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The planning process

1. Outline the Objective


2. Analyse the Environment
3. Develop & Evaluate
Alternatives
4. Implement an Alternative
5. Monitor & Review
SWOT used to analyse
Strengths inside the
organisation
Weaknesses inside the
organisation
Opportunities outside the
organisation
Threats outside the
organisation
The organising process
1. Determining the Tasks
2. Classifying and Grouping Tasks
3. Assigning Work and Delegating
Authority
Procedures
1. Identify an Issue or Problem
2. Research & Analyse
Environments
3. Consult Stakeholders
4. Develop a Draft Policy for
Review by
Stakeholders
5. Revise the Policy
6. Approve & Distribute the new
Policy
7. Monitor & Evaluate the new
Policy
Management Control
Autocratic
Persuasive
Consultative
Participative
Lassez-Faire
Problem Solving
1. Identify the Problem and
Causes
2. Gather Revelant Information
3. Develop Alternate Solutions
4. Analyse the Aternatives
5. Choose one Alternative and
Implement it
6. Evaluate the Solution
Master Production Schedule
1. Quantity of each item
2. Type of each item
3. How production takes place
4. When production takes place
5. Where production takes place
6. Labour required
Maslows Need Hierarchy
1. Self Actualistation
2. Self Esteem

3. Belonging
4. Safety
5. Physiological
Negotiating Agreements
Aware of awards and national
employment standards
Table relevant information
Consult widely
Keep an open mind
Remember the big picture
Exercise care
Lodge the agreement
Kotters Theory of Change
Management
1. Establish necessity
2. Establish a guiding group
3. Create a vision
4. Communicate the vision
5. Empower people
6. Recognise & reward
7. Consolidate improvements
8. Institutionalise the change
Hertzbergs Two Factor
Theory
Some things stop people
becoming dissatisfied
(Environment) and other things
motivate people (Motivators)
Environment - extrinsic to the
worker
Motivator - intrinsic to the worker
Lockes Goal Setting Theory
Set Goals
Feedback
Motivation
Improve Performance
Employment Cycle
Maintaining
Terminating
Establishing
HR Planning
How many workers are needed?
What qualifications & skills are
needed?
When and where workers are
needed?

The Selection Process


Short list applications
Tests
Interviews
Background Checks
Select (better) candidate
Remuneration Package
Wage
Salary
Benefits
Salary Sacrifice
Benefits of Training
To the Worker:
Opportunities promotion & self
improvement
Satisfaction performing tasks
better
Challenge learning new things
Adaptable able to adapt to
change
To the Organisation:
Improve work quality
Increases work productivity
Better able to initiate and cope
with change
Achieve objective more easily
Reduce costs
Training
Job Rotation moving around the
organisation
Mentoring using another person
as a coach for guidance and
support
Formal Training undertaking
specific management training
such as an MBA (Masters in
Business Administration)
Rewards & Recognition
Motivation
Equitable
Clear
Defensible
Consistent
Relevant
Cost Effective
Integrated with Objectives

Job Description is a written


statement of tasks, duties and
responsibilities.
Job Specification is a list of key
qualifications, skills and expertise
required for a job.
Job Analysis is a systematic study
of each employees studies, tasks
and work environment.

Performance Appraisal
Provide feedback to workers
A measure for promotion, pay
rises etc.
Helps the organisation monitor its
workers
Identify training & development
needs
Identify new objectives & plan
future performance

Job Design
What tasks?
Who, how and when performed?

Centralised System
The government controlled the
system and all wages &

conditions were the same for all


workers in the same areas of
work.
Decentralised System
Individual organisations control
their own system and decide the

pay and conditions (above the


legal standards) for their own
employees.
Awards
In the past contained the terms
and conditions of employments

which applied to particular


industries.
Today are a set of 10 minimum
agreements that apply where no
enterprise agreement has been
reached.