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Village Venture

October 2015

CLAREMONTS 34TH ANNUAL ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR

Ghost Walk
Tales from the
dark side, p10

Every day is Halloween! p26

Courier
Claremont

claremont-courier.com

Archives reveal towns tricky past, p21

Whats inside: Venture map/p4, event festivities/p5, booth listings/p6 Online: Haunted photo gallery on claremont-courier.com

Village Venture 2015

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

Ghost stories
Claremont Ghost Walk: Tales from the dark side.

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Halloween town
City opens window on Da de los Muertos.

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A history of grief
COURIER archives reveal towns tricky past.

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The art of A. G. Castaneda


One local artist explores the shadows.

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Every day is Halloween


COURIER bloggers visit The Theatre Company.

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VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

Event festivities: Saturday, October 24, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Rain or shine


he Claremont Chamber of
Commerce is proud to announce
the 34th annual Village Venture
Arts and Crafts Faire. The streets of the
Claremont Village will be lined with
over 475 booths selling an assortment
of merchandise, including original
handmade crafts, jewelry, clothing
accessories, original paintings, ceramics, glass and photography. This is the
perfect place to kick off your holiday
shopping. Youll find something unique
for everyone on your list!

Great Pumpkin Carving Contest


Sponsored by Claremont Sunrise Rotary
Take your pre-carved pumpkin to the Great Pumpkin
Patch (corner of Bonita and Harvard avenues.)
between 8:30 and 9:30 a.m.
Fill out registration form when you drop off your precarved pumpkin.
Prizes will be awarded at the Great Pumpkin Patch at
2 p.m. Participants must be present to win.
Pumpkins must be picked up between 2 and 4:30 p.m.
Unclaimed pumpkins will be discarded after 4:45 p.m.
Childrens Halloween Costume Parade
Parade will begin at 9:30 a.m. All participants must
assemble on Bonita and Harvard avenues by 9:15
a.m. (No motorized vehicles).
Parade will be led by the El Roble Marching Band.
Participants will receive goodie bags at the end of the
parade, sponsored by Moultrie Academy of Music,
Voice and Dance.
Musical Entertainment - throughout the day
Sponsored by Casa Colina
Moultrie Academy of Music, Voice and Dance at the
Claremont Depot from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff


The El Roble Intermediate School color guard and marching band led the costume parade at last years Village Venture
street fair. The parade, which is held early Saturday morning, is a popular feature of the yearly extravaganza.

Hanks Cadillac at the Claremont Depot from 2 to 4:30 p.m.


Folk Music Center at booth #277.

city streets including the Metrolink at College/First


Parking Structure, West First and Oberlin.

Food Court
Booths located on First Street between Yale and
Harvard avenues.

Shuttle
Free service available between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m.
with buses every 10 to 15 minutes. Last shuttle pickup is at 5 p.m. Handicapped accessible. Shuttle parking and pick-up is available at the following locations: University Facilities: First and Mills, Taylor
Hall parking lot: Scripps/Indian Hill, and St.
Ambrose Episcopal Church: Bonita/Mountain. The
shuttle drop-off point can be found at the Metrolink
Parking: College/First.

Business and Organization Booths


Booths located on First Street between Harvard and
College and between Yale and Indian Hill Boulevard.
Parking
Parking is available in any city parking lots and along

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

Village Venture Booth Listing


Apparel and Accessories
Space# Company
104
No & Yo
108
Country Attic Boutique
109
The Dragon Flame Shop
111
Linda's Crafts
116
Sinns Art
124
Ribbon Fairy Boutique
130
Designs by Ursula
135
Dress to Kill
162
John A. Conroy
168
Laurie Jo Designs
176
Just Buddha, Inc.
178
Blue River
183
Shakeel's Concepts
187
Simply Roses
190
Dustin and Daisy
194
Orangheat
204
Linda Stevens
212
Thai Dye
213
Sun Hwa and Co.
218
Yoney's One Of A Kind
224
Jessie's Girl Couture
241
Anantara
242
Cathy's Collectibles
251
Scents 2 High Heaven
276
Graces Design
293
Freaky Wallets
296
An Original to Remember
302
Diane Country Corner
304
SorellaBella Designs, LLC
305
Greenwood Goodies

306
313
315
319
324
339
344
363
366
376
378
385
393
397
408
411
412
414
422
433
434
454
465
468
470
474
484
504
507
512
535

Kelly's Hartstrings
Recyclicious
elle-ments
Ames Creations
Bad Pickle Tees
Marcy's Bendable Hair Clips
Angel Girlz
Bag Lady
JWT Gnome
Maria
McGowan Studios Selling
Ecofunwear
KBD Studio
Jackapotamus
Blazin Trails
Pontigo
ini creations
Martha's Special T's
Cheyr-D-Zigns
Audrey Durnan
Trimitive
Rainbow Tie-Dyes
Not Made in China
Margaret George
Backseat Driver
Floradora Hats
Jones & Johnson Gourd Crafts
Captured Colors
Mod Clothing
Pure Intent
Nite Owl Ink
TLG Clothing

538
554
556
558
602
604
609
611
613
Arts
Space#
121
132
165
189
233
236
255
263
285
287
328
334
341
346
350
361
383
413
416
431

TLC Travel Laundry Company


GMH Designs
Jest for Fun
Ecowear Apparel Co.
Photo-Kraze
PurseSnippity
Womanhood Collection
Silly Yeti
aCutee

Company
Sunset Wave Art
Sun Lovers Place
Elizabeth Carr
Art by Ora
Quirino
Jason Mernick Metal Art
MOA Fine Art
Primordial Profiles
Piri Mee Studio
Aiko Institute
Patrick Morgan Artisan
Robert Marble
Pipers Photography
Daisy Punk, LLC
Maynard Breese Artist
Michelle's Art Design
Grant Bathke
NTKS
Jeanne Dana Paper and Stone
The Art of Robert Tyler

442
453
472
490
501
508
551
617

Fiendish Thingies
Elizabeth Butterfield
Don Schimmel Photography
Zuniga's Art
Art By Opoku
Jolana Pineda
Jutta Mayrl
Dorothy Wallace Photography

Businesses and Organizations


Space# Company
701
Such-A-Deal
703
Candlelight Pavilion
704
Crossroads
705
Our Lady of the Assumption School
707
Inland Valley Humane Society
& SPCA
708
Classic Elegance Video Photo
& Media Transfer
709
Kiwanis Club of Claremont
710
Citrus College
711
Eric Martinez State Farm Insurance
712
California Pest Management
713
Justin A. Shuffer, DDS
714
WSR Real Estate Sales
& Management
715
Silpada Designs
716
California Computer Schools, Inc.
717
360 Remodeling
721
DoubleTree by Hilton Claremont
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722
723
724
725
726
727
728
729
730
732
733
734
735
736
741
742
743
744
745
746
747
748
749
750
751
752
753
754
755
756
757
758

WIA Warner Ins Agency


Claremont Heritage
Claremont Chiropractic
Foothill Country Day School
Ophelia's Jump Productions
League of Women Voters Claremont
Claremont Bible Chapel
Saint Mark Episcopal School
Atlas Spinal Care
Solar City
LA Times
The Leather Boutique
Democratic Club of Claremont
CJC Marketing
Massage Envy
Claremont Craft Ales
Sonnie Faires Nerium International
Claremont Community School
of Music
Pilgrim Place
Western Christian Schools
The Claremont Forum
Plume Ridge Bottle Shop
Sekai Black Belt Academy
RE/MAX Resources
Trinity Youth Services
Claremont HS Theatre
Pomona College
Claremont Modern Dentistry
Bungalow 360
Village Network Africa
U.S Bank
Daily Bulletin

759
760
761
762
771
772
773
774
775
776
777
778
779
780
781
782
783
784
785
803
804
805
806
807
808
809
810
811

Tupperware
Nation Wide Real Estate Executives
ITT Technical Institute
Temple Beth Israel Preschool
Moultrie Academy of Music,
Voice & Dance
VNA Hospice & Palliative Care
Southern California
Pomona Valley Audubon Society
Southern California Golden
Retriever Rescue
Real Connections: A Village of
Community Senior Services
Pomona Valley Hospital
Medical Center
Claremont Museum of Art
Harry C. Brown, DDS
Origami Owl
Granite Creek Community Church
Sam & Alfreda Maloof Foundation
for Arts and Crafts
Pomona Catholic School
It Works- Independent Consultant
Saint Johns Sponge Co.
Int'l Lutheran Laymen's League
Claremont Yes on Public Safety
Intelligent Floor Solutions
Turf-n-California
Unleashed by Petco
Lucky Feet Shoes
Abundant Life Chiropractic
Next Door Solar
Perry's Collectibles
United Nations Association of
Pomona Valley

814
815
816
817
818
819
820
822
823
824
825
826
827
828
829
830
831
835
836
837
838

Cruise One Hathaway Vacations


Mijac Alarm
Kundalini Inspired Creations
Panache
Solid Rock Church
Claremont Unified School District
Initials, Inc.
Inland Valley Repertory Theatre
Laga Handbags
St. Luke Lutheran Church
Organic Wellness Center
Priceless Pet Rescue
AMO Marketing
Pomona Unified School District
Child Development
Link Educational Institute
ADT Security Services
Elvi Bath Bombs & More
Light 4 Life- University of La Verne
Sottobosco
Tri-City Mental Health
Urban Soul Oils

Ceramics
Space# Company
126
Barbara Lamb Ceramics
140
The American Museum of
Ceramic Art
182
JPW Pottery
222
Pako Lazo
234
Symphony of Creative Expressions
240
Cactus Jack Ceramics
284
Of The Earth Ceramics
292
Mary Swann

320
327
381
386
401
404
425
426
443
455
483
583

ShaJa Ceramics
Jan Cabrera
Malgosia Nowakowski
Rica Aghasi
Beyond Blue Ceramics
Venier Ceramics
Cardoza Pottery
Ellen Williams Ceramic Art
Squires Ceramic Studio
Potter of LaQuinta
Fabrile Studios
Ramona Paloma Tile Studios

Crafts
Space#
106
107
125
138
163
166
188
191
193
206
215
217
252
273
295
303
314
321

Company
Gerda Mason
Carl's Welding
Suzanne's
Curmudgeon Cards
Busy Brushes
Starfish Are People Too
The Happy Golfer
One Crafty Mess
The Smoke Stack Co.
I am Mandy Made
3 Dog Design
Dots Daughter Designs
Stone Struck
Pixie Village Cottages
Judy Morrison
Daisies
Stillwater Co.
Chicken Lips

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338
343
347
349
365
368
387
388
391
394
396
402
406
409
415
429
445
462
467
475
486
503
506
513
561
605
607
610

Grain in Focus
Kathleen Miller
Sun Kissed Herbal
Antiquity Body Care, LLC
Kori M. Capaldi
Baby Cadeaux
Cuddle Cups
Service Center for Independent Life
Craft 4 U
Elva Rodriguez
Inner Sol Body Essentials
Everyday Crafts Shop
Essential Addictions
Blossom Soap Co.
Body Scentsations
Larcon Products
Friends 1st Crafters
Judy Day
Country Neighbor Crafts
Heather's Cards
American Vintage Fare
Papermade Craft Shop
Botanicals by the Sea
Dianna's Gourds-n-Crafts
Martel Crafts
Broney Distributing
Elaine Cobb
Tarnished Angels
Kat's Dollies

Floral and Garden


Space# Company
117
Woodland Creations

167
225
244
247
260
297
310
311
326
337
390
457
476
532
579
601

Frank's Bonsai
Cheep "Housing"
Lily's Florist & Gifts
S.C. Ironworks
Janet Jobe
Clay Do Flowers
Glass Garden Diva's
WS Home Craft
Vintage Chimes
Dennis Shaw Artist
Monalisa's
Pacific Winds
Windancer
Old Mexico Arts & Crafts
Violet Perfection by Gini
Barbara Larson/Art Metal

Food Court
Space# Company
521
Rosa's Tacos
522
Gourmet Blends
523
Pams Sweet Shack
524
Charlas
525
All Stars Dips
526
Cjontes
527
Fallen Fruit from Rising Women
528
Korean BBQ
529
Green Mango Thai Bistro
530
Planet Cookies
531
Bert & Rocky's Cream Co.
562
Olive Avenue
563
Indonesian Satay
565
Pine Haven Caf and Catering
566
Diamond Valley Gourmet
567
JB's Famous BBQ

568
569
570
571
572
573
574
575

Bubba's Jerky
The Tamale Guy
Garysseasoning
Justin Popping Good Corn
Marco's Produce
Bamboo Hut
Fresh Squeezed Lemonade
Now You're Poppin

Glass
Space#
128
134
170
186
257
281
318
377
423
444
481
491
555
560
603

Company
Michael Foster, Stained Glass
Follies
Jerry Lin
KS Creations
Glass Action Studio
Second Tyme Chimes
Beads Bottles and Bags by ME
M.Newmark Crystal Glass Nail Files
David Tate Blown Glass
Judy's Fusion
Caruso & Foschi Designs
Hand Blown Glass by Ivan Adaniya
Creative Glassworks by Christina
Jeff Price Art Glass
Phantasia Art Glass

Home Decor
Space# Company
302
Diane Country Corner
112
Brenda Landon
114
Aprons, Etc.
122
Kathy Bell
174
HWL Tablecloth Sales
175
Cindy Whitehead

179
192
195
214
249
274
282
307
308
316
317
323
329
335
342
348
352
364
371
374
380
395
398
430
450
464
488
493
511
533
553
559
606

Leaf Motif
D's Designs
My Mother's Daughter
Wine Country Candles
Classy Sassy Sisters
Sew Rockin Designs
JL Company Market Baskets
Quillos by Pat
Vintage Rhodes
Happy Shacks
Waycool Candles
Oilcloth Alley
Vineglow
3 Old Hens
Cakes in Bloom
Blue Violet Muffin
Southern Charms
Pillow Picasso
Autumn Enchantment
Blankety Blank Designs
Outrageous Embroidery
RJ's Unique Boutique
Stella Star
Yu-neek
Stella Divina
Summerfield Candles
The Om
Natural Body & Bath
Good Vibrations
Handmade by Karen
Rena Howe Design
Cuzi's Custom Crafts & Embroidery
Susie Sew 'n' Sew
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615

Royal Quilts and Beads


Little Shop of Guitars

Jewelry
Space#
110
115
123
127
129
131
133
136
139
164
181
185
211
216
223
235
248
253
258
272
275
278
283
286
294
309
312
322

Company
Taj Taj Designs
Personal Touch
Silver Spoon Jewelry
Creations By Krys
Milestones
On The Rawks
Allan Mason
Rone Prinz
Helen Crisp
Elizabeth Carr
Sanderra
Exotika Fashion
Ancient Echoes
Sharon Kaplan Jewelry
Kay Taylor Handcrafted Jewelry
Atelier Akion
Voz Jewelry
William Harrold Design
Mi Juleree
Jackie Cohen Jewelry Designs
Leather E
Kozakh
Cathy's Earcuffs
Riokko Design
Studio of Bob Johnson
Panache Jewelry
Tiffany's House, Inc.
Little Muse Designs

325
333
336
340
345
351
362
369
375
379
384
389
392
403
405
407
410
427
432
446
451
456
458
463
471
473
482
485
487
492
502
505
509
534

Teresa Thorn Design


Excavade
Tommy Lane Jewelry
Joy's
Rica Jewels
Anni Designs
Stapleton-McErlane Designs
The Lath Straw
Rewind
Arts Anvil
Forkedelic
Winters Designs
Bali Buddha
JX-Style
CharlaRae
Janet Bergner
Color Conscious
Shell-Bell Designs
Jay Simmons Designs
Personal Touch Designs
Beth Kukuk Handcrafted Jewelry
Adornments
J. Dubson - Design Odyssey
Sparkles by Sarwat
Porcelain Designs
Hasri Collection
Slavic Gifts
Andi Danie Designs
The Joan & Lucy Show
Jewelry by Peter
Created by Stephanie/The Roots
of Africa
Swan Jewelry
Victoria Duque Creations
Inner Earth Jewelry

537
552
557
578
582
608
612
616

Jewelry by Naomi
Eco-Je'
Despina Buoncristiani Couture
TLC Pearls
Wings Studio, Inc.
Sweets & Sparkles
Linda's Jewelry Creations
T Stones Jewelry

Music
Space# Company
172
Livingston Music
370
Arrow Records
Village Business
Space# Company
113
The Chama
141
Vintage Odyssey
173
The Bath Workshop
177
Healthy Hair Bar Salon and Wigs
201
Cheese Cave
202
Xerxes for Gents
203
Tocaja
205
Tattle Tails
221
Claremont Chamber of Commerce
231
The Diamond Center
232
Claremont Village Treasures
243
Some Crust Bakery
256
Podges Claremont Deli & Juice
259
Sunny Days
261
Amelie
262
Buddhamouse Emporium
277
Folk Music Center
331
City of Claremont
367
The Men's Shop

373
447
452
466
489
497
539
577
580

581
801
802
812
813
821
834

Himalayan Collections
Hendricks Pharmacy
Tintura Salon
Jacqueline's Home Dcor
Friends of the Claremont Library
Rio de Ojas
Aromatique Skin & Body Care
First City Credit Union
Mint Leaf Natural Products
& Massage
Escape Salon
Claremont Lock & Key
Art and Sol Fine Art Classes
Maple Boutique
Vom Fass
Bottega 25
Replay Vintage

Wood
Space#
105
161
171
180
184
207
291
372
428
461
469
494
510
536

Company
Zofia's Boxes
Grandpas Off His Rocker
Imagination Depot
rayroundsdesigns
GW Wilson Co.
Eduardo Fernandez
Gomez Carvings, LLC
James Hoover Woodworks
Birds Wood Shack
Hudson River Inlay
Wood Craft by David
Wood U Like
The Great American Toy Company
D and D Woodworking

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

10

Annual Village ghost walk rattles residents

n a place as old as Claremont, theres


bound to be a few spooky ghost stories peppered around town. The city
is full of beautiful old homes that have
tales of otherworldly mischief hiding
around every cobwebbed corner.

The Claremont Ghost Walk, now in its third year,


brought the City of Trees creepy history to the forefront on October 3 and 4. Organized by the Claremont
Girl Scout Troop 109, the event also featured a Gypsy
caravan complete with tarot readings, card tricks, fortune telling and a spine-tingling string quartet.
At the rear of the caravan, a projector screen played
scenes from classic horror films of the 1920s and
1930s, including Nosferatu, Dracula and The
Phantom of the Opera.
According to event coordinator Joan Bunte, the troop
created and staffed almost all of the booths at the
Gypsy caravan. It lets the Girl Scouts shine, she said.
The walk first started out as just a troop thing,
according to troop mom Holly Pugno. As it grew in
popularity, the girls teamed up with Ms. Bunte and
turned it into an event all Claremont families can enjoy.
This year, the event was completely sold out225
people enjoyed the frightening festival, according to
Ms. Pugno.
The centerpiece of the festivities was the walk itself.
Ms. Pugno, clad in a black cloak and holding an old
lantern, led the group through the Village to locations
that some say carry hair-raising histories.
Whether the stories are old or new, all the stories are
true, Ms. Pugno said. Nothing is made up.
The first stop on the tour was Some Crust Bakery,
a Claremont institution that apparently contains a
pesky poltergeist.
The building was originally constructed in 1889 as
Claremonts first general store and became a bakery in
1916. Throughout the years, employees and customers
have reported objects, ranging from coffee cups to 40pound menu boards, flying across the bakery.
In an alarming anecdote, one of the bakerys cake
decorators, Katrina, was working one evening when
a roll of cellophane launched from the shelf and landed on the table between her and her co-worker, as if
possessed by a malevolent spirit. Another cake decorator felt something hit her in the back, which turned

COURIER photos/Peter Weinberger


Stephanie Johnson of La Verne was all ears during the third stop on the tour at Olgas Underground
Furniture, located on 262 Fourth St. Before it was used as a one-stop shop for the dearly departed, a
man named Timmy tried to turn it into a hair salon. He never realized his vision, dying in the desert of
a drug overdose before his shop opened.

out to be a glob of buttercream frosting. Nobody else


was in the room.
Scott Feemster has experienced his run-ins with the
specter as well. One night, while working the graveyard shift to prepare pastries for the morning, Mr.
Feemster witnessed coffee cups careening across the
room. He was the only one in the room at the time.
The second stop on the tour was Barbara Cheatleys
gift shop. The proprietors tale didnt involve the store
itself, but instead took place at Ms. Cheatleys 1880s
Victorian farmhouse home in Ontario.
It began when Ms. Cheatley bought a long, narrow
antique
chest from a dealer. Once Ms. Cheatley brought
One of the many pit-stops for the Ghost Walk in the
the
chest
home, people in the house began to see shadVillage is Some Crust on Yale Avenue. Here Girl
owy
figures
in the corner of their eyes. Eventually,
Scout Jenna Heskin tells a ghostly story about the
much-loved bakery.

GHOSTWALK/continues on the next page

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

11

The fourth stop on the ghost walk tour was none other than Bridges Auditorium, Pomona Colleges famous theater. Staff and visitors insist the historic
venue is haunted.
GHOSTWALK
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apparitions revealed themselves in their full form.


One ghost was dressed in an old blue military coat
with brass buttons, and another was dressed in a gray
military coat. The two spirits appeared frequently in
different parts of Ms. Cheatleys house, including on

her driveway and in the bathroom.


The ghosts even bothered guests in Ms. Cheatleys
home, at one point causing a worker who was remodeling her home to pack up his tools and leave.
Eventually, Ms. Cheatley found out the antique
chest was actually something more macabre: a
holding coffin, used to temporarily house dead bod-

ies during the Civil War.


The third stop on the tour was Olgas Underground
Furniture, located on 262 Fourth St. Before it was used
as a one-stop shop for the dearly departed, a man named
Timmy tried to turn it into a hair salon. He never realized his vision, dying in the desert of a drug overdose
GHOSTWALK/continues on the next page

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

GHOSTWALK
continued from the previous page

before his shop opened. It remained


vacant for a short time before it was
once again turned into a hair salon.
During the houses second salon stint,
strange things began to happen. One of
the stylists, Ray Riojas, felt a creepy,
otherworldly presence touch his shoulder and send a chill through his body.
When Mr. Riojas turned around, he
saw a dark, shadowy figure turn the corner at the end of a hallway. He could
only make out a vague description of
the visitor: a man wearing a black mink
coat with shoulder-length hair.
When a beauty representative arrived
at the shop, Mr. Riojas described the
strange encounter to him. The shocked
representative told Mr. Riojas the figure was none other than Timmy, the
doomed entrepreneur.
From that time, ghostly encounters
regularly occurred, even after Mr.
Riojas and his wife left and a floral
shop opened at the space. To ward off
Timmys spirit, the new owners burned
sage in the house. But once they
returned the next day, every flower in
the house was frozen solid.
The fourth stop on the tour was none
other than Bridges Auditorium, Pomona
Colleges historic and famous theater.
Legend has it that a handyman named
Walter, who was working on the auditorium and adored the building, fell to
his death from the rafters during construction.
According to storyteller Chuck Ketter,

COURIER photos/Peter Weinberger


Organized by the Claremont Girl Scout Troop 109, the ghost walk also featured
a Gypsy caravan complete with tarot readings, card tricks, fortune telling and
a string quartet just outside Hendricks Pharmacy on Harvard Avenue.

Walter never really left the theater he


loved so much. Over the years, people
have seen his figure in the corners of
their eyes, and stage lights have been
tampered with when nobody was
around.
When the theater was used during
filming of the television show The West
Wing, a crewmember taking a break in

the restroom had a close encounter with


the spirit world.
While he was washing his hands, he
felt a presence behind him, Mr. Ketter
said. He looks up in the mirror, and in
the reflection behind him, he sees a man
in 1930s clothing standing behind him
and looking at him. He quickly turned
to look, and there was no one there.

12

It seems as if Walter will always be a


part of Bridges Auditorium.
The fifth stop was at Pomona
Colleges Sumner Hall. According to
speaker Gina Capaldi, the hall was originally a hotel and is among the oldest
buildings in Claremont.
Paul and Gwendolyn Rose, who were
originally from the Midwest, were
guests at the hotel while looking for a
permanent place to live. Paul was a
womanizer and, after he was caught with
another woman, Gwendolyn was found
dead in the basement of the hotel. She
was said to have died of a broken heart.
Over the years, people who work in
the building have experienced strange
events. Frank Bedoya, Pomona Colleges
associate dean of campus life, has heard
doors slam in the basement area when
he was alone in the building.
Another school employee, Irineo De
Leon, saw Gwendolyn when locking
up the building for the night. After
checking for unexplained sounds coming from the basement, Mr. De Leon
saw the apparition of a woman in a
Victorian dress walking across the
basement and disappearing through a
closed door. After he opened the door,
the room was empty.
The sixth stop on the tour was the
stately Seaver House on College
Avenue. The house, built in 1900 by
Carlton and Estelle Seaver, was originally located on the corner of Holt and
Garey. It was moved to the Pomona
College grounds in 1979 after Mr. and
GHOSTWALK/continues on the next page

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

The fourth stop on the tour was Pomona Colleges historic and famous theater, Bridges Auditorium. Storyteller Chuck Ketter described the origin and
activities of resident ghost Walter.

13

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

GHOSTWALK
continued from the previous page

Ms. Seavers granddaughter, Nilla Seaver, died.


Nancy Treser Osgood, the colleges director of
alumni affairs, has worked in the building for 28
years and has experienced the ghost of Ms. Seaver on
numerous occasions.
Once, after Ms. Osgood shut off all the lights in the
house, the attic light was on when she returned the
next morning. Loud, disembodied sounds have been
heard coming from the attic over the years, becoming
so bothersome that Ms. Osgood once screamed into
the air for Nilla to quit making noise.
Immediately afterward, she heard a huge crash coming from the attic. When Ms. Treser Osgood raced
upstairs, fearing a file cabinet of important documents
had toppled over, there was nothing; everything was
where it should be.
This was Nillas way of saying, this is my house,
so she apologized. Ms. Pugno said.
As Ms. Pugno was delivering her story on Seaver
Hall, an eerie, unexplainable green light was faintly
flickering from a second-floor window. Was Nilla
Seaver listening?
The seventh and final story takes place at a private
residence on Springfield Street, about a mile south
from the Village. The house belongs to Beth Garvin,
the daughter of Ms. Bunte.
According to Ms. Pugno, the ghost of a little girl
haunts the house. At first, the family cat was seen hissing and arching its back at the closet in the room of
Ms. Garvins son, Jack. Then, some of Jacks electronic toys began moving on their own.
One evening, Jack saw the little girl sitting in the
corner of his room. Another time, he called his mother
into his room to tell her the ghost was writing on the
walls with a red marker. Ms. Garvin turned the light
on, and nothing was there.
After a few more instances of unexplained visions in

14

COURIER photos/Peter Weinberger


Claremont Girl Scout Troop 109 started the ghost walk tours at Harvard Avenue and Second Street in
Claremont. This year the tours were sold out, with 225 people taking part.

Jacks room, Ms. Garvin hired a medium to check the


house. As soon as the medium went into Jacks room,
she felt an eerie energy. When the medium asked if
anyone was there, the disembodied voice of a little girl
plainly responded, Yes.
The medium then concluded the closet in Jacks
room was a portal to the other side, and spirits were
using it to haunt Ms. Garvins house.
Throughout the tour, children were clutching their

parents sides as they learned about Claremonts


creepier side. As night fell, the stories began to take
a more sinister form, the darkness adding an unsettling ambience.
According to Ms. Pugno, there are new additions
every year to the ghost walk. One can only wonder
what terrifying tales will be added next year.
Matthew Bramlett
news@claremont-courier.com

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

18

Village businesses honor Da de los Muertos with


colorful, fanciful window displays

a de los
Muertos is a
holiday traditionally celebrated by
Hispanic families
and friends who
gather together to
pray for and remember loved ones who
have died. These
events take place on November 1 and 2,
and often people will build altars that
include family memorabilia and favorite
foods and beverages of the deceased.

Latin-flavored gift shop Rio de Ojas on Harvard


Avenue celebrates this occasion with their own Day of the
Dead altar, which commemorates loved ones from owners Ray and Terri Riojas families.
A local way to commemorate this festive time is to
paint fanciful skull images on windows. Some Claremont
Village businesses are immortalizing this ancient event
with more than 20 decorated windows.
DA DE LOS MUERTOS/continues on the next page

COURIER photos/Jenelle Rensch


ABOVE: A skeleton mermaid painted by Jordan
LoGiudice welcomes guests to the Packing House
gallery The Colony at Loft 204. FARLEFT: Another
window painting by Ms. LoGiudice is a peaceful
Da de los Muertos monk at Shraddha Meditation
Studio in the Claremont Packing House.

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff


LEFT: Two skeletons dance in a Da de los
Muertos painting on the front of Jacquelines
Home Decor.

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

19

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff


ABOVE: A famous Diane Arbus photo and Stanley Kubricks The Shining inspired the Da de los Muertos window display at Claremont Photo and Video. RIGHT: Olgas Underground Furniture has an ornately painted two-panel
window display depicting traditional sugar skulls.

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Four bedrooms and two bathrooms in a
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VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

20

DADELOSMUERTOS
continued from the previous page

Jacqueline Cook, owner of Jacquelines Home Dcor,


coordinated this celebration for the Claremont Village
Marketing Group.
Fanciful, colorful and glittered window masterpieces
may be viewed at Amelie, Aromatique Skin and Body
Care, Claremont Photo and Video, Espiaus Restaurant
and Cantina, Full of Life, Hands Down Nail Spa, Hands
Down Too, Hendricks Pharmacy, Ilo Collective,
Jacquelines Home Dcor, Kut Haus Salon, Laemmle
Theatre, Olgas Underground Furniture, ShraddhaMeditation Studio, Sonja Stump Photography, The
Colony at Loft 204, The Grove Vintage, The Last Drop
Caf, Village Postmark and Yogurtland.
Local artists who shared their interpretations of this
festive art form include Evelyn Acosta, Eddie
Cunningham, Debbie Fuentes, Sandy Garcia, Danny
Hinzo, Jordan LoGiudice, Suzanne Poulos and Kathy
Starke.

COURIER
photo/Steven
Felschundneff
Pedestrians
pass by Rio De
Ojas, where
they have displayed a Da de
los Muertos
altar for many
years.

Happy Autumn!

Have a great time at


Village Venture from...

Ellie Goritz

REALESTATEBROKER

Lic. #00466987

DEAR ELLIE, Thank you for all your

help in finding us a beautiful new home. We dont


know how you put up with us, but your patience
and hard work are really appreciated. M. G.
REAL ESTATE

2261 Marietta Ave., Claremont

OFFICE: (909) 624-8165


etgoritz@aol.com

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

21

Now and Then: The City of Trees once went wild on October 31

laremont is a pretty lively place


on Halloween nights. You have
families roving through the
Village, trick-or-treating and taking in
sights like the Howl-OWeen Dog
Costume Contest. You also have extra
police cruisers on the prowl, looking for
anyone who may have taken the wheel
after having a few too many.

Occasionally, an incident takes place, usually


involving an adult who has imbibed a surfeit of spirits. Such was the case in a rather amusing incident
that took place on Halloween night in 2014, as
recorded in the COURIER police blotter.
A Claremont police officer returned to his squad car
at about 2 a.m. after making an arrest. After hearing
NOWANDTHEN/continues on the next page

COURIER file photo/Robert Frampton


The Claremont volunteer fire department poses in
front of the station on Second Street, circa 1950.

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

22

COURIER archive
A T.G.&Y. advertisement
from the October 19,
1961 edition of the
Claremont COURIER
Shopping Bee showcases Halloween goodies from spooks to
clowns, witches to
queens...a costume for
every little boy and girl,
and just $1.98 each. Let
them choose their
favorite one, complete
with mask.

COURIER archive
The front page of the October 29, 1953 edition of
the Claremont COURIER highlights Halloween festivities, encouraging residents to enjoy community
events instead of causing grief. The article
states: The few who believe that Halloween night
gives them a license to destroy other peoples
property will find more than ghosts and goblins.
They will discover that [Chief of Police T. E.]
Swoveland has asked the Reserve police members
to assist that evening and has arranged for the use
of several extra vehicles as patrol units.

NOWANDTHEN
continued from the previous page

heavy breathing, he found a woman dressed in a


black cat costume passed out in the back seat. Police
speculated that, in her disoriented state, she may
have thought the vehicle was a taxi. The 25-yearold, who hailed from northern California, was
arrested for being drunk and disorderly and released
on $250 bail.
But despite the rare Halloween misadventure, its
nothing like the old days, when Claremont was infamous for its All Hallows Eve hijinks.
A story in the November 4, 1949 edition of the
COURIER, Halloween Score Tells Extent of
Damages in City, evokes the climate at the time,
when local neer-do wells chose to carpe noctem,
seize the night, in a reign of mischief.
The article related the following tally: Six palms
burned in five fires; 12 fireplugs opened; eight
minor fires in streets; six streetlights broken; six
windows smashed or shot at; and seven or eight
fences knocked down or damaged, among other
incidents.
Amazingly, the list was actually a sign of growing
civil obedience. The record appeared better than
last year, following published appeals against water
waste and vandalism, but was still far from spotless, it was reported.
A look at the headline of the aforementioned warning, printed on the front page of the October 29, 1949
NOWANDTHEN/continues on the next page

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

23

City of Claremonts Halloween Spooktacular

ponsored by the city of environment that is a safe


alternative to traditional doorClaremont and local
to-door trick or treating.
businesses, the
The event set for Saturday, October
Halloween Spooktacular pro31
from 1 to 4 p.m. in the Claremont
vides children ages 2 to 12
Village business district. Admission
with an unforgettable, fun and is free.
entertaining experience in an
A variety of roving entertainment

NOWANDTHEN
continued from the previous page

COURIER, shows that the city was facing familiar concerns: Gushing Fireplugs to be Serious
Offense on Halloween Due to Water Shortage.
Gushing fire hydrants and flaming palm trees are
OUT this Halloween because of the critical water
shortage affecting Claremont and other parts of
Pomona valley after a five-year drought, the newspaper noted.
If too much water was wasted via open hydrants
or was used to quench mischief fires, the article
warned, the city might find itself short of water
needed to fight a major fire.
Then Police Chief Paul Gordon expressed dismay
at the way the holiday seemed to transform residents
into Claremonsters: There have been few good
pranks or jokes observed here in recent years, and
far too many leading to vandalism.
The previous year must have been particularly
disheartening for Chief Gordon and his crew. The
article recalled the vandalism toll of Halloween
1948, which included no less than 37 fire-plug gushers, 11 torched palms and six other minor fires.
Local firefighters were right to be vigilant about
the water supply. Much like today, Claremont was
facing unusually high temperatures, as recorded in
the November 4, 1948 edition of the COURIER.
The front page included a weather update titled 20Year November Heat Record Set. November 1 and
2 had highs of 90 and 93, respectively. It had been
90 degrees on Halloween.
Heated Halloween mayhem continued apace for
the next several years. A 1954 post-mortem on the
holidays toll, Halloween Pranks Do Small Damage
Over 4-Day Period, gave a nod to the citys growing
reputation for ghoulish games.
All Saints Eve was a reasonably quiet one for
Claremont, but the pace picked up in the following
few days as belated celebrants got in their licks.
Two small rugs were stolen off a Ms. Norma
Woods porch, depriving her Cocker Spaniel
Blackout of his usual napping spot. A palm tree was
set ablaze in Oak Park Cemetery, and two residents
reported rowdy revelers emptying trash cans full of
garbage on their property.
Perhaps most outraged was a west Baseline resident who informed police that a gang of hoodlums had pelted her house with eggs.
Its been some time since the polices crackdown
on widespread Halloween hoodlumism warranted
front-page coverage. But update the police chiefs
name to Paul Cooper and the warning stands. Keep
it safe, sane and water-wise this Halloween. And
leave those palm trees alone!
Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

will be provided throughout the


Village, and many local businesses
and shops will be handing out candy
to children of all ages.
In addition to trick or treating from
2 to 4 p.m., free games, entertainment
and face painting will be offered at the
Depot from 1 to 4 p.m. A Howl-o-

Ween dog costume contest will commence at 2 p.m. and the Rainforest
Romp Animal show will take place at
2:30 p.m. At 3:30 p.m., kids are asked
to return to the Depot for a childrens
costume contest.
Call Human Services for more information at (909) 399-5490.

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

24

Local artist exhibits dark side

rtist A. G. Castaneda
or Gus, as many call
himis known for his
dark subject matter. With his
current exhibition at Claremont
gallery The Colony at Loft 204,
Mr. Castaneda challenges what
he calls the dark stigma.

I purposely juxtaposed symbols of life


and death, he said of the show, on view
in the Packing House venue through
October 31. With my artwork, I want to
change the viewers thoughts, or at least
make them question their thoughts, on
the symbols of life and death. It does

not always have to be dark.


In one piece epitomizing the artist's
milieu, a young woman wears a skull
topped with a crown, as if ready for a
monstrous masquerade.
If asked to describe his art, hell ask
you to describe it.
I don't feel my art is dark but, yes, I
do love the macabreclassic and traditional ghost stories and Halloween
hence my love for October, he
explained. Its my favorite time of
year, not just for Halloween but for the
season changing, the days getting
shorter, the smell of autumn.
Mr. Castaneda works mostly with
watercolor paints, then incorporates oil
pastel for richer and deeper color satu-

ration or art pen for sharpness. I really


enjoy the movement of watercolor and
the techniques involved with the medium, he said. Oil pastels I enjoy for
the literal hands-on approach; its a
cross between sculpting and painting.
He recently moved to Upland after
living in Claremont for three years
where he worked as a bartender until
making a career change to pursue his
art full-time.
I realized many of my ventures had
to do with creativity, so it was time to
stop creating for other people and start
creating for myself, he shared.
He feels that it was a good move
spiritually, emotionally and physically,
but financially Im an artist, he joked.

Mr. Castaneda sees great potential for


a Claremont art revival. I think for
Claremont having such a large community of artists, the art scene is somewhat
subdued.
Hed like to see the fine resident
artists at the Claremont Colleges mingle more with off-campus locals looking to make their mark. It would, Mr.
Castaneda said, help strengthen the
local art community as a whole.
Mr. Castaneda is delighted to be back
in the City of Trees, this time serving
up art instead of cocktails.
I instantly fell in love with the city,
and more so the people. Everyone I
THE ART OF A. G. CASTANEDA
continues on the next page

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

25

THE ART OF A. G. CASTANEDA


continued from the previous page

meet and know here has some artistic


talent or are connected to some art
form.
See The Artwork of A. G. Castaneda
through October 31 at The Colony at
Loft 204, located at 532 W. First St.
#204, upstairs in the Claremont
Packing House.
Visit the gallery in November for their
next exhibition featuring photography
by Michael DAvello in support of the
Movember Foundation, titled The
Beard Collection: Rite of Passage.
Jenelle Rensch
calendar@claremont-courier.com

COURIER photo/Jenelle Rensch


Artist A. G. Castaneda stands
among his collection during
the exhibits opening reception.
The exhibit is on display at The
Colony at Loft 204 at the
Claremont Packing House
through October 31.

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

26

The Theatre Company helps actors, partygoers go incognito

or most people, dressing up for


Halloween is a stressful once-ayear affair, but at The Theatre
Company, costuming people is an art
form that is practiced daily.

With a collection of more than 200,000 costumes


and growing, The Theatre Company is one of the
biggest providers of show costumes in southern
California. At the helm of this giant enterprise is
actress and costume connoisseur Barbara Hinrichsen
and her husband Greg.
Mr. Hinrichsen and his close friend Marylou
Waldrum started the business in 1972 after directing

CLAREMONT AFTER HOURS

Jenelle Rensch and Jessica Gustin Pfahler

numerous plays and noticing the lack of quality costumes available. The two began building the company in Mr. Hinrichsens garage until they outgrew the
space. Ms. Hinrichsen married into the business in
1984 after meeting Mr. Hinrichsen during a production of The Music Man that the pair starred in.
Over the course of three decades, the Hinrichsens
have revolutionized costume rentals in their Benson
Avenue location in Upland. The building that was
once an auto-repair shop has been thoroughly overhauled, with every possible workspace covered in
fabric, feathers, glitter and get-ups.
But not all remnants of the buildings past could be
THEATRECOMPANY/continues on the next page

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

The Theatre Company owner and actress Barbara Hinrichsen among her many costumes.

COURIER photos/Jenelle Rensch


Jessica Gustin Pfahler dresses as Marie Antoinette at
The Theatre Company in Upland. Featuring over
200,000 theatrical-quality costumes, the shop offers just
about any costume imaginable all year-round.

27

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

THEATRE COMPANY
continued from the previous page

forgotten or covered up. There are still oil stains on


the concrete, a large divot where the car lift used to be
and, of course, a ghost! The ghost, who staff describe
as a young boy in a red shirt, enjoys hiding in the
workroom. They know he is happy when the light fixture swings in the hallway. However, customers have
no need to fear the resident spirit, who is nothing but
friendly and whose favorite time is Halloween when
the staff is most hectic.
The Theatre Company, which has dressed actors
from the Candlelight Pavilion and Citrus Colleges
Musical Theater Workshop, was commissioned to
costume over 40 shows during this month alone. And
with Halloween just around the corner, the store is
busier than ever. Clients can start reserving their

28

COURIER bloggers Jessica Gustin Pfahler and


Jenelle Rensch play dress-up on assignment at The
Theatre Company in Upland. The costume warehouse, which is open to the public, is filled floor-toceiling with everything from Elvis Presley jumpsuits
to Civil War uniforms to princess gowns and more.

Halloween costumes as early as mid-September. By


the time October rolls around, the selection has dwindled substantially. With that in mind, customers are
advised to come in early!
Upon entering the store, some might find themselves severely overwhelmed. Luckily, the highly
trained staff at The Theatre Company is there to
assist; from costume ideas to fittings to accessories,
they will help you every step of the way. Ms.
Hinrichsen believes in full disclosure, and all of her
staff members are trained to make sure you look
your absolute best.
We care what you look like when you go to the
party, Ms. Hinrichsen emphasized.
Whether you want to be Darth Vader, Little Red
Riding Hood or a zebra, The Theatre Company has
you covered. Currently, garb from the Roaring 20s is
a fan favorite, but with an ever-evolving collection of
costumes, there is no shortage of options.
A small army of designers, seamstresses, pattern
makers and other staff consistently pump out new and
exciting designs for clients to try out. Their most
recent creation is the addition of a whole line of
steampunk outfitshalf Victorian, half Scifiwhich
is available for the 2015 Halloween season.
Costume rentals range anywhere from $30-$75 and
can go up depending on the accessories you choose.
Once rented, the customer has the outfit for three days
and can even extend this period if need be. The
Theatre Company also offers an array of costume
accessories, wigs and theatrical makeup for all ages.
The one thing you wont find is that thin polyester
fabric common in cheap costumes, the sort sold at
seasonal Halloween shops that Ms. Hinrichsen refers
to as weeds that pop up each year. From sturdy cottons and rich velvet to satin and brocade, The Theatre
Company is known for fine materials and top-notch
construction.
Ms. Hinrichsen says she understands why so
many people visit her shop, looking for the ultimate
disguise. The real reason Halloween is so big is
because it is the one night of the year when no one
judges you.
The Theatre Company, located at 1400 N. Benson
Ave. in Upland, has extended its hours to accommodate the Halloween rush. From now until October 31,
the costumers are open Monday through Friday, 10
a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and
Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. For more information, call
(909) 982-5736 or visit theatreco.com.
Happy Halloween! J&J
claremontafterhours.com

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

Jessica Gustin Pfahler dances as Carmen Miranda in a brightly colored and ruffled dress, complete with a fruit turban.

Jenelle Rensch chooses a classic ensemble from the


Colonial section, complete with petticoats and bustle for
authenticity.

29

VILLAGE VENTURE 2015

30

Claremont Sunrise Rotarys Turkey Trot

or the eighth consecutive year,


the Claremont Sunrise Rotary
Club is putting on its Turkey
Trot 5k and 1k run on Thanksgiving
Day, November 26.
The 1k Fun Run is for kids 10 and under and
commences at 7:30 a.m., while the 5k run starts at 8
a.m. Both races start and end at the Claremont Depot.
The Turkey Trot has become an annual rite of
passage for avid runners, families, groups and even
people who just walk the route with their dogs.
Participation last year exceeded 2,500 people, up

from just over 1,000 in its inception.


Its so great to see people up and out early on
Thanksgiving Day join in the fellowship and fun of the
racefrom those who are trying to log their best time,
to fitness, church and community groups, and the families who bring relatives from all over the country to
participate. It makes us proud both as a club and community to put this event on year after year, said Mark
Nichols, the 2015-2016 club president.
Last year, more than 60 percent of participants were
from outside Claremont. Social networking has greatly
increased attendance, as have the multiple media
reports and heightened popularity of the race itself. The
course runs through the College and Village areas of
Claremont, distinguished by its vintage homes, beauti-

ful residential streets and large old growth trees.


With individual chip-timing, each participants
pace is accurately measured regardless of where they
start in the runners pack. Uses for proceeds are
many, including the granting of over 800 youth
sports scholarships to individuals and groups who
have difficulty meeting the financial requirements of
a sport, whether it be cheerleading outfits, football
helmets, or travel assistance. Proceeds also benefit
our local senior community and student and teacher
scholarships.
Individuals, groups or businesses who are interested
in either participating in this years event as runners,
walkers or sponsors are encouraged to visit the clubs
website at claremontsunriserotary.org for information.

Take a Los Angeles


Chocolate Tour on the
senior excursion

xplore some of LAs favorite hot


spots and hidden cocoa-flavored
treasures, with stops at a
Ukrainian chocolatier and a monastery
where the Sisters make handmade chocolates. Youll lunch at Tam OShanter and
have chocolate souffl for dessert, of
course. The excursion, which costs $65
per person, will take place Thursday,
November 5 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Trips are open to adults ages 50 and older and participants must submit a signed excursion emergency
form to participate. Trips depart from the Hughes
Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd.
Transportation to and from the Hughes Center must
be arranged by the participant.
Participants should arrive at least 15 minutes prior
to departure. There is no reserved seating on the bus;
seats are selected on a first-come, first-served basis.
If you use a wheelchair, have a caregiver or have
other mobility issues, please notify the Joslyn Center
at time of registration. Caregivers are required to register. Refund requests must be received at least one
week prior to the trip date.
Register for trips online by visiting claremontrec.com,
by phone at (909) 399-5488, or in person at the
Joslyn Center. Seats are limited and may sell out well
in advance.

Masquerade Ball dinner


and dance at the Joslyn

he city of Claremont, under sponsorship of Inter Valley Health


Plan, will offer a fun-filled
Masquerade Ball on Wednesday, October
28. The events include dinner, dancing
and live entertainment with a lot of exciting tricks and treats along the way. Guests
are asked to dress for the occasion. Pre-registration is required and space is limited.
The event will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. at
the Joslyn Center. Tickets are $5 and must
be purchased in advance. Register online at
claremontrec.com or visit the Joslyn
Center, 660 N. Mountain Ave., Claremont.

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