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TRIBUNE-PHONOGRAPH

~ www.centralwinews.com ~
Serving Abbotsford, Colby, Curtiss, Dorchester, Milan and Unity, Wis.
Vol. 54, No. 43

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Abby
pushes
ahead
in playoffs
page 12
16 pages -- $1

Districts
look for
ways to
partner

New fire
board sets
goals for
merger
By Kevin OBrien

By Christian Parker
Talks about the logistics of increasing
cooperative opportunities between the
Colby and Abbotsford school districts
led to lengthy discussions Thursday
about differences in school schedules
and calender arrangements.
The boards convened jointly in response to a letter the Colby school board
sent last spring to Abbotsford asking to
discuss cost-saving measures between
the two districts. Abbotsford school
board accepted the invitation and hosted
the meeting Oct. 22.
Colby board president Bill Tesmer
prefaced the discussion by stating the
dialogue was not a consolidation effort,
but rather an attempt to look at ways to
save taxpayer money.
Abbotsford administrator Reed Welsh
began the conversation by highlighting
some areas the districts collaborated
in the past and services they currently
share. Programs shared between the
schools include sports such as cross
country, girls swimming and wrestling.
Falcon Enterprises Alternative High
School has been in a shared agreement
with Colby since 2000. Programs shared
through Northcentral Technical College
include academy classes such as manufacturing hosted by Colby and marketing hosted by Abbotsford.
If you look at the history of what
weve got now, its worked because weve
been able to find a common denominator, Abbotsford board president Don
Medenwaldt said. With the academies,
kids can get college credit and not miss
classes in either school.
Colby district administrator Steve
Kolden said hed like to see a long-term
vision for collaborating.
Id hate to see us get into something
that was real short-term and have it fall
apart, he said.
Welsh also highlighted programs

INSIDE
NS

A fall tradition
Abbotsfords choir and band students put on their fall pops concert Monday night. Above, middle school choir students add some hand motions
to one of their songs. From left to right, in the back, are Mari Cruz Ochoa,
Erica Weich and Danielle Florian; in the middle row are Belana Thompson,
Mariela Arredondo and Bobbie Lee; in the front row are Vanessa Maganda, Kaylee Boller and Yeremi Ramirez. Below, the high school band plays
a medley of songs. From left to right are Justin Marcott, Adam Budzinski,
Austin Hawkey, Megan Bittner, Jade Sales, Hunter Carpenter and Jazmine
Sales.
STAFF PHOTOS/CHRISTIAN PARKER

See SCHOOLS/ Page 16

At their first meeting as a seven-member board last week, representatives


from area municipalities established a
list of 15 goals to accomplish when exploring the possible consolidation of fire
and ambulance services.
Elected officials from the cities of
Abbotsford and Colby, the village of
Dorchester and the townships of Holton,
Mayville, Hull and Colby met Oct. 21 at
Abbotsfords fire hall.
Larry Oehmichen, Colby town chairman and president of the Colby Fire
Commission, was elected president of
the board, with Pat Tischendorf from the
town of Holton as vice-president.
Oehmichen said he sees a lot of potential for all the communities to save money by merging fire/EMT services.
Im very much in support of this
thing, he said, noting that Colbys fire
commission has worked well for years.
During public comment, however, Abbotsford resident Dean Wiese said the
board needs to hear from communities
where a consolidated fire district did not
work out and what the problems were.
I think we need a lot more information, Wiese said. I dont think we can
rely on everything John Neihart said.
Neihart is a retired fire chief from
Lake Hallie who has offered local communities advice on forming a fire district
out of the three departments in Abbotsford, Colby and Dorchester.
Abbotsfords representative, Ald. Marty Schwantes, said he, too, would like to
hear from places where a fire district
failed and find out what went wrong.
Its not going to be 100 percent smooth
and not everybody is going to agree, he
said.
Among the 15 goals brainstormed by
board members were technical issues
such as making sure the radio systems
and apparatus are compatible, as well

See FIRE DISTRICT/ Page 8

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Tribune-Phonograph

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Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Perspectives

Barely a pulse

Sixty percent of Wisconsin citizens feel the state is


headed in the wrong direction. A like percentage disapprove of Gov. Scott Walker, a Republican. How must
that make the Republican majority in the state legislature feel? Probably vulnerable.
Perhaps that explains why the state assembly passed
three horrendous bills last week. This legislation
doesnt lower anybodys health insurance premiums,
repair any potholes, make anybodys college tuition
more affordable or, otherwise, improve the lives of
Wisconsins people. But the bills better guarantee that
doing any of this stuff, an angry electorate will elect
incumbents to new terms.
One bill opens the door for anonymous donors to
give unlimited sums to state political action committees and to the legislatures top leadership. Donors
may coordinate their political action campaigns with
candidates as long as they dont use magic words like
vote for in their attack ads. A second bill blows up
the Government Accountability Board. Instead of
having retired judges referee elections, panels with
equal numbers of Democrats and Republicans will
rule. In this setup, Republicans will be able to veto any
potentially damaging investigation into any alleged
scandal. The third bill, cosponsored by Rep. Bob Kulp
(R-Stratford), limits the number of crimes that can be
investigated through a Joe Doe procedure (basically a
grand jury criminal investigation, but overseen by a
judge), thus shielding incumbents from scandal. The
bill would have blocked the two John Doe probes that
dogged Gov. Scott Walker over the past several years.
The first two bills, approved by the Assembly, may
get hung up in the state Senate. Gov. Walker, however,
signed the third bill into law Friday. The John Doe bill
is a disaster both for what it does and for what it says.
The bill is a legislative work of art. It agrees to maintain John Doe criminal inquiries for a lengthy list of
crimes, including homicide, sexual assault, armed
robbery, drug manufacturing and delivery, battery and
carjacking. The bill, however, silently exempts other
crimes. These include bribery, violation of campaign
finance laws, misconduct in public office, corruption
to influence legislation, tampering with a public record, perjury, false swearing, not meeting standards
for conduct of state and local officials and tampering
with a public record.
Now, clearly, all Wisconsin citizens, including members of the legislature, are still subject to John Doe
investigations for the first list of crimes. Yet, when it
comes to the second list of crimes those a politician
might likely commit no John Doe is allowed. And
what is the rationale for this double standard?
Assembly Majority Leader Rep. Jim Steineke (RWauwatosa) explained this past week in a press release that the bill is needed, primarily, to protect citizens against law enforcement abuses. This is what he
said citizens subject to a John Doe investigation can
expect: Imagine for a moment that its early morning,
youre still in bed and theres a pounding on your door.
You open the door to armed law enforcement holding a
battering ram. After forcibly entering your home, they
begin to confiscate your computers and phones. Youre
confined to your family room which is guarded by an
armed officer and youre forbidden to call anyone, not
even your family or a lawyer. Not only are you initially
forbidden to tell anyone, you are never allowed to tell
anyone even if you are never charged with a crime.
Sound awful? Sure does. But guess what? Citizens
suspected of a regular crime under the Republican bill
are still subject to this heavy-handed law enforcement.
It is people who are suspected of political crimes, however, who are now protected. The state reserves John
Doe horrors for bad people...who, by a new definition, dont commit political crimes.
And this is what is most galling. The first principal
of justice is that all people are equal before the law. The
state legislature, however, has turned itself into a protected class. It is not subject to the same legal investigations as the rest of us. These legislators are not just
acting above the law. What theyve done is far worse.
They have rewritten the law to ensure that when they
break it they wont get caught. Nice trick.
Lets be truthful. Democracy in Wisconsin barely
has a pulse.
Guest editorial by Peter Weinschenk, The Record-Review

PAGING THROUGH HISTORY:

A Treasury of Weekly Newspapers


MILAN SENTINEL
PUBLISHED IN MILAN
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1923

THE TRIBUNE-PHONOGRAPH
PUBLISHED IN ABBOTSFORD
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1960

Auction Nov. 3-4 on buildings on 29


Card party given by young
All the buildings that have been purladies of St. Louis congregation
chased for the right-of-way for the new
grand success
The card party given by the young Hwy. 29 between Abbotsford and Owen
will be sold at
ladies of
public auction
the
St.
Nov. 3 and 4.
Louis ConThe auction
gregation,
will begin with
at Essers
buildings
on
Hall on last
the former AbTuesday
ner Gustafson
evening,
property
just
proved to
east of
the
be a most
Clark County
enjoyable
home, and will
one in spite
proceed
east,
of the bad
parcel by parw e a t h e r.
cel.
After rainThe sale the
ing all day
second day will
and
also
ST. LOUIS CATHOLIC CHURCH - DORCHESTER
begin at the forin the eve1924
mer Frank Voning, about
lovsek tavern at
80 people
SUBMIT YOUR HISTORICAL PHOTOS TO
Curtiss Corners
turned out
FILL THIS SPOT EACH WEEK
at the junction
to
make
of Highway 29 and County Trunk E.
this a success.
The buildings will be opened for inFour games were played, namely
Sheepshead, Pinochle, Five Hundred spection Wednesday, Nov. 2, and until
sale time Thursday and Friday.
and Rummy. Prizes were awarded.
The Volovsek tavern at Curtiss corCards were played until about 10
oclock after which a dandy lunch was ners will serve as the office for conserved. The card party closed with ducting the inspections.
All buildings must be moved from
an old-fashioned dance consisting of
square dances, circle two steps, etc. the premises by Dec. 1. Purchasers are
Everyone certainly had a wonderful cautioned that they must have a pertime. Were all looking forward to an- mit from the state highway commisother good time of this kind and we all sion to move buildings over state highhope that next time, whether rain or ways, and the sale of a building does
not necessarily bind the commission
shine, everyone will come out.
into granting a permit.
The buildings are being sold to make
Fire destroys
room for a new roadway for Highway
Atwood warehouse
Fire early Wednesday morning of 29. Work has already started on a porlast week totally destroyed the Farm- tion between Abbotsford and Owen.
Plans are to build a new two-lane
ers Warehouse at Atwood, with all of
its contents. Neighbors were attracted highway running from just west of
to the fire by the barking of farmers Abbotsford and south of the present
dogs living nearby, and when they got Highway 29. It will bypass Owen and
to the building it was a mass of flames Withee to the south and will continue
on past Thorp, Stanley and Cadott.
and nothing could be saved.
The state has purchased enough
The building contained a large
quantity of flour and feed as well as right-of-way to build a four-lane digrinders and other machinery and the vided highway. In the future, if trafloss will reach nearly an even thou- fic merits, another two lanes will be
added.
sand.

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Perspectives

Tribune-Phonograph

NOTABLE QUOTE

ere two miles apart. It would be easy to pull together to


help some of our low-income families.

Cheryl Ploeckelman
Colby school board member,
discussing how the Colby and Abbotsford school districts could
collaborate on offering weekend meals to families

Correction
Last weeks page 14 article about the Abbotsford Falcons football team
winning the Cloverwood Conference title contained two errors. The headline incorrectly identified Abbotsford as a D5 team; they are in Division
6. Also, the article incorrectly stated that Talon Laabs intercepted Athens
final pass of the game. Cooper Hendrickson is the one who intercepted the
pass.
The Tribune-Phonograph apologizes for these errors.

NEWS AND LETTERS SUBMISSION


The deadline for the current weeks paper is 5 p.m. on Monday.

Letter Guidelines
We welcome letters from our readers on
any subject of current interest.
We reserve the right to edit for length,
grammar or libel. All submitted letters must
have a handwritten signature, address and
telephone number where the writer can be
reached for confirmation.
Forward to the Tribune-Phonograph, 103
W. Spruce St., PO Box 677, Abbotsford, WI

54405. Fax to 715-223-3505, or e-mail to tp@tp


printing.com.

Community News
Community news for Abbotsford, Colby,
Curtiss, Dorchester and Unity may be submitted directly to the Tribune-Phonograph
at 103 Spruce St., P.O. Box 677, Abbotsford,
WI 54405. Information may be sent via fax to
715-223-3505, e-mailed to tp@tpprinting.com,
or called in to 715-223-2342.

CLARK COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY PET OF THE WEEK


Lucille
Lucille is such a sweetie. Shes a seven-month-old, 4.5-pound
spayed female with a beautiful Tortie (swirls of black/brown/
orange) short-haired coat. Lucille is living in Kitty City with
lots of her friends. Shes one of the very first cats to come and
greet you at the door. Shes only one of many cats and kittens,
puppies and dogs, just waiting for the right person to come
along and adopt them. If you have room in your heart and
home for her or any of the other pets here, please go to the
website and see their pictures and descriptions. Now is a great
time to look for a new pet. There are 41 cats or kittens and 64
dogs or puppies here. Surely theres one just right for you.
Check them all out at www.cchs-petshelter.org/id8.html.
If you love animals and have some time, now is a great
time to come on down and get involved at CCHS. You can
fill out a volunteer application form online by going to our website (www.cchs-petshel
ter.org) and clicking Volunteer at CCHS from the menu, or stop at the shelter or at our
Paws and Claws store in the Marshfield Mall. Come to an orientation and join our Pet
Lovin People group, get a tour of the shelter and well tell you about all of the many
ways to volunteer. Well find just the right spot for you to get started helping animals.
Youll love it!
Get your pets microchipped at our store in the mall, open Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
w

Clark County Humane Society - W3926 St. Hwy. 73, P.O. Box 127, Neillsville, WI 54456
(715) 743-4550 12-3 p.m. Mon/Wed/Fri/Sat petshelter@email.com
www.cchs-petshelter.org or www.facebook.com/petshelter

IN THE FIELD OF
AGRICULTURE,
ONE NAME
STANDS OUT.

&4QSVDF4USFFUt"CCPUTGPSE
t
43-153403

Page 3

Educators do more with


less, but still get a bad rap
The best book Ive read recently is has grown by 124 percent.
In Praise of American Educators
In 2014, for the first time in hisby Richard DuFour.
tory, 51 percent of public school chilAs I enter my 29th year in educa- dren are eligible for free and reduced
tion, I have never witnessed such meals.
criticism and bashing of public
Today, about 13 percent of all
education and educators as I have in public school students receive special
the past four years. It almost seems education services.
as if its become fashionable to critiThe evidence is pretty clear, Amercize public education.
icas educators have never before
My reference to Dr. Duaccomplished so much,
Fours book (and Profesand contended with such
sional Learning Communiincreasing obstacles as in
ties) and the connection to
the past 20 years. A fair
criticism of public educaand balanced analysis
tion is very simple. What
of the evidence can only
is the evidence? Profeslead to the conclusion that
sional Learning CommuAmerican schools and the
nities (PLCs) are based
educators within them are
around three big ideas: a
not failing and are, in fact,
focus on learning, a culachieving some of the best
ture of collaboration and
results in our nations hisa focus on results. As edutory (DuFour, 2015).
cators, we are continually
I really need to emphalooking for the data and
size, can public schools
evidence to improve our
do better?
Absolutely.
practice. Yet it seems that
Our children who are ecoBY
most educational reforms STEVEN KOLDEN nomically disadvantaged,
we see are based on philohave special needs, African
sophical belief rather than SUPERINTENDENT American, or are English
hard evidence that they pro- COLBY SCHOOL Language Learners continduce results.
ue to score below their peers
DISTRICT
What are the results?
on exams. We can do better.
What is the evidence?
Yet what is the answer to supporting
According to Education Week, 47 the work of public schools? DuFour
states showed gains in high school writes, The question is not should
graduation rates, two were steady and our schools be improved, but how?
only one (not Wisconsin) declined.
The mission of the Colby School Dis The College Board, for the first trict is learning for all. The objective
time in history, reports that 20 per- is simple: improving student achievecent of graduates scored honor ment and closing achievement gaps.
grades on AP exams. The number of This includes using evidence-based
students taking AP classes exceeded research to implement what actually
one million. More students and high- works.
er scores.
The state of Wisconsin will
According to the Department of spend $258 million on private school
Public Instruction (DPI), Wisconsins vouchers in the 2016-17 school year.
2015 graduates had steady overall according to an analysis by the Legresults on the ACT with an average islative Fiscal Bureau (LFB). What is
composite score of 22.2, which tied the evidence that vouchers produce
with Iowa for second place behind increased student achievement? Use
Minnesota (22.7) among states where Milwaukee, its the longest voucher
50 percent or more of students take program in the nation. Are these the
the assessment.
results we wish to see statewide?
The National Assessment of Ed The 2015-17 biennial budget inucational Progress (NAEP) reports cludes no additional money for public
scores over the past 20 years that education. While the budget includes
show slow, steady and significant in- new money in 2016-17, with revenue
creases. Students of all racial and caps in place, this is simply tax relief.
ethnic groups are reading better than
What is the evidence that freezing
they did in 1992.
school spending increases student
The TIMSS (Trends in Inter- achievement?
national Mathematics and Science
As you enter into conversations
Study) administered in 63 countries about public education, Id encourage
showed American students have im- you to always consider whats right
proved their scores each time the test with public schools and when disis administered since 1995. The U.S. cussing new initiatives and potential
is one of 12 countries to show growth new laws, ask the question What is
each time the test is given.
the evidence that this works?
Twenty-eight percent of parI witness on a daily basis all the
ents responding to a PDK (Phi Delta great things that are happening in
Kappa)/Gallup Poll survey gave our our classrooms. Sometimes as edunations schools a D or F letter grade. cators, we are our own worst enemy
Yet, when asked about their local as we rarely boast about all the great
schools, 75 percent of parents gave things happening in our schools.
their local school an A or B. Ameri- Maybe we simply need to toot our
cans most familiar with the public own horn a bit more.
school love them (PDK, 2014).
I am extremely proud to be an edu A Marquette University poll in- cator; I consider myself blessed to be
dicated 78 percent of Wisconsin citi- a small part of all the great things
zens oppose cuts to public education. happening in the Colby School Dis Between 1979 and 2003, the num- trict.
ber of English Language Learners

BE OUR
GUEST

Page 4

Perspectives

A fun way
to watch
B movies
As someone who has been watching
horror movies since I was a kid, its really hard for me to be scared anymore
watching something on a screen. Freddy
Krueger may have compelled me to keep
the lights on when I was 12 years old,
but the thrill of being frightened or at
least spooked is elusive as an adult.
But, even at 35, I
still havent grown
UT FOR
tired of watching
scary movies on
TV, especially in A WALK
the annual lead-up
to Halloween. Last
night, AMC had a
Friday the 13th
marathon,
and
after a long day
at work, that was
the perfect thing
to watch while my
higher brain functions were taking a rest. Its just
BY
good, stupid fun.
Of course, Ive KEVIN OBRIEN
seen at least bits
EDITOR
and pieces of
all these movies before, and its not like Im going to
discover anything new about the art of
filmmaking while watching a guy in a
hockey mask chase young adults around
a campground. In fact, it is the bad acting, silly plot lines and generally shoddy
quality that makes these movies so entertaining. I consider myself a connoisseur
of what many would call low-brow or
schlock.
In order to get the full experience, Ive
found you actually have to look deeper
and pay closer attention. This is where
the goofs section at Internet Movie
Database comes in handy. Every editing mistake, plot hole and factual error
is painstakingly cataloged. All movies,
even the critically acclaimed ones, have
plenty of screw-ups that make it into the
final product. But B movies in the horror
genre are brimming with them.
Whether its a prop that continually
disappears and reappears from one shot
to the next, or an obvious dummy being
substituted for a human actor, almost no
scene goes by without some type of noticeable flub. If you know what to look
for, you can often see crew members,
cameras and boom microphones in the
corners of the screen.
Continuity errors are the most common. This is when several different takes
have been edited together, but someone
wasnt paying attention to all of the details. As a result, an actors clothing may
change drastically, a piece of food will go
from being half-eaten to untouched and
back again, or the background will be
totally rearranged from one shot to the
next. My favorite one is in the 80s classic
Evil Dead, when the lead actors hair
briefly goes from being short-cropped to
shoulder length in a matter of frames.
Apparently, he got a haircut after the first
few takes were shot, and the production
people decided to mix and match the footage without regard to hair length.
Try this sometime with a film youve
seen before, and you might get a few
chuckles if youre a movie geek like
me, that is.

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Tribune-Phonograph

W ITHOUT W ORDS

How I take advantage of Halloween

H
T

B-flicks and terror classics all week long. I was delighted


to come upon the airing and make a point of checking
in from time to time. We watched the better part of the
2004 Satins Little Helper, a movie where a little naive
boy unknowingly helps a serial killer dressed as Lucifer
terrify his own family. The film really wasnt as bad as
it could have been, and worked a demented tongue-incheek horror parody kind of vibe.
Im sure in a couple weeks, when the attention turns
to Christmas movies like White Christmas and Elf,
while Im still on Fargo, The Boogens, Coven,
Night of the Living Dead or Dont Look Now, Ill
again be alone in my quest to fulfill my horror and dark
comedy fix. Right now, however, its nice to have a little
company.

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Im not one to be drawn into a fascination with spooky things just


because its Halloween. I like weird, spooky oddities year-round. If I
learn of an abandoned building or haunted location, Im just as happy
to go check it out in an eerie pre-winter autumn evening as I am to explore an old foundation in a field in broad daylight during the month
of July.
My favorite movies tend to be creepy, odd, horrific films with disturbing subject matter. I will gladly watch The Shining, either the
1997 version by Mick Garris or the 1980 Stanley Kubrick rendition,
any day of the year. The nice thing about this time of year - Halloween,
however, is that its easier to talk people into joining me in watching
sick, twisted B films and horror flicks.
My wife is traditionally terrified by horror
films. Shes not usually phased when I tell her that
OLD HAT
is the point. It took her well over a year before she
was willing to brave the Evil Dead series, and only
HOUGHT
after I convinced her it is really a dark comedy.
Last week, she decided she was ready for Amityville Horror, a delightful 1977 film depicting
the true story of a Long Island family who purchased a beautiful Dutch Colonial house on the
water only to have remnants of its wicked past
turn each of its inhabitants mad. Its a real staple
for those who love the supernatural and hideous
flicks of the 70s. (The subject matter is hideous,
not the films themselves.)
I was finally able to convince the wife to let Kid
BY
watch Evil Dead II. I told her theres no profanity
CHRISTIAN
or nudity, so its fine for a six-year-old. (Im pretty
sure that was about the age I first saw Stephen
PARKER
Kings Christine about the car that kills people.)
REPORTER
Rebecka thought Kid would be terrorized by the
film, but since she has no soul, it didnt bother her
at all. I made a little popcorn and Wife, Puss, Kid and I all settled down
on the couch to enjoy the Sam Raimi classic.
My wife was worried the kid wouldnt be able to deal with the film
and kept checking in with her. I told her to quit coddling. Kid concurred. She thought Bruce Campbells possessed hand beating him
over the head with kitchenware was hilarious. She laughed hysterically when the buried corpse of Ashs girlfriend rose from the earth,
was reunited with her head and began to dance claymation style.
We sent her off to school the next day with a new arsenal of lines
and catch phrases like, Whats this in my fruit cellar?? A fresh soul!
We told her to refrain from saying Ill swallow your soul or Join us
to her teacher or kids on the playground, even though she threatened
to do so.
The next day, I suggested that the next movie for Kid to watch would
be Burnt Offerings, a somewhat forgotten 1976 haunted house film
starring Karen Black and Oliver Reed. Rebeckas response was, No,
Kid is not watching Burnt Offerings! Oh well... Cant win em all.
I noticed a local over-the-air station is running 24 hours of horror

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Tribune-Phonograph

Law Enforcement

Page 5

COLBY-ABBOTSFORD POLICE LOG


She said it appeared as if the
damage was caused by someone
who was backing out of a spot.
She identified the classmate
whose spot was next to hers.
The officer located the classmates vehicle and noticed scuff
marks and a broken taillight
that corresponded with the
damage to the complainants vehicle. The officer met with this
student, but she did not think
she had hit the complainants
truck. She claimed the scuff
marks had been there for a
long time and her taillight had
been damaged the same day the
complainants vehicle was. She
questioned if someone had broken the lights out by hand.
The officer explained to her
how the damage of the two vehicles matched up. The student
then said she remembered being
sick that day and was on medication, so she may have hit the
other vehicle without knowing
it. The officer said she probably
should not have been driving
if she was that medicated. The
officer also pointed out that the
schools security cameras will
show what happened. She acknowledged the camera would
probably show her vehicle hitting the complainants vehicle.
The officer told her to tell her
father, the vehicles registered
owner, so repairs could be made.
Oct. 19 - An officer met with
a woman who said she was receiving harassing messages
from her ex-boyfriends fiance.
The complainant said she told
the woman to stop contacting
her, but when she left work a few
days later, she noticed a truck
followed her as she went to pick
up her child from the babysitters residence.
When she returned to her vehicle after picking up her child,
she noticed that her cell phone
had died. She checked it and
saw the SIM card was missing.
She believes the fiance took the

card so she could find out if she


was talking to her ex-boyfriend.
The complainant said she, her
ex and his fiance all work the
same shift at the same company.
The complainant did not
know the suspects last name or
phone number, but she provided
contact information for the exboyfriend.
Oct. 21 - While at Colby
High School investigating another incident, an officer was
approached by the principal
regarding a student refusing to
change out of an inappropriate T-shirt. The principal said
the student had told a secretary
about the shirt the previous day,
and he was told not to wear it
to school. The student came to
school wearing the shirt that
morning, and the principal told
him he needed to go home and
change before noon. The principal just saw the student with the
shirt on in the lunchroom and
he refused to go to her office.
The officer located the student in the hallway, and as soon
as he noticed the officer, the
student said he did not have to
talk without his mother present. The officer asked him if he
had been told to go to the principals office. The student said he
didnt have to go because he had
done nothing wrong. The officer
said he would be arrested for
disorderly conduct and taken
to jail if he did not comply. The
student agreed to go to the office, but continued to complain
about the rules being stupid
and claiming that he was being
picked on.
The principal told the student
that the rules were not debatable. The student said he had no
way of getting home to change
his shirt. The officer said he
would transport the student
home, and he agreed. When
they returned to the school, the
student was again warned that
his action could lead to him be-

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Crepes, Fruit
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Cheese, Coffee,
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Oct. 18 - Vehicle lockout on


Washington Avenue.
Oct. 21 - Theft by fraud on
West Apollo Avenue.
Oct. 22 - Operating a motor
vehicle without a valid license
on South Linden Street.
Oct. 22 - Hit and run - property adjacent to highway on
South Linden Street.
Oct. 22 - Operating a motor
vehicle without insurance on
South Linden Street.
Oct. 22 - Alcohol offenses on
South Linden Street.
Oct. 22 - Warning citation
on Center Avenue.
Oct. 22 - Speeding on Center
Avenue.

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Children (5-10 Years)
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ating a vehicle while revoked


for an alcohol-related violation. His drivers license was
revoked for three months.
Wilbur J. Holman, 73, Colby, was fined $200.50 for operating an ATV on a roadway and
$200.50 for operating an ATV
without a valid registration.
Charles W. Lewallen, 40,
Owen, was fined $150.10 for failure to display vehicle license
plates, $200.50 for operating a
vehicle without insurance, and
$175.30 for nonregistration.

DORCHESTER POLICE LOG

Serving 7:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Fundamentals of Family Child Care

CPR Refresher for the Healthcare Provider

Kelly M. Mason, 21, Curtiss, was placed on probation


for three years and fined $443
for possession of marijuana,
and was placed on probation
for three years (to run concurrent with the first term) and
fined $518 for possession of
narcotic drugs. A charge of
possession of methamphetamine was dismissed but read
into the record.
Oscar Flores, 27, Abbotsford, was sentenced to 10 days
in jail and fined $778 for oper-

Sunday,
Nov. 1, 2015

Fundraising Fundamentals

ately if any of the activity is occurring.


Oct. 25 - An officer met with
a woman who said she had been
receiving harassing phone calls
and text messages from her exboyfriend. Because the woman
lives in Dorchester and that is
where the harassment is occurring, the officer said she needed
to contact that police station.
The complainant agreed to
speak with Dorchesters police
department about getting a restraining order.

CLARK COUNTY COURT

Brunch

NTC Spencer November


Continuing Education Classes

Insurance Licensing & Recertification Classes

ing arrested in the future. He


said he understood.
Oct. 23 - A cashier at a local
gas station reported ongoing
suspicious activity in the parking lot. She said every day that
week a skinny, blonde-haired
male subject has parked in the
lot and watching her. She said he
has come into the station to talk
to her about getting together
sometime. She also mentioned
other issues with people loitering at the station. An officer told
her to call the station immedi-

Abby Lions

43-174004

Oct. 14 - A Curtiss man


called to report a personal
check stolen from his residence.
He said he suspected a former
friend took it. An officer told
him he would need to contact
Clark County because it was
outside the departments jurisdiction. The complainant became upset and said the same
suspect also attempted to steal
his car the previous night while
he was in Abbotsford.
The complainant said his car
broke down near the intersection of Second and Pine streets,
and he locked it before he left.
When he returned to the car
that afternoon, he said it was
unlocked and the area around
the ignition was damaged. He
said the same woman who stole
his check did this, but he did
not provide any evidence. He
thought there were security
cameras at a nearby housing
complex, but the officer was not
aware of any in that area.
The officer checked on the
vehicle and saw that it was unlocked and damaged near the ignition. He told the complainant
to let him know if he found out
any more information about the
attempted theft.
Oct. 19 - An officer met with
an employee of an Abbotsford
gas station in reference to a
purse found in the parking lot.
The employee said he checked
to see if anyone had lost a purse,
but no one claimed it. The purse
contained a wallet with the drivers license of a woman in Elk
Mound. The officer provided the
information to dispatch, which
tried unsuccessfully to reach
the woman by phone. Dispatch
said they would continue trying
to get hold of her.
Oct. 19 - An officer met with
a student at Colby High School
who reported that someone
struck her truck in the schools
parking lot, causing a small
dent and breaking a taillight.

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community projects.

Oct. 22 - 911 call on South


Front Street.
Oct. 23 - Speeding on Center
Avenue.
Oct. 23 - Medical alert on
Kennedy Avenue.
Oct. 24 - Headlamp warning
issued on Center Avenue.
Oct. 24 - Speeding on Center
Avenue.
Oct. 24 - Operating a motor
vehicle without a valid license
on Center Avenue.
Oct. 24 - Operating a motor
vehicle without insurance on
Center Avenue.
Oct. 24 - Warrant arrest on
Center Avenue.

City of Colby
Autumn Leaf Pickup
The City of Colby will be
picking up leaves that are in the curb
October 30 to November 3.
42-174156

Girl Scout Troops


7085, 7029, 7432 &
Cub Scout Pack 321

Will be collecting
hygiene items for the
needy at the Abbotsford
City Hall from 2-4 p.m.
and during Trick or
Treat hours on

Saturday,
October 31
43-175042

Page 6

Tribune-Phonograph

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Wood Co. to host 2018 Farm Tech Days


By Dean Lesar
The TRG
The Marshfield area will be center
stage for the states agriculture industry in 2018 when a pair of neighboring
farms just southwest of the city will
host the annual Farm Technology Days.
The Sternweis and Heiman families
were announced last week as the cohosts of the July 10-12, 2018, statewide
show, which will feature the Sternweis
robotic milking operation and the Heiman familys diversification into ag enterprises other than dairy farming.
Wood County has not hosted a Farm
Technology Days since 1960, when the
Marshfield Ag Research Station was
the site. Farm Technology Days general manager Matt Glewen said the long
time span since the county last hosted
the show worked in its favor as the 2018
site was selected recently.
As many as 40,000 people are expected
to visit the show at the farms about a
mile southwest of Marshfield off Wood
County Road B. A small army of 2,500
volunteers will be needed to pull the
show off, and the host farms will begin
now to alter crop rotations to fit the
shows needs.
The Daryl and Brenda Sternweis family is a fifth-generation family operation
started in the town of Lincoln in 1879.
The farm built the first free-stall barn in
the area to house its 70 cows in 1965, and
recently built a six-robot parlor facility
to handle 360 cows. The farm consists of
1,200 acres.
The Heiman family has a unique agricultural history. It started more than
100 years ago with Nasonville Dairy, and
moved into the farming area in 1995 with
the purchase of Webers Farm Store
from JoEllen Weber Heimans family.
The Nasonville Dairy cheese-making
business dates back to 1885, while Jo-

LOOKING AHEAD - Wood County Farm Technology Days executive committee chairman Dennis Bangart, center, introduces the Heiman family, left, and the Daryl and Brenda Sternweis family, right, as the co-hosts for the July 2018 Farm Technology Days. The farms are southwest of Marshfield, off Wood County Road B.
TRG STAFF PHOTO/DEAN LESAR
Ellens grandparents started the dairy
farming operation in 1904.
Webers Farm Store has been bottling
and selling milk for more than 60 years,
and now also sells meat and cheese
products. It recently introduced a new
product in flavored kefir, a drinkable yogurt, and more innovative products are
planned.
Nasonville Dairy has been the mainstay for the Heiman family, allowing it
to use not only its own milk, but that of
220 other area farms. Heiman Holsteins
is now the starting point for the next
generation of the family, with the recent
installation of a 40-cow rotary parlor
and exhibition area for people to view
the operation.
Ken Heiman said at the Oct. 22 Farm
Technology Days host announcement
event that his family looks forward to
showing the state how diversification
can pay dividends in agriculture.

Diversification to us means everything, Heiman said. We hope in 2018


to be able to show a lot of these facets.
Daryl Sternweis said he and his wife
and eight children are continuing the
farming legacy of his familys prior four
generations. They installed the robotic
system to keep up with ever-changing
technology, and decided to co-host the
show to try to teach everybody what
technology can bring today.
Glewen said the 55-year gap since the
last Wood County Farm Technology
Days show is longer than usual, especially for a county thats in the heart
of the states best dairy area. Typically,
an ag-based county will host the show
every 25-30 years, Glewen said, and he
considered Wood Countys long absence
when weighing the applications for the
2018 show.
I looked at which ones hadnt had a
show for a long time, he said.

After Wood County was chosen, six


farms applied to host. The countys executive committee toured all of them,
Glewen said, and the Sternweis-Heiman
operation stood out.
Every one of the farms we looked at
could have hosted the show, he said.
This one just kind of rose to the top.
One reason is the farms gently rolling topography. Thats ideal, Glewen
said, so rain will run off demonstration
and parking areas if it falls during the
shows 3-day run.
Drainage -- thats really the main
thing, and lighter soil types, Glewen
said.
Organizers also look closely at the
farms location for access for visitors.
In terms of traffic, its perfect, Glewen said. Youve got really good roads.
With the site now chosen, the host

See FARM TECH/ Page 9

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

Abbotsford City Council Minutes


September 8, 2015
Abbotsford City Hall
Mayor Rachu called the regular meeting to order at 6:00 p.m.
Roll call: Mayor Rachu, Voss, Horacek, Anders, Mediger,
Weideman and Schwantes, (Faber and Gosse-absent).
Others present: Clerk Lopez, DPW Stuttgen, Todd Trader - MSA,
Jim Brodhagen, Robert Morrow, Brenda and Dean Wiese, John
Austin, Chief Lori Voss, Chief Ray Esselman, K. OBrien - Tribune
Phonograph and other concerned citizens
The Pledge of Allegiance was heard.
There were no comments by the mayor.
Under comments by the public, Brenda Wiese stated that she
understood that the Finance Committee has requested reviewing the
financial reports from First City Days. Schwantes stated his concern
was with having a nonemployee operating a city vehicle and that the
financials were requested at the last meeting.
John Austin questioned why it was quoted in the newspaper
that the council felt there was not forward momentum from the fire
department. It was stated that the city council has not participated in
any fire meetings and has not asked the department how they felt.
Schwantes will strive to attend the next meeting.
It was stated that in the past there was a council representative
assigned to the Fire Department Committee; it was suggested that
may be a positive way to increase communication.
Motion Voss/Mediger to waive the reading and approve the
minutes from the council held August 3, 2015, with correcting the
spelling of event from even. Motion carried without negative vote.
Considerations before the council
Under discuss/approve purchase of city banners, Stuttgen stated
that the cost with printing of both sides would be $46 per banner
plus shipping. Motion Anders/Schwantes to approve the city banner
with the white star in the center of the state. Motion carried without
negative vote.
Under discuss Resolution 2015-7 Recognizing and Endorsing the
Safe Routes to School Plan for the City of Abbotsford and School
District of Abbotsford, motion Schwantes/Mediger to approve
Resolution 2015-7 as presented. Motion carried without negative
vote.
Committee Reports
Public Works was presented by Horacek.
Public Works update was presented by Stuttgen.
Minutes from August 27, 2015, were reviewed.
Under discuss/approve CIP Plan, Stuttgen stated the highlighted
projects have already been completed; page two is the unfinished
projects from the last CIP Plan plus new projects. After some
discussion, it was stated that 2016 will be a year of completing
resurfacing projects. Motion Voss/Anders to approve the CIP Plan
as presented. Motion carried without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve budgeting $15,000 in parks for the
completion of the Red Arrow ball park renovations, Stuttgen stated

the city received a $5,000 donation from the Christensen Charitable


Foundation and are still $15,000 short and will work to have this work
completed in 2016.
Under discuss/approve allocating $25,000 to improve Elderberry
Road, motion Horacek/Schwantes to place this as a priority in 2016.
Motion carried without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve requesting the Plan Commission to
amend TIF #5 Project Plan to include the resurfacing and water and
sewer work for Second Street, Stuttgen stated that it is not known
yet if the TIF would be needed to fund Second Street, but by making
the amendment, it could be a possible revenue source. By amending
the plan it could provide additional funding. Motion Anders/Horacek

to request the Plan Commission to amend TIF #5 Project Plan to


include the resurfacing and water and sewer work for Second Street.
Motion carried without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve upgrading the electrical box on First Street
for the Fall Festival at a cost not to exceed $600. It was stated that
this is for the carnival. It was questioned why this is a city expense.
Motion Horacek/Weideman to approve upgrading the electrical box
on First Street for the Fall Festival at a cost not to exceed $600.
Motion carried without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve beginning the hiring process for Public
Works after the city receives official written notice from the retiring
employee, it was stated that the city has received official notice of
Continued to page 7

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TOWN OF HOLTON
NOTICE OF PUBLIC BUDGET HEARING

Anticipated Revenues
(tax in)
State Shared Revenues
DOT Highway Funds
Interest on Funds/Dividends
Services for Residents
State Fire Dues
Intergovt Services
TRIP/LRIP/Bridge Aid
Recycling Grant
Licenses
Misc. Revenue
LEVY
Proposed Expenditures
(Tax out)
Highway Expenditures
Payroll Expenses
Smart Growth
Board Expense
Assessor Fee
Treasurer and Supply
Clerk, Supply and Election
Recycling and Sanitation
Fire Protection/Inspections
Building Maintenance

Actual 2014
652,533.46
87,568.85
103,415.45
1,446.97
10,010.78
2,102.44
1,234.24
0.00
1,840.58
110.00
998.05
861,260.82

564,732.59
215,095.39
0.00
152.70
12,621.99
3,399.97
6,364.69
14,096.15
9,393.94
44,801.02
2,400.63
873,059.07
The budget hearing and adoption will be held on November
Town Hall before the regular board meeting.
Jan Kloth, Town Clerk

YTD 2015
441,250.84
12,128.33
80,675.76
466.31
6,975.09
1,954.39
0.00
2,525.80
1,840.51
0.00
241.82
0.00
548,058.85

2016 Budget
87,568.00
107,568.00
800.00
9,000.00
1,955.00
1,000.00
0.00
1,841.00
110.00
500.00
81,257.00
291,599.00

551,010.86
176,430.23
195,000.00
4,480.16
4,500.00
30.00
1,500.00
11,457.33
13,750.00
2,644.47
3,174.00
7,408.45
8,890.00
12,318.42
14,785.00
7,477.92
9,500.00
37,058.98
38,000.00
4,242.05
2,500.00
814,558.87
291,599.00
11, 2015, at 7:30 p.m. at the Holton
43-175022

WNAXLP

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Tribune-Phonograph

Page 7

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

Continued from page 6


retirement. Motion Voss/Schwantes to begin the hiring process for
Public Works. Motion carried without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve Pay Application #3 - $268,509.30 - Steen
Construction; Todd Trader stated the alley project is now complete.
American Asphalt will be completing Elm Street and 7th Street mid
week. Trader stated that the amount completed to date is $268,509.30;
at this time MSA is awaiting paperwork from subcontractors to fulfill
the CDBG requirements. Trader recommended we approve the
application contingent upon all paperwork for CDBG is completed.
Motion Voss/Horacek to approve Pay Application #3 in the amount
of $268,509.30 contingent upon receiving the necessary CDBG
paperwork and approval from MSA. Motion carried without negative
vote.
Trader has completed a list of items that need to be completed by
Steen on or before September 11 for substantial completion. After
September 11 the city could look at liquidated damages for items
not completed.
Trader stated he is recommending the city sign a PERF form for
the 2nd Street water main replacement project; this would be filed at
no cost to get our project ranked on a scoring list. This PERF is for
the funding cycle of 2017.
Water and Sewer was presented by Voss.
Minutes from August 24, 2015, were presented; the tour will be
rescheduled when the weather is better.
Abbotsford Fire, Ambulance Department, Consolidation
Committee was presented by Mayor Rachu. Minutes from Fire, July
22, 2015, were presented.
Minutes from Ambulance from August 10 and August 31, 2015,
were presented.
The Consolidation Committees next meeting will be held
September 16, 2015, at the Colby Fire Hall.
Abbotsford Library was presented by Mayor Rachu.
Minutes from August 18, 2015, were presented.
Police Commission was presented by Anders.
Police minutes from August 10, 2015, were presented. Anders
stated that the commission is working on an official ride-along policy.
Motion Anders/Voss to approve the Police bills in amount of
$10,471.16. Motion carried without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve contract with Lexipol for the preparation
of the commissions policies at a cost of $15,123; to be funded with
$7,000 from the plate fund, $2,500 from the K-9 budget and $4,000
from the 2015 fuel budget line item surplus with budgeting for the
continual annual cost of $2,673, motion Schwantes/Voss to approve
as presented. Motion carried without negative vote.
Under discuss/approve the purchase of a Dodge Durango from
Colby Chrysler in the amount of $27,900, Voss questioned if a
nonpursuit vehicle is a safety concern, it was stated this is not a
concern of the department. Motion Voss/Schwantes to purchase
a Dodge Durango from Colby Chrysler in the amount of $27,900.
Motion carried without negative vote.
Finance and Personnel was presented by Schwantes.
Minutes from July 27, 2015, were presented and a correction was
recommended that the city would be short sited to not participate in
the ground level discussions.
Under discuss/approve having the City of Abbotsford participate
in the Fire District creation process, it was stated that the deadline
from the Consolidation Committee was set for September 16, 2015.
It was felt that the city should be a participant in the discussions
on how the process would be handled. This will not assure that the
city is in the district. Motion Anders/Schwantes to have the City of
Abbotsford participate in the Fire District process. Motion carried 5:1
(Weideman).
Under discuss/approve assigning the city representative for the
Fire District to be the council president, pending ordinance review;
Schwantes stated that the goal was to select this person based upon
a vote of the council (council president). Schwantes stated this will
only pertain when the district is formed and not before then. Anders
stated that at the last consolidation meeting they requested an
elected official from the tax entity be present. It was stated that the
ordinance states that the mayor appoints the representative subject
to a council vote. At this time the city has two representatives.
License & Building was presented by Schwantes. Building
permits: Michelle Albrecht, 214 W. Butternut St., garage into family
room, $3,000; Robbie Smazal, 207 E. Spruce St., repair roof, paint,
replace furnace, $15,000; Donna Proft, 204 W. Spruce St., 14x20
addition & 28x40 garage, $38,000; AbbyBank, 401 E. Spruce St.,
8x16 garbage enclosure, $3,500; Donna Proft, 204 W. Spruce
St., driveway; Antonio Velazquez, 117 South 5th St., garage and
bedroom on top, $10,000; James Colby, 509 N. 5th St., new home,
$120,000.
Under discuss/approve operators, motion Mediger/Schwantes to
approve the licenses as follows: Kim Hederer, Kwik Trip, original;
Sharon Resler, Kwik Trip, original; Marcela Hansen, Kwik Trip,

original; Diane Drabek, Kwik Trip, original; Christine Rau, Kwik Trip,
original; Diane Zimmerman, Kwik Trip, original; Devon Griepentrog,
Kwik Trip, original; Charlotte Johnson, Kwik Trip, original; Jade
Korallus, Kwik Trip, original; Mary Martyn, Kwik Trip, original; Dillon
Brummund, Kwik Trip, original; Maricia Schmitt, Kwik Trip, original;
Rachael Reis, Kwik Trip, original; Karmen Goessl, Holiday, original;
Jennifer Haberman, Kwik Trip, original; Toni Kroening, Kwik Trip,
original; Sandie Calhoun, Kwik Trip, original; Cynthia Reuter, Kwik
Trip, original; Amanda Dvorak, Holiday, provisional; Connie Freeman,
Holiday, provisional; Almi Meraz, Kwik Trip, renewal; Katelynn
Andreo, Kwik Trip, renewal; Paula Ruesch, Kwik Trip, renewal.
Noting that Jeffery OLeary, Brandon Dvorak and Brian
Bridenhagen have been removed from the approval list. Motion
Mediger/Schwantes to approve operators as presented with
denying the licenses for Jeffery OLeary, Brandon Dvorak and Brian
Bridenhagen. Motion carried without negative vote.
Abbotsford Colby Area Chamber of Commerce was presented by
Lopez.
Minutes from August 5, 2015, were presented. The next meeting
will be September 9, 2015, at the Abbotsford City Hall.
Additional committee meetings were set.
Motion Schwantes/Voss to adjourn at 7:15 p.m. Motion carried
without negative vote.
Jeni Lopez,
Abbotsford City Clerk
43-175038
WNAXLP

2015 that will exceed the state levy limit.


2. The town board directs that the question of increasing the town
tax levy for 2015 (to be collected in 2016) by 28.69 percent, which
would increase the town levy by $20,000, for a total town tax levy of
$89,708, shall be placed on the agenda for the special town meeting
to be held on November 12, 2015.
Adopted this 15th day of September, 2015.
Signed: Larry Oehmichen, Town Chairman
Attest: Theoline Ludwig, Town Clerk
43-175021
WNAXLP

NOTICE OF PUBLIC BUDGET HEARING


TOWN OF COLBY, CLARK COUNTY

Notice is hereby given that on Thursday, November 12, 2015,


at 7:00 p.m. at the Colby Town Hall, a public hearing on the proposed 2016 budget and levy will be held. Following the public
hearing on the proposed budget, a special town meeting will be
held to approve the total 2016 expenditures and to adopt the
2016 tax levy. The proposed budget is available for inspection at
the home of the clerk by appointment. Call 715-223-3031. After
the above special meeting, the regular monthly business meeting
will be held.
Theoline Ludwig, Clerk
Town of Colby
Attest: October 21, 2015

TOWN OF COLBY
PROPOSED 2016 BUDGET
$143,187.77
19,884.09
30,216.00
84,394.00
102,921.48
89,708.00
$470,311.34
$38,465.00
9,300.00
32,700.00
387,206.34
2,640.00
$470,311.34

RESOLUTION #091515
TOWN OF COLBY
RESOLUTION OF TOWN OF COLBY
TOWN BOARD TO PROPOSE EXCEEDING LEVY LIMITS
Whereas, the State of Wisconsin has adopted levy limits on
town, village, city and county levies for 2015 and thereafter under s.
66.0602 of Wis. Statutes;
Whereas, s. 66.0602 of Wis. Statutes limits the allowable local
levy for 2015 to a percentage increase of no more than the greater of
(a) 0% of the 2014 payable 2015 adjusted actual levy as calculated
under the states levy limit law** or (b) a percentage equal to the
percent change in equalized value due to net new construction;
which for the Town of Colby is 1.763 percent;
Whereas, the town board of the Town of Colby, Clark County,
believes that for the 2015 tax levy (collected in 2016) it is in the
towns best interest to exceed the state levy limit as described above
by a greater percentage than 1.763.
Whereas, the Town of Colby 2014 payable 2015 adjusted actual
levy is $68,500 (typically provided on line 4 of the preprinted Municipal
Levy Limit Worksheet from WI DOR); And further whereas the state
law would limit the increase to $1,208 ($0 or dollar amount allowed
for net new construction) for an allowable town tax levy of $69,708
(typically line 7 of the preprinted Municipal Levy Limit Worksheet)
before adjustments, for 2015, collected in 2016.
Now, therefore, the town board of the Town of Colby, Clark County,
does hereby resolve and order as follows:
1. The town board supports an increase in the town tax levy for

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS


The Clark County Highway Committee is soliciting
proposals (bids) to replace culvert pipes on CTH M, in the Town
of North Foster, with a timber bridge. Proposals (bids) must be
submitted to the Clark County Highway Committee, 801 Clay
St., Neillsville, WI, no later than 9:00 a.m. November 10, 2015.
For further details please contact Randy J. Anderson,
highway commissioner, at 715-743-3680.
43-175040

STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT, WOOD COUNTY


SMALL CLAIMS
PUBLICATION SUMMONS AND NOTICE
Case No. 15SC1161
Plaintiff:
Feddick-Goodwin Law Office S.C.
252 S. Central Ave., Suite 1
P.O. Box 187
Marshfield, WI 54449
vs.
Defendant:
Geneva Oliver
110 N. Front St.
P.O. Box 193
Unity, WI 54488
Publication Summons and Notice of Filing
TO THE PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS DEFENDANT:
You are being sued by the person named above as Plaintiff. A
copy of the claim has been sent to you at your address as stated in
the caption above.
The lawsuit will be heard in the following Small Claims court:
Wood County Courthouse, 400 Market St., Wisconsin Rapids, WI
54495 on the following date and time, November 24, 2015 at 1:00
p.m. 715-421-8490
If you do not attend the hearing, the court may enter a judgment
against you in favor of the person suing you. A copy of the claim has
been sent to you at your address as stated in the caption above. A
judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding
money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or
in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure
of property.
You may have the option to Answer without appearing in court on
the court date by filing a written Answer with the clerk of court before
the court date. You must send a copy of your Answer to the Plaintiff
named above at their address. You may contact the clerk of court at
the telephone number above to determine if there are other methods
to answer a Small Claims complaint in that county.
Alanna J. Feddick-Goodwin
252 S. Central Ave., Suite 1
P.O. Box 187
Marshfield, WI 54449
715-389-8444
43-175049 WNAXLP
October 14, 2015

WNAXLP

NOTICE FOR SEALED BIDS


TIMBER STUMPAGE

The Clark County Forestry and Parks Committee, Courthouse,


Neillsville, Wisconsin, will receive sealed bids for county forest
timber stumpage until 11:00 a.m. Monday, November 16, 2015.
Contact the forestry office for detailed cutting requirements and
maps of all tracts. The Forestry and Parks Committee reserves
the right to accept or reject any or all bids. Bids will be publicly
opened in the auditorium (Room 101) at the Clark County Courthouse, 517 Court Street, Neillsville, Wisconsin, starting at 11:00
a.m. Monday, November 16, 2015. The committee will award contracts during their regular meeting on November 19, 2015. Any
unsold timber sales will be re-advertised for sale on the sealed bid
procedure for the December 14, 2015, bid opening.
Clark County Forestry & Parks Committee
John Wendorski, Forestry Manager
43-175039 WNAXLP

43-175053

EXPECTED INCOME
General/Saving Accounts
County Culvert Aid
Power Line Annual Payment
State Shared Revenue
State Highway Aid
Town of Colby Levy
Total
PROPOSED EXPENDITURES
General Government
Recycling/Solid Waste
Fire Protection
Highways
Miscellaneous
Total
43-174949 WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT CLARK COUNTY


IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF VICTORIA SIMPSON
Notice Setting Time to Hear Application and Deadline for Filing
(Claims Informal Administration). - Case No. 15PR61
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal administration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth December 23, 1918, and date
of death August 19, 2015, was domiciled in Clark County, State of
Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 100 S. 4th Street, Abbotsford,
WI 54405.
3. The application will be heard at the Clark County Courthouse,
517 Court St., Neillsville, Wisconsin, Room 403, before Stephen J.
Walter, Probate Registrar, on November 20, 2015, at 11:00 a.m.
You do not need to appear unless you object. The application may
be granted if there is no objection.
4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedents estate is
February 5, 2016.
5. A claim may be filed at the Clark County Courthouse, 517 Court
Street, Neillsville, Wisconsin, Room 403.
6. This publication is notice to any persons whose names or address are unknown.
If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability to
participate in the court process, please call 715-229-2284 at least 10
working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the
court does not provide transportation.
/s/ Stephen J. Walter, Probate Registrar
Date: October 22, 2015
Attorney Bonnie Wachsmuth
P.O. Box 416
Owen, WI 54460-0416
715-229-2284
Bar Number 1025677
43-175046
WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT CLARK COUNTY


IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JENNY P. KNEPPER, aka
PATRICIA J. KNEPPER. Date of Death: May 21, 2015.
Order Setting Time to Hear Petition for Administration and Deadline for Filing Claims (Formal Administration). Case No. 15PR60
A petition for formal administration was filed.
The Court Finds:
The decedent, with date of birth February 22, 1928, and date
of death May 21, 2015, was domiciled in Clark County, State of
Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 281 S. 2nd Street, Dorchester,
WI 54425.
THE COURT ORDERS:
1. The petition be heard at the Clark County Courthouse, 517
Court Street, Neillsville, Wisconsin, Room 401, before Circuit Court
Judge Honorable Jon M. Counsell on December 9, 2015, 9:30 a.m.
You do not need to appear unless you object. The petition may be
granted if there is no objection.
2. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedents estate is
February 5, 2016.
3. A claim may be filed at the Clark County Courthouse, 517 Court
Street, Neillsville, Wisconsin, Room 403.
4. Heirship will be determined at the hearing on petition for final
judgment.
5. Publication of this notice is notice to any persons whose names
or addresses are unknown.
If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability to
participate in the court process, please call 715-743-5181 at least 10
working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the
court does not provide transportation.
By the Court:
Honorable Jon M. Counsell
Attorney Karl J. Kelz
Kelz Law Office, LLC
133 W. State Street
Medford, WI 54451
715-748-5900
Bar Number: 1033236
43-175041
WNAXLP

Page 8

Tribune-Phonograph

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Fire district
Continued from page 1
as overall objectives like maintaining a
united department.
One of the stickier points of discussion was how the city of Abbotsford can
join the district if the corporation that
runs its fire and ambulance services does
not want to participate.
The people who own Abbys equipment seem to be totally opposed to this,
Tischendorf said.
Schwantes said thats something we
have to work on as a city.
Oehmichen said its also important to
have the firefighters and EMTs on board.
If we dont have the people to run that
equipment, we dont have anything, he
said.
In contrast to Abbotsford, both the Colby and Dorchester fire departments are
jointly owned by three municipalities,
with each entity having representatives
on a fire commission board.
There seemed to be consensus among
board members that equipment paid for
by firefighter fundraisers should remain
at the station where it was purchased.
That equipment should stay with
the stations that raised the money,
Schwantes said.
Tischendorf said he believes each
town, village and city is at the limit of
what they can afford for fire service,
so the only way to proceed is with a fire
district. Even if the savings arent realized until several years from now, he
said small communities cant afford fire
trucks costing upward of $500,000.
Who can even stand to go on their
own anymore? he asked.

Schwantes said, for him, its all about


providing the best possible service for
people who dial 911 on the worst day of
their life.
Another issue that generated a lot of
discussion was the selection of a new fire
chief to oversee the district.
Wiese said he doesnt think one of the
current chiefs should be hired to run the
district, but he doesnt think they should
be pushed out of their positions, either.
Schwantes said it is too early in the
process to talk about who will be fire
chief, but he agreed that current officers
should not lose their jobs.
They worked hard to get where they
are, he said. They should not be shoved
out the door because of this.
Deciding how much each municipality
will have to pay into the district is also
something that needs to be discussed further, board members said. Oehmichen
said Colbys fire commission bases its
cost sharing on equalized property values, and in exchange, the city is granted
three votes on the commission while the
towns have two votes.
Weve never really had a battle over
money, he said.
Based on 2015 equalized property values, Abbotsford would pay about 25 percent of the costs, the city of Colby would
pay 18 percent and the other five entities
would contribute 12 percent or less.
One factor that could drastically
change the cost breakdown would be the
inclusion or exclusion of property value
within tax-incremental finance (TIF) districts. The two cities and Dorchester all

AT THE HEAD TABLE - Town of Colby chairman Larry Oehmichen was elected
president of the new seven-member board exploring the possible consolidation of
fire and ambulance services in Abbotsford, Colby and Dorchester. Carol Staab has
agreed to serve as the boards secretary for now.
STAFF PHOTO/KEVIN OBRIEN
have active TIF districts, so subtracting
that value from the equation would shift
more of the costs to the townships.
Oehmichen said he personally thinks
the property within TIF districts should
be fully counted as part of each municipalitys valuation.
If there are buildings that need to be
protected in TIF districts, they should
count, he said.

Full-time EMTs?
Though much of the boards discussion centered around the fire departments, the question of how a consolidated district could benefit ambulance
service was also raised.
Abbotsford EMT chief Ray Esselman
said his department is down to just a couple of people who are available to go on
ambulance calls during the week.
Daytimes are horrible, he said. You
dont have anybody in the communities
that wants to do it anymore.
Colby fire chief Ross Rannow said all

small ambulance departments struggle


with filling EMT shifts Monday through
Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Rannow believes a combined ambulance service could afford two full-time
EMTs, at no extra cost to taxpayers, with
enough money left over for ambulances
and equipment.
One or both of the full-timers could
also be a firefighter, which would improve the districts insurance rating and
allow the district to use money from the
state to do fire inspections, Rannow said.
Esselman said his department is
skeptical that Rannows idea would
work, based on the declining revenue
generated by ambulance calls.
Under current law, two certified EMTs
are needed for every ambulance call,
but Rannow said a bill in the legislature
would allow one EMT and one first responder, opening it up to firefighters.
That will help tremendously, he said.
The boards next meeting was set for
Nov. 17 at 7 p.m. at Colby City Hall.

Decker
De
De
ec
c
ck
ker
ke
er
LLC

Office: 7715.654.5836
715.360.2425
Cell: 71

GOALS - Members of a new seven-member board drew up a list of 15 goals for a


proposed fire district. From left to right are Dorchester trustee Warren Underwood,
Colby fire chief Ross Rannow, town of Mayville trustee Bryon Broeske and Abbotsford resident Dean Wiese.
STAFF PHOTO/KEVIN OBRIEN

6,000
Gallo
n
Tank

ETERANS DAY

DEADLINES

TRG, Tribune-Phonograph and


The Record-Review
43-175025

All Classifieds, Display Advertising & News Articles Are Due On

Friday, Nov. 6 at 4 p.m.


Deadline change due to post office closure on Wed., Nov. 11
Shopper deadlines are not affected.

TP Printing Co., Inc.

If you have questions call your advertising


representative for more details!

www.centralwinews.com

(715) 223-2342

43-155149

Nov. 11 Issue of the

Portable able
l
Toilets Avai

Servicingg Residential & Commercial


Septic & Holding Tanks
in Clark, Taylor & Marathon Counties

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Tribune-Phonograph

Page 9

Colby band selling off old


uniforms to buy new ones
By Kevin OBrien
The last time Colby High Schools
marching band got new uniforms, Bill
Clinton had just been elected president,
the Internet was unknown to most people and baggy jeans were in style.
Its time to update our look and get
new uniforms, said band director Nathan Larsen during a recent interview
about a unique new fundraiser that
makes use of the 22-year-old uniforms as
a means to buy new ones.
Based on an idea Larsen got from another band director, members of the
bands booster club are selling greenand-yellow memorabilia made from pieces of uniforms first purchased in 1993
and again in 1998.
Thanks to the work of a couple of parents, Joleen Schade and Becky Schmelzer, the uniforms are being transformed
into pillows, tote bags, satchels, teddy
bears and marching hats.
Its a lot of sewing, Larsen said.
Starting with close to 100 uniforms,
Larsen said they have repurposed 20 to
30 so far. The first uniform they cut up
produced two pillows and two tote bags,
he said.
Larsen said they plan to continue the
fundraiser throughout this school year
and into the next, with the goal of using
the money to buy new uniforms during

the summer of 2017.


As long as we have uniforms left, well
continue selling stuff, he said.
Eventually, Larsen and the booster
club will review designs available from
vendors and get price quotes for new
uniforms. He said they expect to pay $350
per uniform and they would like to buy
at least 40, so they hope to raise $14,000.
Pillows are currently available in a
variety of sizes and designs, while the
other items need to be ordered.
The choirs Nov. 9 concert, which starts
at 7 p.m., will be the last time to order one
of the items in time for the holiday season.
That will guarantee you will get them
by Christmas, Larsen said.
Since the uniforms have been passed
down from generation to generation,
Larsen said they should make a great gift
for a lot of former students who played in
the band over the past 22 years.
The booster club introduced the pillows at the Oct. 9 Colby Hornets homecoming football game. About a dozen
pillows were sold and another 10 to 15 orders were placed for other items, Larsen
said.
The response that night was fantastic, he said.
For pricing and ordering information,
emails can be sent to Larsen at nlarsen@
colby.k12.wi.us.

ON DISPLAY - Becky Schmelzer, one of two booster club members who has volunteered to make items for a band uniform fundraiser, displays some of the pillows
for sale during the Colby Hornets Oct. 9 homecoming football game. The pillows
will also be on sale at the bands Nov. 9 concert, when other handmade fundraiser
items can be ordered.
STAFF PHOTO/KEVIN OBRIEN

Farm Tech Days


Continued from page 6
families will begin planning
for the location of Tent City
and the hundreds of acres of
alfalfa that will be needed for
forage harvesting demonstrations. A main draw of Farm
Technology Days is demonstrations of new equipment,
which dealers bring to the
show to display for potential

customers. About 600 vendors


usually bring their products/
services to the show.
The big thing will be to get
the rotations changed, Glewen said. Were going to need
almost 600 acres of alfalfa.
Glewen said it takes about
$1.2 million to stage an annual show. About $250,000

will be raised at the show in


concession sales, all of which
stays in the hands of the local
nonprofit groups that provide
volunteers to sell food and refreshments.
The first show was held in
Waupaca County in 1954 as a
plowing contest. It has grown
since, and was known as Farm

Progress Days for many years.


Glewen said it is the largest
show of its kind in the country
that moves its location every
year. Other shows that have a
permanent location think we
are absolutely crazy to try to
move this show every year,
Glewen said.
It works, though, and is able

to bring the latest in technology to a new area each year.


Most visitors come from within 100 miles, Glewen said.
The 2016 show will be held in
the southern part of the state,
near Lake Geneva in Walworth
County. The 2017 show will be
in Kewaunee County on the
eastern side of the state.

Its your choice where you go for physical therapy!

SPORT & SPINE


PHYSICAL THERAPY
www.sportspineclinic.com
www.sportspineclinic.com

Chad Bogdonovich

604 N. Division St.,


Colby, WI
(715) 223-4060
133 S. Main St.,
Greenwood, WI
(715) 267-4583

Judith Larson
MPH, PT

MA, PT, FAFS

40-171967

Reduce Pain
Improve Mobility
Patient Education
Movement Awareness
Functional Strength

COMMON SHOULDER PROBLEMS SEEN


BY PHYSICAL THERAPISTS:
Rotator Cuff
Pathology
Impingement
Syndrome

Frozen Shoulder/
Adhesive Capsulitis
Tendintis
Arthritus Pain

Strain/Sprain
Bursitis
Shoulder
Instability

Call for an appointment or additional information


Its Your Choice: In Wisconsin, you pay for your health care, so you
have the right to choose where you go for Physical Therapy. We hope
you allow us to be your provider of choice.

Wishing
i hi
h you many
more years of
health & happiness!
Love,
Your family

d
e
T

e
d
a
r
a
s
Time Again!
hristma

o
B
&

9
08

7
3-1

Its

43-174841
43-174841
484
8441

PRIMARY GOALS

50

th
Po
lzin

In many cases PHYSICAL THERAPY


can help patients avoid or delay surgery.

nn
ie

National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey 2009

43-175057

Shoulder Pain is one of the top 5 reasons a


patient will visit an Orthopedic Surgeon.

43-175056

SHOULDER PAIN

Christmas
Parade is
Sat., Dec. 5

d you!
e
e
n
e
W
FAMILIES, KIDS & ADULTS

Come Sign Up for a Costume!


Sat., Nov. 7 Wed., Nov. 11
10 a.m.-3 p.m.

3:30-7:30 p.m.

At Abbotsford/Colby Area Chamber ofce

100 W. Spruce Street, Abbotsford


(former Abbotsford Community Resource Building)

Contact Kris OLeary 715-223-2342 days or 715-223-2011 evenings

Page 10

Tribune-Phonograph

People

COMMUNITY
CALENDAR
TRICK, TREAT OR DONATION
Girl Scout troops 7085, 7029 and 7432,
along with Cub Scout Pack 321, will collect
hygiene items for the needy while trick-ortreating in Abbotsford Oct. 31. The Scouts
will also be at Abbotsford City Hall to collect
items from 2 to 4 p.m.

ABBY LIONS FALL BRUNCH


The Abbotsford Lions Fall Brunch will be
held Sunday, Nov. 1, from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m., at St. Bernards Catholic Church in Abbotsford. All the proceeds go toward supporting local Boy Scouts, food pantries and
other community projects.
ST. PAULS HARVEST DINNER
St. Pauls Lutheran Church in Curtiss will
host its annual harvest dinner Sunday, Nov.
8, from 11:15 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The churchs
worship service is at 10:15 p.m.
ABBY CHRISTMAS PARADE MEETING
The Abbotsford Christmas Parade committee will meet Monday, Nov. 2 at noon at
Pizza Hut. Any person wishing to volunteer
and help with the parade is welcome to attend.

BIRTHS
Brown birth

LIONS CLUB SEEKS NEW MEMBERS


The Dorchester Lions Club is looking for
new members. Anyone who lives in the village or the surrounding area is welcome to
join. Meetings are the first Monday of every
month at 7 p.m. at Boozers. Anyone with
questions can contact Richard Hunsader at
715-654-5847 or at dorhunsrj@yahoo.com.
INFO NIGHT FOR JUNIORS
Abbotsford and Colby high schools will
host a post-secondary informational night
for juniors in high school as well as their
parents Thursday, Nov. 12, starting at 6 p.m.
in the community room of Abbotsford High
School. Admissions representatives from
the UW System, private universities, technical colleges and the military will present
information. School counselors Lori Huther
and Jennifer Krauss will also be available to
answer any questions.

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Abby Scouts take first at chuckwagon


Cub Scout Pack 321 of Abbotsford won first place in the Samoset Council
chuckwagon competition Oct. 17 at Klemme Reserve Park in Stratford. Scouts
were judged on proficiency in various skills such as fire building, archery, Scout
basics, flag handling, tent building, first aid, team building, tool knowledge, uniform compliance and map reading. Pictured, from left to right, are Warren Flink,
leader Jamie Jakel, Jack Sheahan, Tyler Priekschat, Gunner Graves, Zachary
Steinke, Zander Steinke (with trophy), Matthew Jakel, leader Jim Steinke, Brennan Denzine and Carter Kundinger.
SUBMITTED PHOTO

A son, Colby Edward, was born to


Erik and Gina (Schaefer) Brown, Hixton, on Oct. 14, 2015, at La Crosse HospitalMayo Clinic Health Systems in
La Crosse.
He joins two brothers, Ryder and
Eastyn, and three sisters, Kenley,
Hayden and Tylan.
Grandparents are Steve and Karen
Brown, Unity, and Jeff and Becky
Schaefer, Abbotsford.
Great-grandparents
are
Ginny
Brown, Colby, and Roman and Marcella Schreiber and Marie Thompson, all
of Abbotsford.

Schreiber birth
A son, Brett Galen, was born to Bart
and Brittany Schreiber, Athens, on
Oct. 23, 2015, at Aspirus Hospital in
Wausau. He weighed six pounds, six
ounces and was 18.6 inches long.
Grandparents are Tom and Linda
Daigle, Tomahawk, and Galen and
Marlene Schreiber, Athens.

DORCHESTER
To share your news, call 715-223-2342
or send an email to tp@tpprinting.com

College note
Emily Uhlig has earned a bachelor
of science in community health education from UW-La Crosse.

ABBYCOLBY CROSSINGS MEETING


The AbbyColby Crossings Chamber of
Commerce will meet at noon Nov. 4 at Colonial Center in Colby.
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Abbotsford Evangelical Free Church, 4868
Cemetery Ave., Abbotsford, holds Sunday
services at 10:30 a.m. with Pastor Bruce
Jahnke. Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. For
more information, call 715-223-4445.

Curtiss Lions recognized for service


Three charter members of the Curtiss Lions were recently recognized for
their 35 years of service to the club. District Gov. Robert Henning, left, presented awards Oct. 20 to Erv Primeau, center, and Rod Hawks. Claude
Peissig was unavailable for the photograph.
SUBMITTED PHOTO

NORTH RIDGE CHURCH


North Ridge Church of Abbotsford, Assemblies of God, 122 N. Second St., Abbotsford, holds Sunday services at 10 a.m.
and Sunday night services at 6 p.m. for high
school students. Wednesday services are
held at 7 p.m. with Pastor Will Krebs. For
more information, call 715-223-3223.

COLBY

CHRIST EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN


Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church, 308
W. Linden St., Abbotsford, holds Sunday
services at 10 a.m. and Wednesday services
at 7 p.m. with Vicar Donald Bruce. Sunday
school is at 11 a.m. For more information, call
715-223-4315.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
First Presbyterian Church, 301 W. Elm St.,
Abbotsford, holds Sunday services at 11
a.m. with Rev. Marcia Thomas. For more information, call 715-223-3641.
FIRST UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
First United Church of Christ, 111 S. Second St., Colby, holds Sunday services at
10:30 a.m. with Pastor Teri Hanson. For more
information, call 715-223-2712.

Cherokee Chums 4-H

First to read 100


Hailey Huther was the first to read
100 books in Abbotsford Public
Librarys 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten program.

The Cherokee Chums 4-H Club meeting was called to order at 6:35 p.m. Oct.
4 at the home of Steve and Carol Luther for the clubs annual hayride. The
American pledge was led by Leanna
Golz, and the 4-H pledge was led by Brian Larson. The secretarys and treasurers reports were approved as read.
The Bender family reported on garbage pickup held Oct. 3. Nine people
were in attendance for this service.
Members were asked to print off
the new calendar for this year if they
havent done so already. Members
were also reminded to re-enroll by
Nov. 1.
National 4-H Week ran from Oct.

To share your news,


call 715-223-2342 or
send an email to
tp@tpprinting.com

4-10. The Kahn and Krebsbach families are on the committee.


The Family Focus was gone over for
important dates that are coming up.
Committee families for the Halloween
party are the Feitens and Benders.
They will contact all members as to
the date and time.
Election of officers was held. Emily
Gurtner was elected president; Jared
Goodwin, vice-president; James Hinrichsen, secretary; Carley Elmhorst,
treasurer; Carla Schmelzer, historian;
and Jennifer Kahn, junior vice-president-.
A motion to adjourn the meeting was
made by Jadyn Goodwin and seconded
by Leanna Golz.

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Tribune-Phonograph

Page 11

Highground Bike Tour raises $44,560 for park


A total of 113 bicyclists rode threeand four-day routes across Wisconsin
this fall as part of the 31st Annual
Highground Bicycle Tour, the largest
annual fundraiser for the veterans
park near Neillsville.
The Highground is a 155-acre
manned veterans park which provides healing and education to veterans, their families and all who
visit. This is accomplished through
the work of volunteers and donors.
The Highground has large outdoor
tributes honoring military veterans, exhibits and educational programs, on-ground individual and
group counseling, PTSD awareness
and outreach programs, many events
throughout the year honoring veterans and provides a respectful, serene
place to heal, remember and reflect.
The riders and several support
personnel obtained individual and
corporate donations for their trip. In
addition, several veterans posts and
community organizations helped the
cyclists along the way with food and

THEYVE ARRIVED - Bicyclists from the northern route assembled around


The Highgrounds Vietnam Veteran Tribute, Fragments.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
lodging.
Donations have continued to come
in from The Highground Bike Tour
even after the Aug. 2 Journeys

End ceremony. The total as of Oct.


20 was $44,560.
The northern route of the tour officially started in Hayward; however,

Budding artists
The Colby City Hall was filled Oct. 16 with 25 participants of the first Paint
Away class held in conjunction with the monthly Colby Public Library Craft
and Hobby Night. Roxie Caswell of Paint Away in Stanley led the students
in the step-by-step acrylic paint process to create an autumn scene canvas
in a little over two hours. Pictured with their artwork in back, from left to
right, are Melissa Wavrunek, Tina Feiten and Jennifer Krauss. In front are
Samantha Penry and Donna Schmidt. The Nov. 20 Craft and Hobby Night
will feature a string art demonstration led by Brittani Mertens. Call the library at 715-223-2000 for a supply list.
SUBMITTED PHOTO

Gerald (Potz) Pinter


June 24, 1937-October 29,, 2010

We miss you more


than words could ever say.
say
Although we loved you de
dearly,
rly
we couldnt make you stay.
st
We hold on to the
precious memories we made,
And ppromises G
God ggraciously
ously
uslyy gave.
ggave
You are forever in our hearts,
arts
ts,
Wife, Ruby, and children, Pam,
m, Mik
Mike,
Kristi and Teri, and their families
milie
milies
mil
lie
43-174868
77486
74868
748
4868
68

Meeting in the heart of Dairyland


Agriculture agents from UW-Extensions Northwest Region met at Holland
Cheese in Thorp for their annual meeting Oct. 20. Clark Countys agriculture agent Richard Halopka organized the meeting and highlighted Clark
County. There were also presentations by UW state specialists from Madison. From left to right are Nancy Vance, Kevin Schoessow , Melissa Kono,
Mark Hededorn, Katie Wantock, Halopka, Jerry Clark, Steve Okonek, Jodi
Podmolik, Tim Jergenson and Mike Travis.
SUBMITTED PHOTO

Need to place a memorial ad to


remember your loved one by?
Many designs and poems to
choose from or make it your own.
Stop by our ofce to see samples.

TP PRINTING CO.
103 W. Spruce St., Abbotsford

715-223-2342

many members of the bike tour began their ride near Neillsville and
rode north to Hayward to join other
riders at the start, doubling their
miles pedalled. Northern route participants biked either 170 or 340
miles, depending on their starting
points.
The tour had additional routes
that traveled through Wisconsin to
The Highground: the western route
(178 miles) from New Richmond; the
southern route (184 miles) from Madison; the eastern route (147 miles)
from Appleton; and a new branch of
the eastern route (198 total miles)
originating in Norman.
The Highground Veterans Memorial Park is open year-round. The 32nd
Annual Highground Bike Tour will
be Aug. 4-7, 2016. The bike tour is an
event for both families and bicyclists
of every skill level.
More information about The Highground and The Highground Bicycle
Tour can be found at www.thehigh
ground.org.

OBITUARY POLICY
A free death notice will be available. A death
notice will include name, age, city, date of birth,
date of death and service information (no photo).
Funeral home names will be included, but no web
address.
All other obituaries will be charged at a rate of
$5 per column inch.
Call 715-223-2342 with questions.

Efficient And Fast!


When you need a printing job done quickly...we deliver!
Rely on us.
W. Spruce St., Abbotsford
TP Printing Co.103 Ph.
715-223-2342

Tribune-Phonograph - Your Community News Source

Page 12

Tribune-Phonograph

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Sports

Falcons edge past Mondovi


Unity Eagles
up next for
Abbotsford
By a narrow margin, the Abbotsford Falcons football team
was victorious Friday night
over the Mondovi Buffaloes in
the first round of WIAA playoffs.
Slippery conditions from a
stiff mist out of the east made
the competition between these
two contenders interesting at
times. Slipping and sliding on
the field were enough to botch
otherwise solid plays.
Fans from both sides attended in large numbers to support
their respective schools, endur-

ing the elements and showing


strong enthusiasm throughout.
An early touchdown by Mondovi with a successful twopoint conversion put the Buffaloes up by eight points.
We didnt touch the ball in
the first quarter because they
had a 15-plus play drive that
ended in a score, said Abbotsford coach Jacob Knapmiller.
They shanked the kickoff
and we didnt recover so they
got the ball back. We stopped
them inside the 15 on the drive
and came back with an 80-yard
drive to make the score 8-6.
A strong Falcons defense
forced a punt by the Buffaloes
on the 30. A five-yard touchdown run by Garrett Rau made
the score 13-8 at halftime.
In the second half, Knapmiller described his boys as being
mostly in control of the game

LONG CARRY - Brock Halopka stiff-arms a defender as he takes the ball downfield against
the wind and rain during last Fridays level one playoff game against Mondovi.

LOYAL FANS - Students braved the rain and cold to show


support and cheer on the Falcons football team Friday night.
STAFF PHOTOS/CHRISTIAN PARKER

with a two-score lead. The Falcons earned the only score in


the third quarter on a field goal
kicked by Izzy Garcia.
Thats when Mondovi started running trick plays and we
were in position to knock the
ball down on double reverse
passes, Knapmiller said.
The Buffaloes were able to
recover two onside kicks and
scored with minutes remaining. With the two Falcon fourth
quarter touchdowns, the score
was 30-28.
With 24 seconds remaining

in the game, Mondovi attempted a two-point conversion and


failed, ending their chances
of putting the game into overtime.
We really did play well on
both sides of the ball other
than a couple mistakes at the
end, Knapmiller said.Our
kids were in position on the
onside kick, but the kicks took
a bounce and our guys slipped
because of the rain. We had
four dropped interception opportunities.
Knapmiller expressed pride

for the boys playing in lessthan-ideal weather conditions


and showing an ability to compete even when things werent
going according to plan.
Mondovi is a good team,
he said. We felt like we wore
them down with our offense
and played physically on the
defensive side.
The Falcons advance to
round two in the playoffs, facing Unity this week at Abbotsford. The Eagles, Knapmiller
said, run a very similar offense
to the Falcons.

Stratford shuts out Colby in first round of playoffs


The Colby Hornet football team traveled to Stratford Friday night for their
Division 5 level one playoff game with
the Tigers. Things didnt go well for the
Hornets as they saw their season end
with a 40-0 defeat.
The game started with Stratford kicking off, but as the kick spun and bounced
on the ground, the Hornets werent able
to corral it. One of the Tigers pounced
on the ball and secured possession at
the Colby 35.
The Hornets defense was able to
withstand the threat and forced a turnover on downs, giving the ball back to
the offense at that spot. That possession didnt produce much offense and
the Hornets were forced to punt the ball
back to the Tigers.

Stratford started the ensuing possession at their 36 and were able to move
down the field for the first score of the
night with a two-yard touchdown run at
the 2:41 mark of the first quarter. A successful extra-point kick made the score
7-0.
The next three possessions ended in
punts and, on the third one, Stratford
started a drive from their 36. They were
able to convert on two fourth down
plays during the drive and ended up
with a touchdown with 3:48 left in the
half. The extra-point kick was no good,
making the score 13-0.
Neither team was able to threaten
during the rest of the half.
The second half saw the Tigers take
the first possession at their 45 and move

down the field with a steady diet of run


plays, producing a touchdown with
10:30 left in the third quarter. The 19yard scoring run and a successful extrapoint kick made the score 20-0.
Colby punted from their 38 on their
ensuing possession but a Stratford fumble at their 18 gave the ball back to the
Hornets. After a penalty moved them
back to the 28, an interception by the Tigers ended the Colby threat.
Stratford started from their 26 and
scored shortly after with a 70-yard run.
The touchdown came with 4:34 left in
the third quarter and a failed fake kick
on the extra point made the score 26-0 in
favor of the Tigers.
Colby moved inside the Stratford 45
with their next possession, but were

forced to punt from there. Stratford then


went on a 95-yard drive for a touchdown
with 7:42 left in the game and kicked the
extra point, making the score 33-0.
Both teams used reserve players for
the rest of the game and a Stratford interception of a Colby pass accounted
for the last score of the night, coming at
the 1:49 mark of the fourth quarter with
a successful extra-point kick accounting for the 40-0 final score.
Im proud of our guys for being
ready to play tonight, Hornets coach
Jeff Rosemeyer said. We came out
playing very good defense for the first
half but just had trouble moving the
ball offensively. Making the playoffs
was a goal we had this year and we can
feel good about getting there.

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Tribune-Phonograph

Page 13

Falcons knocked out of Cross country team ends


semifinals by Marathon its season at D2 sectional
The Abbotsford Falcons volleyball
team had their season come to an end
Oct. 22, losing to the Red Raiders of Marathon in the WIAA regional semifinals.
The Falcons put up a good fight, earning some much due respect from the
top-ranked Raiders, said coach Lee Schreiber.
We executed our game plan and
played very well. Im proud of how the
girls hung on in the match, all the hours
of hard work and dedication were displayed throughout the night, Schreiber
said.
The set scores for the evening were 2125, 18-25 and 9-25. The Falcons were led
by senior Makenzie Klieforth with nine
kills and senior Jaelyn Friedenfels with
21 set assists. Senior Ariana Branstiter
had 15 digs and senior Sabrina Branstiter added eight digs.
It was a great season for the Falcons,
earning 25 match wins and only nine
losses. The Falcons finished high in the
Marawood North, being near the top in
kill percentage. Seven of the top 10 servers were Falcons. Abbotsford also led
the conference in digs and setting assists.
This is a team that any coach would
be proud of, Schreiber said. Like all
good things, it has to come to an end but
not without many memories for me and
these kids. I would like to thank all of
the parents and the School District of
Abbotsford for all their support. I would
also like to thank the seniors for all their
hard work. You will be greatly missed by
the coaching staff.

EYE ON THE BALL - Jaelyn Friedenfels sets the volleyball for her teammates in last Thursdays match in Marathon.
STAFF PHOTO/CHRISTIAN PARKER

Even though no one from the ColbyAbbotsford cross country team qualified
for state this year, coach Bryon Graun
said he was very proud of his runners
performance at last Saturdays Division
2 sectional in Black River Falls.
Kolby Jensen ran one of the best
races of his career for us and Preston
Mertins gave it everything he had with a
wonderful finish in eighth place, Graun
said. The team has become a family and
it is sad that it has to end.
Mertins was the boys top finisher with
a time of 17 minutes, 21.11 seconds, followed by Trevor Flick in 27th (18:14.09),
and Jensen in 30th (18:23.54).
As a team, the boys came in fifth out of
15 teams at the meet.
On the girls side, freshman Isabelle
Feiten was the top finisher in 30th place
(22:01.96), followed by junior Kayli Donahue in 50th (23:50.32) out of 94 runners.
The girls placed 10th out of 14 teams.
Graun said two things come to his
mind when he looks back on the season.
First and foremost, I had a great
group of seniors. Preston Mertins and
Trevor Flick led the boys team on and
off the course, Graun said. They were
our front runners in all our races and
were great examples for our team each
night at practice and helped everyone get
ready to race each week.
Seniors Haylee Geiger and Paige Kocian fought through injuries all season,
but they were the backbone of the girls
team, Graun said.
They kept everyone on track each and
every day, he said. I have never depended on a group of seniors as much as this

A GREAT
START Freshman
Isabelle Feiten
emerged as
the teams top
runner for the
girls this year.
She was the
teams highest finisher at
many of the
meets, including a home
Oct. 10.
STAFF PHOTO/
KEVIN OBRIEN

year. They will be truly missed.


At the same time, Graun said the
teams future looks bright.
We had six freshmen on the team and
they all were a great addition to our family, he said. Matt Roth and Alex Schmitt
stepped in and contributed to our varsity team from the get-go. Matt ended his
season with a great run at conference to
earn all-conference honors.
Feiten became the girls top runner on
her first day, Graun said.
She worked hard and answered the
call as our top runner, improving every
week, he said. These three freshmen,
along with Aaron Schmeiser, Ben Krug
and Jena Steen, were wonderful additions to the team and I will be expecting
even bigger things from them next year.

Tree stand falls can happen to anyone, so be careful


T
D
E

than a normal rise on a set of stairs. They should extend above the height of the hand grips included on
the stand and be offset at 45 degrees from the front
of the hang-in stand. This allows the hunter to step
down into the stand while maintaining three points
of contact, and then get back out of the stand when
done hunting with three points of contact.
Always pull your bow, firearm or other gear up
into stand with a pull rope. I know good friends tell
me and show me how they use a sling and just climb
right up. Great, but that firearm across your back
creates a single point of primary impact across a
single vertebra and does an incredibly good job of
not only smashing the bone but injuring the spinal
column permanently. Again, statistics are hard to
argue with.
Good luck these next few weeks and stay safe in
your stand.

43-174988

a climbing stand while wearing the harness is the


safest way to hunt from a tree stand. Ladder stands
account for the greatest number of falls.
The falls usually take place
HROUGH A when setting up or taking
down the stand. Until they
are tied in with their straps,
ECOY S
they are unbelievably unstable. Someone out there might
YE
want to debate that, but they
would be arguing against
proven statistics.
The hang-in stands provide
mixed results. They are safe
once hung and once the hunter is in them with their safety
harness on. Very few spend
the money on a fall prevention system that allows them
to wear a safety harness while
climbing the steps or strap-on
ladder. Falls happen when the
BY
is getting into or out
CHUCK KOLAR hunter
of the stand.
LOCAL OUTDOORSMAN
The two biggest reasons
come from not using enough
climbing steps and icy steps. The climbing pegs are
vertical, not at an angle like a true ladder. Hunters
should use enough steps that are no further apart

Is excited to introduce
their NEW Therapy Company

FROSTWOOD APARTMENTS in COLBY


AVAILABLE ONE & TWO BEDROOM APARTMENTS
FOR RENT. Rents from $477 includes water, sewer,
garbage and hot water. On-site coin laundry. On-site
Caretaker. No AGE restrictions.
For showing and application:
TF-500240

One of the things I noticed while grouse hunting


this year was the surprisingly low number of buck
scrapes. When your hunting is confined to walking
trails while others work your dogs points, you notice
things like this. We saw the first scrape on Monday
next to a secluded bedding area.
Tuesday we saw a couple of scrapes, and by
Wednesday it seemed a lot of bucks where making
scrapes. The rut is definitely kicking off. Saturday
I saw the first evidence of a buck, a scrubby eightpointer, searching for does.
I wont hunt the rut this year and most likely wont
do any archery hunting. Ill take the off season to
look into whether or not Ill hunt with a crossbow
from now on. Tree stands may be out of the question,
but Ill always cherish the time spent in my climber
enjoying the sights, sound and smells of fall.
Hunting off the ground comes with risks risks
that very well may change your life forever, and Im
not talking about just walking down trails for a season or two. As hunters we have worked hard and are
committed to making our passion safe.
Today hunting has fewer injuries by far than golf.
But falls from tree stands dont necessarily get classified as hunting related accidents. They get classified
as falls. Whats more, you are far more likely to suffer a fall in your hunting career if you hunt from tree
stands. The trauma industry calls it a fall from an
elevated position, and it is life changing.
One out of every three hunters who hunts from a
tree stand will experience a fall. Please dont say it
cant happen to you; everyone Ive ever taken care
of who fell from a tree stand said that to me at some
point in time. A good friend of mine had a strap
break on a tree stand he left in the woods for three
years. He was climbing into it a couple weeks before
gun season and suffered an 18-foot fall as his ladder
stand crashed to the ground. A long-time painter, he
received a lot of ladder safety training and did exactly what he needed to do so he only broke both legs
and one ankle. Two years later he still walks with a
limp and both legs throb when the weather changes.
Wearing a safety harness is step one. Hunting from

Landmark
C O M PA N Y

Call FRANK at 920-765-0133 or 1-800-924-3256


LANDMARK COMPANY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROVIDER AND EMPLOYER

If you are in need of Inpatient or Outpatient


therapy services we are here every step of
the way to help get you back to your active
life as quickly as possible.

Come see us or give us a call at

(715) 229-2172
W4266 CTH X, Owen, WI 54460-8932

Page 14

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Tribune-Phonograph

HELP WANTED

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43-175047

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Currently hiring
All shifts available

McDonalds
Marathon City
Ph. 715-443-6545

Managers & Crew

Also hiring: Casual Housekeeping/Laundry,


Part-time Activities and Part-time Dietary

43-174074

HELP WANTED

All Shifts

Please come in to apply


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Marsheld, WI

We offer competitive pay, advancement


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vacation, 401(k), reduced price meals, crew rewards
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Apply in-store or online at
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Spread the Word With Classied Advertising

New car calling your name? Old vacuum sucking up space in the closet? Odds and ends collecting dust.
Odds are, somebody else can put your old stuff to good use. Make sure they know all about it with an ad in the Classieds!
CWS = Central Wisconsin Shopper
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Write one word per box. Use sheet of paper if additional room is needed.

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word PER PUBLICATION

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Star News Paper
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Email: classsub@tpprinting.com
Call: 715-223-2342 Fax: 715-223-3505
www.centralwinews.com

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Tribune-Phonograph

Page 15

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

AGRICULTURE

FOR SALE

WANTED TO BUY

HELP WANTED

AVAILABLE AT Green Acres


Terrace in Colby: 2 bedroom,
1 bath for $550 for 11/1/15. Includes lot rent. Utilities not included. Cats considered, sorry
no dogs. Vacant lots for $225.
Colby, WI. 715-340-2116.

AVAILABLE NOW. One bedroom


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Withee. Eligible applicants must
be 62 or disabled. Appliances
and some utilities included.
Building features community
room, car plug-ins, and laundry facilities. Tenant pay 30% of
adjusted monthly income. For
an application please contact:
Impact Seven, Inc. at 855-3168967 or 715-357-0011. EHO.
impact@impactseven.org.

TWO CALF-TEL Calf hutches,


pails, fences, hay boxes, $150
each. Two sets of tractor chains,
fit WD Allis, Moline Z. Twenty
used rubber cow mats, $10
each. 715-257-1485.

FOR SALE: 5 person spa, good


shape, $600. Moving sale. 715571-2268.

WANTED: GUNS - new and


used. Turn them into ca$h or
trade for a new one! Shay Creek
in Medford, 715-748-2855.

FARM MACHINERY

FURNACE CLOSEOUT. Marathon Metalworks is selling final


inventory of conventional wood
boilers before EPA deadline.
30x34x54 firebox with 3/8 steel.
715-654-5443.

MEYER MANUFACTURING Corporation is accepting applications for production welders,


painters and general labor. Competitive wage, excellent fringe
benefits, normal work week
is four 10 hour days, Monday
through Thursday. Apply in person at Meyer Mfg. Corp., Hwy. A
West, Dorchester, WI.

4 BEDROOM House with 2 car


garage in the country. $550/
month, heat and electric extra.
Call 715-223-5483.

ONE BEDROOM Upper apartment, stove and refrigerator furnished, in Abbotsford. 715-6517511.
FOUR BEDROOM House, 2 car
garage, close to Abbotsford
schools. Includes appliances,
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plus security deposit. No pets.
715-654-5349.

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Happy Anniversary,
Happy Whatever!
For all the happy
things you want to
express to everyone...

REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE: 40 acre homestead. Passive solar home with
attached greenhouse, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, attached 2+ car
garage. Includes office building
with apartment, one car garage
and workshop. Small pond. On
dead end road. Popple River
Tributary runs length of property.
$195,000. 715-613-4775.

The Tribune-Record-Gleaner
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The Record-Review
Central Wisconsin Shopper

715-223-2342
HELP WANTED

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Deb Tomlinson

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www.exceptionallivingcenter.com

43-174877

is lookingg ffor

HELP WANTED

FOR SALE: DC Atlas 542, 42 bu.


silage cart, $2,800. Two Hanson silo unloaders, 18 and 20
with motors. Call 715-255-8966.
Loyal.

FOR RENT
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY At Roland Kanneberg Villa, 200-201
N. Eighth Street in Abbotsford,
to accommodate agricultural
processing workers, 2 & 3 bedrooms, rent starts at $455. Owner
paid heat, water, sewer & trash
removal. Certain restrictions apply. For more information please
contact Impact Seven, Inc. at
855-316-8967 or 715-357-0011.
EHO.

PORK - FUTILITY Farms - whole


pig, $2.75/lb. & halves $2.85/lb.,
plus processing. Ready November/December. Call Beverly 715550-5720.

NOTICES
CATCH US ON THE WEB. Visit www.
centralwinews.com to view featured stories from The Tribune-Phonograph and The Record-Review.
Local advertisers also available on
www.centralwinews.com.

HELP WANTED

LIVE YOUR DREAM JOB!

U>>}OR Lawn and Garden equipment


U ViiVi
U-}iV>V>>`i
U`ii>
Take control of your earning potential
up to $30 per hour (based on school/experience)
and a competitive benet package.
Interested candidates should apply online at

www.rands.com/careers

Bills Service Center, Central Wisconsins largest Polaris dealer


and newest Ski-Doo and Can-Am dealer is expanding. Bills Service Center has openings in the following areas: parts department, service department and the sales department. Experience
in power sports is a plus, but will train the right person.
We offer competitive wages, health and dental insurance, paid
vacation, paid holidays and a retirement plan.
Send resume to:
Bills Service Center
B
P.O. Box 71
Stratford, WI 54484
Attn: Jon Ulrich
or e-mail to
jon@billsservicecenter.com

Caregivers Come Join Our Team


COUNTRY TERRACE OF WISCONSIN
in Abbotsford has full & part-time positions available for 1st and 2nd shift.
Previous experience is not needed.
We will provide all the training and
certificates required. We offer a
number of benefits, including paid
vacation for part time staff. A fun,
homelike environment with competitive wages. Background check
required per DHS83. EOE
Please apply at:

Riesterer & Schnell, Inc., is an equal opportunity employer.


Women, minorities, people with disabilities and veterans
are encouraged to apply.
43-155198

HELP WANTED Milking cows, 4


hour shifts, flexible schedule, 4
a.m., noon and/or 8 p.m. start
times. Other work available,
crops & etc. Athens/Stetsonville
area. 715-297-3796.

LOG TRUCK Driver wanted.


Loader experience preferred
but willing to train, some maintenance required. Call Thurs Trucking, 715-257-9242.
LOOKING TO Hire CDL drivers.
$1,100 to $1,500 average weekly.
Call Bill at 920-634-9008 for details. Based out of Greenwood,
WI.

has a support staff opening that must be filled


immediately. Please send a letter of interest with
your qualifications to:

Janeen LaBorde
Stratford School District
P.O. Box 7
Stratford, WI 54484
or email to
jalaborde@gapps.stratford.k12.wi.us
43-174950

Heartland NAPA
of Abbotsford
We are taking applications for a part-time delivery/counter person. An
individual with the right skills and job performance could be moved
to full-time. Applicant should have parts sales and/or mechanical
experience in the automotive, agricultural or heavy duty industries.
Good communication skills and the ability to multi-task are a must.
A clean driving record and passing a pre-employment drug test is
mandatory.
Applications can be picked up at:

107 N. 4th St., Abbotsford

100 South 4th Ave., Abbotsford, WI 54405


See our website for further information:

www.carepartners-countryterrace.com

42-174542

Join Our Award


Winning Team!
We are currently recruiting for the following positions:

Now Hiring

Generous
Sign-on Bonus
Offered!

Casual A.M., P.M. & Night CNAs


Part-time P.M. & Night CNAs
Full-time P.M. Nurse
Part-time P.M. & Night Nurse
Casual Cook & Dietary Aide

Contact
C
t tE
E.D.
D or D
D.N.S
NS
or apply online @ goldenlivingjobs.com

600 East Elm Street,


Abbotsford, WI
715-223-2359

Full-time P.M. Resident Assistant

3:00-11:00 p.m. which includes every other weekend and holiday

Day RA Position

6:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m.


Every other weekend ONLY
Must be 18 years old to apply for these positions.
If interested, please apply
in person at:
Colby
Retirement
Community
Awarded
510 W. Wausau Street
the prestigious
Colby, WI 54421
2014 Excellent in
loelrich@midwestseniorliving.net
Action Award from
NO PHONE CALLS
National Research

Corporation
43-174844

Or contact Sue Kalinski at 920-757-6101

ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS For


waitress and cook. Apply in person, Abby Cafe, Abbotsford.

TRUCK DRIVER Wanted for grain


hopper division, home weekends. Saturday morning mechanic. Full-time dispatcher for
expanding fleet. 715-571-9601.

42-174689

Service Technician (Diesel)

HELP WANTED

PART-TIME Milk hauler wanted.


Experience preferred. Potential
career opportunities in the future.
Call 715-613-1148.

43-174948

Available Full-time Position in our Stratford Store


and what we are looking for:

HOMETOWN PAINTING. Painting and staining, interior & exterior, reasonable, experienced.
Quality work guaranteed. 715687-3188.

Stratford School District

EXPERIENCE A CAREER IN THE POWER SPORTS INDUSTRY!

Country Terrace
off W
o
Wisconsin
isscons
o sin
Join one of the most successful John Deere
dealers in Wisconsin! Local family-owned company
continues to grow due to the stability of Wisconsins
agricultural industry. Join the service team at Riesterer
& Schnell and represent the industry-leading equipment
brand of JOHN DEERE.

WORK WANTED

HELP WANTED: Part-time farm


help milking, cleaning, some calf
work and feeding. Owen. Call
715-613-3510.

HELP WANTED

43-174952

THREE BEDROOM, 1 bath,


country ranch home in Rib Falls,
$600 plus security deposit. Tenant pays all utilities. Onsite laundry. Smoke-free, no pets. 715571-7356.

FOR SALE: Red and white oak


firewood, 100 inch lengths. 715316-2276.

Page 16

Tribune-Phonograph

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Christ Lutheran marks 100 years


Christ Lutheran Church in Abbotsford celebrated its 100th anniversary Sunday, which served as a homecoming for several past
members and pastors. Above, from left to right, are Rev. Edwin
Borchardt, a graduate of Abbotsford High School and former
member of Christ Lutheran Church currently serving Trinity Lutheran in Evansville, Minn; Rev. Kenneth Loerhke, who served Christ
Lutheran Church as his first parish from 1971 to 1982 and retired
in 2010 while serving Pella Lutheran Church in Waupun; Rev. Dr.
Gary Paul, who served Christ Lutheran Church from 2011 to 2014
and is now retired; Vicar Donald Bruce, currently serving Christ
Lutheran and St. Paul Lutheran churches, a dual parish; Rev.
Dwayne Lueck, president of the North Wisconsin District LCMS;
and Rev. Robert Busse, Abbotsford native and former member of
Christ Lutheran Church currently serving Calvary Lutheran Church
in Princeton. At top right, Vicar Bruce leads the procession into
Sundays worship service.
STAFF PHOTOS/KEVIN OBRIEN

Schools
Continued from page 1
that were once shared between the two
schools, but are no longer. The schools
once shared a vocational education capstone program hosted by Abbotsford,
a music and chemistry instructor and,
more recently, a joint bus route. Welsh
was unsure why the bus route was discontinued.
Colby board member Cheryl Ploeckelman reminded Welsh that a Colby custodian was also used briefly by Abbotsford. Colby board member Deb Koncel
recalled some shared college prep calculus and English courses in the 90s.
Kolden, however, said there could be
logistical and cultural issues as the two
schools share programs and services.
Each district has its own culture and
way of doing things, he said. Do we
merge calenders? Do we talk about the
total number of school days? An awareness of the individual cultures as we
move forward is important.
Each district operates on a separate
school calender with its own built-in
traditions. Colby, for instance, has a late
start time every Monday. Abbotsfords
early releases, parent-teacher conferences, solo ensembles and teacher inservice dates are also unique.
Everybody here must have some idea
of commonalities that will give us something to latch onto between the two districts, Medenwaldt said. The calender
has come up quite a bit. It would require
some degree of undoing by each district
to make things mesh. Its not impossible,
but change comes hard sometimes.
Welsh said he doubted that the two districts calendars are that far apart.
We all start on the same day and Id
guess we arent too far off on the last day
of school either, he said.
Ploeckelman
suggested
summer
school as an easy starting point for collaboration. Weekend food packages for
low-income families was another area
she mentioned which neither district

JOINT BOARDS - Presidents and administrators from the Colby and Abbotsford
school boards shared ideas among the two bodies. From left to right are Steve
Kolden, Bill Tesmer, Don Medenwaldt and Reed Welsh. STAFF PHOTO/CHRISTIAN PARKER
has done yet.
Were two miles apart, she said. It
would be easy to pull together to help
some of our low-income families.
Abbotsford offered an August summer
school session for two years, which was
ended due to poor attendance. Members
of both school boards thought between
the two districts, an August program
could be re-instated as a way to give students a head start immediately prior to
the beginning of the school year.
We might be able to get the numbers
between the two schools with a common
curriculum to make it a worthwhile endeavor, Medenwaldt said.
Kolden and Welsh said both districts
are looking at making some changes
to their respective summer school programs. Welsh said Abbotsford is looking at adding to the academic aspects of
summer school and making programs
more grade-level specific. Kolden said
Colby is also looking to find a balance between academics and recreation in the

summer school setting.


Bussing was another topic members
considered revisiting. Koncel pondered
why joint bus routes didnt work out
when the arrangement was tried previously. Welsh thought perhaps is was a
time lag between routes. Colby is currently running 11 bus routes and Abbotsford four.
Welsh suggested shared bussing
would be an instance where slightly different start and end times to the school
day could be beneficial, so students dont
have to wait for busses to arrive.
Other possibilities discussed for consideration included the combined hiring of one full-time teacher, likely a specialist, if both would need a half-time
position filled. Abbotsford school board
member Shanna Hackel said the cost effectiveness of running additional classes
could be more realistic for both schools
by sharing more teachers. Welsh mentioned sharing might help retain quality
employees in both districts, especially in

elective programs.
The core areas in both schools will
remain relatively the same, Welsh said.
The fluctuation is going to be in the
elective areas.
Kolden recapped discussion points
meriting further exploration. He identified summer school, bussing, course options and increased options for distance
learning through the virtual academies
as immediate discussion topics worthy
of pursuing.
Colby board member Seth Pinter also
suggested the weekend meals for lowincome families as an excellent opportunity for immediate collaboration.
Starting with coordinated summer
school schedules and possible shared
bus routes would be a good first step,
suggested Hackel.
Scheduling of a smaller high school
is incredibly difficult, Kolden said.
Whatever the circumstances, we make
it work.
Medenwaldt asked the group when
they would like to meet again. The consensus was to advance further discussions among the individual boards and
meet collectively at least annually.
Most members were in favor of leaving individual school calendars unchanged until there is an imminent need
to coordinate.
What does having a common calender allow us to do that we cant do without it? Even with the academies, we have
four districts with different calendars
and we make it work because we adjust.
I dont see a calender interfering with
something we want to have happen,
Kolden said. I dont see it as a barrier.
Members of both boards were generally pleased with the ideas generated by
the think tank.
Well just play it by ear, Medenwaldt
said. I dont think the calender has to be
thrown out, but the limiting aspects we
can probably continue to work around.