cant help it. Im a vehicle lover. Worse! I love diesels. But love
affairs are usually transient. Our affair with
the internal combustion engine is about
over. On the Road Again isnt romantic
any more.
Thats my lamentation for this week.
Chris Rubel
Claremont

Reward our police


Dear Editor:
Claremont needs a new police station.
The current one is too old and too small.

All you have to do is to tour the police station to see how bad things are.
In considering whether to vote yes on
November 3, two important questions
need to be answered: Is the parcel tax the
fairest way to fund a new police facility?
And, two, would the new police station be
too large and too expensive?
If the voters had a general obligation
bond up for a vote, not all of those protected
by our police would have to pay for the
needed service. Nonprofits such as our Colleges and our churches would not be paying towards the costs of the new facility.
Their failure to contribute would be unfair
to the rest of us, as we all benefit by having police protection.
Individuals whose property is not covered by Prop 13 could very well see an increasing tax burden every two years due to
property value increases. A general obligation bond is the wrong choice to fund the
needed new facility.
The more difficult question is whether
the new building would be too large and too
costly. Yes, Claremont has twice the population it had when the original facility was
built. But public safety facilities now have
certain rules and regulations for earthquake
standards, jail requirements and Americans
with Disabilities, which would necessitate
a larger facility than one would think you
need.
The costs to build anything has gone up
dramatically. I am not an architect nor an
engineer nor do I pretend to be. The potential cost is up to $50 million. If someone can explain what could be cut from the
plan, I am ready to listen but otherwise we
should rely on the experts. Our city council should be trusted in this case to have chosen the least costly plan for what we
need.
The reality is that you get what you pay
for. A recent author of a letter referred to
Upland. Well, Claremont is 17.5 percent
less dangerous to live in than Upland, and
Upland has an incredibly high auto theft and
rape crime rate. Maybe, just maybe, some
newer equipment might help Upland.
Our police have been successful in protecting the residents of Claremont. People
move here with the expectation of living
in a safer community. We need to reward
our police by having a modern police station so that they can continue to do their job.
Our quality of life is enriched by having a
good police force that puts their lives on the
line every day. The least we can do is to plan
for the future and not be willing to let our
infrastructure crumble.
Gar Byrum
Claremont

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 9, 2015

William Kroehler

11

OBITUARIES

Missionary educator, problem-solver


William Bill George Kroehler died
on Saturday, September 26, 2015 at his
home in Claremont. He was 84.
He was born on February 7, 1931 in
St. Louis, Missouri to Arthur and Clara
Kroehler, the fourth of five children.
His siblings included younger sister
Ruth, older brother Armin and older
sisters Lois and Eleanore, who died
when she was eight.
Bill came from a large extended family that included many pastors and missionaries. His father Arthur was a
pastor in Belleville, Illinois, a job he
followed with posts at churches in Fort
Collins, Colorado, Lyman, Nebraska
and Hardin, Montana where Bill graduated from high school. He played basketball and football in high school, and
continued to do so while attending
Rocky Mountain College in Billings,
Montana. He met his future wife La
Verne at the Billings Montana Church
of the Air, where he was part of a quartet for a radio broadcast.
Upon graduating with a degree in
English and a minor in philosophy, Mr.
Kroehler served for two years in the US
Army. After basic training, he was stationed at Fort Hollibird in Baltimore.
He married LaVerne during a furlough
on April 30, 1954. Mr. Kroehler had a
musical family and regularly joined his
sisters and brothers in song over the
years as his voice evolved from a fine
tenor to a rich bass. His marriage was
seen as having a practical side, his wife
shares, with the family declaring, Oh,
good. Weve got an alto. After the
Kroehlers honeymoon in Colorado,
Bill left for Camp Kobe in Japan. His
wife joined him seven months later.
After returning to the United States,
Mr. Kroehler got his teaching certificate and their daughter Jody was born
on October 4, 1955. They lived in

Scobey, Montana for two years, where


Mr. Kroehler taught English and social
studies. He was also the librarian, junior high basketball coach and high
school basketball referee. During their
time in Scobey, Bill and LaVerne also
lent their voices to the choir at the local
Methodist church.
In 1957 the couple moved to
Nashville, Tennessee where Bill got his
masters degree in foreign missions at
Scarritt College for Christian Workers
and their son Ty was born. Two years
later, the Kroehlers left for Japan where
for 42 years they served as missionaries
with the United Church of Christ. After
two years attending language school,
Mr. Kroehler began teaching at the Disciples of Christ-affiliated Seigakuin
Boys School.
Bills brother and sister-in-law,
Armin and Evelyn Kroehler, were also
missionaries in Japan along with Evelyns parents Gilbert and Cornelia
Schroer. The three families had summer

cabins in northern Japan at the missionary community of Takayama where


they vacationed and the cousins Ken,
Kaye, Jody, Ty, Iris, Margaret and
Christopher were able to be together.
Mr. Kroehler spent his time building
sand structures, playing chess with
Armin and working for the community
in various roles
In 1967, he began teaching at JoshiSeigakuin Junior College, a womens
school located north of Tokyo in Ageo.
Two years later, at age 40, Mr. Kroehler
became president of the college. Bill always enjoyed a good gadget and with
the acquisition of an early Macintosh
acquired the nickname kon kichi,
which means crazy for computers.
After 23 years as president of JoshiSeigakuin and head of the affiliated
kindergarten, he retired from that position and became head of the International Center, working with exchange
programs for students going to the
United States and other Asian countries
as well as Australia and England. Bill
was instrumental in establishing
Seigakuin International School
(SAINTS), a Japanese bilingual school
in Atlanta, Georgia. He was also active
with the ICYE, International Christian
Youth Exchange.
Mr. Kroehler was passionate about
physical and mental health, education
and working with people. He always
saw possibilities for problem-solving
for the good of all. At a time when
many colleges in Japan were reluctant
to admit students with special needs, he
accepted them, making changes in
campus facilities as they went along,
helping them to succeed.
If there was a possibility that he
could do a job, Mr. Kroehler accepted
the challenge, sometimes to the consternation of his colleagues. He drove

the kindergarten bus, pulled weeds and


cleaned up. He built toys and furniture
for his children, made repairs around
the house and washed the dishes. He
insisted on people correcting his Japanese, and corrected English manuscripts.
He wrote books, and made speeches.
He went to concerts, played with children and ran races, always with enthusiasm and grace.
After retiring to Pilgrim Place in
2001, Bill continued to work half-time
for the next five years as head of the International Center, dividing his time between Japan and the United States.
While at Pilgrim Place, he was active
as a volunteer at a local elementary
school and the Beta Center. He sang
with the chorale briefly, walked with
the race walkers, joined the many
hands movers and worked in furniture
and haberdashery.
Bill is survived by his wife LaVerne;
his daughter and son-in-law, Jody and
Clark Magnuson of Mercer Island,
Washington; his son and daughter-inlaw, Ty and Kyoko Corsten of Fountain
Valley; and his siblings, Armin (Evelyn) Kroehler of Honolulu, Hawaii,
Lois Kroehler of Silverdale, Washington and Ruth (Dave) Dyck of Lynden,
Washington. He also leaves his grandchildren Sky (Miriam), Terra, Ray and
Kaili as well as his great-granddaughter
Dax Olivia.
A memorial service will be held on
Sunday, October 18 at 3:30 p.m. in Pilgrim Places Decker Hall. A reception
will follow in Napier Center. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be made to the
Pilgrim Place Memory Care House
Fund or the Alzheimers Association.

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ONTARIO AUTO CENTER
1201 AUTO CENTER DR.
800-BUY-FIAT 800-289-3428
WWW.FIATOFONTARIO.COM

EMPIRE NISSAN
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(866) 234-2544
15 FREEWAY, EXIT JURUPA AVE.

NEW AND PRE-OWNED SALES


LEASING SERVICE PARTS
WWW.EMPIRENISSAN.COM

ROMERO HYUNDAI
ONTARIO AUTO CENTER
(866) 232-4092
NEW AND PRE-OWNED SALES
LEASING SERVICE PARTS
15 FREEWAY, EXIT JURUPA AVE.
WWW.ROMEROHYUNDAI.COM

ROMERO MAZDA
ONTARIO AUTO CENTER
(866) 232-4092
NEW AND PRE-OWNED SALES
LEASING SERVICE PARTS
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WWW.ROMEROMAZDA.COM

cadillac
CRESTVIEW CADILLAC
2700 EAST GARVEY SOUTH,
WEST COVINA
(626) 966-7441
NEW AND CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SALES

LEASING PARTS BODY SHOP

volkswagen
EXCLUSIVELY VOLKSWAGEN
1300 AUTO CENTER DR., ONTARIO
CALL CHRIS OR DON (909) 605-8843
WWW.EXCLUSIVELYVW.COM
WE REFUSE TO BE UNDERSOLD

volvo
EXCLUSIVELY VOLVO
1300 AUTO CENTER DR., ONTARIO
CALL: SAM NASRI (909) 605-5700
WWW.EXCLUSIVELYVOLVOCARS.COM
GOING ABROAD? CALL ABOUT
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toyota
CLAREMONT TOYOTA
601 AUTO CENTER DR., CLAREMONT
(909) 625-1500
SALES SERVICE PARTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

12

Know your plastic


by Alexis Reyes

lastic is everywhere. With a quick


look around me, I see pens, mugs,
furniture, utensils, my keyboard
and even chewing gum. Yes, chewing
gum.

Plastic was invented in the late 19th century, but


due to war demands and increased technology, plastic
production soared from 20 million pounds produced
in 1927 to 650 million pounds in 1943. Thats a 3000
percent increase in less than two decades.
Today, Americans generate 33 million tons (or 66
billion pounds) of plastic each year. More than half of
that are plastics consumers use once and then toss
(think plastic wrapping, boxes, bags, twist ties, etc.).
And of the total, only nine percent of the plastic waste
was actually recovered for recycling. The large majority of plastics end up in the landfill, where it takes
500 to 1,000 years to degrade.
If you expand this view globally, where waste management systems lack, approximately 17 billion
pounds of plastic is currently floating in the oceans.
These plastics collect in ocean gyres (circular currents), which create giant plastic islands under the
surface of the ocean. These islands can grow as large
as the size of the entire United States.
In case this wasnt enough to persuade you to be
plastic-conscious, lets talk human and animal health.
Plastics with resin ID codes #3 (PVC-shrinkwrap,

Demystifying
SUSTAINABILITY
food packaging, toys), #4 (LDPE-plastic bags for produce, bread and trash), #7 (BPA and BPS-reusable
water bottles, jar lids) have been known to release
trace amounts of chemicals that can disrupt our endocrine systemmood, growth and development,
metabolism, sexual function and reproductive
processes, to name a few.
Scientists have found that these chemicals have
disrupted the endocrine system of wildlife animals,
causing cancer, genital deformations and infertility in
many species, such as polar bears, deer, whales and
otters.
Plastic #6, polystyrene (styrofoam), is known to
leach styrene, which can damage your nervous system and is linked to cancer. Levels of chemical leaching increase when plastics are heated (hot coffee or
tea in cups, hot food in take-out containers) and with
foods that are fatty, salty or acidic.
So, are you convinced that we should be more plastic-conscious? I am! Use these tips to start reducing
your plastic consumption today.
Use (and remember to bring) reusable shopping
bags at any store (not just the grocery store). Go bagless for produce. 500 billion plastic bags are used

globally every year.


Fill reusable (glass, ceramic, aluminum) water
bottles and store in the fridge. Americans throw away
35 billion plastic water bottles every year.
Avoid purchasing single-serving foods and other
packaging with excess plastic. Opt for childrens toys
that are plastic-free. Check out
LifeWithoutPlastic.com, which sells common products that are made without plastic.
Refuse plastic straws, drink lids and utensils.
Bring your own reusable utensils for school/work
lunches.
If you must use plastic, choose #1 (PETE) or #2
(HDPE), as these are the most-commonly recycled
plastics. Avoid plastic bags and styrofoam, which
have the lowest recycling rates.
Craving more information? Check out the blog
MyPlasticFreeLife.com to learn about a California
gals journey towards a Plastic-Free Life.
What do you do to reduce plastic in your life?
Please share on the Sustainable Claremont Facebook
page at facebook.com/sustainableclaremont.
Demystifying Sustainability is a project of Sustainable
Claremont (sustainableclaremont.org). Follow them
on Facebook at facebook.com/sustainableclaremont
and on Twitter @GreenClaremont. Consider becoming a member.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

Applicants wanted for Claremont Hills Conservation Corps


Residents interested in taking a more active role in
the citys decision-making process are encouraged to
apply for appointment to a board or committee. Currently, applications are being sought for appointment
to the Claremont Hills Conservation Corps.
A total of nine members are appointed by the following organizations: three by the Claremont City
Council, three by Pomona College and Padova Padua
Hills, and a final three by the board of directors. Appointments are based on the results of application reviews and personal interviews, and are generally for
three-year terms.
Those interested in being considered for appointment to the CHCC are encouraged to file an application with the city clerk by November 5 at 6 p.m.
Applications and information are available in the
clerks office, located at city hall, 207 Harvard Ave.,
Monday through Thursday from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Applications are also available on the city website at
www.ci.claremont.ca.us. Contact the city clerks office for assistance at (909) 399-5461 or (909) 3995463.

Support local theater by joining


the Ophelias Jump campaign
Ophelias Jump Productions needs a home. Ophelias Jump has been producing shows for more than
three years in Claremont, however, they still dont
have a permanent home. The logistics and resources
necessary to put up and tear down an entire show at a
different site every timeas well as struggling to find
spaces to rehearsemakes it difficult to put on highquality shows.

OUR TOWN

Residents are invited to join in Ophelia Jumps Indiegogo campaign to help fund a permanent home for
next season. There are 24 days left in the campaign.
All donations are tax-deductible.
The funds will go towards the conversion of a theater space as well the implementation of programs
that will enrich the community and bring theater to
young people who dont currently have access.
Visit www.indiegogo.com/projects/ophelias-jumpneeds-a-home to donate now.

Seminar to highlight the ins


and outs of Common Core
Join Middle Tree Academy on Tuesday, October 20
at 6:30 p.m. for a free seminar on Common Core. Participants will get information about what Common
Core is, why its being implemented and how they
can work with their kids within the system. A question and answer portion will be offered at the end of
the presentation. The seminar will be held at Middle
Tree Academy, located at 250 W. First St., Suite 256,
Claremont. For more information, visit middletree.org
or call (909) 293-9560.

Claremont Toastmasters Club


keeps winning gold
Its no longer a best-kept secret. For the third year
in a row, the Claremont Foothills Toastmasters club
grabbed top honors at a local speech competition for
the Claremont-Upland-Pomona area.

13

Chiropractor Dr. Jameson Wong took home two


gold trophies in the Humorous and Evaluation speech
contests respectively.He is expected to advance to the
next round of competition on October 17 at Western
University.Toastmasters have the opportunity to compete on the local, regional and international level
every year.
The winning streak is just part of the reason the
club attracts orators from Pasadena to San
Bernardino.
The club meets every Wednesday morning
atClaremont Graduate Universitys Drucker Business
School. Toastmasters is the worlds leading organization dedicated to developing vital skills in speaking,
listening and leadership.
For information, call Connie Pheiff at(909) 7581120 or visit http://1475.toastmastersclubs.org.

Power of Pink celebration this


Sunday at PVHMC
Its Power of Pink time. Get those knitting needles
and crochet hooks busy. This is the 10th year of the
Power of Pink Project, a community endeavor where
local knitters create scarves for women undergoing
treatment for breast cancer.
A celebration will be held this Sunday, October 18
from 2 to 4 at Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Centers Pitzer Auditorium, located at 1798 N. Garey
Ave., Pomona.
The afternoon will include refreshments, door
prizes, a contest for the PINKest party outfit, bingo
and opportunity drawings. Most importantly, however, will be the presentation of PINK scarves and
crowns to women in treatment for breast cancer.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

14

Young Claremonter is a hit covering national politics

mericas newest hotshot journalist


is still in middle school. Sammy
Buch, 12, received an opportunity
any aspiring reporter would only dream
of: a chance to cover the first Democratic
debate of the election year. It was an experience of a lifetime for the El Roble student.
It was really really cool, Sammy said. I had a
great time.
Sammy is a part of a new program called Kid
Scoop Media, which gives youngsters the opportunity
to experience what its like to be a real journalist in
the field. Kids in the program have covered music
festivals, interviewed dignitaries and even met with
Vice President Joe Biden.
Sammys involvement with the program happened
purely by chance, according to his father, Paul Buch.
We went out for ice cream and there was an Italian caf ice cream shop in Culver City, Mr. Buch
said. Sitting at one of the tables was a woman that
our friend knew. In conversation, she reveals her organization, Kid Scoop Media. He was immediately
attracted to the possibility of doing that.
Once Sammy signed up with the program, it was
only a matter of time before Kid Scoop Media could
grab some credentials. He was initially asked to go to
the second Republican debate in Simi Valley, but
Sammy had to decline due to a scheduling conflict.
When he was offered a chance to go to Las Vegas
for the Democratic debate, Sammy and his father
jumped at the opportunity.
Once his credentials came through the previous
Friday, Sammy and his father booked a flight to Las
Vegas. They had to arrive early; check-in time was 1
p.m., nearly five hours before the debate started.
Once checked in, Sammy was directed to his very
own spot in the sprawling media room at the Wynn.
It was interesting how different it was than I actually thought it was going to be, Sammy said. I
thought it was going to be a lot of hectic typing the
entire time, but there was a lot of photo editing.
Sammys presence among the seasoned media elite
did not go unnoticed by other reporters, according to
Sammys father.
He got interviewed on camera to see what its like
to be a 12-year-old boy in the midst of all this national craziness, Mr. Buch said.
After the debate, Sammy was given the opportunity
to work the floor. He talked to staffers from the
Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton campaigns about
gun control. He had quick conversations with two
well-known celebrity journalists, Chris Matthews of
MSNBC and Don Lemon of CNN (Sammy considers
Mr. Lemon a personal hero).

Photo by Michelle Mayans/KSM-KidScoopMedia


Claremont resident Sammy Buch, 12, traveled to Las Vegas where he attended the Democratic candidate debate as a student journalist with the organization KidScoopMedia.

But the post-debate scrum proved to be a little exhausting for Sammy. I was really tired. It was like 10
oclock at night, he admitted.
Eventually, he came face-to-face with an actual
presidential candidate, Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island. With a bonafide candidate willing to talk to him,
Sammy asked a tough question.
I asked [Mr. Chafee] why he thinks he should be
the president, Sammy said. And he said its a combination of his experience of being a mayor, going up
all the way through the ranks, and him not having any
scandals or anything like that.
It was a good answer to a great question.
Now that he has the experience of a true journalist,
it seems Sammy may have caught the reporting bug,
one that many of us at the COURIER know all too
well.
I think I would love to be a journalist when I grow
up, Sammy said. Im kind of deciding what area of
journalism. I like politics a lot, but I dont know
specifically what kind of journalism I want. But journalism is really interesting.
Mr. Buch, who has a degree in journalism, sees a
lot of himself in young Sammy.
I think he has a natural feel for it, Mr. Buch said.
But hes also into science. His ambition up until
[Tuesday] was to go to Harvey Mudd. Lets see if
thats changed.
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Budding reporter Sammy Buch is a seventh grader at
El Roble.

Matthew Bramlett
news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

15

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff


Members of the freshman class steady their float as they attach a mural of New Orleans Bourbon Street on Wednesday during float-building at Claremont High.

CHS packs in the


activities during
homecoming week

Sophomore Nathaniel Alcala spray-paints a giant apple


while helping classmates build their float on Wednesday at
Claremont High. This years theme for the homecoming parade is cities of the United States. The sophomores picked
New York.
ATRIGHT:Hannah Umansky places dice on the junior
class Las Vegas-themed float during float-building at CHS.

ts been an exciting week for Claremont High


School students as they prepared for homecoming festivities. Today, Friday, October 16,
CHS will dismiss at 2:05 p.m. to allow students
the opportunity to gather at Memorial Park for the
crowning of the Homecoming king.
Following the coronation, the CHS homecoming Parade will begin at approximately 3:30 p.m.
at the corner of Yale Avenue and Tenth Street. The
parade travels east on Tenth Street, south on Har-

vard to Bonita, west on Bonita to Yale, then north


on Yale to Harrison Avenue for the final stretch
west to El Roble Intermediate School.
Capping the day is the varsity football game
against Ayala at 7 p.m. at the high school. The
half-time show will include the crowning of the
homecoming queen.
The homecoming dance will take place at CHS
beginning at 8 p.m. on Saturday, October 17.

Friday, October 16 through Saturday, October 24

CALENDAR

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

Nightlife

Claremont Kids

La Chispa Latin Jazz to perform


at The Press Restaurant.

Spooky activities for the


whole family.

Page 19

Page 20
direction of ARTstART student teachers. All ages are welcome and all participants will be encouraged to share
their kindness postcards. 2 to 4 p.m.
Claremont Library Community Room,
208 Harvard Ave., Claremont.

YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

October
Friday

16

EXPO Disability Awareness, Health


and Wellness Expo to bring awareness
to consumers about programs and resources in the community and help
people with disabilities live independent lives. Service Center for Independent Life has paired up with The
National Federation of the Blind of
California Inland Empire Chapter to
host the event. In the exhibit area, attendees will learn about different companies and equipment available that
provide items and services, which are
accessible to people with disabilities
and seniors. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Service
Center For Independent Life, 107 S.
Spring St., Claremont. (909) 621-6722.
OLDENBORG LUNCHEON COLLOQUIUM Nelson A. Denis, author,
attorney and former New York State assemblyman (1996-2000), will speak on
War Against All Puerto Ricans. He
has written for the New York Times, New
York Daily News, Newsday and Harvard Political Review. Mr. Denis was
the editorial director of El Diario, the
largest Spanish-language newspaper in

16

October
Sunday

COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger


The copper dome on Pomona Colleges Millikan Laboratory building at Sixth Street and
College Avenue, shines in the hot October sun. Weekend weather will be cooler with
highs around 80 degrees and lows in the mid-60s with a chance of rain on Sunday.

New York City and won the Best Editorial Writing award from the National
Association of Hispanic Journalists. He
also wrote and directed the feature
film Vote For Me!, which premiered in
the Tribeca Film Festival. 12:15 p.m.
Pomona College Oldenborg Center, 350
N. College Way, Claremont. Contact:
Leanne.Thach@pomona.edu, (909)
607-1159.

October
Saturday

17

YOUTH ART WORKSHOP This is


What Kindness Looks Like to Me.
Participants will have the opportunity
to write, draw, collage or otherwise express what kindness means to them on
a kindness postcard, under the artistic

18

BUILDING THE EMPATHIC


COMMUNITY Panel members are
Sister Terry Dodge from Crossroads,
Katie Diestelrath from Claremont Youth
Services and Monica Harmon from
Speaking Out Against Bullying. Inspired by the desire to transform society
through the guiding principles of enlightened compassion and kindness, the
women will bring expertise to the
themes of Wonder in a moderated discussion. Audience participation encouraged. Part of On the Same Pages
community read Wonder by author R.
J. Palacio, which focuses on the theme
of choosing kindness as a guiding precept in conducting ones daily life. Originally written for young adults, Wonder
succeeds in transcending all age groups.
2 to 4 p.m. Claremont Library, 208 Harvard Blvd., Claremont. (909) 621-4902.
9-DAY CALENDAR
continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

9-DAY CALENDAR
continued from the previous page

October

October

Thursday

Monday

19

ISRAELI FOLK DANCE A fun way of exercise


with music of Israeli folk dance. Beginners group at
6:45 p.m., followed by open dancing. $6. Masonic
Lodge, 227 W. Eighth St., Claremont. (909) 921-7115.

October
Tuesday

20

COLLECTING FINE ARTS The speaker is Walter


Ebrahimzadeh, owner of Artist Trait Gallery. The
University Club meets Tuesdays at 11:30 a.m. at the
Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd.,
Claremont. $13 meeting fee includes buffet lunch.
COMPUTER CLUB Claremont Library information with Amy Crow. The Claremont Senior Computer Club meets on Tuesday evenings at the Hughes
Community Center at 1700 Danbury Road. Meetings
begin at 7:30 p.m., with social time at 7 p.m. For
more information, visit cscclub.org.

October
Wednesday

21

ZEN MEDITATION 7:30 to 9 a.m. McAlister Center for Religious Activities, 919 Columbia Ave.,
Claremont. (909) 621-8685.

Artwork by Wakana Kimura

R.S.V.P. LOS ANGELES:


The Project Series at Pomona

he Pomona College Museum of


Art exhibition R.S.V.P. Los Angeles: The Project Series at
Pomona celebrates the milestone of 50
Project Series exhibitions by connecting
the extraordinary artists who have been
part of the program with a new generation
of artists based in the Los Angeles area.
The exhibition features seven artistsJustin Cole,
Michael Decker, Naotaka Hiro, Wakana Kimura, Aydinaneth Ortiz, Michael Parker and Nikki Pressley
and is unified by a unique curatorial process.
With these artists, the exhibition captures the dynamism of the southern California art scene, while
further extending the Project Series impact on the
arts community. The exhibition is accompanied by a
publication, designed by Kimberly Varella of Content
Object, contextualizing the art of the late 20th and
early 21st century in Los Angeles through the lens of
the Project Series. The book includes two new contextualizing essays by Terri Geis and Rebecca McGrew, and essays on each of the seven artists by Lisa
Anne Auerbach, Terri Geis, Doug Harvey, Kathleen
Howe, Ms. McGrew, Nicolas Orozco-Valdivia,
Glenn Phillips, Valorie Thomas and Sarah Wang. All
artists will engage with students and elements of the
curriculum in a variety of ways during the exhibition.
Visit pomona.edu/museum/ for a listing of lectures.
Created by Ms. McGrew, Pomona College Museum
of Art senior curator, the Project Series focuses on
emerging and under-represented southern California
artists. Its intent is to bring to the Pomona College campus art that is experimental and that introduces new
forms, techniques or concepts. The Project Series has
enhanced the Museums role as a laboratory for exploring innovative, cross-disciplinary collaborations and
ideas and as a catalyst for new knowledge.
The exhibition will be on display at Pomona College Museum of Art through December 19.

22

ART AFTER HOURS Current exhibitions on view


beginning at 5 p.m. This event is free and open to the
public. Pomona College Museum of Art, 330 N. College
Ave., Claremont. Contact justine.bae@pomona.edu.

October
Friday

23

THINGS THAT GO BUMP IN THE NIGHT


See the owls, wolves, spiders and insects that rule
the garden at night. Walk along the garden paths to
interactive activity stations with animals, plants and
crafts. This is not a Halloween eventno costumes.
The Lobos Food Truck will be on site. Picnics are
also welcome in the courtyard. 5:30 to 9 p.m. (last
entry at 7 p.m.) $10 for general admission or $6 for
students, seniors and children. Rancho Santa Ana

17

Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont.


For more information, visit rsabg.org.

October
Saturday

24

ABRAHAMIC BIOETHICS SYMPOSIUM


Dignity and Healthcare at the End of Life. Panel
discussions and banquet. Register at bayanclaremont.org. 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Claremont School of
Theology, 1325 N. College Ave., Claremont.
AUTUMN GALA The second annual International
Autumn Gala. An entertaining night of performances
representing cultures from around the world. Make
sure to come early for appetizers and the photo booth
on the north patio. Hosted by International Place of The
Claremont Colleges and the international students of
The Claremont Colleges. 6 to 9 p.m. Pomona College
Bridges Auditorium, 450 N. College Way, Claremont.
Email ipoffice@cmc.edu or call (909) 607-1139.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

PERFORMING ARTS
ALLEN THEATRE: Pomona Colleges Seaver
Theatre Complex, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont.
(909) 607-4375.
Friday, October 16: OLC: War Against All Puerto
Ricans. Noon to 1 p.m.
Friday, October 16: Friday Noon Concert. 12:15
to 1 p.m.
BRIDGES AUDITORIUM: 450 N. College Way,
Pomona College. Box-office hours are Monday
through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (909) 607-1139.
Purchase tickets online; choose seats at
pomona.edu/bridges. For disabled access and to drop
off patrons at Bridges Auditorium, drive north on Columbia Avenue from First Street to Fourth Street.

Saturday and Sunday, December 5 and 6: The


Nutcracker comes to life in Inland Pacific Ballets
spectacular holiday ballet with dazzling sets, beautiful costumes and more than 80 dancers on stage. This
annual yuletide favorite tells the story of a young girl
named Clara who receives a magical nutcracker doll
on Christmas Eve and sets out on a wondrous journey
to the Land of the Snow and the Kingdom of Sweets.
Saturday at 2 and 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m.
HAUGH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER: 1000
W. Foothill Blvd., Glendora at Citrus College. Discounts available for students, seniors and youth. (626)
963-9411 or haughpac.com.
Sunday, October 18: RV adventurer John Holod
narrates his travel film Route 66: Exploring the
Mother Road. 2 p.m.
Friday and Saturday, October 16 and 17: A Night
of Music from Film. This annual showcase of stu-

18

dent work features video projections, student actors,


singers and the Citrus Sierra Wind Symphony. 8 p.m.
Saturday, October 24: Mnozil Brass at 8 p.m. with
humor and wit from Monty Python.
November 6 through 15: It is April 9, 1940. The
Nazis invade your country and take over your home.
What would you do? The Epiphany depicts a heroic
young womans struggle to keep her family together,
uphold her dignity and honor against malevolent
forces, and ultimately choose between collaboration
or resistance in order to survive. Over the course of
the occupation, she discovers her true identity by
demonstrating the power of the human spirit through
self-determination and free will while embracing her
indigenous Sami lineage and culture. The Epiphany
powerfully dramatizes challenges faced and sacrifices
made by everyday men and women trapped in the
crucible of war and enemy occupation. At the Citrus
Little Theatre.
Sunday, November 8: Tom Dreesen celebrates
Frank Sinatras 100th birthday. 2 p.m.
Saturday, November 14: Stunt Dog Experience is
back again by popular demand with a full-length production. 2 p.m.
Saturday, December 5: Candy Cane Corners.
Theres a new family in Tinsel Towers and theyve
never heard of Christmas. At the Citrus Little Theatre. 1:30 and 3 p.m.
December 5 through 20: The entire Citrus Music
Department welcomes the holidays with an all new
choral concert and magical awe-inspiring holiday
musical Christmas Is Santa visits snowy Victorian
England to capture the wonderment of Christmas
memories, past, present and future, before inviting
the audience to visit him and Mrs. Claus at their home
in the North Pole. This original production will feature the famous Citrus Singers, extravagant scenery
and costumes and a glorious live orchestra. This jolly
show is jam-packed with holiday melodies, festive
dancing and Christmas cheer. Its guaranteed to dazzle your senses, tug at your heart, tickle your funny
bone and get you ready for a magical holiday season.
Bring your family and all your friends and join the
thousands who come year after year for their dose of
Christmas spirit, Citrus-style.
Saturday, December 5: Songs of Christmas.
8 p.m.
Thursday and Friday, December 10 and 11: Holidance! The annual dance celebration of the holiday
season showcases student and faculty work, and is
packed chock-full of holiday music, dancing and
good cheer, including selections from Tchaikovskys
beloved Nutcracker. 8 p.m.

Courier
Claremont

claremont-courier.com

Restaurants!
Dont rely on word of mouth.
Remind them to choose you. Advertise in the Claremont
COURIERs Restaurant Row. Call Mary for special rates!

909-621-4761

Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and


entertainment. Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m.
Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com.
There is NO guarantee that items submitted
will be published.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

19

RESTAURANT ROW

NIGHTLIFE
EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St.,
Claremont Packing House. Open from 11 a.m. to
midnight, Sunday through Thursday; closes at 1
a.m. Friday and Saturday. Hoppy Hour daily
from 2 to 6 p.m. (909) 445-8875.
Thursdays: All Titos Vodka drinks $2 off and Eureka Thursday Night Music.
THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave.,
Claremont Village.
Open mic night, the last Sunday of every month.
Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from
6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $2. (909) 624-2928 or
folkmusiccenter.com.
FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont
Packing House. 18 and over. Show times: Friday at 8
and 10 p.m., Saturday at 7 and 9:30 p.m. and Sunday
at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at the door.
Friday, October 16: Bruce Jingles from Showtime.
8 and 10 p.m.
Saturday, October 17: Bruce Jingles from Showtime. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, October 18: Two Milk Minimum at 4:30
p.m. Magic and Comedy. 7 p.m.
Thursday, October 22: Carlos Loma and Friends at
8 p.m. and Open Mic Audition Show at 10 p.m.
Friday, October 23: Theo Von from Deal

With It. 8 and 10 p.m.


Saturday, October 24: Theo Von from Deal With
It. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, October 25: Magic and Comedy. 7 p.m.
THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave.,
Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday
until 2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21
and over after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30
p.m. (909) 625-4808.
Friday, October 16: Townes (western/rock). 10 p.m.
Saturday, October 17: La Chispa Latin Jazz
(salsa/jazz)
Sunday, October 18: Sunday guitar with Gina Roode
at 6 p.m. followed by Soul Time (soul/DJ) at 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, October 20: King Trivia Night. 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday, October 21: Joe Atman (piano).
9:30 p.m.
Thursday, October 22: Teryn Re (jazz) at 8:30 p.m.
followed by DJ Spy See Man Go at 11 p.m.
Friday, October 23: The Popravinas (rock). 10 p.m.
Saturday, October 24: Hunter and the Dirty Jacks
(rock/soul)
Sunday, October 25: KSPC Presents: Sunset Review and Forward into the Past (live radio shows).
1 p.m.
PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday
and Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 21 and over. $5 cover charge

COURIER CROSSWORD

on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover


charge with student ID). (909) 547-4266.
Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with
the band.
Wednesdays: Rockstar Karaoke. Rock the mic
or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka
Rockstars. 9 p.m.

Answers to last weeks puzzle #336

Crossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #337


Across

1. Warm-up
5. Official language of
Cambodia
10. Gangsters gun
13. Fixed points
14. Innocent
15. Its business is picking up
16. Benjamin Disraeli, e.g.
17. Pond denizen
18. Condo division
19. He developed
Claremont Graduate
Universitys MBA program
21. Can you believe it?!
23. Ball-and-socket joints
24. Seize quickly and easily
25. Tapioca source
28. Catch a glimpse of
29. With one leg on each side
32. British john
35. Ornamental buttons
36. We need to get a cat!
37. Belittle
39. Sn, in the lab
40. Benefactor that enabled
the establishment of
Claremonts Graduate
School of Management,
goes with 63 across
42. Perfumer Chanel

45. Ptero suffix


46. Apportioners
49. Remain sullen
50. Candid ___
51. Rude
55. Citing word
56. Regional plants
59. Certain currency
60. Dry Spanish libation
61. True believers belief
62. Snap
63. See 40 across
64. Basic Instinct star,
last name
65. Siesta

Down

1. Argued
2. Lions warning
3. Light brown in color
4. Fish mentioned in
I Am the Walrus
5. Leg protector
6. Sideburns and whiskers
7. Centermost
8. Holiday lead-in
9. Nickelodeon staples
10. Swindler, slangily
11. Kind of skeleton
12. Deed

15. Relating to green cover


20. Pueblo Indian structures
22. Catch a few Zs
24. Searches for the truth
25. Threw
26. Italian wine region
27. Shock
30. Audition tapes
31. Green field
32. Survive
33. Wan
34. Obscure
37. In the slightest
38. Strong lager
41. Bootlick
42. Set of principles
43. Skipping contraction
44. Arts and _____
46. Asimov, Heinlein works
47. Equestrians attire
48. Kind of group, in
chemistry
49. Medical van warning
52. Govern
53. Historical times
54. Word of warning
57. Umpires cry
58. Sponsor of Central
Parks Strawberry Fields

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

20

:Halloween
Halloween
Word search
candy
costume
frighten
ghost
goblin
haunted
jackolantern
mummy
pumpkin
scarecrow
spooky
treat
trick
vampire
witch

r ee
t
e
Po

Me and My Skeleton
My skeleton is made of boneslots of them, I know.
They're in my arms and legs, and my fingers and my toes.
My skeleton holds me up, so I can walk and run
And do lots of other things that are so very fun.
My skeleton keeps growing right along with me.
I never want to lose it, 'cause then where would I be?
Sue LaBella

Book Nook
A Wrinkle in Time

It was a dark and stormy night...


If you love science or astronomy, I'm surprised you haven't read this novel yet. A
Wrinkle in Time, a book by Madeleine
LEngle, is about a girl named Meg and her
little brother Charles Wallace. Their dad has
mysteriously disappeared without a word,
leaving Meg, Charles, their twin brothers
and their mother at home.
A strange woman who calls herself Mrs.
Who arrives at their house. Along with her
companions Mrs. Which and Mrs. Whatsit,
Mrs. Who brings Meg, Charles and their
athletic friend Calvin on an adventure
around the galaxy.
The kids travel to and fro on tesseracts,
cube-like figures that lead to another dimension. On their way, they encounter
good and evil. Will they find their dad?
Read the book to find out! Recommended
for ages 10 and up.

Q. What was the ghosts favorite ride at the fair?

Review by Claremont Kids correspondent Eden Yu, an eighth grader at El Roble


Intermediate School.

Q: Whats a vampires favorite fruit?

A. The scary-go-round.

Q. What was the ghosts second favorite


ride at the fair?
A. The roller ghoster.

Q: Why do ghosts like to ride in elevators?


A. It raises their spirits.

Q: Who sold cookies to the monster?


A. The Ghoul Scouts.

A. A neck-tarine.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

21

RSABG invites you to embrace the darkness

he Rancho Santa Ana Botanic


Garden is hosting its annual
Things that Go Bump in the
Night event on Friday and Saturday, October 23 and October 24.
The family event, which runs from 5:30 to 9 p.m.
each night, lets guests observe and learn about plants
and animals that are most active at night. You can follow Garden paths with a passport to visit interactive
stations exploring the nocturnal world and its amazing critters.
This years highlights include Wild Wings of California with several raptors including live owls, The
Parasitic Insect Show and a visit from Kimmi Kraus
of Project Wildsong, who will dispel myths and misinformation and provide education about their live
wolves Damu, Cael and a new puppy ambassador.
Please bring a flashlight and leave your Halloween
costume at home.
Tickets are $10 for adults and $6 for seniors, students with ID and children ages 3 to 12. Gates will
open from 5:30 until 7 p.m. The admission kiosk will
be staffed until 9 p.m. Visit rsabg.org or call (909)
625-8767 ext. 224 for more information.

Flickr photo by Gerry Gutteridge

What are Elephant & Piggie Saying?


Do you know that random
kids are going to write in a
newspaper to see our play?
Really?
So we are
celebrities?

Boo-tiful evening

oure invited to the city of


Claremonts Halloween
SPOOKtacular on Saturday,
October 31. The event is aimed at kids
age two to 12 and their families.

Congratulations to Lauren Juarez, a fifth grader at Sycamore Elementary


School, who has won our What are Elephant and Piggie Saying? contest. She and her family have won tickets to see Elephant and Piggie:
We are in a Play! at the Lewis Family Playhouse.

There will be games, face painting and roving


entertainment from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Claremont
Depot. Numerous Village businesses will be giving
out goodies to trick-or-treaters from 2 to 4 p.m.
Several special events are scheduled at the
Depot. The Howl-O-Ween Dog Costume Contest will be held at 2 p.m., followed by the Rainforest Romp Animal Show with the Wildlife
Learning Center at 2:30 p.m. The Childrens
Costume Contest begins at 3:30 p.m. Call
Human Services for more information at (909)
399-5490.

Notable Quotables:

Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn and cauldron bubble.
William Shakespeare

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

22

CHS on hot streak as teams beat up competition

hat is happening with Claremont High School sports? The


football team is undefeated,
boys water polo is ranked number-one,
cross country is on a tear and now girls golf
is having their best season ever.
The girls, 7-6 overall, added another victory on Tuesday, narrowly defeating visiting Ayala, 214-217, at Marshall Canyon Golf Course. In the process, the Pack set a
new low score for their home course.
Allison Gallegos led the charge
SPORTING
with 40 strokes on the 36 par nineLIFE
hole course. Not far behind was
Vanessa Lopez at 41, Maryn Santiago at 42 and Sally
Wang at 44. Rounding out the teams score was Ivana
Kovac at 47 and Juliana Gomez at 51.
Top Ayala performances came from Kelly Lee at 41
and Anisha Choi at 43.
Claremonts changing fortunes are partly the result of
Gallegos, who has become the top-seeded player although she is just a junior.
While some fall sports are in their second week of
league play, golf is almost done with its season because
it must finish before the end of daylight savings time. As
a result, the season starts just after Labor Day and proceeds at a torrid pace so that the Pack can play each of the
seven other teams in the league.
We have the best team weve ever had, said Coach
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Octavio Hernandez as his team was getting ready for the
Allison
Gallegos,
left,
and
Vanessa
Lopez
strategize
about
a
putt
on
the first hole of the Wolfpacks match
Ayala match. Im really proud of them. They worked
against Ayala on Tuesday at Marshall Canyon Golf Course. Number-one seed Gallegos shot a match-low 40
hard on the off-season. We played some teams that had
on the 36 par nine-hole course.

SPORTING LIFE/continue on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 16, 2015

SPORTS

23

SPORTING LIFE/from previous page

great number-one players but weve been


solid all across the boardlike the tournament we played yesterday, everyone
was within 10 strokes.
As they go into their final match of the
season against Chino Hills on Thursday
the Pack is tied for third and headed to the
CIF tournament for the first time in the
teams history.
With no seniors and an up-and-coming
freshman in Wang, next season promises
to be strong as well.
Next week, the rapid pace continues
with Palomares League prelims at Los
Serranos Country Club in Chino Hills,
followed by league finals at Western Hills.
The team returns to Los Serranos the following week for CIF.
Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com

HIGH SCHOOL ROUND-UP

CROSS COUNTRY
On Saturday the boys and girls cross
country teams traveled to Clovis for the
ASICS Clovis Invitational. Among
more than 4,300 high school runners,
the girls team finished fourth and the
boys team finished 13th.

BOYS WATER POLO


Boys water polo continues to dominate the Palomares League with a 20-4
victory over Diamond Bar on Tuesday.
There were no individual stats.

GIRLS WATERPOLO
The Claremont High School girls
varsity volleyball team won a close
league match against visiting Ayala 3-1
(25-21, 25-21, 16-25, 25-14) on Tuesday in Claremont. Junior Jordan Bishop

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff


Freshman Sally Wang shot a very respectable 44 during the Packs narrow vistory over Ayala at Marshall Canyon Golf Course.
The girls are having their best season ever in the competitive Palomares League, according to Coach Octavio Hernandez.

had 12 kills for a kill percentage of 31


percent. Other top performances came
from Breanna Carasik with six kills,
Fallon Vrieling with four and Alana
Washington with three. Vrieling also
had three solo blocks and one block assist.

SAHS VOLLEYBALL
San Antonio High School volleyball
had their first game on October 8
against Pomona Park West.The Lions
lost the series two games to three, however, it was an exciting first match that
proved the competition would be fierce.
The MVP of the game is Elijah Black,
who stood out among the Lions for his
commitment to getting to every ball
Allison Gallegos, left, and Vanessa Lopez chat as they walk to the first green.

and keeping the team in the game. San


Antonio will play Park West again on
October 15.This is the first year that

San Antonio has played volleyball and


they have a coed team of 12 girls and
three boys.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

909.621.4761
Friday 10-16-15

CLASSIFIEDS

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

rentals........24

Rentals

Rentals

Marketplace

services......25

For lease

Office space for rent

Gallery space

THREE bedroom, two bathroom house near Condit


School. $2,400 monthly.
Ready for immediate occupancy. No smoking, no pets.
Agent, GeoffHamill.com,
909-621-0500.

MASSAGE or healing professional welcomed to share


office space in a lovely suite
with kitchen and bathroom.
Call Joanne at Claremont
Healing Arts Center, 626802-0224.

House for rent

Townhome for rent

CALLING all artists! Wish you


could have your own art gallery,
but dont have the time or
money? Claremont gallery
space available starting at
$100 monthly (three months
minimum). Student discount
available. Call 626-388-6248.

CHARMING tree shaded


two-story home. Four bedrooms, two bathrooms.
Lovely throughout. Near
Claremont Club. $2,600
monthly plus security. 909629-1028.

THREE bedrooms, two-anda-half bathrooms, 1900 sq. ft.


Two-car garage, central heat
and A/C. $2,000 monthly.
WSPM 909-621-5941.

legals..........27
real estate....29

24

OPEN HOUSE
DIRECTORY

Internship

CHARMING two bedroom,


one bathroom home, Mt.
Baldy Village. Perfect for couple or small family, one child.
Great K-8 schools, walking
distance. No pets, no smoking. $1,500 monthly plus security. 909-981-3501.
IN Village, near Memorial
Park. Three bedrooms, 1.75
bathrooms. Hardwood floors,
central heat and air, washer,
dryer, dishwasher, detached
garage, patio with retractable
awning. Gardener service included. $2,500 monthly. 909624-5822.

Marketplace

MARKETINGintern needed for


art gallery. Must be familiar with
social media and advertising.
Perfect for students looking for
college credit. 626-388-6248.

Animals
Antiques
A barn and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls.
Refinishing too! 909-593-1846.
Kensoldenoddities.com. La
Verne.

Garage sale

Want to advertise an open house?


The COURIERs open house directory is Claremonters go-to guide for upcoming open houses in the
area. And the best news? If you are already advertising a property, your listing is complimentary! Otherwise, the cost is simply $25 per listing.

Needs good home


HANDSOME, large, loving, mature, neutered, grey, male cat
seeks lap to sit on. Fully vaccinated. Nora, 909-576-8830.

SATURDAY, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.


834 Hood Drive, Claremont.
50 years of tools, fishing,
gold panning gear, furniture, steins.

BIG Boy a four year old,


male, Great Pyrenees is looking for a loving home. This
gentle giant has all of his
shots but is not fixed. Not
good with other male dogs,
females okay. 760-243-6890.

Business

Financial

DIRECTV staring at $19.99


monthly. Free installation.
Free three months of HBO,
Showtime, Cinemax, Starz.
Free HD/DVR upgrade! 2015
NFL Sunday Ticket included
(select packages.) New customers only. Call 1-800-3859017. (Cal-SCAN)

SELL your structured settlement or annuity payments for


cash now. You dont have to
wait for your future payments
any longer! Call 1-800-6735926. (Cal-SCAN)

Sunday, October 18
1-4 p.m. 1906 Cloverdale Drive, Pomona.
Curtis Real Estate.
1-4 p.m. 750 Santa Barbara Drive, Claremont.
Wheeler Steffen Sothebys International Realty.
2-4 p.m. 383 Blaisdell Drive, Claremont.
Wheeler Steffen Sothebys International Realty.

CAL-SCAN
Announcements
DID you know information is
power and content is king?
Your doorway to statewide
public notices, California
Newspaper Publishers Association smart search feature.
Sign-up, enter keywords and
sit back and let public notices
come to you on your mobile,
desktop and tablet. For more
information call Cecelia at
916-288-6011 or www.capublicnotice.com. (Cal-SCAN)
PREGNANT?
Considering
adoption? Call us first. Living
expenses, housing, medical
and continued support afterward. Choose the adoptive
family of your choice. Call 24/7.
1-877-879-4709. (Cal-SCAN)
EVERY business has a story to
tell! Get your message out with
Californias PRMedia Release,
the only press release service
operated by the press to get
press! For more information
contact Cecelia at 916-288-6011
or prmediarelease.com/california. (Cal-SCAN)

DID you know seven in 10


Americans or 158 million US
adults read content from newspaper media each week? Discover the power of newspaper
advertising. For a free brochure,
call 916-288-6011 or email
cecelia@cnpa.com. (Cal-SCAN)
DID you know information is
power and content is king?
Do you need timely access to
public notices and remain relevant in todays highly competitive market? Gain the
edge with California Newspaper Publishers Association
new innovative website capublicnotice.com and check
out the free one-month trial
smart search feature. For
more information call Cecelia at 916-288-6011 or
w w w. c a publicnotice.com.
(Cal-SCAN)
DID you know 144 million US
adults read a newspaper print
copy each week? Discover
the power of newspaper advertising. For a free brochure,
call 916-288-6011 or email
cecelia@cnpa.com.
(CalSCAN)

DISH Network: Get more for


less! Starting at $19.99
monthly (for 12 months.) Plus
bundle and save (fast internet
for $15 more monthly.) Call
now 1-800-357-0810. (CalSCAN)

Donations
DONATE your car, truck or
boat to Heritage for the Blind.
Free three-day vacation, tax
deductible, free towing, all paperwork taken care of. 800731-5042. (Cal-SCAN)
GOT an older car, boat or RV?
Do the humane thing. Donate it
to the Humane Society. Call 1800-743-1482. (Cal-SCAN)

SOCIAL Security disability benefits. Unable to work? Denied


benefits? We can help! Win or
pay nothing! Contact Bill Gordon & Associates at 1-800966-1904 to start your
application today! (Cal-SCAN)

Health
GOT knee pain? Back pain?
Shoulder pain? Get a pain-relieving brace at little or no cost
to you. Medicare patients call
Health Hotline now! 1-800796-5091. (Cal-SCAN)
LOWEST prices on health
and dental insurance. We
have the best rates from top
companies! Call now! 888989-4807. (Cal-SCAN)

SAFE Step Walk-In Tub! Alert


for seniors. Bathroom falls
can be fatal. Approved by
Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic jets. Less than fourinch step-in. Wide door.
Anti-slip floors. Americanmade. Installation included.
Call 800-799-4811 for $750
off. (Cal-SCAN)
VIAGRA 100mg, Cialis 20mg.
50 tabs $90 includes free
shipping. 1-888-836-0780 or
Metro-Meds.net. (Cal-SCAN)
ATTENTION: Viagra and
Cialis users! A cheaper alternative to high drugstore
prices! 50-pill special, $99
and free shipping! 100 percent guaranteed. Call now, 1800-624-9105. (Cal-SCAN)

Help wanted
ATTENTION drivers: $2,000
sign-on bonus. We put drivers
first! Family company with
401k. Beautiful trucks. CDLA required. 877-258-8782.
www.drive4melton.com. (CalSCAN)

Personals
MEET singles right now! No
paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages
and connect live. Try it free.
Call now 800-945-3392. (CalSCAN)
FIND the love you deserve!
Discover the path to happiness. New members receive
a free three-minute love reading! Entertainment purposes
only. 18 and over. 800-6392705. (Cal-SCAN)

Animal Shelters
Inland Valley
Humane Society
909-623-9777
Upland Animal Shelter
909-931-4185
H.O.P.E Upland
1-800-811-4285
West End Animal Shelter
909-947-3517

Friday 10-16-15

SERVICES

1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711


Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Acoustical

Chimney Sweep

QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor, specializing in


acoustic removal, texture,
painting, acoustic re-spray
and
drywall
repairs.
Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.

Quality Fireplace
& BBQ
Chimney sweeping.

AC/Heating
STEVES HEATING
& AIR CONDITIONING
Serving your area for over
25 years. Repairs all
makes/models. Free
service call with repair.
Free estimate on new units.
MC/Visa. 100 percent
financing. Senior discounts.
Lic.744873
909-985-5254

Complete fireplace,
woodstove installation,
service and repair.
Spark arrestor supply
and installation.
Call 909-920-6600
392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland

Gash Chimney Sweep


Dust free chimney cleaning.
Repairs, chimney covers,
dryer vent cleaning,
masonry and dampers. BBB
accredited. Please call
909-467-9212.

Concrete
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
Stamped, broom,
color finishes.
Slate, flagstone, planters,
walls and walkways.

SAME DAY SERVICE


Free service call with repair
Only $69.50 diagnostic fee
without repair
We repair all brands
SCE quality installation
approved
Great prices
Friendly service
909-398-1208
www.novellcustom.com
Lic.958830

Art Lessons

Call 909-599-9530 now


Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area
30 years!
Lic.323243

Contractor
THE Wood Dr. Specializing in termite and dry-rot
repairs. Fascia boards,
eves, patios, decks. 909262-8649.

ONE-ON-ONE art lessons


with Jordan. The Colony at
Loft 204 gallery and store.
For more information email
jords.kelly@gmail.com.

WENGER Construction. 25
years experience. Handyman
Services. Cabinetry, doors,
electrical, drywall, crown
molding. Lic.707381. 951640-6616.

Bathroom Remodeling

ADVANCED
DON DAVIES

A Bath-Brite
authorized dealer.
Bathtubs and sinks.
Showers, tile, countertops.
Refinish - Reglaze - Restore
Porcelain, ceramic,
fiberglass.
Quick and affordable.
Please call 909-945-7775.
www.bath-brite.com

Veteran
New and repairs.

Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED rough to
finish remodeler. Kitchens,
porches, doors, decks, fences,
painting. Lots more! Paul,
909-919-3315.

Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service.
Claremont resident serving
Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck-mounted cleaning
units. Expert carpet repairs
and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency
water damage service.
Please call 909-621-1182.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

CONTACT US

909-599-9530
Serving Claremont
for 30 years!
Lic.323243
REX ROMANO
BUILDERS
Excellence in building
and customer satisfaction.
Kitchen and bath.
Remodel.
Best of Houzz 2015.

Drywall

Electrician
PRECISION Electric. Electrical experts, panel upgrades,
rewires, LED lighting, trouble-shooting. Licensed and
insured. Lic.826388. 909770-4329.

MOR ELECTRIC &


HANDYMAN SERVICES
Free estimates
and senior discounts.
909-989-3454
909-767-0062
Residential * Industrial *
Commercial. We do it all.
No job too big or small!
24/7 emergency services.
Reasonable and reliable.
Lic.400-990
30 years experience.
Haydens Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
No job too big or small!
Old home rewiring specialist.
24-hour emergency service.

909-982-8910
909-767-0062
* Senior Discount *
Lic.359145
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service changes, repairs, service calls, outdoor lighting
and
room
additions.
Lic.258436. Call 909-2417671, 909-949-8230.
SPARKS ELECTRIC
Local electrician for all your
electrician needs!
909-946-8887
Lic.922000

Lic.763385

PPS General Contractor.


Kitchen and bathroom remodeling. Flooring, windows, electrical and plumbing. Serving Claremont for
25 years. Lic.846995. 951237-1547.

Handyman

Irrigation

ADVANCED
DON DAVIES

SPRINKLER SYSTEMS

Lic.323243

A-HANDYMAN
New and Repairs
Inside, outside, small,
large, home, garage, yard.
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243
30 years experience!
Claremont area.

Fictitious Name

Hauling

A FICTITIOUS Business
Name Statement (D.B.A.) is
required if you're in business.
You are required to file and
publish a DBA in the local
newspaper. You must renew
your FBNS every five (5)
years. You must file and republish if any changes have
been made to your business.
If your business is located in
LA COUNTY, The COURIER
will help you file your FBNS
with L.A. County Clerk, publish the statement and provide you with proof of publication. Fees start at $26 to
the County and $95 to the
Courier. Notary Public available to help notarize your Affidavit Of Identity for your
FBNS for an additional fee.
Claremont COURIER: 1420
N. Claremont Blvd., Suite
205B, Claremont. Call Vickie,
909-621-4761.

SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY

909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691

909-626-3019
KOGEMAN
CONSTRUCTION
Room additions.
Kitchen/bath remodeling.
Custom cabinets.
Residential/commercial.
909-946-8664
Lic.B710309
Visit us on Facebook!

Fences & Gates

Veteran
New, repairs.
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA
Lic.742776. Please call 909816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com.
Taking the time to care for
Courier readers complete
restoration needs since 1965.
La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.

Gardening
Garden Maintenance
Hand-pull weeding, mowing,
trimming, sprinkler work,
monthly service, cleanups
and junk removal.
Free estimates.
David, 909-374-1583

Girl Friday
I'M here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands. Senior,
pet, house sitting. Jenny Jones,
909-626-0027, anytime!

Handyman
Serving Claremont
Since 1995. Residential,
Commercial.
Recessed lighting and
design, breaker replacement,
service panel upgrades,
ceiling fans, troubleshooting,
landscape lighting, rewires
and LED lighting. Free
estimates. 24-hours emergency service. References.

909-900-8930
909-626-2242
Lic.806149

25

Claremont
Handyman Service
Carpentry, repairs,
gates, lighting,
small painting projects.
Odd jobs welcome!
Free consultations.
909-921-6334
HOME Repair by Ken. Electrical, plumbing, lighting, irrigation, tankless maintenance.
Local and experienced. 12
years. 909-374-0373.

Free estimates.
Senior discount!
WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE!
909-382-1210
626-383-1442
sameday-haulaway.com

INSTALLATIONS
EXPERT REPAIRS
DRIP SYSTEM
SPECIALISTS
C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

909-621-5388
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.
Call 909-599-9530 Now
Cell: 626-428-1691

Haydens Services Inc.

ADVANCED
DON DAVIES

Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
No job too big or small!

Same Day
One call does it all!
Garage, yard, home,
moving!

24-hour emergency
service.
909-982-8910

909-599-9530

* Senior discount *
Lic.359145

House Cleaning
20 YEARS experience. Free
estimates. Excellent references. Tailored to your individual needs. Senior care,
day or night. Call Lupe, 909236-2236.
TERESA'S House Cleaning.
Honest, reliable, experienced,
deep cleaning. References
available. Free estimates. 909621-0896 or 909-762-3198.
ROSIE'S Spic Span Cleaning
Service. Residential, commercial, vacant homes, apartments, offices. Free estimate.
Licensed. 909-277-4215.
Shirley's Cleaning Service
28 years in business.
Office/residential.
No job too small.
Free estimates.
We do spring cleaning!
909-730-8564
CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning.
Family owned for 26 years. Licensed, insured. Senior rates.
Professional services including: cleaning, windows, senior care, fire damage, move
in/out, closet organization. 10
percent discount to Claremont College faculty. Check
us out on Angies List. Robyn,
909-621-3929.
Established, upbeat,
licensed house cleaning
service. Organic
cleaning supplies used.
26 years of experience.
Jeanette 909-224-1180,
909-803-0074.

Ironing
Impeccable Ironing. Affordable, professional, diligent.
Pick-up and delivery optional.
Est. 1968. 909-620-5945.

Expert Repairs
Retrofit Experts
Ask us how to save water.
Allen Cantrall Landscape
909-224-3327
Lic.861685
Serving the area
since 1983.

Landscaping
GREENWOOD
LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for
complete landscaping,
irrigation, drainage,
designing and gardening.
Lic.520496
909-621-7770
DLS Landscaping and Design.
Claremont native specializing
in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting.
Artistic solutions for the future.
Over 35 years experience.
Call: 909-225-8855, 909-9825965. Lic.585007.

Dale's Tree &


Landscape Services
Drought tolerant planting
and design. Drip irrigation.
Maintenance specials.
Over 30 years experience.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381

DANS GARDENING
SERVICE
Sprinklers/drip installed, repaired.
Lawn removal. Cleanup,
hauling. Drought landscapes,
planting, sod, lighting,
drainage. Insured.
References. Since 1977.
Lic.508671.

Please call 909-989-1515.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, October 16, 2015

Landscaping

Sustainable Landscape
& Design
Zero emission maintenance
QWEL-Certified personal
specialized drip irrigation
Native plant specialists
Artistic hardscapes
Award-winning landscapes
From the creators of the
Pomona College Organic Farm

909-398-1235
www.naturalearthla.com
Lic.919825
Put the wow back in your
yard and meet water
restrictions. Call now!
Taylor Landscape
909-519-4027
Lic#541078

Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
BONDED and INSURED
Many references.
Claremont resident.
35 years experience.
Lic.315050
Please call: 909-624-5080,
909-596-4095.
COLLINS Painting &
Construction
Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and
commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 909-985-8484.

STEVE LOPEZ
PAINTING
Extensive preparation.
Indoor, outdoor, cabinets.
Offering odorless green
solution. 33-year master.
Lic.542552

Please call
909-989-9786

Sunset Gardens Landscaping

C-27Lic.#373833.
John Cook- Specializing in
Desert Landscaping.
Designed
Installed
Maintained

909-231-8305
Drought tolerant and
California native design.
Water conserving irrigation.
Lighting and maintenance.
Allen Cantrall Landscape
909-224-3327
Lic.861685
Serving the area
since 1983.
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, refurbish or repair.
Design, drainage, concrete,
slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243

Learn Japanese

RESIDENTIAL/Commercial.
Quality work at reasonable
prices. Free estimates.
Lic.541469. 909-622-7994.

AFFORDABLE. Traditional or
green options. Custom work.
No job too big or too small.
20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates.
Lic.721041. 909-228-4256.
www.vjpaint.com.

Patio & Decks


ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair.
Concrete, masonry, lighting,
planters and retaining walls.

909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243

Plastering & Stucco

TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at


the Claremont Forum in the
Packing House. Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday afternoons/evenings. All levels welcome. Excellent brain exercise
for seniors! 909-626-3066.

Painting
KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting,
40 years experience!
Competitive rates.
Small repairs.
No job too small.
References available.
We work our own jobs.
Carrie or Ron
909-615-4858
Lic.778506
D&D Custom Painting.
Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior
or exterior. Free estimates.
909-982-8024.

Plumbing

FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATES


Free Leak Detection,
$49-Drains, $199-Water
Heaters, $499-Slab Leaks
Insurance Approved Contractor
24-7 Emergency Service
All Credit Cards Accepted
CALL TODAY 909-466-6237

Haydens Services Inc.


Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL!
24-hour emergency service.

909-982-8910
* Senior discount *
Lic.359145
STEVES PLUMBING
24-hour service* Low cost!
Free estimates. All plumbing
repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection,
water heaters.Your local
plumber for over 25 years.
Senior discounts. Insured,
Lic.744873.
* 909-985-5254 *

Roofing
Custom Construction
Reroof Specialist
All types of roofing.
Dry rot, flat roof,
tile repairs.
Insured and bonded.
Lic.630203.

Mark 909-996-2981
GORDON Perry Roofing.
Reroofing, repairs of all
types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976.
909-944-3884.

Sprinklers & Repair


WASTING WATER?
Poor Coverage?
Sprinkler repair.
Installations
and modifications.
C.F. Privett
909-621-5388
Lic.557151

ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran,
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly

PLASTERING by Thomas.
Stucco and drywall repair
specialist. Licensed home
improvement. Contractor
Lic.614648. 909-984-6161.
www.wall-doctor.com.

New, repairs.
Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.

Plumbing

Call 909-599-9530 now


Cell: 626-428-1691

EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated.
30 plus years experience.
Expert plumbing repairs and
drain cleaning. Water
heaters, faucets, sinks,
toilets, disposals,
under slab lead detection,
sewer video inspection.
Licensed, bonded and
insured. Lic.917874.
909-945-1995
RENES Plumbing and AC. All
types residential repairs,
HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working
familys budget. Lic.454443.
Insured professional service.
909-593-1175.

DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install,


repair, automate. Since 1982.
Free estimates. Lic.540042.
Call 909-982-1604.

Tile

Tree Care
Johnny's Tree Service
Tree trimming
and demolition.
Certified arborist.
Lic.270275, insured.
Please call:
909-946-1123
951-522-0992
MANUELS Garden Service.
General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming,
general maintenance, tree
trimming and removal. Low
prices and free estimates.
Please call 909-239-3979.
Dale's Tree Service
Certified arborist.
Pruning and removals.
Drought tolerant planting
and design. Maintenance
specials. Over 30 years
experience.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381
TOM Day Tree Service. Fine
pruning of all trees since 1974.
Free estimate. 909-629-6960.
MGT Professional Tree Care.
Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree
care needs. Certified arborist.
Lic.836027. Matt Gray-Trask.
Call 909-946-7444.

Wallpaper
WALLPAPER
hanging and
removal by
Andrea. Environmentally
friendly.
30
years local experience. Free
estimates. Lic.844375. 951990-1053.

Weed Abatement
JOHNNY'S Tree Service.
Weed abatement/land clearing. Disking and mowing.
Please call 909-946-1123,
951-522-0992. Lic.270275.
TIRED of dealing with weed
problems on your lot or field?
Help control the problem in
an environmentally safe
manner. To receive loads of
quality wood chips. Please
call 909-214-6773. Tom Day
Tree Service.

MASTER tile layer. Quick

and clean. Stone and granite work. Residential, commercial. Lic.830249. Ray,
909-731-3511.

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care
service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal
hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house
keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are
available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance.
Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114
Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
Weed eating, mowing,
tractor fields,
manual slopes, hauling.

909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691

Window Washing

REGROUT, clean, seal, color


grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888764-7688.

26

NACHOS Window Cleaning.


For window washing, call nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Number one in LA
County.
SUNLIGHT Unlimited. Window and solar panel cleaning
team. Since 1979. Mike and
Greg 909-753-9832.

909-621-5626

LEGAL TENDER
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015244235
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as THE UPS STORE, 2063 Rancho Valley Dr.,
Pomona, CA 91766. Mailing address: 23728 Decorah Rd., Diamond Bar, CA 91765. Registrant(s):
BALNER CORPORATION, 23728 Decorah Rd.,
Diamond Bar, CA 91765.
This business is conducted by a Corporation.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Baljinder K. Sandhubasi Title: President
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 09/22/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: October 2, 9, 16 and 23, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015247179
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as ROORAH, 175 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Ste. 203,
Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): WCPS
MANAGEMENT ONTARIO INC, 175 N. Indian
Hill Blvd., Ste. 203, Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by a Corporation.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Damien M. Melle Title: CEO
This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/County
Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/24/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: October 2, 9, 16 and 23, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015241375
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as YAHAL ANTIQUE, 119 N. 7th St., Burbank,
CA 91501. Registrant(s): Grace G. De Guzman,
119 N. 7th St., Burbank, CA 91501.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Grace G. De Guzman Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 09/18/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: September 25, October 2, 9 and 16, 2015
APN: 8765-014-022 TS No: CA08000963-15-1 TO
No: 95307489 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU
ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST
DATED April 28, 2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY
BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN
EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On November 4, 2015 at 10:00
AM, near the fountain located in the Civic Center Plaza,
400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766, MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps, as the duly Appointed
Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust recorded on May 8,
2006, as Instrument No. 06 1001552, of official records
in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County,
California, executed by EDWIN P SALVERON, AND
NENITA T SALVERON, HUSBAND AND WIFE
AS JOINT TENANTS, as Trustor(s), in favor of
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC. as nominee for AMERICA`S
WHOLESALE LENDER as Beneficiary, WILL SELL
AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said
County, California describing the land therein as: AS
MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF
TRUST The property heretofore described is being sold
as is. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3184 FALLOW FIELD DRIVE,
DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765-3477 The undersigned
Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of
the street address and other common designation, if any,
shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant
or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal
sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with
interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if
any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees,
charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts
created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the
unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses
and advances at the time of the initial publication of this
Notice of Trustees Sale is estimated to be $780,934.53
(Estimated). However, prepayment premiums, accrued
interest and advances will increase this figure prior to
sale. Beneficiarys bid at said sale may include all or
part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will
accept a cashiers check drawn on a state or national
bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or
a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified
in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and
authorized to do business in California, or other such
funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event
tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustees Deed Upon Sale until
funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a
matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes
all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any
reason, the successful bidders sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and
the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Notice to Potential Bidders If you are considering bidding
on this property lien, you should understand that there
are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You
will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the
property. You should also be aware that the lien being
auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible
for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned
off, before you can receive clear title to the property.
You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this
property by contacting the county recorder's office or a
title insurance company, either of which may charge
you a fee for this information. If you consult either of
these resources, you should be aware that the same
Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of
Trust on the property. Notice to Property Owner The
sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the
California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not
present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your
sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the
rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property,
you may call In Source Logic at 702-659-7766 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site address listed below for information
regarding the sale of this property, using the file number
assigned to this case, CA08000963-15-1. Information
about postponements that are very short in duration or
that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not
immediately be reflected in the telephone information or
on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.
Date: September 29, 2015 MTC Financial Inc. dba
Trustee Corps TS No. CA08000963-15-1 17100
Gillette Ave Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-8300 TDD:
866-660-4288 Joseph Barragan, Authorized Signatory
SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON
LINE AT www.insourcelogic.com FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL:
In Source Logic AT 702-659-7766 MTC Financial Inc.
dba Trustee Corps MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT
COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A
DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE
USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ORDER NO. CA15003455-1, PUB DATES: 10/09/2015, 10/16/2015,
10/23/2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015244487
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
HAYDEN MIKHAIL, 228 West Bonita, Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: PO Box 121,
Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Hayden
Webb, 228 West Bonita, Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names
listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Hayden Webb Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
09/22/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: October 2, 9, 16 and 23, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME


File No. 2015245330
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
PEDROS LANDSCAPE, 2371 Kathryn Avenue,
Pomona, CA 91766. Registrant(s): Pedro N. Osorio,
2371 Kathryn Ave., Pomona, CA 91766.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business
under the fictitious business name or names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Pedro N. Osorio Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/County
Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/23/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which
it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as
provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it
expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth
in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered owner.
A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be
filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014,
the Fictitious Business Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize
the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in
violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or
common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and
Professions Code).
PUBLISH: September 25, October 2, 9 and 16, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015250799
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
SHER AND T, 15416 Talbot Dr., La Mirada, CA
90638. Registrant(s): 1.) Sherry Evans, 15416 Talbot
Dr., La Mirada, CA 90638. 2.) Tamara Nimeh, 13103
Los Alisos St., La Mirada, CA 90638.
This business is conducted by a General Partnership.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business
under the fictitious business name or names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Sherry Evans Title: General Partner
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
09/29/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which
it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as
provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it
expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth
in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered owner.
A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be
filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014,
the Fictitious Business Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize
the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in
violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or
common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and
Professions Code).
PUBLISH: October 9, 16, 23 and 30, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015254326
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
MERCIFUL ELIXIR, 2105 Foothill Blvd., Ste. F,
LaVerne, CA 91750. Mailing address: 6904 Oriolr
Ave., LaVerne, CA 90750. Registrant(s): Alyssa
Marchello, 6904 Oriole Ave., LaVerne, CA 91750.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business
under the fictitious business name or names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Alyssa Marchello Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/County
Clerk of Los Angeles County on 10/02/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which
it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as
provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it
expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth
in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered owner.
A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be
filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014,
the Fictitious Business Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize
the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in
violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or
common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and
Professions Code).
PUBLISH: October 9, 16, 23 and 30, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015250462
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
HANDS DOWN, 115 Harvard Avenue, Claremont,
CA 91711. Registrant(s): Thy Nguyen, 3878 Turquoise
Lane, La Verne, CA 91750.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business
under the fictitious business name or names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Thy Nguyen Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/County
Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/29/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which
it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as
provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it
expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth
in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered owner.
A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be
filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014,
the Fictitious Business Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize
the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in
violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or
common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and
Professions Code).
PUBLISH: October 9, 16, 23 and 30, 2015

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, October 16, 2015

NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE TS No. CA15-674917-AB Order No.: 730-1503894-70


YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED
OF TRUST DATED 4/25/2005. UNLESS
YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR
PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE
PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU
SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public
auction sale to the highest bidder for cash,
cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank,
check drawn by state or federal credit union, or
a check drawn by a state or federal savings and
loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial Code and authorized to do business in
this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee.
The sale will be made, but without covenant or
warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title,
possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the
Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges
thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances,
under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest
thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the
Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the
initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount
may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN
THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s):
NORMAN COMIA AND CORRINA
COMIA, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT
TENANTS Recorded: 5/2/2005 as Instrument
No. 05 1016307 of Official Records in the office
of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County,
California; Date of Sale: 11/2/2015 at 10:00 AM
Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in
Civic Center Plaza, located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $714,278.27 The
purported property address is: 1454 ASHLAND
AVE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 Assessors
Parcel No.: 8303-022-010 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering
bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a
trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not
on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at
a trustee auction does not automatically entitle
you to free and clear ownership of the property.
You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the
highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be
responsible for paying off all liens senior to the
lien being auctioned off, before you can receive
clear title to the property. You are encouraged to
investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by
contacting the county recorders office or a title
insurance company, either of which may charge
you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that
the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE
TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date
shown on this notice of sale may be postponed
one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary,
trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of
the California Civil Code. The law requires that
information about trustee sale postponements be
made available to you and to the public, as a
courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you
wish to learn whether your sale date has been
postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled
time and date for the sale of this property, you
may call 916.939.0772 for information regarding the trustees sale or visit this Internet Web site
http://www.qualityloan.com , using the file
number assigned to this foreclosure by the
Trustee: CA-15-674917-AB . Information about
postponements that are very short in duration or
that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may
not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best
way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee
disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of
the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or
other common designation is shown, directions
to the location of the property may be obtained
by sending a written request to the beneficiary
within 10 days of the date of first publication of
this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to
convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the
return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the
successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason,
the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only
to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser
shall have no further recourse against the
Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagees Attorney. If you have previously been
discharged through bankruptcy, you may have
been released of personal liability for this loan in
which case this letter is intended to exercise the
note holders rights against the real property only.
As required by law, you are hereby notified that
a negative credit report reflecting on your credit
record may be submitted to a credit report
agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your
credit obligations. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY
INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED
FOR THAT PURPOSE. Date: Quality Loan
Service Corporation 411 Ivy Street San Diego,
CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 916.939.0772 Or
Login to: http://www.qualityloan.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318
Quality Loan Service Corp. TS No.: CA-15674917-AB IDSPub #0092818 10/9/2015
10/16/2015 10/23/2015

27

SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE
INTRODUCED AT THE
REGULAR CLAREMONT
CITY COUNCIL MEETING
OF OCTOBER 13, 2015
(Full text of this ordinance is on file in the office
of the City Clerk and in the document archives
on the City website: www.ci.claremont.ca.us)
SUMMARY OF AN ORDINANCE OF THE
CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CLAREMONT, AMENDING AND UPDATING
CHAPTER 1.14 OF THE CLAREMONT MUNICIPAL CODE REGARDING AUTHORITY
OF CITYS TREE ARBORIST TO ENFORCE
MUNICIPAL CODE AND ISSUE ADMINISTRATIVE FINES AND PENALTIES.
The proposed ordinance will amend Chapter 1.14 of
the Claremont Municipal Code. Section 1.14.026
will be added to read:
1.14.026 Violations of Chapter 12.26 City Trees.
It is unlawful for any person to violate any provision of Chapter 12.26 of this Code. In addition to
those authorized to enforce all provisions of this
Code, if the City's designated arborist finds that a
provision of Chapter 12.26 has been violated, may
issue a citation contemplated and allowed by this
chapter to such person responsible for the violation.
Publish: October 16, 2015
MASSAGE BUSINESS ORDINANCES
SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NOS. 2015-09,
AND 2015-10
INTRODUCED AT THE REGULAR CITY
COUNCIL MEETING OF SEPTEMBER 22,
2015 AND ADOPTED AT THE REGULAR
CITY COUNCIL MEETING
OF OCTOBER 13, 2015
(Full texts of these ordinances are on file in the
office of the City Clerk)
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF
THE CITY OF CLAREMONT ADDING CHAPTER 16.099 TO TITLE 16 OF THE CLAREMONT MUNICIPAL CODE AND AMENDING
TABLE 2 IN SECTION 2.3.3 OF THE CLAREMONT VILLAGE EXPANSION SPECIFIC
PLAN FOR THE CITY OF CLAREMONT REGARDING MASSAGE ESTABLISHMENTS
AND MASSAGE PRACTITIONERS
and
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL
OF THE CITY OF CLAREMONT, AMENDING CHAPTER 5.36 OF TITLE 5 OF THE
CLAREMONT MUNICIPAL CODE REGARDING MASSAGE ESTABLISHMENTS
AND MASSAGE TECHNICIANS
THE FOLLOWING IS A SUMMARY OF THE
ABOVE TITLED ORDINANCES:
The Amendments to Title 16 (Zoning) and the
Claremont Village Expansion Specific Plan are as
follows:
1. The ordinance includes the addition of Chapter
16.099 to Title 16 and an amendment to the Claremont Village Expansion Specific Plan use chart to
add a requirement for a Conditional Use Permit and
to restrict the zones in which massage businesses are
permitted. All new and existing businesses will be
required to obtain a Conditional Use Permit within
one year from the effective date of the ordinance.
2. The Commercial Neighborhood (CN), Commercial Freeway (CF), and Mixed-Use 1 (MU1) zoning
districts will no longer permit massage businesses.
Two businesses will be considered non-conforming
and be given a one-year amortization period.
3. Massage businesses in the Business/Industrial
park district will only be allowed with a Conditional
Use Permit if massage services are ancillary to a
gym, health club, yoga studio, pilates studio, or other
similar use.
The amendments to Chapter 5.36 (Business Regulations) are as follows:
1. The exemptions section has been revised to address massage administered in direct connection
with medical uses, schools and events, coaches, and
trainers employed by accredited high school, community colleges, or universities while performing
under the scope of their employment.
2. Requirement for each massage business to maintain an employment list.
3. A list of massage services and cost of such services shall be clearly posted in an open and conspicuous place in the lobby area of the business.
4. A registry of all employees shall be kept and
maintained for inspection by representatives of the
City.
5. Each massage establishment or business shall
keep a written record of the dates and hours of each
treatment.
STATE OF CALIFORNIA
)
COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES ) ss.
CITY OF CLAREMONT
)
I, Shelley Desautels, City Clerk of the City of Claremont, County of Los Angeles, State of California,
hereby certify that the foregoing Ordinance Nos.
2015-09, and 2015-10 were introduced at a regular
meeting of said council held on the 22nd day of September, 2015, that they were regularly passed and
adopted by said city council, signed by the mayor,
and attested by the city clerk of said city, all at a regular meeting of said council held on the 13th day of
October, 2015, and that the same was passed and
adopted by the following vote:
AYES:
Councilmembers: Calaycay, Lyons,
Nasiali, Pedroza, Schroeder
NOES:
Councilmembers: None
ABSENT:
Councilmembers: None
ABSTAINED: Councilmembers: None

__________________________________
City Clerk of the City of Claremont
Publish: October 16, 2015

LEGAL TENDER
NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE TS No. CA14-615569-AL Order No.: 1604433 YOU ARE
IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST
DATED 11/21/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE
ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC
SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION
OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT
A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a
state or national bank, check drawn by state or
federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state
or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial Code and authorized
to do business in this state, will be held by duly
appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but
without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of
the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the
note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of
Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses
of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of
the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The
amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS
THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE.
Trustor(s): ANDREW J PEREZ AND IRENE
E PEREZ, MARRIED TO EACH OTHER
Recorded: 11/28/2007 as Instrument No.
20072615589 of Official Records in the office of
the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 11/6/2015 at 10:30AM Place
of Sale: Near the fountain located at 400 Civic
Center Plaza Pomona, California 91766
Amount of unpaid balance and other charges:
$352,971.83 The purported property address is:
639 W SAN JOSE AVE, CLAREMONT, CA
91711 Assessors Parcel No.: 8316-015-015 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are
considering bidding on this property lien, you
should understand that there are risks involved in
bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding
on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the
highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of
the property. You should also be aware that the
lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If
you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are
or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can
receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and
size of outstanding liens that may exist on this
property by contacting the county recorders office or a title insurance company, either of which
may charge you a fee for this information. If you
consult either of these resources, you should be
aware that the same lender may hold more than
one mortgage or deed of trust on the property.
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale
date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section
2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the
public, as a courtesy to those not present at the
sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date
has been postponed, and, if applicable, the
rescheduled time and date for the sale of this
property, you may call 888-988-6736 for information regarding the trustees sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.qualityloan.com ,
using the file number assigned to this foreclosure
by the Trustee: CA-14-615569-AL . Information
about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled
sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site.
The best way to verify postponement information
is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned
Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common
designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be
obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is
unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy
shall be the return of monies paid to the
Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have
no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for
any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be
entitled only to a return of the deposit paid.
The Purchaser shall have no further recourse
against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the
Mortgagees Attorney. If you have previously
been discharged through bankruptcy, you may
have been released of personal liability for this

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders rights against the real property only. As required by law, you are hereby
notified that a negative credit report reflecting on
your credit record may be submitted to a credit
report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of
your credit obligations. QUALITY MAY BE
CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND
ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE
USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Date: Quality
Loan Service Corporation 411 Ivy Street San
Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON
SALE information only Sale Line: 888-9886736 Or Login to: http://www.qualityloan.com
Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318
Quality Loan Service Corp. TS No.: CA-14615569-AL IDSPub #0093078 10/16/2015
10/23/2015 10/30/2015
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER
ESTATE OF DAYLE M. LITTLEFIELD
Case No. BP167302
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors,
contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of
DAYLE M. LITTLEFIELD
A PETITION FOR PROBATE has
been filed by Murray G. Monroe in the Superior
Court of California, County of LOS ANGELES.
THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Murray G. Monroe be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the
decedent.
THE PETITION requests the decedent's will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for
examination in the file kept by the court.
THE PETITION requests authority to
administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will
allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the
personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived
notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an objection to the
petition and shows good cause why the court should
not grant the authority.
A HEARING on the petition will be
held on Nov. 12, 2015 at 8:30AM in Dept. No. 79
located at 111 N. Hill St., Los Angeles, CA 90012.
IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the hearing and
state your objections or file written objections with
the court before the hearing. Your appearance may
be in person or by your attorney.
IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court within the later
of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative,
as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate
Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052
of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may
want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in
California law.
YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept
by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an
inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any
petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is
available from the court clerk.
Attorney for petitioner:
J BENJAMIN SELTERS III ESQ
SBN 082786
SELTERS & SELTERS
399 W MISSION BLVD
STE K
POMONA CA 91766
CN916701
Publish: October 16, 23 and 30, 2015
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER
ESTATE OF PATRICIA M. ARMENDARIZ
CASE NO. BP167373
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in
the will or estate, or both, of PATRICIA M. ARMENDARIZ; PATRICIA ARMENDARIZ:
A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by
PRISCILLA A. VAN SCOY in the Superior Court of
California, County of Los Angeles.
THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that
PRISCILLA A. VAN SCOY be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of the decedent.
THE PETITION requests the decedents will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any
codicils are available for examination in the file kept
by the court.
The PETITION requests authority to administer the

estate under the Independent Administration of Estates


Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions,
however, the personal representative will be required
to give notice to interested persons unless they have
waived notice or consented to the proposed action.)
The independent administration authority will be
granted unless an interested person files an objection
to the petition and shows good cause why the court
should not grant the authority.
A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD
IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS:
Date: November 25, 2015 Time: 8:30 A.M. in Dept.:
67 Room: located at:
Superior Court Of California, County Of Los Angeles,
111 North Hill Street
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Stanley Mosk Courthouse
IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you
should appear at the hearing and state your objections or
file written objections with the court before the hearing.
Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney.
IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a CONTINGENT
CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file
your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the
later of either (1) four months from the date of first
issuance of letters to a general personal representative,
as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate
Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of
the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal authority may
affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to
consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law.
YOU MAY EXAMINE THE FILE KEPT BY THE
COURT. If you are a person interested in the estate, you
may file with the court a Request for Special Notice
(form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal
of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided
in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special
Notice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Christopher T. Coffin, Attorney SBN: 60826
2208 Calle Margarita
San Dimas, CA 91773
Ph# (909) 592-0305
Publish: October 16, 23 and 30, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015257241
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
DINOS CHICKEN & BURGERS, 770 East Arrow
Highway, Pomona, CA 91767. Registrant(s):
METHUSELAH, INC., 770 East Arrow Highway,
Pomona, CA 91767.
This business is conducted by a Corporation.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious name or names listed above on 08/01/2015.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Ki Young Lee Title: CEO
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
10/07/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which
it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as
provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it
expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth
in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered owner.
A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be
filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014,
the Fictitious Business Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize
the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in
violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or
common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and
Professions Code).
PUBLISH: October 16, 23, 30 and November 6, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015257533
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as GILBERT F. IVEY & ASSOCIATES, LLC,
5430 Edgewood Drive, La Verne, CA 91750.
Mailing address: 1502 Foothill Boulevard, Suite
103, #442, La Verne, CA 91750. Registrant(s):
GILBERT F. IVEY & ASSOCIATES, LLC, 5430
Edgewood Drive, La Verne, CA 91750.
This business is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company.
Registrant commenced to transact business under
the fictitious name or names listed above on
09/26/2015.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Gilbert F. Ivey Title: President
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 10/07/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision

M ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE


1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711

EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
Celebrating Over 25 Years
Selling Real Estate in the Area

MALKA RINDE
Broker - Owner
BRE# 00545647

Bus: 909-625-2407
Fax: 909-621-2842
www.malkarinde.com

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, October 16, 2015

(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days


after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: October 16, 23, 30 and November 6, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015256926
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as GT STAINLESS CO, 124 San Lorenzo St.,
Pomona, CA 91766. Registrant(s): George Tec,
124 San Lorenzo St., Pomona, CA 91766.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ George Tec Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 10/06/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: October 16, 23, 30 and November 6, 2015
NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY
OF A RECIRCULATED
DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL
IMPACT REPORT
FOR THE PROPOSED
POMONA COLLEGE 2015
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN
AND NOTICE OF PRELIMINARY DESIGN REVIEW
OF THE NEW POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART PROJECT
The City of Claremont, as lead agency, hereby gives
notice that, pursuant to the authority and criteria contained in the California Environmental Quality Act
(CEQA) and the CEQA Guidelines, the City of Claremont has prepared and completed a Recirculated Draft
Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the proposed
Pomona College 2015 Campus Master Plan. The Recirculated Draft EIR is a partial recirculation of the
Final EIR, which was released to the public in March
2015, but was not certified. An EIR is an informational
document that evaluates a proposed projects potential
to significantly impact the environment, while also
identifying ways to reduce or avoid environmental impacts through mitigation measures and alternatives to
the project.
Document Availability: The Recirculated Draft
EIR will be available beginning on October 19,
2015 for public review and comment during regular business hours at the following locations, and
may also be viewed on the Citys website at
www.ci.claremont.ca.us:
Claremont City Hall, Community Development Department, 207 Harvard Avenue, Claremont, CA 91711
Claremont Public Library, 208 Harvard Avenue,
Claremont, CA 91711
Alexander Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Road, Claremont, CA 91711
Youth Activity Center, 1717 N. Indian Hill Boulevard, Claremont, CA 91711
Sections of this EIR that have not been changed since
availability of the previous (March 2015) Final EIR are
not included in this Recirculated Draft EIR. The March
2015 Final EIR is available from the City of Claremont.
Public Review Period: The City has made this Recirculated Draft EIR available for public review and comment pursuant to California Code of Regulations, Title
14, Section 15082(b). The comment period during
which the City will receive comments on the Recirculated Draft EIR is:
Starting Date: October 19, 2015
Ending Date: December 3, 2015
Comments: The City requests, in accordance with
California Code of Regulations, Title 14, Section
15088.5(f), that commenters limit the scope of their
comments to the information contained in the Recir-

28

culated Draft EIR, and reserves the right to respond


only to comments or portions of comments relevant to
such information. Comments must be submitted in
writing to the address below and received by the City
no later than 5:00 p.m. on December 3, 2015.
Belle Newman, LEED AP
Contract Planner
City of Claremont
PO Box 880
Claremont, CA 91711
Fax: (909) 399-5327
Email: bnewmanplanning@gmail.com
Project Location: The project area (also Plan Area
or campus in the Draft EIR) is the campus of
Pomona College in the City of Claremont, County of
Los Angeles, California. The campus of Pomona College is approximately 140 acres, and is roughly
bounded by First Street on the south, Eighth Street on
the north, Harvard Avenue on the west, and Mills and
Amherst avenues on the east.
Project Description: The proposed project consists of
a long range Master Plan for planned future improvements to the Pomona College campus over a period of
15 years from the date of City approval of the Master
Plan, plus associated actions. The broad parameters of
the Master Plan may be summarized as follows:
Enrollment increase of 50 students (from 1,590 to
1,640 students), a net increase of 26 student beds on
campus (from 1,534 to 1,560 beds), an increase of 30
faculty (from 192 to 222 faculty), and an increase of
30 staff (from 495 to 525 staff)
Removal of up to 126,700 gross square feet of existing facilities and construction of up to 608,200 gross
square feet of new facilities, for a net increase of
205,400 gross square feet of structural development
A net increase of 18 on-campus parking spaces
Campus lot coverage would increase from approximately 16% to approximately 18%
Pedestrian and bicycle improvements to improve
safety and clarify pedestrian and vehicular circulation
patterns
New and remodeled open spaces such as courtyards,
plazas, walkways, streetscapes, and landscaping
Significant new information in the Recirculated Draft
EIR includes:
Relocation of Renwick House to accommodate construction of the new Pomona College Museum of Art
project, and demolition of the rear structure
Incorporation of information relating to a sewer study
currently being prepared by the City, which has found
existing and expected future capacity deficiencies in
sewer lines serving Pomona College
Consistent with CEQA Guidelines Section 15088.5(c),
this Recirculated Draft EIR contains only the portions of
the March 2015 Final EIR that have been revised and replaced. The revised sections and appendices include:
Executive Summary
1.0 Introduction
2.0 Project Description
4.0 Environmental Impact Analysis
o 4.1 Aesthetics
o 4.4 Cultural Resources
o 4.13 Utilities and Service Systems
6.0 Alternatives
7.0 References and Preparers
Appendix C: Historical Resources Reports
Appendix H: Comments Received After Close of the
Public Review Period of the Original Draft EIR and
Before October 13, 2015
Appendix I: Pomona College 2015 Campus Master
Plan, September 2015
Potential Environmental Effects: Potentially significant environmental impacts were identified in the
following issue areas in the March 2015 Final EIR:
Aesthetics, Air Quality, Biological Resources, Cultural
Resources, Land Use and Planning, Noise, and Transportation/Circulation. This Recirculated Draft EIR
continues to identify potentially significant environmental impacts in these areas, but also in the issue area
of Utilities and Service Systems.
Commission Review: The Architectural Commission
is scheduled to review the Recirculated Draft EIR on
Wednesday, October 28, 2015. The meeting will be
held in the City Council Chamber, 225 W. Second
Street, Claremont, beginning at 7:00 p.m.
Pomona College Museum of Art: On October 28,
2015, the Architectural Commission will also conduct a preliminary review of the new Pomona College Museum of Art (PCMA), a project included in
the Master Plan. The proposed location for the new
PCMA is on the west side of College Avenue between Second Street and Bonita Avenue. The building area of the PCMA is 34,683 square feet.
In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities
Act (ADA), if you need special assistance to participate in the above-mentioned public meetings, please
contact the City Clerk at (909) 399-5461 VOICE
or 1 (800) 735-2929 TT/TTY. Notification three
working days prior to the meeting, or time when special services are needed, will assist City staff in assuring that reasonable arrangements can be made to
provide access to the meetings.
Future Notices of Project: If you would like to be
notified electronically about this project in the future, please provide your email address to Belle
Newman, Contract Planner, at (909) 399-5485 or
bnewmanplanning@gmail.com.
Publish: October 16, 2015

909.621.4761

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

29

Claremont Real Estate Market Snapshot

Friday 10-16-15

REAL ESTATE

September 2015

2015

Number of Homes Sold


Number Sold > $750,000
Number Sold < $750,000
Number of Short Sales
Highest Sale Price
Lowest Sale Price
Average List Price of Homes Sold
Average Sold Price
Average Days On Market

2014

36
8
28
0
$2,300,000
$242,000
$693,305
$674,956
51

Change From Previous Year

39
5
34
3
$2,700,000
$305,000
$637,017
$624,200
78

-8 percent
60 percent
-18 percent
-15 percent
-21 percent
9 percent
8 percent
-35 percent

September was another consistent month for Claremont home sales with no major drops or rises in sales numbers. Though the news broke in mid-September, perhaps the announcements from the FED that they would not
be raising rates had something to do with it. I recently saw interest rates for a 30-year loan just below four percent, which is still incredibly low and highly motivating for one looking to purchase right now. Inventory of available properties ended around 100 homes by the end of the month, which is typical for this time of year. Prices
were up quite a bit compared to last September, but a larger sample size would be a better indicator of actual
percentage increase in property values. The Year End Report will shine a much brighter light on the true increase. I believe as long as the FED keeps the rates where they are, we will continue to see a strong and steadily
rising real estate market.

Information provided by Ryan Zimmerman, Wheeler Steffen Sotheby's International Realty.


Contact Ryan at ryan@rrzimmerman.com or call 909.447.7707.

REAL ESTATE

(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com

Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!

The recent sale of our Claremont home presented some very


unique challenges. Carlos and Pat handled my former home
as if it were their own. They kept me informed,
responded with professionalism and reassurance, and made
sure that as their customers, my ex-husband and I were their
top priority. The house ended up selling for higher than
asking price. I recommend Carlos and Pat Samuelson with
complete confidence and a heart full of gratitude.
Janet Price, Claremont

CARLOS, 909-964-7631
PAT, 909-214-1002
Do you want to know what your home is
worth today? Visit our website at:
CarlosandPatSamuelson.SmartHomePrice.com
BRE# 01326104 & 01733616

Residential Investment Historical Green Short Sales

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-4 P.M.

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4 PM

New
Price!

1906 CLOVERDALE DRIVE, POMONA.

Listing Agent: Carol Wiese


Two bedroom home with refinished
hardwood floors, FA/CA, dual-pane
windows and remodeled kitchen
with granite counters. Freshly painted interior, drought-tolerant landscaping and covered back patio on
a spacious lot. $335,000. (C1906)

573 WAYLAND CT., CLAREMONT


Enjoy Claremont living in this affordable
Claremont PUD. This home has 2 master suites, one with a walk-in closet and
half bathroom downstairs. Open floor
plan, vaulted ceilings and a cozy rock
fireplace. Living area leads to a patio
with small yard. Newer carpet and
paint. Two-car attached garage with direct access. This complex has only 35
units and has been recently renovated
on the exterior. Walking distance to
Claremont Village, Colleges, MetroLink
and pooch park. $335,000. (W573)

758 W. 1ST ST., CLAREMONT


Three bedroom, 3 bathroom, Village
Walk townhome with many upgrades
including new A/C, interior paint and
stainless appliances. Other upgrades
include travertine and tile floors, granite counters and wood shutters. Vaulted ceiling living room, fireplace and
balcony off the master suite. Walk to
everything from this popular location!
$529,000. (F758)

383 BLAISDELL DRIVE, CLAREMONT This Mid-Century Modern, five

bedroom, three bathroom Criley-McDowell pool home is located in the coveted


Claremont Unified Chaparral school district. Light, bright and airy, the home has
two bedrooms and one bathroom in the front. There are two bedrooms, one of
which is presently an office with a door to the outside, and one bathroom in the
back. Bathrooms and kitchen have been remodeled. There is a complete, separate
guest house with its own kitchen and bathroom.

M
ADHU SENGUPTA
500 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont
www.callMadhu.com

(909) 260-5560

Congratulations to Carol Wiese

Top Salesperson for the 3rd quarter!

Carol Curtis, Broker

Sales Associates: Irene Argandona, Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills,


Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese
BRE#00979814

Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947

107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711

(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, October 16, 2015

30

Your trusted resource as you transition


through the new stage in your life...
Pamela Bergman-Swartz
REALTOR, Transition Living Consultant,
Seniors Real Estate & Certified Probate Specialist

8311 Haven Ave. Suite #180, Rancho Cucamonga


pamelabergman@ymail.com

(909) 636-2744
BRE#01899295

GEOFF T. HAMILL

Broker Associate, ABR, CRS, e-PRO, GREEN, GRI, SFR, SRES

GEOFF IS #1 IN CLAREMONT SALES & LISTINGS SINCE 1988

Celebrating over 25 years of service 1988-2015

Tell a Friend...

"Best Possible
Price Achieved,
Every Time!"

OPENHOUSESUN 1-4PM

New
Price!

COMING SOON:
Claremont Village Heritage House - $1,100,000
Northeast Claremont Pride of
Ownership - $750,000
La Verne Hillside View Lots - $650,000
Custom Designer Home Near Village - $650,000
Charming Cottage Near Village &
Colleges - $495,000
Live Oak Canyon Hillside View Lot Over
One-Acre - $275,000

FOR LEASE:

AWARD-WINNING CONDIT ELEMENTARY


SCHOOL DISTRICT - $550,000
Well-maintained home above Foothill Boulevard in coveted Claremont North neighborhood, convenient to
shopping, neighborhood park and K-12 schools. Quality built by Lewis Homes. Boasts three bedrooms plus a
library/den. Formal entry leads to family room with brick
fireplace. Cheerful kitchen includes an eating nook. Extensive built-ins and storage throughout. Gleaming oak
hardwood flooring. Central air conditioning and forced
air heating. Nearly 1/4-acre lot has a nice spacious yard
with sparkling swimming pool, plus extensive grass and
patio areas. (R910)

New
Listing!

750 SANTA BARBARA DRIVE, CLAREMONT


PRESTIGIOUS MID-CENTURY CUSTOM IN COVETED
TOWNE RANCH NEIGHBORHOOD - $600,000
Quality custom residence built by Guy Musgrove.
Sprawling one-story light filled floor plan perfect for
entertaining and family living. Cheerful spacious
kitchen with eating and office nook opens to friendly
family great room with second fireplace. Central air
and heating, copper plumbing plus multiple built-ins
throughout. Indoor laundry room. Beautifully landscaped deep and wide lot, approximately 1/4 acre
with expansive covered patio and spacious yard areas. (S750)

New
Listing!

North Claremont Condit School


District - $2,400 monthly

OLD CLAREMONT VILLAGE RANCH-STYLE


$665,000
Custom built home recently remodeled boasts redone kitchen with newer wood cabinets, granite
counters and eating area. Three potential bedrooms, two bathrooms and approximately 1850 sq.
ft. Third bedroom used as office/den (missing an entry door) with wood paneled walls and bookshelves.
Oak hardwood floors plus tile floors in kitchen and
bathrooms. Central air and heat. Two-car garage
plus carport. Approximately 1/4-acre lot with grassy
yard areas, tall mature trees and an attractive field
stone wall. (T683)

Sale
Pending!

GREEN!

SELLERS:
I have motivated and qualified buyers
looking for a Claremont home.
Please contact me today for a FREE
complimentary market analysis of your
property. Thank you!

909.621.0500
Geoff@GeoffHamill.com
D.R.E. #00997900

CLAREMONT VILLAGE CRAFTSMAN - $995,000


Two-story residence in a picturesque setting. Quality custom built and designed for first owners, Oliver and Francis DuVall circa 1912. Warm and inviting wrap-around front porch. Three bedrooms, a
study, office plus a den. Formal entry foyer accented with beautiful staircase. Unique architectural elements throughout. Beautiful oak hardwood flooring, multiple built-ins, sliding pocket doors and
more. Central air and heat. 10-year new roof. Twocar garage. Large deep lot approximately acre
with tall trees and spa in a tranquil setting. (S256)

NEWLY BUILT ECO-FRIENDLY GREEN HOME


$669,800
This newly built single-level home is presented by Crestwood Communities in north Upland. Features 2601 sq. ft.
of living space, four spacious bedrooms, three bathrooms
and an open concept floor plan. Enjoy the large kitchen
with its center island, granite countertops, breakfast bar,
nook area and all new stainless steel appliances. Energy-wise features include Low-E dual-pane windows, radiant barrier roof sheathing, high efficiency heating and
cooling equipment, tankless water heaters and is Green
Certified. This is a rare find, a brand new energy efficient
home with no HOA or Mello Roos. (K1061)

NEWLY RENOVATED NORTH CLAREMONT


CRAFTSMAN MASTERPIECE - $998,000
Quality rebuilt by Pruitt Construction in 2004. Completely remodeled home with downstairs guest
quarters. Prime Chaparral Elementary School district. Custom features include granite kitchen and
bathroom countertops, oak kitchen cabinets and
stainless steel kitchen appliances. Plantation shutters, dual-pane windows, oversized crown and base
moldings, hand-scraped wood floors in the great
room, dual CAC/FAH, solar electric system, saltwater pool and spa plus RV/boat parking with hookups. (M358)

For more information, photos and virtual tours, please visit www.GeoffHamill.com or call 909.621.0500

Mason Prophet, Voted Top Local Realtor


in the COURIERs Best of the Best Contest

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES

909.447.7708 Mason@MasonProphet.com

www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034


Read what my clients are saying.Visit
www.MasonProphet.com and click on "Testimonials,"
or find me on www.Yelp.com.

Mason is an excellent realtor. We commend him


for his diligence throughout the entire process of
selecting and purchasing our new property. We're
sure with his thoughtfulness and kindness he will
do very well in his chosen field of endeavor.
Garry & Dorothy L.

Local Expertise with a Global Reach


CE
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NORTH EUCLID CUSTOM

VIEW, VIEW, VIEW

This traditional custom home warms the heart at every turn. The large open foyer leads
you through the first and second floor of beauty and elegance set off by wonderful features
like the custom milled oak plank flooring and the floor-to-ceiling stone fireplace in the living room. Find oak hardwood detailing in the interior doors, decorative window frames and
French doors. Spacious and cheery gourmet kitchen inspires the chef with its specially
designed cabinetry including a center island, two ovens and breakfast area all framed
within a beautiful wood-beamed ceiling. Enjoy the expansive exterior of this prime property with wrap-around covered porch, gazebo, three-car garage and spectacular landscaping. Call today on this home with its top of Euclid location! $1,049,999. Lori Johnson
909-561-7338. (E2376)

Stunning views are yours in this gorgeous home on one-and-a-half acres, no expense was
spared! Find custom wainscoting, crown molding, designer flooring plus decorator touches
and spectacular views of valley lights and sunrises/sunsets. The new gourmet kitchen is a
chefs dream with all the desired amenities like the center island, granite counters and recessed lighting. Resort-worthy master suite is incredible with its serene private spa-like ensuite featuring high quality amenities. The ambiance continues outdoors with multiple covered
patio spaces, professional concrete work, lush landscaping and a sparkling pool with a cascading waterfall. This wonderful and relaxing outdoor oasis is topped off with amazing views.
Dont miss out on the opportunity to own this gem, contact me today for a private viewing!
$895,000. Leticia Guerrero 951-545-1763. (A12843)

G
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G
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CUSTOM MEDITERRANEAN

SPRAWLING SINGLE-STORY

SOUGHT-AFTER COMMUNITY

GATED COMMUNITY

This elegant estate showcases luxurious design and detail throughout. The magnificent
style from the formal living room with opulent
fireplace to the formal dining room that flows
to the dream kitchen. Relax with a book in the
cozy library/study. Over one-acre encompasses a pool, spa, tennis court, a built-in BBQ
and outdoor entertainment area. $2,350,000.
Lori Johnson 909-561-7338. (B902)

Fall in love with this home the moment you


drive up and see the lush green lawn and
newer windows. You will make many memories with family and friends as you gather
in the very large family room. Guests will
spill over into the spacious enclosed patio
room. There is new paint and carpeting
throughout! $388,800. Sandy Jones 909227-5538. (L1340)

Enjoy the outdoors in this development that


features two pools, basketball and tennis
courts and a club house! Not to mention the
peaceful property that has been upgraded
and is ready for you to move in and enjoy.
Kitchen with granite counters and four spacious bedrooms within walking distance to
Bonelli Park. $439,000. Jason Nagy 626244-5000. (R684)

This beautiful home is nestled in a private


neighborhood and features three spacious
bedrooms and bathrooms. Find wood laminate flooring throughout the downstairs which
flows from room to room in this open floor
plan. Fresh paint, recessed lighting, master
suite deck plus a private yard and patio.
$519,000. Jason Nagy 626-244-5000 or Lori
Johnson 909-561-7338. (M4321)

TUSCAN ESTATE
Find a rare combination of old-world charm
and impressive architectural features in this
estate designed for multi-family generational
living. There is a full guest house and separate living area. The gardens are a horticulturist's delight. Estate features two outbuildings,
a fire pit, outdoor BBQ with clay oven, koi pond
and more! $1,525,000. Laura Dandoy 909228-4383 (M615)

EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOM

DISTINCTIVE TOWNHOME

GREAT LOCATION

This stunning residence was originally designed


and built by the builder/contractor as his own personal residence. No expense was spared, from
the brick herringbone walkway to the gleaming
designer flooring to the custom cabinetry featured throughout. There is a gourmet kitchen,
downstairs master suite, bonus room and lushly
landscaped grounds. $1,198,000. Laura Dandoy
909-228-4383. (P2439)

Situated in a beautiful complex with a


stream that meanders through the green
belts, is this super clean unit featuring tile
flooring and a cheery kitchen with granite
counters, hickory cabinets and some
stainless steel appliances. Walking distance to local shopping and restaurants.
$260,000. Alexander Nagy 626-4371824. (I991)

Nestled in the foothills and situated on a


beautiful tree-lined street is this singlelevel home in north Glendora. Enjoy the
warmth of a fireplace in both the living
room and in the huge master suite. With
a little TLC you will have the home of your
dreams! $550,600. Leticia Guerrero
951-545-1763. (L355)

Prime Village West Location


101 North Indian Hill Blvd., Suite C1-208
Claremont, CA 91711