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International Journal of Agricultural

Science and Research (IJASR)


ISSN(P): 2250-0057; ISSN(E): 2321-0087
Vol. 5, Issue 4, Aug 2015, 353-356
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PERCEIVED IMPACT OF RICE FARMERS IN PRACTICING


INDIGENOUS TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE PRACTICES
V. MEENAKSHI1 & J.VENKATA PIRABU2
1

Reserch Scholar, Department of Agricultural Extension and Rural Sociology


Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India

Professor (Agriculture. Extension), Agricultural Research Station, Bhavanisagar, Erode, Tamil Nadu, India

ABSTRACT
The present study aims to develop an interpretation on Perceived impact of farmers in adopting indigenous
traditional knowledge practices in rice farming. The purpose is to study the perceived impact of rice farmers in various
dimensions such as psychological, environmental, economical and technological dimensions. This provides qualitative
results in assessing the perceived impact of the respondents. Perceived effectiveness of an indigenous agricultural practice,
greater would be the desire on the part of farmers to adopt it. It indicates the extent to which the indigenous practices
arouses the desire of farmers and induces them to accept it. Based on self- perceived rating procedure, the data on
perceived impacts on psychological, environmental, economic and technological dimensions have been collected. The
responses were obtained on 3 point continuum viz., fully, partial and nil. Mean scores were further worked out to draw
meaningful interpretations.

KEYWORDS: Perceived Impact, Indigenous Traditional Knowledge Practices and Rice Farmers
INTRODUCTION
Perceived effectiveness is the capability of a material or non-material object to produce something or to lead to
some consequences. Any practice to be widely adopted by the farmers must be effective in at least a few aspects. Perceived
effectiveness of an indigenous agricultural practice indicates the extent to which the indigenous practices arouses the desire
of farmers and induces them to accept it.
According to IIRR (1996), indigenous knowledge is useful in the following ways: IK is the basis for self-sufficiency and
self-determination for at least two reasons: a) People are familiar with indigenous practices and techniques b) IK draws on
local resources. Indigenous technologies and practices are often cheaper than modern practices.
It provides rationale and sensibility to integrate IK into development, for the simple reason that it is less
expensive, readily available, environmentally appropriate and familiar, and most important of all, it has a proven record of
effectiveness (Emadi, 1998). Compared to very many modern technologies, traditional techniques have been tried and
tested and are found to be effective, inexpensive, locally available and culturally appropriate and, in many cases, are based
on the principles of preserving and building on the patterns and processes of nature (Grenier, 1998).
Parvathi et al., (2000) concluded in their study that indigenous post harvest practices were perceived by the farm
women as economically feasible and user-friendly. The indigenous post harvest tools used by the women were made by
local artisans, using low cost resources, which were locally available and they were easy to repair and to maintain and they
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354

V. Meenakshi & J.Venkata Pirabu

did not require a higher degree of technical skill.


The traits of IAPs formed the basis for working out the Perceived Effectiveness Index (PEI) of indigenous
practices in this study. Twelve traits were identified using rigorous methods such as Relevancy Ratio, Test of Reliability
and Tests of Validity. Out of 35 IAPs studied on rice cultivation, a majority of 27 (77.14%) were identified as effective and
the rest of eight IAPs (22.86%) as less effective. (Sundaramari, M and T.T. Ranganathan, 2013).

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Based on self- perceived rating procedure, the data on perceived impacts on psychological, environmental,
economic and technological dimensions have been collected. The responses were obtained on 3 point continuum viz., fully,
partial and nil with scores 3, 2 and 1 respectively. The respondents were given with statements in each dimension and
scores were obtained. Mean scores were further worked out to draw meaningful interpretations.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS


The findings related to perceived impact of respondents are presented in the Table 1 and Table 2.
Table 1: Perceived Impact in Psychological Dimensions & Environmental Dimensions
S. No.

Respondents
(N=240)*
Mean score Rank

Perceived Impact

I
Psychological dimensions
1.
Best option for sustainable agriculture
2.
Best to adopt
3.
Best eco-friendly method
II
Environmental dimensions
1.
Unique to a given culture or society
2.
Improvement in soil fertility
3.
Free from pollution
*-Multiple responses Overall mean score =1.359722

1.77
1.42
1.34

I
III
IV

1.25
1.22
1.43

V
VI
II

From the above table, it could be interpreted that in the case of psychological and environmental dimensions, best
option for sustainable agriculture (1.77), free from pollution (1.43) and best to adopt (1.42) had perceived as better scores
compared to the overall mean
The respondents perceived, best eco-friendly method (1.34), unique to a given culture or society (1.25) and
improvement in soil fertility (1.22) possess low mean scores than the overall mean score. In overall, adoption of
indigenous traditional knowledge practices enhanced these perceived impacts of the respondents.
Table 2: Perceived Impact in Economic and Technological Dimensions
S. No.

Perceived Impact

I
1.
2.
3.

Economic dimensions
Successful practice
Less dependent on outside supplies
Often cheaper
Improvement in income
Cost- effective
Minimize risk
Technological dimensions

4.
5.
6.
II
Impact Factor (JCC): 4.7987

Respondents (N=240)*
Mean Score
Rank
0.91
1.31
1.27
1.29
1.30
1.23

X
II
VI
IV
III
VIII

NAAS Rating: 3.53

355

Perceived Impact of Rice Farmers in Practicing


Indigenous Traditional Knowledge Practices

Table2 : Contd.,
1.
Adapted elsewhere
2.
Familiar
3.
Easy to understand
4.
Easy to handle and maintain
*-Multiple responsOverall mean score =1.245417

1.22
1.28
1.36
1.26

IX
V
I
VII

From the Table 2, it could be interpreted that with respect to economic and technological dimensions, Easy to
understand (1.36), less dependent on outside supplies (1.31), Cost- effective(1.30), improvement in income (1.29), Familiar
(1.28), Often cheaper (1.27) Easy to handle and maintain (1.26) were the major impacts as reported by the respondents.
Minimize risk (1.23), adapted elsewhere (1.22) and successful practice (0.91) were the other impacts as reported. All these
perceived impacts might be due to their awareness and adoption of indigenous traditional knowledge practices in their rice
farming.

CONCLUSIONS
All these perceived impacts might be due to their awareness and adoption of indigenous traditional knowledge
practices in their rice farming.

REFERENCES
1.

Emadi, M.H.1998. IK: Sustainability and empowerment. Indig. Know& Devt. Monitor, 6(3): 16.

2.

Grenier, Louise.1998. Working with indigenous knowledge. A guide for researchers. International Development
Research Centre (IDRC), Ottawa, Canada.

3.

IIRR. 1996. Recording and using indigenous knowledge: A manual. International Institute of Rural
Reconstruction, Silang, Cavite, Philipppines.

4.

Parvathi, S., K. Chandrakandan and C. Karthikeyan, 2000. Women and dryland post harvesting practices in
Tamil Nadu, India. Indig. Know & Devt. Monitor, 8(1): 13-16.

5.

Sundaramari, M and T.T. Ranganathan (2013) Indigenous Agricultural Practices for Suatainable Farming.
Agrobios, Jodhpur.

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