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Hardware, lumber,

paint and friends

Flood
of 1955

Page A8

Page A7

COMPASS Real emotion


in film Brooklyn

Ghanaians on the field


Page A13

Page C15

$1.25

38 PAGES IN 2 SECTIONS
20 PAGES IN 1 SECTION

NEWS OF LAKEVILLE ~ SALISBURY ~ SHARON ~ NORTH CANAAN ~ FALLS VILLAGE ~ CORNWALL ~ KENT
2015 The
Lakeville
Journal
LLCRate
Periodical
Paid(Town
at Lakeville
(Town ofConnecticut
Salisbury), 06039
Connecticut 06039
2015 The Lakeville
Journal
Company,
LLCCompany,
Periodical
PostageRate
PaidPostage
at Lakeville
of Salisbury),

VOLUME22119 NUMBER 17
VOLUME 116 NUMBER

THURSDAY,
DECEMBER
THURSDAY,
JANUARY 3,
8, 2015

Salisbury-Sharon Transfer Station


By Patrick L. Sullivan

mated by Anchor at $3,719,843.


The towns are splitting the cost
of the new transfer station, 50
percent each.
Salisbury Board of Finance
Chairman Bill Willis said at the
Oct. 20 meeting that he was confident that Salisburys half of the
costs could be handled with little or no impact
on the mill rate.
A less receptive audience in Sharon heard Tom
Bartram give them an idea of what the project

CONTINUING
CONCERNS

SALISBURY/SHARON
Residents of both Salisbury and
Sharon took a look at the proposal
for a new transfer station in October, as the two-town Transfer
Station Building Committee held
information meetings on Oct. 20 (in Salisbury)
and Oct. 27 (in Sharon).
The Transfer Station Recycling Advisory Committee (TRAC) voted unanimously to support the
plan earlier in October.
The cost of the new transfer station is esti-

See STATION, Page A11

Continuing Concerns

Swap Shop survival is important


By Cynthia Hochswender

SALISBURY AND SHARON As the residents of


Salisbury and Sharon debate
what their future shared transfer station will look like, there is
one thing that everyone agrees
on: There has to be a Swap Shop.
New Englanders are famous for their thrift and their
determination to fix, recycle
and reuse whenever possible.
The Swap Shop is the physical

manifestation of that mindset. For many Salisbury and


Sharon residents, every trip
to the transfer station includes
at least a brief scan of whats
on the shelves and floor of the
long, narrow room.
Always there is a large selection of books, from obscure
and ancient textbooks to new
paperbacks and everything
in between (including lots of
mysteries and cookbooks).
There is sporting equip-

ment, decorative items that


range from kitschy to classic,
old 33 records, cassettes and
audio CDs. There are baskets,
flowerpots, cooking gear and
mechanical equipment of
various vintages.
Transfer Station Manager
Brian Bartram shed light on
some of the mysteries of the
Swap Shop in a recent interview.
See THRIFT, Page A3

FALLS VILLAGE The


parts of the new Amesville (or
Water Street) bridge, which
connects Salisbury to Falls
Village over the Housatonic
River, arrived in the first week
of October. The new sections
were lifted into place by crane
on Oct. 27. It was looking
good for the long-anticipated
opening of the bridge to traffic
on Dec. 15.

But on Nov. 2, at the regular


monthly meeting of the Salisbury Board of Selectmen, First
Selectman Curtis Rand had
bad news: The bridge would
almost certainly not open as
scheduled.
The problems are many.
The entire schedule was delayed several weeks when the
initial low bidder dropped out,
and the state Department of
Transportation had to evaluate
the next-lowest bid.

From an addict, warnings


about the path to heroin
By Patrick L. Sullivan

Amesville-Falls Village bridge


By Patrick L. Sullivan

Dazzling

PHOTO BY KAREN BARTOMIOLI

The Jacquiers at Laurelbrook Farm in East Canaan turned


their largest tractor into a giant toy for the towns Parade of
Lights on Sunday, Nov. 29, with Santa turning the windup
key. Story, more photos on Page A5.

There are parts of the


bridge that have to be installed
and then painted, Rand said.
Only then can the concrete
deck be poured. And with the
weather getting colder, both
painting and concrete work
become less and less feasible.
The state Department of
Transportation closes all jobs
on Dec. 1 and reopens April
1, Rand said.

FALLS VILLAGE Evan W.,


a 31-year-old man from White
Plains, N.Y., described his progression from smoking marijuana and drinking alcohol in high
school, to being a full-fledged
heroin addict in his late 20s, to a
group of students at Housatonic
Valley Regional High School on
Monday, Nov. 30.
Evan was with Jimmy Hughto and Brittanie Decker from
Mountainside Treatment Center
in North Canaan.
Evan attended a big high

school in White Plains, with


4,000 students. I was exposed
to a lot of stuff some good,
some bad.
In early adolescence he began
to feel confused, uncomfortable,
unsure of myself.
He started using marijuana
and drinking and he liked it.
It filled the void, he said.
It made me feel comfortable,
confident.
And this discovery took him
on a journey he now regrets.
Once I realized I could
change the way I felt, I didnt lose
that for years.

For the next 15 years, he devoted himself to using alcohol


and drugs.
Evan was kicked out of his
high school and sent to the bad
kids school, where he made
connections with people who
had gone beyond the alcohol
and marijuana stage.
Evan began writing graffiti,
and this led to a respite of sorts
when an art teacher took him
aside and taught him about
drawing and painting enough
so Evan was able to get into art
See ADDICTION, Page A11

See BRIDGE, Page A11

Architecture critic Goldberger at Forum


By Leon Graham

SALISBURY Architecture
is the art that is around us and
with us every day. We live in and
with the built environment. It
has the power to perplex, anger,
enthrall, delight, even awe us; its
effects set the tone of cities across
the globe, the way their people
live, and reflects what matters to
them and their cultures.

Priceless

T
PHOTO BY PATRICK L. SULLIVAN

On the run
Mountaineer Eli Brinson (No. 20) ran for a touchdown in the
first quarter of the Thanksgiving Day football game between
Housatonic Valley Regional High School and Oliver Wolcott
Tech. Story, Page A13.

here is a very special valley in our region, tucked


away high on the side of
a mountain with 30-mile views,
that has been owned by the same
family for more than a century.
There is nowhere else like it in the
area it is truly incomparable
which makes it hard for an
appraiser to fix its value as real
estate. It is even harder to quantify
its value for the owner, my friend,
for whom it is simply the most

On Dec. 11, The Salisbury


Forum will present Paul Goldberger, the countrys most influential writer on architecture,
explaining Why Architecture
Matters. Goldberger was only
34 in 1984 when he won the
annual Pulitzer Prize for Criticism. The award was created in
1970, and its first winner was
another architecture critic, the
great Ada Louise Huxtable of

NATURE'S
NOTEBOOK
TIM ABBOTT
meaningful place on Earth.
Saving family land from development is unlike any other
real estate transaction. In most
cases, just reaching consensus
about the right outcome for the

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See FORUM, Page A11


land and aligning the priorities
of various family members
takes time and sensitivity. My
own family needed four years
to successfully accomplish the
protection of nearly 20 acres of
forest land in southeastern Massachusetts through an easement
transaction that involved three
conservation organizations, an
expanded network of public access trails and two town meeting
votes. Even though my friend is
See NATURE, Page A11

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The New York Times. Huxtable,


as Goldberger has pointed out,
made architecture good, bad,
indifferent part of the public
dialogue.
Goldberger, a Yale graduate,
began his career at The Times,
following in Huxtables footprints. But he is a quite different
writer, who recognizes that the

Equal Housing Lender

11/23/15 4:47 PM

A2

Regional

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015

In The Journal this week


SHARON ......................... A3
NORTH CANAAN .... A4-A5
SALISBURY ............... A6-A7
CORNWALL .................... A8
KENT .............................. A9
FALLS VILLAGE ........... A10
OBITUARIES ................ A12

SPORTS .............. A12 & A13


OPINION ........................A14
VIEWPOINT ..................A15
FAMILY/FRIENDS........ A16
LEGALS ......................... A16
CLASSIFIEDS ....... A16-A18

Three-day forecast

Friday............................. Partly cloudy, high 45/low 32


Saturday ....................................... Partly cloudy, 46/30
Sunday ...................................................... Sunny, 48/33

Lakeville Weather History


by The Lakeville Journal

Date

Nov. 26
Nov. 27
Nov. 28
Nov. 29
Nov. 30
Dec. 1
Dec. 2

Min.
27
31
34
26
25
39
40

Max. Conditions
44
43
57
40
38
44
49

Partly Cloudy
Cloudy
Light Rain
Mostly Sunny
Partly Cloudy
Rain
Rain

Concert at Colonial Theatre Dec. 19


NORTH CANAAN The
Canaan Colonial Theatre presents a live concert to benefit the
rebuilding of Canaan Union
Station on Saturday, Dec. 19,
at 8 p.m.
This is the first event of a
planned reopening of the historic

theater on Railroad Street as a live


entertainment venue.
Headlining is The Steve Dunn
Band. Special guests are Belle of
the Fall and Molliekate Dionne.
Tickets are $20 and include
buffet snacks. Beer and wine will
be sold. Doors open at 7:30 p.m.

Messiah performance Dec. 6


ASHLEY FALLS Singers
from northwest Connecticut and
southern Berkshire County will
perform G.F. Handels Messiah,
on Sunday, Dec. 6, at 7 p.m.
The performance is a benefit
for the Hearts of the Father Orphanages in Africa (with headquarters in Sheffield).
The group will perform Part
I (the Christmas portion) and

the Hallelujah chorus with Chris


Clark (conductor), soloists, string
ensemble, timpani and trumpet
at Greenwoods Community
Church, 355 Clayton Road, in
Ashley Falls. There is no ticket
cost, but a suggested donation
of $15 per person is suggested
to support HOF orphanages. A
reception with refreshments will
follow the performance.

Correction
A photo in the Nov. 26 Lakeville Journal of Ahmad Kheir, an
exchange student at Housatonic Valley Regional High School from
Tripoli, Lebanon, was incorrectly credited to Patrick L. Sullivan. The
photo
was taken
by Lee H.
Kellogg School teacher Chris Hanley.
CD December
Lakeville
11/23/15

The following information was


provided by the Connecticut State
Police at Troop B. All suspects are
considered innocent until proven
guilty in a court of law.
Driver hits three cars
Carole Purdy, 46, of Falls
Village was driving south on
Railroad Street/Route 7 in
North Canaan on Nov. 19. At
about 8:33 p.m., about 200 feet
north of the Route 44 intersection, she hit three vehicles
parked and unoccupied on the
right shoulder. Purdy was not
injured. Her 2015 GMC Yukon
Denali was towed with front-end
damage. Also towed were a 2006
Hyundai Accent, registered to
Bader Abou-Hamze of North
Canaan, a 2002 Subaru Legacy
registered to Connie Lee Green
of North Canaan and a 2007
Honda Civic registered to Lisa
Fendley of Norfolk. Purdy was
charged with traveling too fast
for conditions and failure to
maintain the proper lane.
Warrant arrest
Brian Brazzale, 23, of Salisbury was arrested Nov. 20 after
he was observed driving with a
suspended license and an outstanding warrant was discovered.
The warrant was issued after
Brazzale did not appear in court
following a previous arrest. He
was charged with second-degree
failure to appear. Bond was set at
$1,500. He is to appear in Bantam
Superior Court Dec. 7.
Larceny, forgery
Shannon Haley, 45, of Hartford was presented by the Department of Corrections in Bantam Superior Court Nov. 20 on

POLICE BLOTTER
three outstanding warrants. He
was charged with fourth-degree
larceny and second-degree forgery in connection with an Oct.
28, 2014, incident at National
Iron Bank in Salisbury.
Prescription forged
Colleen Almy, 53, of Falls Village turned herself in at Troop B
Nov. 22 on a warrant stemming
from a Sept. 30 incident at the
Salisbury General Store and
Pharmacy on Main Street in
Salisbury. She was charged with
illegal use of a forged prescription and second-degree forgery.
Bond was set at $5,000. She is
to appear in Bantam Superior
Court Dec. 7.
No right-of-way
Jessie Cole, 23, of North
Canaan exited the Xtramart gas
station in North Canaan onto
North Elm Street at about 8:37
a.m. on Nov. 23. He pulled his
1994 Ford F350 directly into
the path of a northbound 1999
Mack 600 dump truck driven by
James Dawson, 34, of Southfield,
Mass. The trucks collided nearly
head-on. There were no injuries.
Neither vehicle was towed. The
dump truck is registered to Adams Trucking Co. Inc. in Adams,
Mass. Cole was given a written
warning for failure to grant the
right-of-way.
Pickup hits guardrail
Richard Laclair, 61, of Chester, N.J., was driving south on
Route 7 in Falls Village on Nov.
23. At about 6:03 p.m., his 2003

Chevrolet S10 traveled onto the


right shoulder. It hit a guardrail. It continued on top of the
guardrail until it went over and
down an embankment. It rolled
onto its right side. The pickup
was towed with undercarriage
damage. Laclair refused treatment at the scene for a minor
injury. He was given a written
warning for failure to maintain
the proper lane.
Car hits pole
Alicia Anderson, 32, of Salis-

bury was driving north on The


Lock Up in Salisbury on Nov.
24. At about 9:23 p.m., her 2010
Ford Edge crossed the road. It
hit a utility pole. Anderson was
taken to Sharon Hospital for
evaluation. She was charged with
making an improper turn and
failure to drive right. The car was
towed with front-end damage.
The Lakeville Journal will
publish the outcome of police
charges. Contact us by mail at PO
Box 1688, Lakeville, CT 06039,
Attn: Police Blotter, or send an
email, with police blotter in
the subject line, to cynthiah@
lakevillejournal.com.

Energy-efficient lighting fair


SALISBURY Noble Horizons will host its energy-efficient
discount lighting sale on Saturday, Dec. 5, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
in the Learning Center. A large variety of energy-efficient lighting
products including holiday lights with 100,000 light hours will
be available at a fraction of their regular retail price.
LED bulbs last up to 50 times longer than incandescent bulbs, use
more than 80 percent less energy and dramatically lower lighting
bills. All forms of payment are accepted except debit cards.

IMS Holiday Marketplace Dec. 18


LAKEVILLE Indian
Mountain School will host its
annual Holiday Marketplace on
Friday, Dec. 18, from 2 to 6 p.m.
in its new Student Center.
The event will feature a showcase of handmade goods, including home accessories, fine foods,
handcrafted jewelry, clothing
and seasonal decorations from
more than 20 vendors from
throughout the Tri-state area.
Also featured will be a Gingerbread House Workshop,

where families can purchase a


pre-assembled house for $25 and
decorate it with a large selection
of confections and candies.
Houses will be sold first-come,
first-served, and supplies are
limited. To reserve a Gingerbread
House, call Tanya Waugh at 860435-2855. A percentage of sales
from the houses will be donated
to the Corner Food Pantry.
For more information call
Susan Zekas at 860-435-0871
ext. 141.

Insert Listing House Ads - December 3, 2015

Send obituaries to
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THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015

A3

Thrifts appeal is evident at towns transfer station


Continued from Page A1
One such mystery is how
often the items in the shop are
cleared out.
It depends on the time of
year, Bartram said. Its cleaned
out more frequently in summer
than in winter, because we have
more business in summer. The
summer people are here, so there
is a larger group of people using
the transfer station.
But its also a logistical thing:
Its easier to access stuff in your
garage or your shed in spring,
summer and fall than in winter.
If its something small from a
closet or a bookshelf, people will
bring that in, but no one wants
to schlep a lot of stuff in and out
of the car in 20-degree weather.
At this time of year, he said,
the shop gets cleaned out about
once or twice a week. By winter,
that drops to once a week. In
summer, it can be cleaned out
completely by Friday and by
Sunday you can barely walk
through there, theres so much
stuff. And thats a safety hazard,
which is part of the problem with
that space.
There is a bit of an editing
process. With dishes and ceramics, for example, the transfer
station attendants will often go
through and throw items that
are chipped or cracked into the
regular garbage hopper.
Things should be in working
order if people want to leave
them in the Swap Shop, Bartram
said.If its something that can be
fixed, well, thats not really what
this is for. It should be for things
that are readily reusable.
Bartram also requested that
patrons not bring in piles of old
magazines.
Those should go into the
recycle bin. Having said that,
someone once brought in a
boxed set of a years worth of

National Geographics, all in nice


shape. Someone might want to
take those home. But dont bring
in two or three back issues, no
one really wants that. And dont
bring in encyclopedias.
Clothing is often left in the
Swap Shop. Whatever isnt picked
up right away usually ends up
in the clothing bins. The same
happens with many of the books
that are left at the shop. They are
picked up by companies that
recycle them or sell them in bulk.
For clothing especially, If
its dirty, dont bring it in. If its
washed and clean and in good
shape, bring it. If its ripped or
torn, put it in the clothing bins
and it can be turned into new
clothing or shredded and sold
as rags or insulation.
The Transfer Station earns
$100 per ton for the textiles
collected in the clothing bins
and $60 per ton for books in the
book bin.
That helps us offset the cost
of running the transfer station.
Now that its ski season, one
might get lucky and find a pair
of skis or pole.
Usually, though, we get skis
in spring. We get a lot of baseball bats and sometimes we get
baseball gloves.

PHOTOS BY CYNTHIA HOCHSWENDER

The Swap Shop is sometimes very clean and quiet, as in the


left photo, shortly after the overflow of items has been cleared
out. It can also overflow with people and items, as in the photo
at right, taken on the Sunday after Thanksgiving.
The best cookware that comes
into the Swap Shop is the cast iron
skillets and pots, Bartram said.
People take them home and
season them and cook with them.
Or they can be sold as scrap
metal. But most of the cookware
people bring is no good. A lot of
the Teflon pans that come in have
the coating scraped off them.
They should just go in the metal box although sometimes
people just leave their pans in
the Swap Shop because the metal
box is closed on Sunday. People

PHOTO BY CYNTHIA HOCHSWENDER

Continuing
Concerns

Road crew
SHARON For several
years, and through the tenures
of several boards of selectmen,
there have been concerns and
conversation about the maintenance of the town roads. Former
First Selectman Bob Loucks
made the roads a central part
of his election platform in 2009.
Those concerns seem to be a
thing of the past now. The current board, under the leadership
of First Selectman Brent Colley,
has quietly shifted personnel
around in the past few years to
the point where everything seems
to be rolling along nicely.
Bob Carberry was named
town crew chief this summer.
The selectmen created a clear
list of expectations for town
crew workers and worked hard
to make sure those expectations
are met.
In an interview with The
Lakeville Journal, Colley said that
after first taking office in 2013,
within eight months it became
clear to me that accountability
was an issue and we lacked a systematic approach to operations.
The selectmen sent a letter
to the town crew in 2014 that
explained what we expected
from them and what the consequences would be if the expectations were not met, Colley
said. From that point forward
we were persistent in standing
behind those expectations and
working toward a system that
increased productivity and held
people accountable for the jobs
they are employed to do.
A work order form was also
created. Each one lists a description of the job being done; all
crew members who work on
each project sign-off the work
order so its clear who is doing
what and when.
The work order was implemented to take productivity and
accountability to the next level
and has been both successful and
helpful to all parties, Colley said.
I am very proud of the crew
we presently have and pleased
by the progress we have made
as a unit.
Cynthia Hochswender

The expanding Country Inn


Arising from what used to be a mini shopping and business
strip is a stately new Colonial-style building. Now part of the
Sharon Country Inn, owned by the Cania brothers (who also
own Mizzas Pizza in Lakeville), the structure will include a
gym, conference center and additional rooms. The work is
expected to be complete by March.

shouldnt do that. The Swap Shop


is not a dumping ground.
In the plans for the new
transfer station, the Swap Shop
is supposed to get quite a bit
more space.
We hope to have shelving
there, too, Bartram said.
For the environment, recycling and reusing things is very
good and incinerating things is
very bad.

SHARON CALENDAR
Thursday, Dec. 3 Parks & Recreation at Town Hall, 6:30 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 7 Region One Board of Education at HVRHS,
Room 133, 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 8 Board of Finance at Town Hall, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 9 Planning & Zoning Commission at
Town Hall, 5:30 p.m.

A very Purdy holiday card for Sharon Health Care


By Lizett Pajuelo

SHARON A damp, quiet


day made a perfect opportunity
to sit back and share a conversation with Sharon Health Care
Center Resident Artist Eve Purdy.
Eve Purdy grew up in Alabama, but moved to Sharon when
she was 21 years old; she has lived
in the area for roughly 50 years.
A Sharon Health Care Center resident for five years, she
began painting when she was
11 years old. The main theme
of her paintings which hang
in the hallways of the center
are flowers, but she also enjoys
painting landscapes and has done
several portraits.
As she moved down the hallway, offering a tour of her work,
Purdy said, My style? All things

bright and beautiful.


She creates a bright palette
and said she prefers using acrylic
paints. Her paintings are done
from photos. It takes her an
average of a week to complete
a painting.
She uses special, pre-stretched
canvases with finished edges so
they can be hung without being
framed.
This year, for the first time,
Eve was invited by Sharon Health
Care Center Administrator John
Horstman to design a holiday
card for the center.
The painting she created for
the card has a Christmas tree
with a candle on top, and the
candlelight glows in the shape
of a heart.
Director of Therapeutic Recreation Jacqui Sweet said Purdy

also makes jewelry. She has also


customized T-shirts, creating
stamps from leaves taken off
trees.
Purdy also edits The Good
News, a newsletter about life at
the center, with biographies of
staff and residents, poems and
artwork.
Purdy decided to do the
newsletter because she felt there
should be a publication with positive news, not just the bad news
usually found in newspapers and
on television.
There are hero stories. Fascinating stories. Someone ought
to write about them, she said.
Sweet is happy to see how
involved Purdy is in her community.
People who live here want to
have a purpose, she said.

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A4

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015

North Canaan

Disc golf is open but still a work in progress


By Karen Bartomioli

NORTH CANAAN Disc


golf, also known as Frisbee golf,
is underway here, with tees and
baskets installed at about half of
the holes of the planned 18-hole
course on a town greenway.
It took a village to get the
sport started, with fundraising
(mostly though business sponsors); ongoing clearing and
maintenance of the existing town
greenway trail; and persistence
over the last couple of years by
enthusiasts Ronnie Lizana of
Cornwall Bridge and Israel Fitch
of Torrington. They saw a perfect
mix here of challenging terrain
and a desire in the community
to renew interest in the towns
system of greenways.
The project even became part
of an Eagle Scout project.
Tie-ins with local businesses
are expected by spring.
Newly arrived at Stadium
Systems across the street from
the course is an assortment of
discs for sale, and information
about the sport.
Camp Brook Disc Golf will
be open to the public at no
charge, and will remain open
through the winter months as
long as the trail is accessible.
However, Lizana is recommending that for now, since
there is still work being done on
the course, its probably better
if only experienced players use

for next June; until then, Lizana said, it is best if the general
public waits until the work

is done before giving it a try.


For those who go now,
parking for the course is to

the right of Caddie Shack at


the Camp Brook Trail head
on Ashley Falls Road/Route 7.

Town must increase education


budget to avoid a state fine

PHOTO BY KAREN BARTOMIOLI

An 18-hole disc golf course


is under very low-key construction by volunteers on
the Camp Brook Greenway
Trail in North Canaan. It is
expected to be ready for full
play next spring, though experienced players can make
use of the course now.
the course. Signs havent been
installed yet, and it will be
challenging for anyone new to
the game to get the hang of it
at this point.
A grand opening is planned

Free food on third Thursdays


NORTH CANAAN The Connecticut Food Bank Mobile Food
Pantry has a monthly free food distribution in North Canaan on the
third Thursday of the month, from 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. at St. Josephs
Church. Bring shopping bags. All are welcome. If school is canceled
in Region One, the pantry will be canceled. For more information,
call 203-436-5000.

Veterans honored at service Dec. 7


NORTH CANAAN Men and women who are serving in the
military and veterans, especially those who came under attack at
Pearl Harbor, will be honored during a service at the Doughboy
Monument on Main Street on Dec. 7 at 4 p.m.
For more information, call 860-824-5854 or 860-671-1892.

NORTH CANAAN A
town meeting will be held
Tuesday, Dec. 8, at 7:30 p.m.
at Town Hall to seek a $22,920
appropriation toward the education budget.
Town officials do not plan
to spend the money. But earmarking the funds will ward
off a penalty from the state
Department of Education,
which found North Canaan
in violation of the Minimum
Budget Requirement law.
Under the statute, towns
need to spend at least a small
percentage more on education
than in the prior years It is
meant to discourage towns
from spending Education Cost
Sharing grants on non-school
needs. North Canaan Elementary School (NCES) receives
an annual $2.2 million in
much-needed funding.
Explaining what happened
to the state board has been
futile. At issue is the lumping together of a savings in the Region

NORTH CANAAN
CALENDAR
Monday, Dec. 7 Region
One Board of Education at
HVRHS, Room 133, 6 p.m.;
Board of Selectmen at Town
Hall, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 8 Town
meeting, education appropriation, at Town Hall, 7:30
p.m.; Housatonic River Commission at Cornwall Consolidated School, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 9
Board of Finance at Town
Hall, 7:30 p.m.

One district assessment for


North Canaan, after years of
large increases, and a small
savings at NCES as a result
of efforts to save in areas
such as energy.
Had the decreases been
considered separately, there

would not have been a violation.


The penalty would be
more than $45,000 double the amount the budget
for North Canaan Elementary School decreased.
Karen Bartomioli

Make rustic toy at FYI workshop


NORTH CANAAN Learn to make an old-fashioned
toy at a free FYI Workshop of the Housatonic Youth Service
Bureau. This workshop will be held Saturday, Dec. 12, 10
a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Canaan firehouse.
Children ages 8 and up, accompanied by an adult, are
invited to work together to craft their own rustic toy in time
for the holiday season. This program is hosted in conjunction
with Lost Art Workshops.
Email reporter Karen Bartomioli
at karenb@lakevillejournal.com
Send Family & Friends announcements to
darrylg@lakevillejournal.com

For 2015, an
audit but no
town report
NORTH CANAAN There
will be no annual town report
this year.
The Board of Finance, which
normally issues the booklet full
of updates from local organizations, has declined to do so.
Instead, it will do the minimum
required by law and publish the
audit of town accounts. The audit will be available at the town
clerks office and online at www.
northcanaan.org.
As in other towns, North
Canaans town report has long
been an expanded collection of
town information and reports
from boards, commissions and
other organizations in town and
in the region.
The finance board has been
scaling back in recent years, not
on content, but on the number of
printed copies, because there are
usually so many left over.
But there have also been issues
of reports coming out later than
usual in recent years. Residents
were long in the habit of picking
up a copy when they went to
Town Hall to vote. The reports
were accepted at the annual town
meeting not long after.
Karen Bartomioli

plantin seeds

99 Main Street, North Canaan, Connecticut

DECEMBER CALENDAR OF EVENTS


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9TH NORTH CANAAN, CT 5PM til 8PM
Family Cookie Workshop
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North Canaan

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015

Giant Santas and plenty of ho ho ho at Parade of Lights


NORTH CANAAN The
annual Parade of Lights, held
Nov. 29, was the biggest yet.
Organized by the Canaan Fire
Company (CFC), the festive
outing attracts firetrucks and all
sorts of other vehicles bedecked
with twinkling lights and holiday
decorations.
There were about three dozen
this year, counting CFCs antique
firetruck that brought up the
rear with Santa Claus, who later
greeted children at the vendor
fair at North Canaan Elementary
School.
Traffic was stopped in the
center of town, and those who
had to wait for a few minutes
while the parade rolled down
Main and Railroad streets got a
treat, along with the spectators
who lined the streets.
Among the entries was the
Morris Volunteer Fire Departments beach scene, with Santa
sitting high in a lifeguard chair
overlooking a tropical beach with
hula dancers and palm trees.
There were just as many local
families and businesses coming
up with unique floats.
From Amenia, the Voorhees
family brought its amazing
train, complete with locomotive,
caboose, Santas sleigh cargo and
lights that danced to holiday
music.
Laurelbrook Farm in East
Canaan dressed up one of its
John Deere tractors with Santa
appearing to turn a windup
key to make it go. It was quite
the sight, given its size. At more
than 12 feet high, and with tires
taller than the average adult, it
is reportedly the largest tractor
in the state.
Karen Bartomioli

New bulbs,
ballasts will
bring down
energy costs
By Karen Bartomioli

NORTH CANAAN Another energy efficiency upgrade


at North Canaan Elementary
School has been proposed It will
cost $133,255 to retrofit light
bulbs and ballasts throughout
the school.
School board members discussed the proposal at their Nov.
12 meeting. Principal Rosemary
Keilty explained the upgrade is
a recommendation from JK Energy Solutions, which conducted
an energy audit at the school
through Eversource (formerly
Connecticut Light & Power).
A prior audit resulted in a
change to 32-watt bulbs, motion
sensors in hallways and LED lighting over classroom exterior doors.
The latest recommendation is
for 16.5 watt LED bulbs.
A ballast supplies a brief burst
of the higher voltage needed to
start fluorescent lamps, then
regulates the current to provide
steady light. Newer ballasts
should increase efficiency.
The cost includes an LED
upgrade to the seven pole lights
in the bus circle, which are the
biggest electrical draw at the
school. More sensors will also be
installed, including new ones in
restrooms that detect not only
motion but also sound.
All equipment comes with a
five-year warranty. Board members predicted there would be a
cost saving by having all the new
ballasts installed at once as
opposed to incurring periodic
maintenance bills to replace old
ones as they fail.
Board Chairman Karen Riccardelli asked what happens after
five years, but was assured all of
the lighting equipment can be
expected to last beyond that.
While the cost adds up quickly, so do the savings an estimated $20,627 annually.
There is also a $49,525 Conservation Fund incentive from
the utility company. The remaining $83,730 would be financed
by Eversource as a four-year,
no-interest, government-mandated loan. Monthly payments
of $1,744 would be added to the
schools electric bill.
The loan payments add up
to just slightly more than the
expected savings.
A vote is expected at the Dec.
10 meeting.

PHOTOS BY KAREN BARTOMIOLI

Floats and wagons glowed during North Canaans annual


Parade of Lights on Sunday, Nov. 29.

Continuing Concerns

Union Station rebuild


NORTH CANAAN Construction on the final phase
of work to reopen Canaan Union Station was set to begin
by now, with plans completed and five bids submitted by
general contractors.
But just as the plans were mired in red tape for an extended
period, the same is happening with the bids at the state Department of Transportation (DOT), which is administering
a significant federal appropriation toward the project.
At issue is the percentage of work that will be subcontracted,
which doesnt align with DOT road construction standards
that were inappropriately applied.
Karen Bartomioli

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A5

A6

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015

Salisbury

Library renovation

Continuing Concerns

Lime Rock Park


LIME ROCK In September, Lime Rock Park went to court
to try to amend the injunction governing the days and hours of
operation at the auto racing track. Alarmed neighbors formed
the Lime Rock Citizens Council to oppose the tracks moves.
Meanwhile the Planning and Zoning Commission took up
proposed amendments to the towns zoning regulations concerning the track the major bone of contention being a proposal
to insert the language of the 1959 injunction (and subsequent
amendments) directly into the regulations.
There were two lengthy public hearings on the topic (on Sept.
8 and continued on Oct. 19) during which residents spent a lot
of time talking about Sunday racing and noise instead of the
proposed changes to the regulations despite PZC Chairman
Michael Klemens repeated instructions to the contrary.
The commission met Nov. 19 and the regulations were added.
Patrick L. Sullivan

SALISBURY During the Fall Festival (Oct. 10-12), if you


stuck your head in the Wardell Community Room of the Scoville
Memorial Library (on the lower level), you saw the early stages
of the librarys renovation.
Out front, there is a sculpture of a stack of books, designed
and built by Craig Pecchia. The wood sculpture measures the
librarys progress on its Campaign to Connect fundraising effort.
The renovation project will connect the downstairs rooms
with the main library, upgrade the librarys interior and create
a new Childrens Library and Garden. The Library is working
with Poesis Design of Salisbury and Burlington Construction of
Torrington on this $1 million project.
As of Thanksgiving week, according to library board President
Noel Sloan, a hole for the new staircase has been cut in the main
floor and the outline of the new childrens library is now apparent.
Patrick L. Sullivan

Free Programs at the Library


Saturday, December 5, 3:00
SATURDAY BOOK CLUB, HISTORY ROOM
ACADEMY STREET by Mary Costello.

Music events at Hotchkiss

Saturday, December 5, 4:00


AUTHOR EMERY ROTH, BRASS VALLEY:
THE FALL OF AN AMERICAN INDUSTRY
Cosponsored by the Salisbury Association Historical Society. Meets in the 2nd floor meeting
room at Town Hall.

LAKEVILLE The Hotchkiss Orchestra and Right Brain Logic


Jazz Ensemble will perform on Friday, Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. in Katherine M. Elfers Hall, Esther Eastman Music Center, at The Hotchkiss
School. Admission is free.
The Hotchkiss Chorus will present its annual Festival of Lessons
and Carols on Sunday, Dec. 6, at 7 p.m in the Hotchkiss Chapel. A
tradition at the school for 56 years, the program includes biblical
readings and traditional carols. Part of the nondenominational
service is performed by candlelight. It is led by Hotchkiss Chaplain
Lou Pressman, with the Hotchkiss Chorus directed by Jack Brown.

Wednesday, December 9, 6:00


AUTHOR HOWARD AXELROD DISCUSSES
HIS NEW BOOK, POINT OF VANISHING
The White Hart speaker series in collaboration
with Oblong Books & Music and the Scoville
Memorial Library. Meets at White Hart Inn.
Saturday, December 12, 4:00
AUTHOR CAROLYN ROEHM DISCUSSES
HER NEW BOOK, AT HOME IN THE GARDEN
The White Hart speaker series in collaboration
with Oblong Books & Music and the Scoville
Memorial Library. Meets at White Hart Inn.

PHOTO BY PATRICK L. SULLIVAN

Joie Maison has opened in the former Prime Finds shop.

Village businesses
SALISBURY There have been some changes in the business
landscape.
In June, the Peter Becks clothing and outdoor outfitters shop
on Main Street in Salisbury closed.
Leslie Eckstein opened Studio Lakeville, a fitness center, at
342 Main Street in Lakeville (behind the White Gallery). But
in December, Colleen Kopek will close her Skintastic salon on
Main Street next to Lakeville Wine and Spirits. Eckstein had a
massage studio in the Skintastic space.
Small Fish Technologies opened on Lakeville, offering computer and website consulting services.
Nitya Madhev and Mike Patel took over as owners and operators of the Inn at Iron Masters in Lakeville in October, and
next door, Patrick Sinchak (owner) and chef Tom Juliano opened
B&F Burgers at 227 Main St. (between Pastorale and the Iron
Masters). Pastorale will close this week.
The Prime Finds secondhand furnishings shop moved from
its location in downtown Salisbury near The White Hart to a new
location on Main Street in Lakeville, across from the Boathouse
restaurant. Chrissy Tellalian has opened Joie Maison there.
Patrick L. Sullivan

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Salisbury

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015

A7

The wild and famous Flood of 1955


By Patrick L. Sullivan

SALISBURY Roads were


washed out, bridges destroyed,
and parental influence was greatly
diminished during the Flood of
1955.
Lou Bucceri, for the Salisbury
Association Historical Society, led
a discussion and lecture about the
flood at Town Hall on Saturday,
Nov 21.
The talk (co-sponsored by the
Scoville Memorial Library) relied
on material from the Historical
Societys oral history project, the
librarys archives and memories
shared by residents who were
around for the flood.
The rain kept coming
Bucceri started with two
National Weather Service maps,
showing the rainfall from two
hurricanes that came in quick
succession.
The first, Hurricane Connie,
ran from Aug. 11 to 14, and
dumped between 8 and 9 inches
in the Northwest Corner.
Bucceri said, This was bad,
but not catastrophic.
There was enough water,
though, that it saturated the
ground.
Hurricane Diane, which raged
from Aug. 17 to 20, was a different
story. Our neck of the woods
absolutely got hammered, with
rainfall of 16 to 20 inches.
And with the ground already
sodden, the rain had nowhere to
go but down.
Bucceri had a copy of the
1956 town report, which has
an account of the flood by First
Selectman Bill Barnett.
This included a photo of
Hamzys service station (now
Lakeville Automotive on Main
Street) in the middle of the night,
with flood waters rising against
the garage door.
Stranded for days
It was mayhem everywhere in
town. Bucceri told of reports of
three feet of water over the Burton
Brook bridge; that Lake Wononscopomuc was six inches away
from flooding over into Factory
Pond; that Nancy (Smith) Bushnell, whose father had just started
as the doctor at The Hotchkiss
School, recalled being unable to
get off the hill for several days.
The bridge at Selleck Hill was
damaged. Seventy-five feet of
Lincoln City Road was taken out
by Pettee Brook.
On the Housatonic River, the
water came within inches of the
Amesville bridge and took out
part of the deck. (The bridge was
closed for six months.)
On Falls Mountain Road, 400
feet of the road washed out, as
did Between the Lakes Road from
Twin Lakes to Smith Hill.
Landslides along the Housatonic and at Twin Lakes, some
carrying six feet of mud, took
out roadways and houses even
launching sleeping people, still in
their beds, out into the elements.
Amazingly, nobody was killed.
Bucceri, working from oral
history records, quoted Agatha
Dakin of Amesville, who remembered a retired naval officer turned dairy farmer in that
section of town, which is on the
shores of the Housatonic. Cut
off in either direction, and with
cows that needed milking, the
farmer delivered milk to similarly
stranded residents.
The late Bill Binzen, living on
Brinton Hill, had recalled that
water came about 150 feet up
Brinton Hill Road.
We were absolutely on our
own mountaintop world for three
or four days.
Lime Rock was a mess, with
300 feet of Lime Rock Road
(including the bridge over the
Salmon Kill) gone, and the old
Barnum-Richardson mill destroyed.
Bucceri said the town had been
trying to sell the abandoned mill.
Not after this.
Evelyn Bellini remembered a
Mr. Shaw in Lime Rock, who had
made a diorama of the iron forge.
Her children swam over to the
Shaw house over the hedges
and rescued the diorama, putting
it in a rowboat.
Then they fetched Mr. and
Mrs. Shaw.
Damages: over $2 million
Barnetts figures for damages: $253,578 ($149,370 public; $104,208 private) which
is $2,228,956 in 2015 dollars.
Bucceri said the figure, which
is simply adjusted for inflation

www.facebook.com/thelakevillejournal

Trinity Church
Lime Rock

Lime Rock
Tree Lighting
and
Chili Dinner
Saturday, December 5
Dinner served from 4 to 7
Eat in or Take Out
Carols and
Hot Chocolate at 6pm
Wreaths
Bake Sale

PHOTO COURTESY LOU BUCCERI

Rowboats came out of storage as one of the only reliable forms of navigation during the
November 1955 downpour that flooded the region.
and considers no other factors, is
probably an underestimate.
People in the audience had their
own stories to tell. Ed Dorset said
he was 13 at the time and lived on
the relatively high ground near
Trinity Lime Rock church. His
family was returning from a trip
to Pennsylvania and did not realize
the extent of the damage until they
got to the Northwest Corner.
The bridge over the Salmon
Kill was gone. Somehow his
mother and sisters were brought
across, but he couldnt remember
what he and his father did.
Carol Kastendiecks family
had just bought the old Selleck
mill on the Wachocastinook
Brook, coming off Mount Riga.
The building had no running
water, no electricity, and about
200 years of dirt.
A dam went in the middle
of the night, and for a week the
family lugged buckets up to the
house for flushing toilets.
And some nice memories
Across the street at the Sellecks
house, everybody had a stewpot
going on Sellecks eight-burner
wood stove, she said.
Jim Dresser was at his familys
camp on Mount Riga during the
flood. He was also 13 years old.
It was the best three weeks of
my life as all parental discipline
broke down, he said.
The water was three or four
feet over the South Pond spillway.
By comparison, today we think
it remarkable to get three or four
inches.
The adults decided the teenagers would go to town for provisions. Dressers mother requested
a loaf of bread and a bottle of rye
whiskey.
The youths made it to town
and Dresser convinced Bud
Trotta at the liquor store to sell
him the rye.
By this time the adults had
thought things through a little
better and were worried the dam
might give out as the teens made

their way back.


So they gathered on one side
of the raging brook and waited.
Dresser encountered some
difficulty getting across. I hit a
pot hole and down I went.
He emerged with the loaf of
bread intact, but just the neck of

the whiskey bottle.


Frank Collin (this reporters
grandfather) immediately ran
downstream and started drinking.
Henceforth that stretch of
stream was known as Whiskey
Bend.

SALISBURY CALENDAR
Monday Dec. 7 Board of Selectmen at Town Hall, 4 p.m.;
Region One Board of Education at Housatonic Valley Regional
High School, Room 133, 6 p.m.; Planning and Zoning Commission at Town Hall, 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 8 Zoning Board of Appeals at Town Hall, 5
p.m.; Recreation Commission at Town Hall, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 9 Salisbury Housing Commission annual
meeting at Town Hall, 5 p.m.

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Free Admission
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A8

Cornwall

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015

Students wonder, should Columbus have his own day?


By Karen Bartomioli

CORNWALL A timely
look at whether or not Columbus Day should continue to be
observed spurred a lively debate
among fifth-graders at Cornwall
Consolidated School.
Social studies teacher Will
Vincent looks for ways to get his
students involved with ongoing
issues and current events, drawing correlations with history.
As part of their study of first
Americans, they wrote to the
towns selectmen to ask them to
join in their debate and consider
a town ordinance to change the
name of the holiday. The class
voted 10 to 1 to support reconsideration of the honor bestowed
on the explorer.
I get that he got here by accident, said Ellie Sanders, during
a recent interview with the class,
but he shouldnt have killed
people so ruthlessly. He should
have realized he was not where he
wanted to go and turned around.
Her twin brother, Henry, engaged her in more debate about
the reasons, even though they
both came to the same conclusion. Maybe it was a sibling thing,
but it illustrated how deeply the
students had considered their
decisions.
Columbus Day, celebrated on
the second Monday in October,
has been a federal holiday since
1937. That allowed for 445 years
of folklore to define his role in
discovering the new world. The
facts do not uphold that, with
numerous explorers believed to
have arrived prior to 1492, and
Columbus actually never making
it to the mainland and what is
now North America.
Proponents of the name
change also wonder how anyone
could have discovered a place
already inhabited by millions.
Some towns and states have
already switched to names such
as Indigenous Peoples Day,
turning it around to be a nod to
native Americans who were often
killed or enslaved at the hands of
Columbus.
It was Columbus attitudes
that seemed to make the strongest impression on the students,
who spoke about it recently in
their classroom.
Their decision, as a class,
to support a name change was
not unanimous among the 11
students.
Spencer Markow offered a
solid argument for honoring
Columbus for bringing together
two parts of the world.
No matter how their effort
turns out, they proved they were
willing to dig deep and remain
objective in the face of much
public debate.
I do not believe it was his
fault, said Melody Matsudaira,
who admitted to being swayed
just a bit due to her Italian
ancestry. He was told to come
here by the king and queen. He
didnt intend to bring disease that
would hurt people here.

Continuing
Concerns

Septic
CORNWALL The need for
a new way to deal with sewage
in the center of West Cornwall
is about to be addressed by a
regional consultant who has
done this before.
It is giving new hope that the
village can be revitalized. A local
committee is being appointed
and will begin working with the
consultant this winter.
Karen Bartomioli

CORNWALL
CALENDAR

She felt there could be an


Indigenous Peoples Day, in addition to Columbus Day, because
it would be rude to take it away.
Wolf Shepard would prefer
a day in honor of Leif Erikson,
who came here and didnt kill
anyone.
Aramis Oyanadel took issue
with the way Columbus appears
to have treated not only the
natives, but also his own crew.
Evan Jeans echoed that.
He didnt care what his crew
even thought and didnt listen
when they told him they were not
in India and should keep going.
He never actually set foot in
North America, Nathan Benjamin said. He landed in the
Bahamas first.
There was already document-

ed evidence that Europeans knew


by then the world was not flat,
the students noted, saying that
he should not be credited with
that discovery.
Columbus just took land that
didnt belong to him, Thea West
said. That would be like any of
us going into peoples houses and
saying theyre ours.
Columbus didnt even think
they were people. He was not
a nice person, Henry said,
adding that he changed their
lives dramatically. They didnt
understand about bacteria and
disease. They thought they were
getting sick because they had
done something to make the
gods angry with them.
The natives welcomed Christopher Columbus and showed

him their ways, Peter Gorat said.


But he killed a lot of them and
took others as slaves.
They spoke of differences
and discrimination and how it
applies to the world and their
own lives today.
Nothings really changed.
Thats the problem, Melody said.
Will the selectmen consider
their proposed change?
I think it will be reviewed
carefully. Weve been watching
videos of their meetings and they
spend a lot of time discussing
things, Quinn Hedden said.
This includes other towns and
states, so they need to look at
that, too.
As far as other input, neither Vincent nor his students
received any negative feedback

PHOTO BY KAREN BARTOMIOLI

Cornwall Consolidated School fifth-graders displayed posters they made during their study of Christopher Columbus.
for exploring the issue or for
their majority decision. Parents
became involved in the debate
and were reportedly very receptive to the reasoning presented

by their children.
While this plays out, the students will begin to study other
world explorers.

Hardware, lumber, paint and friendly familiar faces


CORNWALL The future
of the Northeast Building Supply
lumberyard may be in question,
but the hardware store and paint
center remain vital, with plans to
improve and grow.
For many, it will always be
known as Northwest Lumber
and Hardware, its name prior to
the purchase by the Bridgeport,
Conn.-based parent company.
A local feel persists, thanks to
people like Rick Kearns, who
manages the store in the center
of Cornwall Bridge.
The corporate headquarters
told Kearns and The Lakeville
Journal they have no intention
of closing the store or paint center. Actions speak louder than
words, and Kearns is busier than
ever revamping display areas to
accommodate products that were
sold at the lumberyard, such as
siding, roofing and ship lap.
As for lumber, the yard located
a short distance south on Route 7
is in limbo; there is now a court
battle over insurance, following
the Jan. 12 fire that destroyed it.
Local contractors are still able
to get the basics they need at the
store. Meeting that demand is a
dance Kearns is leading smoothly.

PHOTO BY KAREN BARTOMIOLI

Manager Rick Kearns rang


up customers at Northeast
Building Supply.
Because of the lawsuit, Kearns
said they dont even have access
to the lumberyard property, and
there is little extra room at the
hardware store.
These guys wear so many
hats. They are swinging hammers
during the day and going home to
work on billing and job estimates.
They just dont have the time to
think about ordering materials
ahead, he said. They are used to
being able to swing by and pick
up what they need for whatever
work they are doing that day. I
try to anticipate their needs, and

A Most Enjoyable Way


To Start The Holiday Season

Christmas Fair

UCC Parish House


Saturday December 5th
9:30 a.m - 3 p.m

8 Bolton Hill Rd.


Cornwall, CT 06753
(off of Rt. 4)

Fresh Locally Made Sprays and Wreaths


12 & 14 may be ordered ahead, call
(860)-672-6742 9 a.m -1 p.m M-F or leave message
Work by Cornwall and local Litcheld area artists
Crafts: Whimsical, Practical, and Entertaining - an
assortment of ornaments, pottery, jewelry, cards,
quality textiles and ber art
Merriment: childrens special shopping room
Rafes: Irresistible Gift Baskets
Enticing Culinary Delights
Bake Sale: a tempting variety of delectable desserts
and specialty baked goods
Hot Lunch: mouth watering soups, satisfying
sandwiches and...Apple Pie, anyone?

For information please call (860)-672-6840 cornwallucc@aol.com


http://www.uccincornwall.org/

HOLIDAY
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DECEMBER 3rd to DECEMBER 12th

DECEMBER3rd
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Monday, Dec. 7 Region


STOREWIDE!
One Board of Education at
DECEMBER 3rd to DECEMBER 12th
HVRHS, Room 133, 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 8 Economic Development Commission at Town Hall, 9 a.m.;
Senior Luncheon at the WanYour Full Service Store
dering Moose Cafe, 11:30 a.m.
Free Gift Wrapping
to 1 p.m.; Planning and ZonSpecial Orders
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Your
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cornwallpackagestore.com
Cornwall septic informa860.672.6645
860.672.6645
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Except for previously discounted items.
tional meeting at Town Hall,
Except for previously
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CT minimum bottle price prevails.
Except
for previously
items.
CT minimum
bottlediscounted
price prevails.
7 p.m.
CT minimum bottle price prevails.

keep as much basic product on


hand as we have room for in our
warehouse over here. Our sister
yard in Bridgeport is great about
getting lumber here quickly.
Kearns remembers that when
he started at the business in 1986,
trees were just being cleared for
the yard.
Weve grown so much since
then, we dont want to lose that
business. And we dont want our
customers to have to make an
hour trip to get what they need.
In the hardware store, the
space-gobbling kitchen displays
are being removed to make way
for a window and door showroom, and the floor plan will be
reconfigured to accommodate a
consolidation of products.
Area residents have been
offering advice throughout the
process, Kearns said. He is hopeful
that such interactions will bump
up the retail business, which he
estimated is about 15 percent of
the overall business.
There are plenty of ways to
buy local there, from toilet paper
to holiday gift shopping. For the
latter, think bird feeders, small
appliances, car care, jar candles,
fireplace logs and, of course, tools.

The front shelves were removed to open up the front of the


store and make way for a better
display of seasonal items. It will
soon be filled with Christmas
lights, ornaments and wreaths.
At the Benjamin Moore Paint
Center next door, Manager Pete
Calhoun also does a good busi-

ness with contractors, and can


offer expert advice for anyone.
They have a computerized color
match system.
All you have to do is bring
in a sample, he said, and I can
shoot a picture and mix up an
exact match.
Karen Bartomioli

Grocery, Deli, Bakery,


Coffee, Breakfast and More.
At the intersection of
Rt's 4 and 7 in Cornwall Bridge!

860.619.8199
25 Kent Rd.
Cornwall Bridge CT. 06754
6am-6pm Mon-Fri 7am-5pm Sat and Sun

Brain Teasers

CLUES ACROSS
1. Red wine
7. Best nurse-patient aid
10. Footwear closure
12. Chinese dynasty 1122221 BC
13. Persuade to ones side
14. Advocate
15. Mandelas party
16. A woolen cap of
Scottish origin
17. About aviation
18. Shallowest of the
Greats
19. Sheathe
20. Frightened
23. Brews
24. Relates
27. Atomic #52
28. Up the ante
33. The Kingss initials
34. Lepton
36. Cornmeal mush
(British)
38. One who analyzes
syntactically
39. Algonquian tribe
40. Systems, doctrines,
theories
41. Herb __, San Francisco
columnist
42. Informed about the
latest trends
45. Seven
46. Moroccos capital
47. What a doctor
practices
49. Beaks
50. In a way, extends
51. A number or amount
not specified
52. Gambling
CLUES DOWN
1. Composition for
orchestra and soloists
2. Bulgarian monetary
unit
3. Settled upon
4. Common frog genus
5. Electronic countercountermeasures
6. Golf ball supporter
7. Divided into 3
8. Crazy (Spanish)
9. Billiards stick

10. More deficient


11. Solomon Islands capital
12. Larval crabs
14. Malta capital
18. Clairvoyance
19. Tomato condiment
21. Alleviation
22. French seaport
25. New Testament
26. Shortened (abbr.)
29. Employee (abbr.)
30. Opposite of leaving
31. Lip locking
32. Foes
35. Many not ands
36. Covered with healing
scrapes
37. Regions

41. Abels brother (Bible)


42. Greek Queen of the gods
43. Esaus descendants (Bible)
44. Canarium ovatum
46. Ribonucleic acid
47. Gas usage measurement
48. An oppositional argument

November 26 Solution

Sudoku

November 26 Solution

retirement rehabilitation healthcare


www.noblehorizons.org 860-435-9851
17 Cobble Road, Salisbury, CT 06068

Kent

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015

A9

Group convened to
study restroom plans

PHOTO BY LIZETT PAJUELO

J.P. Giffords window offered a view of a Giffords Restaurant made out of gingerbread with twinkling Christmas lights.

Champagne, gingerbread as Kent prepares for holidays


By Lizett Pajuelo

KENT Cold weather could


not prevent a night of fun in the
center of town on Saturday, Nov.
28. A spotlight on the cloudy
night sky by the Swift House
marked the registration center
for the third annual Kent Champagne Stroll.
Main Street stayed busy with
friends and neighbors meeting
up inside and outside stores to
share conversations and compare
the champagnes theyd tasted at

participating stores. Groups of


people traveled around together,
following directions from the
Champagne Stroll map. It felt
like Halloween trick-or-treating
for adults, as they collected a new
taste of champagne at each store.
The two-day event, held on
Nov. 27 and 28, had its largest
turnout ever this year, with a
total of 1,400 visitors the
majority of whom are not Kent
residents according to threeyear volunteer Toni Soule.
Last night alone we had 930

visitors, Soule said on Saturday,


of Fridays attendance.
Last year the event saw 1,000
visitors throughout both days.
She said it felt wonderful to hear
people say they plan to return
for next years champagne walk.
Stores participating for the
first time were enthusiastic about
the positive energy of the two
nights. Maryalyce Merrit, at the
new Tea and Dreams, served a
Segura Viudas Brut Reserva.
Its super fun! she said.
At the entrance to the Fife n

Leaving an imprint, with Greenprint, on landscape


By Cynthia Hochswender

KENT Connie Manes will


join the Housatonic Valley Associations Litchfield Hills Greenprint Collaborative in January,
where she will join The Lakeville
Journals Natures Notebook
columnist, Tim Abbott.
Manes will continue in her
part-time role as executive director of the Kent Land Trust and
she will remain the principal of
Manes Consulting.
Manes moved to Kent in September 2003 with her husband,
Adam. They have three sons,
Jules, Woody and Fuller. They are
all at Kent Center School.
My husband and I both
grew up in Armonk, N.Y., in the
small neighborhood of Windmill
Farms, she said, explaining her
interest in preservation and
open space.
I trace my conservation ethic
to my childhood and to lessons
imparted by my parents, who
both valued open space and
volunteered as civil servants,
she said. And I hope to inspire
the same values in our children.
A 1990 graduate of Williams
College, she earned a law degree
from New York University and
a Masters Degree in Public
Administration from Pace University.
Connie is a great friend and
superb conservation partner,
Abbott said. Her reputation in
the land trust community, her
facilitation skills and conservation expertise, would be assets
in any organization, but are
especially prized in collaborative
work like ours involving many
interests and stakeholders. Im
excited to be working even more
closely with her as she helps the
Greenprint and its members take
our regional partnership to new
levels of conservation success.
The Housatonic Valley Association was founded in 1941 to
protect the entire Housatonic
River Watershed.
The watershed includes
about 2,000 square miles of
land stretching from western
Massachusetts through western

Connecticut and eastern New


York to Long Island Sound,
according to a press release from
the organization.
The HVA is the host partner
of the Greenprint Collaborative,
which was founded in 2004 and
whose mission is to aid area
conservation organizations.
The Collaboratives overarching goal is to safeguard half
of the northwest Connecticut
regions remaining farmland,
woods and drinking water reserves at least 70,000 acres
by 2030, according to the
press release.
Manes will strengthen the
collaborative network, build
community awareness, and help
tee up important land conserva-

tion initiatives, according to the


news release.
I am really very excited about
this, Manes said in an email
interview last week. I feel like
it is a very natural extension
of the work I have been doing
since 2008 when I joined the
Kent Land Trust as its executive
director and began consulting
on the side to provide capacity
building services to other community land trusts.
The volunteers and staff of
our area land trusts are terrific to
work with extremely professional and dedicated, and with a
clear love for the northwest Connecticut landscape. Im looking
forward to helping us all make a
greater impact together.

KENT Sacred Heart Church will hold a Christmas holiday gifts


and White Elephant sale on Saturday, Dec. 5, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Included in the sale will be home decorations, tree ornaments,
handmade doll clothing, aprons, handknit scarves, knick-knacks,
attic treasures and more.

Horse-drawn holiday carriage


KENT Take a free horse-drawn carriage ride through town on
Sunday, Dec. 6, from noon to 4 p.m. Shop the village, decorated for
the holidays. Park at Kent Greenhouse and browse its gift shop, have
hot cider and pick up the carriage to continue shopping around town.
Other sponsored stops will be at the Kent Village Barns, Kent
Wine & Spirit, Kent Pizza Garden, Pantages Gems and SoDelicious
Homemade Bakery.

Thursday, Dec. 3 Board


of Education at Kent Center
School, 6 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 7 Region
One Board of Education at
HVRHS, Room 133, 6 p.m.;
Kent Volunteer Fire Department at firehouse, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 8 Sewer
Commission at Town Hall,
4:30 p.m.; Zoning Board of
Appeals at Town Hall, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 9
Conservation Commission
at Town Hall, 7 p.m.

inaugural meeting.
A company that builds public
restroom submitted some floor
plans. Subcommitee member
John Baker also provided some
sketches. There was a detailed
discussion about what can and
might be done.
The subcommittee for the
public restroom and visitor
center project brings individuals
of diverse backgrounds, which
was something that the board
was looking for.
Members include Merle
Koblenz, who is the owner of
Koblenz & Co. Antique & Estate
Jewelry and is a member of the
Chamber of Commerce; Selectman Mike Van Valkenburg; John
Baker, a semi-retired architect
and member of the Architecture
Review Board; and Mike Everett,
a retired designer.
Koblenz was appointed as the
committees chair at the meeting.
Adams encouraged the committee to look for a fifth member
to join. The member must be a
resident of Kent, and it is preferable if it is someone in the
construction trade.
Lizett Pajuelo

Kent Singers perform Dec. 13 & 19


KENT The Kent Singers
will present Marc-Antoine Charpentiers Messe de Minuit pour
Noel on Sunday, Dec. 13, at 2
p.m. at St. Andrews Church in
Kent. Organist David Baranowski
will accompany the group. Tickets
are $12 in advance and $15 at
the door, with children under 12
admitted free.
The Kent Singers will present
Carols by Candlelight, an hour

of holiday music, readings and


audience participation in carol
singing, on Saturday, Dec. 19, at 5
p.m. at St. Johns Church in New
Milford. The performance is free
to the public and will include a
freewill donation to the Community Fuel Bank of New Milford.
For tickets and information,
call 860-619-8110 or go to www.
kentsingers.org.

Upcoming Events at Noble Horizons


E

Saturday, December 5, 10am-2pm


Huge discounts on LED bulbs and LED reectors including
dimmables, LED holiday lights, night lights, LED 4-Pack
combo special only $10.

Saturday, December 5, 5-7pm


Drinks and hors doeuvres in a festive holiday setting. Silent
auction plus raes for restaurant meals, movie tickets and
toys. $35 per person. Reservations requested; walk-ins
welcomed.

Holiday sale at church on Dec. 5

Holiday

Fair

Saturday, December 12, 9am-3pm


Wide selection of gift items and holiday decorations. Soups
and sandwiches available. Raes for gift baskets and gift
certicates. FREE
Register www.noblehorizons.org
For more information call 860-435-9851, x190
17 COBBLE ROAD | SALISBURY, CT 06068
retirement | rehabilitation | health care

Send news and photos to


cynthiah@lakevillejournal.com

just for the holidays


Gift baskets, hand decorated
wreaths and standing
rib roasts!
Gift certificates are
always available

KENT

CALENDAR

Drum Restaurant, George Potts


welcomed visitors with a taste
of Le Grand Courtage Ros and
some cheese squares.
When asked what is the best
way to care for a bottle of champagne, Potts said, You want to
keep it out of the sun and away
from fluctuating temperatures.
The ideal spot is the north
wall of a cellar where there is
a pretty constant temperature.
While last weekend was all
about champagne, the attention
will begin to shift to a more playful atmosphere for children and
adults as the Christmas season
takes hold. The annual Gingerbread Festival begins officially on
Dec. 4 (and lasts until Dec. 31),
but some gingerbread creations
have already begun to appear in
the windows of downtown shops
and restaurants.

KENT The first meeting


for the Public Restroom Subcommittee was held on Tuesday,
Nov. 10, at Town Hall.
The meeting kicked off with
First Selectman Bruce Adams
re-establishing that the purpose
for this committee is to produce
plans and proposals for the projects development and present
them to the Board of Selectmen.
Once the board has reviewed
the proposals, they will be
brought to the public for feedback (probably at the first Board
of Selectmens meeting in 2016,
which is scheduled for Jan. 21).
At an Oct. 15 town meeting,
voters approved the purchase
of land on Railroad Street,
where the town will build public
bathrooms and a visitor center.
Construction is expected to cost
$185,000; the cost of the land
is $190,000 plus closing costs.
All of it will be paid for with
a $500,000 state Small Town
Economic Assistance Program
(STEAP) grant.
We have more than enough
money to do this right. We dont
need to go cheap about it, Adams said at the subcommittees

10th Anniversary Sale


50% off everything!
This N That for Habitat Store
Starts Friday, December 4
Continues through December
Friday- Sunday 10-4

Rt 7, North Canaan, CT
(860)824-9839

538 Route 343, Millbrook 12545 / 845.677.6221 / For hours please visit walbridgefarm.com

Falls Village

A10 THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015

Holiday Gifts

Learning by doing with high tech gifts


By Lizett Pajuelo

FALLS VILLAGE With


the holidays approaching, parents are starting to plan what
presents theyll buy for their
children this year. Small Fish
Technologies of Lakeville made
a presentation Nov. 18 of gifts
that are both fun and educational.
Small Fish is a web design
company that also offers computer repair and consulting
services.
Their presentation was the
last in an ongoing series of Tech
Talks at the Mahoney Hewat
Science and Technology Center
at Housatonic Valley Regional
High School.

PHOTO BY PATRICK L. SULLIVAN

The current home of the Falls Village Volunteer Fire department will eventually be replaced by a new emergency
services center on Route 7.

Continuing Concerns

The firehouse
FALLS VILLAGE At the
Sept. 14 regular monthly meeting, the Board of Selectmen
voted to accept a $2,477,000
bid from Millennium Builders
to build the new emergency
services center on Route 7.
The Millennium bid was
the lowest of five bids received.

On Dec. 3, 2013, the town


approved a $2.3 million bond in
a referendum vote. A previous
referendum for $2.5 million
failed in 2011.
The town does have a state
grant of $200,000 for foundation work for the new center.
By Patrick L. Sullivan

person, he said. Younger children will need adult supervision.


These toys are like the hightech version of LEGOs. They
encourage creativity and help
develop logic and reasoning
skills in children as young as
4. They also offer youngsters a
way to experiment and to learn

FALLS VILLAGE The FFA


holiday store opens for business
Wednesday, Dec. 3, from 10 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. at Housatonic Valley
Regional High School.
The store is open through
Wednesday, Dec. 23, for all Christmas tree, wreath and decoration

The Lakeville Journal congratulates the honorees of the student


of the week program at Housatonic
Valley Regional High School.
FALLS VILLAGE High
school is a dynamic time of life,
when we meet new people, define our tastes and interests, and
establish our personalities. Yet
for a few students, high school
simply enriches the people they
have been all along.
Patrick Kennedy grew up on
his family farm in Cornwall, and
throughout his time in Region
One schools, his experiences
have enhanced his understanding
of agriculture and clarified his
vision of what he would like to
do in that field.
While attending Cornwall
Consolidated School (CCS),
Patrick extended his knowledge of
agricultural machinery through a
school project. Peter Selino, the
custodian at CCS, helped Patrick
rebuild a motor for the assignment, and later donated a 1973
Suzuki motorcycle to Patrick for
more extensive tinkering.
Patrick carries that experimental spirit into his Agricultural
Engineering class, where he learns
to repair tractors and other large
farm equipment, but with a richer
appreciation for the engineering
and design behind them. His
other favorite subject is mathematics, and he is beginning to
consider a career as a mechanical
engineer, where he can combine
these passions.
Living organisms are also

needs.
The second holiday production
night, where Housatonic Valley
FFA members, alumni, parents
and friends make wreaths and
celebrate the holiday season, is
Thursday, Dec. 10, from 7 to 9
p.m.at HousatonicValley Regional

Tree lighting on Green on Dec. 6

and upgrade the bathroom of


the venerable building. Some
aspects of the plan had to be
scrapped notably, a wheelchair elevator in the rear of the
building was too expensive for
the budget.
Patrick L. Sullivan

FALLS VILLAGE There will be a tree lighting at the town


Green and subsequent festivities at the Senior Center on Sunday,
Dec. 6, at 5 p.m.,with hot chocolate and a visit from Santa Claus.

Blass exhibit ends Dec. 5


FALLS VILLAGE The David M. Hunt Library is hosting the
exhibit, Bill Blass: Folk Art Paintings and Drawings.
Bill Blass, a resident of Falls Village and a self-taught artist, creates
landscapes and animal portraits on a variety of media, including
saws, plastic sheeting and board.
The exhibit will be on display through Saturday, Dec. 5. For more
information, call the library at 860-824-7424, drop by at 63 Main
St. or go to www.huntlibrary.org.

Artisans Group Holiday Market


FALLS VILLAGE The David M. Hunt Library will host the
Artisans Group Holiday Market
on Saturday, Dec. 12, from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. at the Center on Main.
This event is a collaboration
between the library and the Artisans Group, an association of

FALLS VILLAGE
CALENDAR
PHOTO BY PATRICK L. SULLIVAN

FFA president Shelby Jacquier welcomed parents and members to the annual FFA banquet on Friday, Nov. 20.

Awards and
officers at
FFA banquet
FALLS VILLAGE The
Housatonic Valley FFA chapter
honored local citizens at the annual parent-member banquet at
Housatonic Valley Regional High
School on Friday, Nov. 20.
Receiving special chapter citation awards were: Tracy Brown
(Trout Unlimited); Bill Hurlburt
(Hurlburt Farm and Forestry);
David Jacobs (Jacobs Garage);
Michael Jastremski (Housatonic
Valley Association); and Ken
Kushi (electrical consultant).
Robert and Dorothy Jacquier
were named honorary members.
This years FFA officers are:
Shelby Jacquier, president; Bailey
Jacquier, vice president; Molly
Benack, secretary; Kevin Massey,
treasurer; Kristen Galgano, sentinel; Abigail Silvernail, parliamentarian; Patrick Kennedy, reporter;
Morgan Jacquier, historian; Konnor Curtis, junior advisor.
Patrick L. Sullivan

Monday, Dec. 7 Region


One Board of Education at
Housatonic Valley Regional
High School, Room 133, 6
p.m.

through trial and error.


Small Fish is on Main Street
in Lakeville. To make an appointment with McMullan and
the Richardson brothers to learn
about other tech gifts (including
ones for adults), go to www.
smallfishtechnologies.com or
call 860-351-7373.

Housatonic student of the week

Wreaths, trees and more at FFA

South Canaan Meeting House


FALLS VILLAGE The
South Canaan Meeting House
restoration job is complete.
The town and the Falls Village-Canaan Historical Society
received a $200,000 state grant
to repair and waterproof the
steeple, install new windows

At the talk was company


founder Daniel McMullan. Joining him was Ryan Richardson,
who is one of the companys
repair experts and computer
consultants (along with his
brother, Jeremy).
Among the products they
recommended were Tinkering
Studio, Makey Makey, SparkFun
and Little Bits.
These kits are ideal for
learning basic circuits and
programming, McMullan said.
The kits vary from basic
circuits to more advanced
programming kits. McMullan
promised that anybody who can
read directions can build their
own circuit kit.
You dont have to be a tech

makers and artisan craft professionals residing in the Northwest


Corner.
A portion of the proceeds will
benefit the library. Purchases
will be complimented with a gift
certificate for a free dessert at the
Falls Village Inn.

PHOTO BY IAN STREVER

Patrick Kennedy
interesting to Patrick, who has
been learning about them in
both his Veterinary Science class
and his work with cows at home.
His participation in the 4-H Club
brought him to represent Connecticut at the Eastern States Exposition in the dairy category, and
he took his knowledge to a new
level this year when he attended
the World Dairy Expo in Madison,
Wisc., where he competed against
the best in the world.
As busy as he sounds, Patrick
also finds time to play baseball and
basketball, as well as participate
in his church. It is a full life for
this sophomore, but a rewarding
one that always seems to keep
him smiling.
Ian Strever
Assistant Principal

Email reporter Patrick Sullivan


at patricks@lakevillejournal.com

12X12 exhibit

MARIETTA WHITTLESEY, M.S.

FALLS VILLAGE The


David M. Hunt Library will host
the fifth edition of its year-end
flash art exhibit, 12X12, on Saturday, Dec. 12, with a birthday
reception from 5 to 7 p.m.
The reception is free and open
to the public. Refreshments will
be served. A portion of the art
sales will benefit the library.

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THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015

ADDICTION
Continued from Page A1
school in Boston.
But by this time, he said,
the pattern of substance abuse
and spending his time with
like-minded people was firmly
in place.
And it was in Boston that
Evan was introduced to opiates
first in the form of prescription medications such as OxyContin, and then heroin.
It didnt take long for Evan
to become physically addicted.
When I got involved with
pills I had no clue. Within a
month I was physically addicted.
If he couldnt find a supply
of the drug, he experienced
withdrawal symptoms.
There is nothing worse than
going through drug withdrawal,
he said.
His life deteriorated. To
finance his addiction, Evan
stole from friends, family and
employers.
I thought I was this big, bad,
streetwise person. But I was a
complete drug addict.
During the final five years
of his addiction, heroin was the

primary drug.
Evan had a few things to say
about how this all happened.
He said that for him, marijuana and alcohol were gateway
drugs, because once I crossed
the threshold he saw no reason to refuse other drugs when
offered, such as cocaine or PCP.
He said in high school, when
his substance abuse began in
earnest, he developed a mental
obsession with getting high.
And as painful as physical
withdrawal can be, Evan said the
mental obsession was the most
difficult thing to overcome.
He returned several times in
his talk to the realization that he
had wasted 15 years.
All I cared about was hanging
out with stupid people, drinking,
using drugs, and chilling.
Evan noted that during his
high school years, heroin was not
commonly used by young people.
There is heroin in high
schools now, he said. If I had
access to it then, I probably
wouldnt be here now.
He warned of the dangers
of heroin. Old losers like me
dont die. Its young and talented
people with everything going for
them who die.

Continuing Concerns

Heroin
By Patrick L. Sullivan

LAKEVILLE Amid mounting concern over heroin use in the


Northwest Corner, a new advocacy group, the United Coalition
of Northwest Connecticut, held
two informational meetings
one in North Canaan on Oct. 3,
and another in Sharon on Nov. 5.
Founder Brian Ohler of North

BRIDGE
Continued from Page A1
Weve discussed this with
Falls Village, and the feeling is
were close, lets get it done well
and right, Rand said.
The news was not received
well in the Amesville section
of Salisbury. In a letter to The
Lakeville Journal published Nov.
12, the Amesville Association said
its members were dismayed and
angered by the delay.
Four years without a bridge
is unconscionable.

STATION
Continued from Page A1
would mean to taxpayers. Using
the 2014 grand list, the loan of
approximately $1.8 million over
a 20-year period (at an interest
rate under 3 percent) would add
$54.09 to the annual property
tax bill for a house assessed at
$325,000; for a 30-year loan,
it would add $50.54; over 40
years, $34. (Bartram emphasized
the figures were for reference
purposes.)
On Nov. 2, the Sharon selectmen agreed not to proceed
to a town meeting vote on the
transfer station proposal right
away. A meeting with the building committee was held at which
Sharon residents offered ideas
for ways to redesign the planned
facility to reduce the cost.
Salisbury and Sharon at
present share a transfer station
in Salisbury, on property owned
by The Hotchkiss School. The
towns lease the land, and the
lease will end in 2020. The school
has new plans for that property
and will not renew the lease.
The search of a site for a new
transfer station went on for
several years. The towns eventually settled on a piece of land at
Dimond Road in Salisbury, near
the Millerton border.
Following the purchase of the
property, Anchor Engineering
worked with the transfer station
committee to come up with a
design for the new center.

Canaan brought together representatives from the State Police,


area drug treatment facilities
and Sharon Hospital for the
presentations.
Ohler said that about 16
young people, most in their
20s, had died in the region from
overdoses in the first six months
of 2015.
At both meetings, residents
expressed anger and frustration
that more drug dealers are not
arrested, and that those who
are dont seem to stay in jail
very long.
Trooper First Class Roy
Dungan, at the Sharon event,
urged residents to open your
peripheral vision and watch
for unusual vehicles or people
in their neighborhoods. He also
suggested getting in touch with
members of the state Legislature
to ask about drug crimes and
sentencing.

Christmas Fair
SHARON Sharon United
Methodist Church will host
its annual Christmas Fair and
Luncheon on Saturday, Dec. 5,
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
There will be decorated
wreaths for sale as well as baked
goods, handcrafted gifts, ornaments and decor. In addition,
there will be a silent auction and a
luncheon with homemade soups
and sandwiches.

Continued from Page A1


quality of buildings and projects
can be somewhere between good
and bad. He renders his views in
clear, poetic, often witty prose,
trenchant rather than mordant.
His opinions are founded on his
near encyclopedic knowledge of
facts and history.
After leaving The Times, he
was the architecture critic of The
New Yorker from 1997 to 2011.
He served as dean of Parsons, The
New School of Design, from 2004
to 2006, and continues to hold a
chaired professorship at The New
School. He is currently a contributing editor of Vanity Fair.
Goldbergers love of cities,
particularly New York, is evident in his many books, which
range from a consideration of
the Hamptons in Beyond the
Dunes, vertical buildings in On
the Rise and the rebuilding of
Ground Zero in Up From Zero,
a bestseller in both hardcover
and paperback. Among his many
awards and prizes is the Medal
of Honor from the New York
Landmarks Preservation Foundation, which called his writing
the nations most balanced,
penetrating and poetic analyses
of architecture and design.
Goldberger is also a believer
in the power of great architects
to make buildings that expand
possibilities and allow us to see
architecture in new ways. He is
the author of the only authorized
biography and critical study of
Frank Gehry, the countrys most
famous living architect. (One of
his amazing titanium and glass
buildings serves as Bard Colleges
performance hall in Annandale-on-Hudson.) The book,
Building Art: The Life and Work
of Frank Gehry, was published
in late September in conjunction
with a Gehry retrospective at the
Los Angeles County Museum of

Art and received highly favorable


reviews.
Paul Goldberger will speak at
The Hotchkiss School, Walker
Auditorium, on Friday, Dec. 11,
at 7:30 p.m. After his talk and a
Q and A, he will sign copies of
Frank Gehry, which Oblong
Books will offer for sale, at a
post-talk reception in the lobby. As with all Salisbury Forum
events, the presentation is free
and open to all.
Leon Graham is president of
The Salisbury Forum.

NATURE
Continued from Page A1
the sole owner of this secluded
valley, saving his land proved to
be a much greater undertaking.
For one thing, the parcel is on
an entirely different scale. The
property is more than 800 acres
with vast woodlands and rolling
fields. Owning such family land
is a great responsibility accepted
by each successive generation,
but my friend is the last of his
line. The weight and obligation
of doing the right thing for
the valley rested solely on his
shoulders, and finding the right
solution became an imperative.
There are few shortcuts in
land protection, especially those
involving multiple partners, jurisdictions and sources of funding. Saving the valley required
persistence and perseverance
over many years, and I have been
privileged to help my friend work
toward his goal from the very
beginning. Last week finally saw
the culmination of that effort.
Now there are two conservation
easements in place protecting the
land in perpetuity.

CORNWALL The annual


Cornwall Christmas Pageant
will be held on Saturday, Dec.
12, at 7:30 p.m. at the United
Church of Christ on Bolton
Hill Road.
Costumed tableaus, traditional readings and carols
will culminate in the giving of
white gifts for children in need
(please bring a toy wrapped in
white paper). Hot chocolate and
refreshments will be served in

the parish house following the


pageant. Rehearsal will be on
Friday, Dec. 11, at 5:30 p.m.
Members of the community
who would like be in it must
arrive at rehearsal promptly.
The snow date is Dec. 13 at 4
p.m. For more information, call
Jane at 860-672-6101.

You cannot quantify peace


of mind, but long after the last
document is recorded this land
will endure, safe from the fate
of so many other special places
lost to development or broken
up into smaller pieces. I hope
that my friend can breathe easier
now, and I am grateful that we
traveled this long, strange path
together for all these years to see
it through.
Tim Abbott is program director
of Housatonic Valley Associations
Litchfield Hills Greenprint. His
blog is at www.greensleeves.typepad.com.

CORNWALL The Cornwall Historical Society will host


a gingerbread party on Saturday,
Dec. 12, from 2 to 4 p.m. at the
society headquarters on Pine
Street. All are invited to create a
gingerbread cookie masterpiece.
The event is free and open to
all ages.
It will also be a chance to meet
new Executive Director/Curator
Jamie Cantoni and a last
chance to see the 2015 exhibit,
Moo! Then and Now.
Registration is required by
emailing info@cornwallhistoricalsociety.org.

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Gingerbread
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CLASSICO
PASTA SAUCES

Presentation on
Connecticuts
last brass works
SALISBURY Author Emery Roth will speak at the Scoville
Memorial Library and the Salisbury Historical Societys ongoing
series at Salisbury Town Hall on
Dec. 5 at 4 p.m. The event is free.
Over the course of four years,
Roth photographed the last
large-scale brass mills owned
by Ansonia Copper & Brass of
old Brass Valley in Connecticut
and produced a book, Brass
Valley: The Fall of an American
Industry.
He will present a selection of
his images of Brass Valley and
share experiences and discoveries
made while writing the book. A
book signing will follow his talk.

Christmas pageant Dec. 12

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A12 THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015

Dr. Carnes Weeks Jr.

OBITUARIES
Frederick R. Fred Milton
WINSTED Frederick R.
Fred Milton, 63, of Gilbert
Avenue died at his home on Nov.
25, 2015, after a long illness.
He was born Aug. 22, 1952,
in Sharon, the son of the late
Eleanor (Morey) and Frederick
R. Milton.
Fred was a self-employed
painter. He was known for his talent and expertise with windows.
He was raised in Salisbury
and attended Sunday School at
the Salisbury Congregational
Church.
He was an avid fisherman and
enjoyed camping.
Freds true passion was his
Harley-Davidson motorcycle.

He lived to be cruising on the


open road.
Fred is survived by his daughter, Sabrina Wilson of Sheffield,
Mass.; his loving sister, Terry
Milton and her husband, Eddie
Humes of Salisbury; his niece,
Tina Humes of Ancram, N.Y.;
and his nephew, Eddie Humes
III of Salisbury.
Graveside services will be held
Dec. 7 at 10 a.m. at the Salisbury
Cemetery.
Arrangements are under the
care of the Newkirk-Palmer
Funeral Home in North Canaan.
Memorial donations may be
sent to a charity of the donors
choice in Freds memory.

Donald John Plantier


STANFORDVILLE Donald John Plantier, the Fire Duck,
a lifelong Dutchess
County resident,
died peacefully on
Nov. 24, 2015, at Village Crest Center in
New Milford, Conn.
Mr. Plantier retired
as a food-service
worker from Harlem
Valley Psychiatric
Center in Wingdale. He also drove a
school bus for many
years for Arvisais Bus Company
in Wingdale and for the Lee Bus
Company in Dover Plains.
He also worked for several years
for J&J Log and Lumber Company
and for Hunt Country Furniture
prior to his retirement.
Born April 24, in Poughkeepsie, NY, he was the son of the late
Wanona (Brown) and Andrew
Plantier. He attended Dover
Schools and served his country
honorably in the United States
Air Force.
On Nov. 5, 1957, in Pleasant
Valley, N.Y., he married Margaret
N. Curtis, his beloved wife of 58
years. Mrs. Plantier survives at
home in Stanfordville.
Fire Duck was a 55-year life
member and past Fire Police
lieutenant and captain and was
sergeant at arms of the J.H. Ketcham Hose Company in Dover
Plains. He was a member of the
Dutchess County Fire Police
Response Team, a life member of
the Dutchess County Volunteer
Firemens Association, the Exempt
Firemens Association, the Hudson Valley Volunteer Firemens
Association and the Royal Order
of the Red Vest.
He served as a Town of Dover
constable and crossing guard for
many years and was a 40-year
member of the Dover Masonic

Lodge and the Order of the Eastern Star in Dover Plains.


He also belonged to
the Stanford Grange
No. 808 in Stanfordville.
He will be greatly
missed by his loving family and by his
extended firematic
family. He was truly
one of a kind.
In addition to his
loving wife, Margaret,
he is survived by his
two children, Lisarose McGarry and her husband, Terry, of
Dixmont, Maine, and Walter J.
Plantier and his wife, April, of
Wingdale, N.Y.; three grandchildren, Tracy Tompkins and her
husband, Mike,Alan McHugh and
his wife, Katelin, and Cody Plantier; three great-grandchildren,
Michael, Kali and Kane; a special
sister-in-law, June C. Williams;
several nieces and nephews; and
many friends.
He always held a special place in
his heart for his animals, especially
his pet white goose, Goose, and his
black Lab, Winston.
He was predeceased by his sonin-law, Alan McHugh Sr., in 2009.
Arrangements are under the
care of the Scott D. Conklin
Funeral Home in Millerton. J.H.
Ketcham Hose Company conducted services Nov. 29, during
visiting hours. Funeral services
were held Nov. 30 at the funeral
home. Burial was at Valley View
Cemetery in Dover Plains.
Memorial contributions may
be made to the J.H. Ketcham
Hose Company, P.O. Box 706,
Dover Plains, NY 12522 or to
the Dover Masonic Lodge No.
666, 100 Hurds Corners Road,
Pawling, NY 12564. To send an
online condolence, go to www.
conklinfuneralhome.com.

AMENIA Dr. Carnes


Weeks Jr. died Nov. 29, 2015, in
Exeter, N.H.
The son of the late Margaret
Shoemaker of Pittsburgh, Pa.,
and the late Dr. Carnes Weeks
of New York City, he was born
in Manhattan in 1924, the oldest
of four children, which included
Bob, Nonie and Margo.
He grew up in the city, where
he attended St. Bernards School.
In the mid 1930s the family
moved to a farm in Woodbury,
Conn. He attended St. Pauls
School in Concord, N.H., until
he enlisted in the U. S. Marine
Corps in January 1943.
He trained as an aerial gunner in Marine B-25 bombers
in the South Pacific Theater of
the war. His squadron was responsible for bombing bypassed
Japanese-held Islands, mostly
Rabaul, New Britain.
Corporal Weeks was awarded both the Air Medal and the
Distinguished Flying Cross.
After his discharge in November
1945, Dr. Weeks attended Yale
University and graduated in
three years.
He married Patricia Severn
of Philadelphia, Pa., in 1949.
He completed medical school
at the University of Virginia
at Charlottesville, where sons
John and Andrew were born.
His youngest son, Nathan, was
born in Hartford, Conn., where
Dr. Weeks completed two years
general residency at Hartford
Hospital.
He started his family practice
of medicine in Amenia, where
he remained in practice for 18
years, performing maternity,
general medicine, assisting at
major surgery and house calls
from his home office.
In 1972, and for the next
three years, he practiced at
Vassar College; and he started
the Emergency Department at
Sharon Hospital, where he was
director from 1975 to 1989.
Dr. Weeks initiated and
served as chairman of the board
of the Elizabeth McCall Foundation, a center for the treatment
of alcohol and drug addictions,
in Torrington. He was honored
by the building of the in-patient
Carnes Weeks Center, a 20-bed
facility.
His volunteer activities included serving as a civilian physician in a Vietnamese hospital
in Phan Rang in 1967; starting
the Planned Parenthood Clinic
in Amenia and the Eastern
Dutchess County Maternity
Clinic, also in Amenia; and
working at Americares in Danbury, Conn.
Dr. Weeks retired from the
Emergency Department at
Sharon Hospital in 1992 and did

cruise ship medicine for several


years after retiring.
He moved to Sorrento,
Maine, in 2002. He married
Carmen Williams Jensen of
Corea, Maine, in 2012 and lived
in Exeter and Corea until his
death on Nov. 29 in Exeter.
In addition to his deep commitment to medicine, Dr. Weeks
had a lifelong appreciation for
the outdoors. He will be well
remembered for organizing
many family picnics, canoe trips,
fishing expeditions and deer
hunting with the Weeks Gang at
his cabin in Stanfordville, N.Y.
He thoroughly enjoyed carriage driving with his wife Patricia until her death in 1989. He
greatly enjoyed travel and planning adventures with friends.
Some of his notable trips include taking the Trans-Siberian
Railway from Vladivostok to St.
Petersburg, fishing trips in Alaska, an African safari, two trips
following in the steps of Lewis
and Clark and a trip with fellow
veterans to visit World War II
sites in the Pacific. He traveled
this country often in his camper.
His interest in ornithology
led him to bird carving, and he
spent many happy hours with
fellow bird carvers at the Wendall Gilley Museum in Northeast
Harbor, Maine.
He enjoyed cooking and,
after retirement, he enrolled in
a class at the Culinary Institute
of America.
He also loved a good story
and could tell a good story. Most
of all, he loved to be around
people.
He is survived by his sister,
Margo Valentine; his wife,
Carmen; his sons and daughters-in-law, Jack and Elizabeth,
of Kingston, N.Y., Andy and
Bonnie of Exeter and Nate and
Marion of Yarmouthport, Mass.;
his stepchildren, Lee Holsberry
of St. Petersburg, Fla., and Elizabeth and Bill Collins of Orting,
Wash.; his grandchildren, Beth
Weeks, Amy Weeks-Coffield,
Kevin Weeks and Kate Weeks;
and his stepgrandchildren,
Lindsay and Emily Palmer,
Melanie Taylor, A. J. Sidener and
Levi Collins.
Memorial services will be
held in May in Dutchess County
and in the summer in Sorrento,
Maine.
In lieu of flowers, he requested that he be honored by
a donation in his memory to
the Elizabeth McCall Foundation, 58 High St., Torrington,
CT 06790.
Arrangements are under the
care of the Kent & Pelczar Funeral Home in Newmarket, N.H.
Go to www.kentandpelczarfh.
com to sign an online guestbook.

SALISBURY Carol (Coleman) Ray Green died Nov. 24,


2015, at Noble Horizons where she had
been living for several
years.
Carol was born in
1930 to Edina (Davis)
and Clarence Coleman in Scarsdale,N.Y.
She was raised by her
mother, Edina, and
her stepfather, Albert
deRussy Baker.
Carol attended the Maryland
College for Women after graduating from Scarsdale High School in
1948. She married Robert G. Ray
in 1954 and was a mother and
homemaker until she returned
to college after her children were
grown and earned her B.A. in
Human Services.
Carol worked for the McCall
Foundation as a Drug and Alcohol
Counselor and then was in private
practice for 20 or so years, living
and working in Lakeville, which
she called home.
She was active in the Sharon
Congregational Church and
found friendship and solace in
that community.
Our mom was quite a free and
independent spirit with a playful

Regional basketball season begins with annual tourney

Week of December 6, 2015

The Congregational Church


Of Salisbury, U.C.C
30 Main Street

Serving the Lord with Gladness

We bid you warm welcome to come


worship with us Sundays at 10 am.
All are welcome!
Child care, moving music,
and Christian fellowship in a
historic 19th C. Meeting House.

The Rev. Diane Monti-Catania


(860) 435-2442

www.salisburycongregational.org

St. John's Episcopal Church

North Canaan
Congregational Church, UCC

All are welcome. Please join us!


www.northcanaancongregationalchurch.org
nccongchurch@snet.net

North East Baptist Church

Historic Meeting House, Main & Maple


Millerton, NY
God's word Is Always Relevant!
A Warm Welcome Awaits You At
Sunday Services:
Family Bible School - 9:30 AM
Morning Worship - 11:00
Evening Service - 6:00 PM
Weekday Meetings:
Tues. Bible Studies, 1:30 PM,
and Weds. Prayer Meeting 7:00 PM at
at Parsonage 33 S. Maple Ave.
Fellowship Luncheon, first unday of
each month after AM services
Contact Pastor Henry A. Prause
Phone: 518/789-4840
Email: heprause@gmail.com

Public skating on Saturdays


LAKEVILLE The Recreation Commission will offer public
skating at The Hotchkiss School Dwyer Rink from 11 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. on the following Saturdays: Dec. 5, 12, 19; Jan. 9, 16,
23, 30; Feb. 6,1 3, 20. The cost is $3 per skater.
Anyone on the ice must wear skates. Protective equipment
including helmets, gloves and elbow pads are recommended
for all participants. Hockey sticks and pucks are not permitted.
Weather and other cancellations are posted on www.salisburyct.us. Contact Lisa McAuliffe at 860-435-5186 or email
recreationdirector@salsiburyct.us for further information.

Turn to Page A13 for more sports

Park Ave. & Main St., Millerton, N.Y.


Since 1875
518-789-9497

St. Thomas Episcopal Church

Trinity Episcopal Church

484 Lime Rock Rd., Lime Rock


Sun. 8 & 10:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist
Nursery Care/Sunday School 10:20 a.m.
(860) 435-2627

"Offering companionship along the way"


email: trinity@trinitylimerock.org
website: www.trinitylimerock.org
Rev. Heidi Truax

All Saints of America

Orthodox Christian Church


313 Twin Lakes Rd., Salisbury, CT

860-824-1340

Rev. Fr. John J. Kreta


Vespers Sat. 5PM
Divine Liturgy Sun 9:30 AM
Go to our website, or call
www.allsaintsofamerica.us

Unitarian-Universalist
Fellowship of NW CT

Lakevillemethodist@snet.net

The Sharon United


Methodist Church

The Chapel of All Saints, Cornwall

112 Upper Main Steet,


North end of Sharon Green
Touching Lives - Lifting Spirits
The Rev. MARGARET LAEMMEL
10:45 a.m. Worship Service, Nursery Care
No Sunday School in Summer
860-364-5634
email: sharonumc5634@att.net

Falls Village
Congregational Church

16 Beebe Hill Road, Falls Village


10:00 a.m. Family Worship
11 a. .
offee our
A Friendly Church with
a warm welcome to all!!
860-824-0194

Canaan United
Methodist Church

Cemetery Monuments, Pet Markers,


On-Site Lettering, Cleaning, Repairs,
Sand Blasting Service
Bruce Valentine, Proprieter

9 South Main, Sharon CT 06069


860-364-5260
email: cces@att.net
www.christchurchsharon.org
Reverend Jon Widing
Sunday Holy Eucharist 8 & 10 AM
All welcome to join us

Next meeting Dec. 13


Home of Jane and Peter Fitting
8 Salmon Kill Rd. Salisbury
10:30 a.m.
Noble Horizons
For information call 860-435-2319

"Open Hearts Open Minds Open Doors"

VALENTINE MONUMENT
WORKS AND SANDBLAST

Christ Church Episcopal in Sharon

Rev. Elizabeth Fisher, Vicar


Leedsville Road at
Hitchcock Corner & Amenia Union
Rev. Savage Frieze
Every Sunday Silent Prayer:
172 Lower Rd/Route 44, East Canaan, CT
10-10:15 am
8 8
, urc
ce
Worship: Sunday 10:30 am
A congregation that puts faith into service,
Silent Meditiation Every Sunday
in the community and in the world.
10-10:15 a.m.
Worship Services Sundays at 10 am
Tel: 1-845-373-9161
Fishes & Loaves Every Wed. 9-11 am

319 Main St., Lakeville, CT 06039


860-435-9496
The Rev. MARGARET LAEMMEL
9:30 a.m. Worship Service
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.

PHOTO BY CYNTHIA HOCHSWENDER

Church of St. Mary

76 Sharon Rd., Lakeville, CT


860-435-2659
Weekend Liturgies
Sat. Vigil at 4:00 PM
Sun. at 8:00 & 10:15 AM
Weekday Liturgies Thurs. & Fri. at 9:00 AM
Wed. at 10:00 AM at Noble Horizons

12 Main Street, Salisbury, CT


Praising God, Serving Neighbor
Sunday Services
8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist (Rite I) Said
10:00 a.m. Choral Eucharist, Rite 11 Greenwoods Community Church
offee our and ello s ip follo s 355 Clayton Road, Ashley Falls, MA
413-229-8560
Breakfast Club
Sunday Service 10:30 AM
1st Sunday of the month Oct.-May
Kidz Konnection K-6th grade
Litany for Healing
(during Sun. Service)
2nd Sundays of the month
Nursery Care All Services
www.stjohnssalisbury.org
Rev. Richard Woodward
860-435-9290
Please join us!

The Lakeville
United Methodist Church

The Housy Hoops juniors made it to the final game of the regional tournament, Nov. 29.

and creative side she shared with


many. In 2003, she took to the road
in her red Volkswagen
with her dog, Uno, to
drive cross-country and
back, to see the sights
and visit family and
friends along the way.
Carol found peace in
the outdoors,gardening,
flowers and with her furry companions. She also
enjoyed sports growing
up, and was an avid swimmer as
well as a tennis player later in life.
Her greatest legacy is her
children and grandchildren, who
continue to thrive and add goodness to the world.
Carol leaves behind her five
children and their families, Linda
Ray, Robert Bergman and Chloe
Bergman-Ray of West Paris,
Maine, Stephen and JoAnn Ray of
Waterbury, Conn., Barbara Ray of
Millerton and Julian Ray Orozco
of Oakland, Calif., James Ray,
Elliot Wilkinson-Ray and Tyler
Wilkinson-Ray of Burlington,Vt.,
and David, Mackenzie and Haley
Ray of West Hartford, Conn.
We would like to thank Noble
Horizons for the care and kindness
our mother received during the
time she lived there.

Worship Services

at the Pilgrim House, 30 Granite Ave., Canaan

SPORTS
LAKEVILLE The annual
Thanksgiving weekend regional
basketball tournament was held
at The Hotchkiss School on Nov.
28 and 29.
Competition on Saturday was
between boys in grades seven
and eight; the Sunday matches
were between boys in grades five
and six.
The regional team offers competition among teams from towns
in Litchfield County and beyond.
Its for players who are serious enough about the sport that
they are planning to play in high
school, said Sharon Recreation
Director Matt Andrulis-Mette,
who was one of the referees for
the tournament.
Players from the Region
One School District play on the
Housy Hoops team. The junior
players (in grades five and six)
are coached by Kate Nordland
and Tim Sneller. The senior
players (grades seven and eight)
are coached by Kevin Wiggins.
For this years tournament,
there were nine teams competing
in each division. Middlebury was
the champion, defeating New
Hartford in the final round.
The junior Housy Hoops team
made it to the finals, competing
against a team from Watertown.
Watertown won, 47-31, but the
game was a victory of another
kind: This is the first junior team
that the Housy Hoops have fielded
in many years and it was a triumph
that they made it all the way to
the final game.
Cynthia Hochswender

Carol (Coleman) Ray Green

2 Church St., Rte 44, Canaan, CT


860-824-5534
Pastor Peter Brown
10 a.m. Worship Service
"Open Hearts Open Minds Open Doors"
Canaanumc.wordpress.com
Church email: canaanctumc@gmail.com

An intimate Episcopal service every Sunday


8:00am Holy Eucharist and sermon
The North Cornwall Meeting House
Town Street at Cogswell Road,
West Cornwall, CT

Congregation Beth David

A reform Jewish Synagogue


3344 East Main St., Amenia
Rabbi Jon Haddon
High Holiday Services and Services- Sat.
morning-twice monthy
Followed by lunch and adult education
ALL ARE WELCOME
For information call Rabbi Haddon 203 748 4589
or visit our website: www.congbethdavid.org

e it el
Presbyterian Church

it field alley d.
Amenia, NY
845-373-8320
Hours of Worship:
Every Sunday 10 a.m. - 11 a.m.

Sports

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015

A13

From West Africa to Lakeville in pursuit of a dream (and soccer)


By Will Burchfield

boys and girls that the academy


assesses every year, 15 to 20 are
offered scholarships. Just based
purely on numbers that means a
student is nearly 100 times more
likely to gain admission into Harvard than Ghanas Right to Dream
academy.
Its nerve-racking, says
Opoku.
Reducing the familys burden
Thetrialists,as theyre known
at the academy, arent merely
looking for a better education or
a better soccer program, valuable
opportunities though they are. In
many ways, theyre looking for a
ticket to a better life.
So for the four boys, the decision to leave home at the age of
11 Opoku from Sekonde Tarkoradi, Ghana; Osman from Tamale, Ghana; Anyagri from Garu,
Ghana; and Kora from Cotonou,
Benin wasnt a difficult one.
And yet Opoku admits, Thats
where the real pressure starts.
But the trepidation in setting
out alone is eased, Opoku explains,
by the sense of doing right by

one of Right to Dreams U.S.-based


partners. (Others in this region
include Salisbury School, Kent
School and Millbrook School.) It
is the former objective that fuels
their fire on the soccer field.
I just love competing,says Osman, a smile spreading across his
face. And using your will to win.
Yea, yea,his teammates chime
in, expressing their approval. That
they are like-minded on the topic
of soccer shouldnt come as a surprise. The delight in competition
and the will to win are two qualities that every successful Right to
Dream candidate must possess.
Tougher than Harvard
The selection process is unlike
any tryout in our countrys youth
sports landscape. Right to Dreams
high standards coupled with a
tidal wave of applicants yields an
admission rate that would make
Ivy League universities look easy.
For it isnt enough to simply
dazzle on the soccer field. One
must also show promise in the
classroom and charisma beyond it.
Out of the 25,000 to 30,000

LAKEVILLE From the very


moment they were introduced to
the game, Eric Opoku, Umar Farouk Osman, Saviour Anyagri and
Firas Kora have always dreamed of
playing professional soccer.
They never imagined that journey would lead them to Lakeville.
No way,says Opoku incredulously,his three teammates shaking
their heads in agreement. Not
until I attended Right to Dream,
at least.
Opoku, Osman, Anyagri and
Kora are all graduates of the Right
to Dream Academy, a fully residential private school in the eastern
region of Ghana that provides
scholarships to the most talented
young soccer players in West Africa. The academys mission, most
directly, is to produce professional
footballers; more fundamentally,it
is to empower gifted boys and girls
to fulfill their potential.
It is the latter objective that has
brought Opoku, Osman, Anyagri
and Kora to The Hotchkiss School,

In return of Thanksgiving classic, Housy loses 38-28


By Patrick L. Sullivan

rushing and was 1-3 for 20 yards


in the air; Brinson had 63 yards
and one touchdown; Hurley had
12 yards; and Evan Wilkinson had
17, also on the ground. David
Sanchez had three catches totaling
105 yards.
Turnovers were the determining factor in the outcome
of this game, Richardson said
afterward. We gave the ball away
four times, and you cant beat a
good team like Wolcott Tech with
mistakes like that.
Seniors Ted Perotti, Dave
Sanchez and Zack Larson, juniors Evan Wilkinson and Billy
Hurley and freshman Eli Brinson
were the engines that pulled this
train all season, and they gave it
everything they had today. I was
proud of them and proud to
coach them.
Note: The team honored
HVRHS Athletic Director Anne
Macneil and longtime football
supporter Dolores Perotti at
halftime.
The seniors on the team were
Sanchez, Perotti, Austin Gwinn,
Zack Larson and Mike Ocain.
An unruly Wolcott fan was
ejected from the game in the third
quarter, when he persisted in loud
and unimaginatively obscene
remarks.

The Mountaineers appeared


for a moment to have solved the
Morillo puzzle, stopping him
twice in a row for losses.
And when Morillo took a
pitch for a pass play, Brinson
and Sanchez combined for an
interception.
It looked as if the momentum
had shifted to the home team.
But a couple of plays later the
Wildcats Barreto returned the
favor with his own interception.
Wolcott scored again in the
fourth quarter, as Oates hit Barreto, and the score was 38-20.
But the Mountaineers fought
back. Perotti scored with about
4 minutes left in the game, the
two-point conversion was good,
and it was 38-28.
Do not give up! yelled
HVRHS coach Doug Richardson.
Were not done yet!
The Mountaineers tried an
onside kick but failed to recover.
Then Sanchez intercepted
a pass and the Mountaineers
had one more shot as time was
running out.
But that rally fell short, and
the game ended on a Wildcat
interception.
The Mountaineers ended their
season with a 3-7 record. Perotti
had three touchdowns on 83 yards

FALLS VILLAGE The


Housatonic-Wamogo Mountaineers kept things competitive
but ultimately fell to the Oliver
Wolcott Wildcats, 38-28, in the
Thanksgiving Day football game
at Housatonic Valley Regional
High School.
The Wildcats received the kick
to start the game and scored first,
going up 6-0 after a lengthy drive.
The Mountaineers got their
first look at Wildcat running
back/free safety Krysten Morillo
in this series, and the senior was
a constant threat the entire game.
The Mountaineers answered
with a pass from Billy Hurley
to David Sanchez on the first
play from scrimmage, a 9-yard
rumble from Ted Perotti and a
touchdown run from Eli Brinson
(with Perotti making the twopoint conversion).
Wolcott came right back with
a steady march down the field,
culminating with a touchdown
run from Morillo and the twopoint conversion from quarterback Brandon Oakes to make the
score 14-8 with about 8 minutes
remaining in the second quarter.
A promising drive ended badly
for Housatonic when Wolcotts
Derrick Barreto intercepted a pass
in the end zone.
Barreto then contributed a
long run on offense, and a few
moments later Morillo found the
end zone again.
Down 22-8, Perotti scored
for the home team as time was
running out. The two-point
conversion failed, but the score at
the half was a manageable 22-14.
But things went south after
halftime. The Wildcats recovered
a Housatonic fumble and Morillo
dominated in the following offensive series.
Now down 30-14, the Mountaineers refused to give up. Working quickly, with minimal time in
the huddle, and with Hurleysgogo count confusing the Wildcats,
Housatonic marched back down
the field. Perotti punched it in for
the touchdown, the conversion
failed, and it was 30-20.

Bridge scores for Nov. 18 and 25


(56.19 percent) were Patricia
Boyle and Celia Senzer, and in
third with 89.58 points (53.32
percent) were Lily Beck and Joan
Turnure.
On the day before Thanksgiving Day, there were nine pairs,
four and a half tables. Using the
Howell Movement, we played
three boards a round for eight
rounds. Twenty-four boards
were in play with a three-board
sit out The average score was 36.
The three pairs with the best
scores were Billy Saster and Bob
Finn, with a score of 47.43 (65.88
percent), Vivian Sullivan and
David Bill with a score of 42.29
(58.74 percent) and Lily Beck and
Harry Hall with a score of 38.50
(53.47 percent).
Harry Hall

LAKEVILLE There was


a duplicate bridge game at the
Interlaken Inn in Lakeville,
following a delightful buffet
lunch on Nov. 18. There were
eight full tables. Playing four
boards a round and a skip after
four rounds, all pairs played 28
boards. The average score was 84.
For North South pairs, in
first with 110 points (65.48
percent) were Marian and Carr
Ferguson; in second with 90.5
points (53.87 percent) were Gail
and Alan Gamble, and in third
with 87.5 points (52.13 percent)
were Norma Bartholomew and
Tom Burke.
For East West pairs, in first
with 109.42 points (65.13 percent) were Alice Platt and David
Bill; in second with 94.4 points

ones family.Youre cutting down


problems for your family because
they no longer have to pay for your
education. Youre happy because
youre benefiting them.
The boys again nod in agreement, and then Anyagri pipes up.
The playing experience justifies
it too because its so competitive.
Each year, Right to Dream sends
three teams to Europe to play
the best youth academies on the
continent, exposing the players to
the highest level of soccer in their
developmental years.
Its worth it, Anyagri adds,
when you think about how much
you put in day in and day out.
Its also worth it, the four boys
agree, when you consider where
the academy takes you.
Opoku is a senior at Hotchkiss,
Osman a junior, Anyagri a sophomore and Kora a freshman, so they
arrived on the schools campus in
successive years. They all admit
to feeling the same general mix
of emotions on their first day of
high school in America: happy,
confused and overwhelmed.
And lost! exclaims Osman.I
came to school late the night
before classes started so I didnt
know where any of my classes were
on the first day. I had to ask for
directions anywhere I was going.
His teammates laugh as he tells
the story, reveling in the irony of his
predicament: he had successfully
journeyed from Tamale, Ghana
to Lakeville, but he couldnt find
his way from the science building
to the gym.
Aside from the myriad obstacles of being a new kid in a new
school, the boys agree the biggest
challenge in adjusting to life at
Hotchkiss is getting used to the
academic standards.
And to the weather, says
Osman.
And to the food, says Opoku.
And to the girls, says Kora.
He is sufficiently razzed for
this comment, but Kora is making a larger point: People present
themselves in various ways and

PHOTO BY GREG LOCK

Eric Opoku, shown here in a game between The Hotchkiss


School and the Taft School on Nov. 14, is one of an outstanding quartet of soccer players from Ghana now at Hotchkiss.
with various intentions in different
parts of the world, and these tacit
messages can be hard to interpret.
Still, being the freshman in the
group, he isnt let off easy. And the
brotherly ribbing he receives from
his teammates is, most of all, an
indication of their close friendship.
If they have adopted each other
as family, they have chosen the
soccer field as their home.
Its not only a talent they possess, but one of their true passions
outside the classroom, says the
Hotchkiss boys soccer coach, Jay
Thornhill. These young men eat,
sleep and breathe soccer.
As one would expect, they are
standouts on the field, dazzling

crowds and opponents with


their lightning-like feet, deft ball
control and often-colorful celebrations. Together, they helped
lead Hotchkiss to the New England
tournament this season with a
record of 10-5-4. The Bearcats
fell in the quarterfinals to Phillips
Academy Andover.
Thornhill, reflecting on his first
year as coach, says, Working with
Eric, Umar, Saviour and Firas has
been both challenging and gratifying. They have challenged me to
think outside the box and embrace
creativity on the field. Mostly they
have allowed me to appreciate the
beauty of the game and what it
means to each player on the team.

Turn to Page 12 for more sports

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A14 THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015

Opinion

THE MILLERTON NEWS


EDITORIAL PAGE A14
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2015
P.O.
Box 1688, Lakeville,
CT 06039
860-435-9873 FAX 860-435-0146

EDITORIAL

Keep momentum going

t seems to happen whenever long-term plans for a


municipal project begin to approach their final stages.
Despite the fact that multiple parts of the process have
been reviewed in excruciating detail at public meetings
from the very beginning, there are always citizens who come
forward to object toward the end. These are those who either
did not keep track of the planning at all, or came to it late,
and found some things that needed to be questioned. That is
not all bad, but it can certainly be very frustrating for those
who have worked on the project through long years, all in
the public eye.
Such is the situation with the Salisbury-Sharon Transfer
Station plans, which are finally coming to fruition. Granted, it is a big project, and one that has many complicated
aspects. Property had to be found and purchased, research
had to be done to find the best approach for towns the size
of these two, and the final plans had to meet the recycling
needs and wishes of the communities. The work has been
happening for three and a half years, as pointed out by Charlie Kelley, co-chair of the Salisbury-Sharon Transfer Station
Building Committee, giving lots of opportunity for public
input before these final stages.
The October informational meetings that were held in
Salisbury and Sharon brought to light a difference in levels
of acceptance and understanding of the project thus far.
Salisbury residents had only minimal questions at this point
in the proceedings. At the Sharon
meeting, on the other hand, there
were many objections, and queries that related to items that were
resolved about 10 steps ago. However, there were also some thoughtful
cost-saving suggestions presented by
a Sharon engineer, Mike Dignacco,
at the Nov. 18 committee meeting
in Salisbury. If such knowledge can
be useful at this stage, and save the
towns some money while keeping the
quality of the transfer station where the towns want it, that
is excellent. Maybe Dignacco would consider continuing to
volunteer his time to improve the projects outcome, as have
the current members of the committee since its inception.
The Hotchkiss School in Lakeville gave plenty of notice
of removal of the current facility on its property, and the
leadership of Sharon and Salisbury took on the charge of
coming up with a good alternative responsibly. Northwest
Corner towns take recycling and responsible disposal of
refuse seriously, as they should, and a good outcome for the
transfer station project is critical. This new facility on Route
44 near the Millerton line should fulfill the needs of the
towns for many years to come, with no issue of eviction as
there is now.
So it is important for the towns and their residents to
come to an agreement on the best approach to move forward.
It would be disastrous to have a long, drawn-out rehashing of
issues that have been resolved over the course of the last three
and a half years. Good suggestions, such as Dignaccos, could
have a positive effect on the final iteration of the transfer
station. What should not happen, however, is stalling of the
process for no good reason. Hotchkiss has given the deadline
of 2020 for the transfer station to vacate its property. The
towns need to have the carefully planned facility in place
and functioning by then, in order to have no interruption of
service for the residents of Salisbury and Sharon.

Confusion over party affiliation


Selectperson Kiefers letter
to the editor (Lakeville Journal,
Nov. 19) has compelled me to respond. Although I was endorsed
by the Democratic Party, I ran
as an unaffiliated voter on their
ticket. While the Secretary of
the State may consider a person
elected on a party line as counting
toward that partys allocation of
seats on a board or commission,
that doesnt change who I am
or what I believe in, nor alter
my commitment to doing what
is in the best interests of the
community.
I sincerely appreciate that the
Democratic Party respected my
convictions by including me as
an unaffiliated candidate on
their ticket. Therefore, I would
respectfully suggest to Ms. Kiefer
that there is more than one path-

way to maintain ones political


independence as unaffiliated
within the local electoral system.
I do agree with her that we need
to focus on peoples abilities and
qualifications to serve, rather
than arcane party litmus tests
that have little relevance to the
issues and challenges of governance at the local level.
On another matter, I take
note of Stuyvie Bearns letter
to the editor on Nov. 19, which
provided a much-needed alternative viewpoint to The Lakeville
Journals editorial of Oct. 29
concerning proposed regulations
for the Rural Enterprise Zone.
Michael W. Klemens
Salisbury
The writer was re-elected to the
Salisbury Planning and Zoning
Commission in November.

Thanks for a great season


I would like to thank Salisbury School and Hotchkiss School for
allowing our local middle school kids of the Steamroller Football
team to have official games at their fields on Oct. 30 and Nov. 6.
It was a thrill for our team to play under the lights and on such
nice fields!
I would also love to thank our four coaches who tirelessly coach
these kids every week, no matter the weather and the conditions:
Dan ODell, Charlie Humes, Rob Gilpatric and Marcus Cole.
This was a rebuilding year for the Steamrollers, and we plan
to grow even more for next season. This team is open to kids in
fourth to eighth grades. The younger ones traditionally will do Flag
Football to start. We plan to have signups this summer, but please
check dates out on our Facebook page. A Pick-up Flag Football
evening will also happen weekly this summer for anyone who wants
to check things out.
Jennifer Good
Lakeville

The letters deadline is 10 a.m. each Monday.

TURNING
BACK
The
Winsted
Journal
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
THE PAGES
P.O. Box AD, Millerton, NY 12546
P.O. Box 835, Winsted,
CT 06098

518-789-4401 FAX 518-789-9247


860-738-4418 FAX 860-738-3709
Airbnb
service is important to community
NORMA GALAISE

Ambassadors of goodwill is how the government in Washington, D.C., and others refer
to Airbnb. As a participating host member of
Airbnb, I would like to comment on the Nov. 19
guest commentary from Ed Ferman of Cornwall
with regard to the Cornwall P&Z possible ruling
and understanding of this service.
Airbnb charges 3 percent for its
listing service. Members are strictly
graded in several categories by those
who use the service. Payment is
made only through bank accounts,
by the company. This money is
taxable.
People using the service are those
who like the convenience of private
homes, with space and a yard for
children to play safely in, and sometimes a kitchen to feed their families
in. Contrary to the name Airbnb,
food is not prepared and served
by the owner. I do refer guests to
local restaurants, hiking trails, canoe
rentals, ski and fishing options.
Most all of my guests have been here for
Cornwall family functions, such as weddings and
visits to relatives. One or two hotel or motel rooms
are mostly more expensive and less convenient for

comings and goings of families. Local services:


restaurants and businesses are utilized, and there
would be a loss of income to these businesses if
guests go to other towns for their visits. Personally,
these guests have all been gracious and considerate with no damage, breakage, or disturbances.
This is a worldwide service,
helping visitors to our area to utilize our recreational options and
local businesses. It now is a new
era with new travel possibilities
and great ways to promote goodwill and potential for meeting and
learning about different cultures
and meeting new friends.
Putting time limits for visits
and adding new limitations to the
service does not enhance our goodwill. (And, New York City has many
listings, by the way.) Homeowners
do rent their spaces, aside from
this service, in many ways. I do not
understand how this could change.
Locals can and should educate themselves with
the actual service and its rules, limitations, allowances and securities. Go to the websites and read.
Verne Henshall
West Cornwall

Planning and Zoning is under-appreciated


We would like to thank the
Planning & Zoning Commission for the extraordinarily
hard work they put forth in
their efforts to resolve longstanding local conflicts. They
have always listened, and we
believe, considered carefully
the arguments presented. Often
decisions had to be made that
have had far-reaching consequences for everyone involved,

yet they made those decisions


with careful thought about the
implications for the whole town.
The Planning & Zoning
Commission is arguably the most
important commission in town.
It is charged with the almost
impossible task of protecting the
present, while administering regulations that often restrict what
people may feel entitled to. At the
same time, they must plan for

Support for new interim CEO


We would like to publicly
welcome Peter Cordeau to
the position of interim CEO
at Sharon Hospital. Peter has
done an excellent job as chief
nursing officer. He recognizes
the vital role the hospital holds
in our community and values
its excellent and hard-working
staff.
We are hopeful and enthusiastic about the future
of Sharon Hospital under his
leadership.

The Physician Leadership


Council of Sharon Hospital
Dr. A. Martin Clark Jr.
Dr. Jack Finkelstein
Dr. William Kirber
Dr. Suzanne Lefebvre
Dr. Mark Marshall
Dr. Howard Mortman
Dr. Michael Parker
Dr. Evan Rashkoff
Dr. Roniel Santos
Dr. Robert Schnurr
Dr. Donald Soucier
Sharon

Thanks for supporting food pantry


Thank you to everyone in our
community who has given so
generously to the Corner Food
Pantry all year long and especially in the last few weeks. As we
prepared for our Thanksgiving
distribution, the support of volunteers and organizations in our
area was overwhelming. We were
able to provide nourishing food
for 81 households representing
over 300 individuals for their
Thanksgiving.
Many organizations donate
food all year long, but during the
holiday season we are especially
grateful for the food drives held
by St. Marys Church, The United Methodist Church, The Salisbury Congregational Church, St.
Johns Episcopal Church, Trinity
Lime Rock Church, Hotchkiss
StuFac, Salisbury Bank and
Trust, Salisbury Central School,
the Salisbury Rotary Club, Skip
Barber, The Connecticut Valley
Porsche Club and, of course,
NASCAR Dave, who donated

turkeys for Thanksgiving.


In the summer the Hotchkiss
Farm, Gordon Ridgway, the
Community Garden in Salisbury and countless other local
farmers and gardeners generously donate fresh vegetables.
Throughout the year, financial
donations from individuals
and grants from the Community Foundation of Northwest
Connecticut, Berkshire Taconic
Community Foundation, as well
as generous discounts on food
from LaBonnes Market, make
it possible for the Corner Food
Pantry to provide over 100,000
pounds of food per year to
about 70 households per week.
None of this would be possible
without all of the hard-working
volunteers who tirelessly sort,
shelve and distribute the food.
Thank you all on behalf of
our clients.
Marla Miller
The Corner Food Pantry
Lakeville

the future of their constituents,


many of whom may disagree on
what that future should look like.
Our community relies on their
good judgment to ensure stability, while allowing for growth and
yet still maintain proper land-use
practices.
The commission can meet
twice a month, as well as hold
public hearings and special meetings in order to update zoning
regulations. There are many
additional hours of work besides
the public meetings. Over the
course of the last seven years Jon
Higgins spent countless hours
working with the Lime Rock
Race Track and the residents of
Lime Rock. His work has been
invaluable.
Chairman Michael Klemens
has shown careful guidance and
determined leadership, to fairly
resolve the longstanding issues
that have existed between the
Lime Rock Race Track and the
surrounding neighborhood.
No solution is perfect, there are
elements in the revisions that
either one side or the other may
be opposed to, but without Mr.
Higgins and Chairman Klemens
hard work, along with the input
from lawyers, we would be back
where we were six months or six
years ago.
Again, we want to thank you,
and the other commissioners,
for being fair, and for all your
hard work since you are all so
under-appreciated.
Doug Howes
Peter Wolf
Lakeville

Id just like to express my thanks to Jessie Bate for organizing the


building of shelters for feral cats. The goal was 100 shelters, and it was
exceeded by 17. It was wonderful to get together with neighbors, meet
new friends, enjoy cider and cookies and, of course, build shelters!
Cynthia Kirk
Part of the Cornwall contingent

City people live the city. We live in L.A., New York, we


live in places where its chaotic and you never know
whats gonna happen. And thats the music - you
never know whats gonna happen.
Alice Cooper
I hate small towns because once youve seen the
cannon in the park theres nothing else to do.
Lenny Bruce

LAKEVILLE Civil engineer


G. Everett Hill of New York has
been in town this week on matters pertaining to the proposed
sewage system which is to be
installed in Lakeville Fire District
next spring.
SALISBURY Edwin Smith
has sold his jitney to William
Dempsey, and has purchased
a new Ford car from Pittsfield
parties.
LAKEVILLE Myron Holley is remodeling the porch on
the south end of his residence.
SALISBURY George E.
Parsons residence is being improved by shingling the entire
building.
LIME ROCK We hear Philo
Lyon is to be the new livery man.
50 years ago 1965
Fire of undetermined origin
gutted the home of C. Stanley
Sherwood Jr. on Route 44, Salisbury, last Friday evening about
9 p.m. Aided by neighbors, the
firemen were able to remove
some of the living room furniture, but most of the pieces were
damaged by flames, smoke or
water. Other furnishings, including some valuable antiques, were
consumed.
Construction has begun on
a new, large capacity substation
in North Canaan, according to
Ernest H. Nelson, Northwest
Division manager for the Hartford Electric Light Company.
Located about a half mile east of
Canaan near Route 44, the new
substation will serve all of North
Canaan, Norfolk and the eastern
portion of Salisbury.
FALLS VILLAGE Former
resident Harry Fullum, whose
parents once operated Old
Bank Farm on Music Mountain,
stopped for a brief visit last weekend with the Edward Castagnas.
He had just been married, and
was on his honeymoon trip.
25 years ago 1990
CANAAN The Canaan Exchange Club surprised Dr. Vincent J. Peppe by honoring him
at the annual Italian night held
Monday Nov. 19, at the Cannery
Restaurant. He was presented
with a plaque in appreciation
of his 46 years of service to the
community and the Canaan
Exchange Club.

Now, near the Winter Solstice, it is good to light candles. All the nice meanings of bringing light to the
world can be beautiful. But perhaps we are concentrating on lighting the world because we dont know
how to light up our own lives.
Ralph Levy, Hanukkah Another View
THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL

(USPS 303280)
An Independent Connecticut Newspaper
Published Weekly by The Lakeville Journal Company, LLC
33 Bissell Street, P.O. Box 1688, Lakeville, CT 06039-9989
Tel. (860) 435-9873 Fax (860) 435-4802
www.tricornernews.com editor@lakevillejournal.com
Volume 119, Number 17

The Little Guild of St. Francis

100 years ago 1915


SALISBURY Chas. Whitbeck and family have moved into
the rooms over Wangers Garage.

Mission Statement

Thursday, December 3, 2015

The Lakeville Journal Company, LLC, Publishers of


The Lakeville Journal, The Millerton News, and The Winsted Journal
Our goal is to report the news of our communities accurately and fairly,
fostering democracy and an atmosphere of open communication.
Cynthia Hochswender
Executive Editor
Janet Manko
Publisher and
Editor-In-Chief
Libby Hall-Abeel
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In Memoriam
A. Whitney Ellsworth
1936-2011
Managing Partner
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1918-2011
Editor and
Publisher Emeritus

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Viewpoint

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015

A15

Its official: The spending


cap does not matter

or 23 years, lawmakers in
Hartford had to co-exist
with the states spending
cap, which was intended to put
reasonable limits on spending
growth. Lawmakers played nice
with the cap, at least pretending
to abide by its letter while rarely
respecting its spirit. Last week
we learned the lengthy charade
is over when Attorney General
George Jepsen offered a formal
opinion that the constitutional
spending cap has no legal effect.
The lawmakers who voted to
institute the income tax offered
taxpayers the spending cap as a
consolation prize. The people of
Connecticut voted overwhelmingly to adopt the constitutional
amendment, with more than 80
percent voting in favor.
According to a Huffington
Post poll conducted with YouGov, apple pie has an 81 percent
approval rating. In other words,
the spending cap is about as
popular as apple pie.
Yet, for more than two decades, lawmakers have delayed
and dissembled rather than take
the last step necessary to put the
spending cap into effect. All that
remains to be done is to define
the terms in the amendment.
Lawmakers have not taken this
simple step. If they took it now,
Jepsens opinion wont matter.
Hes saying the cap cant work
until its terms are defined. If
nothing else, lawmakers cant
say their instructions arent clear.
The attorney generals opinion
hinges on the interaction between the old statutory spending
cap and the new constitutional
one.
The statutory cap was never
very meaningful for a simple
reason: a law cannot make it illegal to pass another law. In other
words, legislatures are free to do
most things, but they cannot bind
future legislatures.
Jepsen said these principles
safeguard voters ability to
elect representatives vested

THE FOUNDRY
ZACHARY JANOWSKI
with authority undiminished by
the acts and judgments of past
legislatures.
Higher forms of law, namely
constitutions and their amendments, can bind future legislatures. This is exactly what the
people of Connecticut attempted
to do with the spending cap
amendment. The complication
is that the amendment gives the
legislature the authority to define
terms within the amendment
without requiring that they be
defined or offering a default.
Twenty-two years ago, Attorney General Richard Blumenthal
(now a U.S. Senator) issued an
opinion on the spending cap.
Blumenthal said lawmakers
could change the statutory cap,
but such changes would violate
the constitutional cap, so they
could only be changed by the
three-fifths vote totals required
by the amendment.
Under Blumenthals opinion
the constitutional spending cap
had effectively absorbed the statutory cap as its initial imperfect
implementation.
Under Jepsens opinion, the
statutory cap is unrelated to the
constitutional cap and there is
no bridge between them. Indeed,
Jepsen said lawmakers dont
even have to explicitly repeal or
revise the statutory cap. Instead
they could pass a budget than
exceeds the cap and it would be
presumed to have suspended the
conflicting portions of the earlier
enacted statutory spending cap.
Had lawmakers followed
the spending cap closely over
the past two decades, the state
would have more than $5 billion
more on its balance sheet. Thats
considerable since the states liabilities exceed its assets by tens

In other words, legislatures are free to do


most things, but they
cannot bind future
legislatures.
of billions of dollars.
Sadly, lawmakers for two decades ignored an overwhelming
majority of voters and chose not
to implement the constitutional
spending cap. Now that were
being honest, maybe some in
Hartford will take this issue more
seriously. That would be about as
American as apple pie.
Zachary Janowski writes for
the Yankee Institute, Connecticuts free-market think tank. His
opinions are his own. Reach him
at zach@yankeeinstitute.org.

Esty raises lots of money, not much opposition

ongresswoman Elizabeth
Esty is an endangered
Democrat, targeted and
besieged by the Tea Party, the
Brothers Koch and others on
the radical right. I know this
because she tells me so several
times a week in emails from her,
her associates, her daughter and
sometimes her famous friends
like Nancy Pelosi.
The correspondence occasionally mentions issues, but
mostly its about money
mine going to her. According
to the emails, Im one of her
enthusiastic contributors, which
represents a very good return on
an investment of nothing.
I believe giving to a candidate
isnt a good idea as long as Im
involved in journalism, even
writing opinion. Therefore, Ive
never contributed to a candidate. I did vote for Esty once
and against her once and have
registered with both parties in
order to exercise the right denied

Our home, our future

Voices from the Salisbury community about the housing


needed for a healthy, economically vibrant future

Sharon Hospital

o live and work in the


Northwest Corner of
Connecticut is a privilege and a challenge. Beauty
abounds with rolling hills,
open space, and fresh waterways.
A serene place to call home. To
raise a family. To grow old. But,
for many, actually finding an
affordable residence is quite a
challenge. This idyllic American
Dream, quite frankly, is out of
reach for many working families.
The viability of our community
is at risk.
We prefer to call the lack of
affordable housing a serious lack
of workforce family housing.
Many of our Sharon Hospital
staff find it difficult to live in our
community. Of our 415 full, part
time, and per diem employees,
52 percent live in Connecticut,
44 percent live in New York, 2.3
percent live in Massachusetts,
and 1.7 percent commute from
other states. More than 30 of our
hospital team members commute 25 miles or more and over
a dozen commute a distance of
50 miles or greater.
Many of our younger hospital
employees are finding it increasingly difficult to find places of
their own within our immediate
neighboring towns; often residing with parents, friends, or other
family members. The trend of
multi-generational living from
years past is becoming more and
more prevalent.
As the age of our population
increases, so too does our lack
of family workforce housing. In
Sharon alone, the median sale
price of a single family home
doubled from 2000 to 2006.

SERIES ON
HOUSING
JILL GROODY
MUSSELMAN
And, as of June 1, 2015, more
than two-thirds of recent home
sales in Sharon in the past year
were sold to individuals with
out-of-town permanent addresses or non-traditional, second
homeowners who do not utilize
local services on a routine basis.
The median sales value of these
homes was $616,097. For those
earning the median household
income of $70,877 in Litchfield
County, a home in our area is
simply out of reach.
After speaking with Kate, a
young nurse at Sharon Hospital,
I was able to confirm the difficulty and frustration often
heartache that touches some
of our Sharon Hospital family
members. The need for housing
is real. Kate is a single parent.
Starting a career. Looking for
local daycare. Finishing her education. Striving to find a place to
call home that is a short commute
to the hospital. Kate has searched
for months and has resigned to
living with her parents for the
foreseeable future. She would
love nothing more than to have
a home to call her own and raise
her children.
Affordable housing for working adults like Kate, whether a
single family home, a duplex,
condominium, or apartment,

Cartoon by Bill Lee of Sharon and New York City

is desperately needed for many


members of our areas current
workforce (hospital staff, teachers, bank tellers, emergency
service volunteers, firefighters
and more). This challenge exists
when it comes to recruiting new
staff and young healthcare providers to our community as well.
There are several places within
our service area that offer affordable housing. We applaud those
community members who have
come together to create places
throughout Litchfield County.
The most recent additions have
been created by The Sharon
Housing Trust with 12 additional
units completed in 2014. There
are also several single family
dwellings being constructed
currently in our area. But, the
need is so much greater. There
simply is not enough workforce
family housing, period.
As a community, we have a
desperate challenge facing us.
We must come together to create
workforce family housing for a
viable future. For our community
to grow and thrive, we need a
true collaborative team effort; a
housing team made up of town
leaders, employers, developers,
and community members. We
need out-of-the-box ideas and
collaboration. We must work
together to find suitable land
to build suitable housing that
will offer our current working
generation and their children a
place they can afford a place
to call home.
Jill Groody Musselman was
formerly in communications at
Sharon Hospital.

After speaking with Kate, a young nurse at Sharon Hospital, I was able to confirm
the difficulty and frustration often heartache that touches some of our Sharon Hospital family members. The need for housing is real.

to the unaffiliated majority in


Connecticut primary elections.
This time, Im waiting to see
what develops, including the
identity of her real opponent, but
Esty certainly helped her cause
by not joining the other two allegedly endangered Democrats,
Jim Himes and Joe Courtney,
and voting for the demagogic
anti-Syrian refugee bill.
How this sometime supporter
got on her mailing list of habitual
donors is something of a mystery,
but someone thinks Im a giver.
Youve always stepped up
when I needed you, Dick, wrote
Elizabeth on Sept. 30, as she
asked for $3, $10, $25 or another
amount as a Federal Election
Commission reporting deadline
neared. In another email, my
congresswoman explained she
needed the resources to fight
back against the Tea Party, which
she often mentions. In October,
it was a plea to help as the Koch
brothers were closing in.

IF YOU ASK ME
DICK AHLES
She is apparently done well,
even without my $3 or $8. The CT
Mirror reported Esty leads all five
of the incumbent Democratic
House members in fundraising,
having received a comfortable
$709,000 as of the Sept. 30 reporting deadline. Only Himes,
who frequently has respectable
opposition, is close.
So far, all that money is available to combat one announced
opponent, a mysterious figure
named John Pistone, who has
raised nothing or maybe just not
enough to require reporting it.
Also said to be making calls
about a possible run against
Esty is one Clay Cope, the first
selectman of Fairfield Countys

No secret trials in CT

ov. Dannel P. Malloy and


the General Assembly
are to be commended
for their 2015 Second Chance
Society legislation, reversing
racist laws that filled our jails
with nonviolent drug users, most
of them African-American and
Latino.
But it is ill-advised to pursue
announced policies emanating
from that corrective action;
especially plans for secret trials
of defendants in their early 20s.
Secret trials are unconstitutional. James Madison told Congress in 1789 that he is proposing
what became our Bill of Rights,
To satisfy the public mind that
their liberties will be perpetual.
Among his constitutional
amendments is this: In all criminal prosecutions, the accused
shall enjoy the right to a speedy
and public trial, one of the tenets
of the Sixth Amendment.
Gov. Malloy has proposed
taking state laws that allow
low-risk teenagers to wipe clean
criminal records and extend
that practice to defendants up
to age 25. He also has proposed
allowing those between 21 and
25 to have their cases heard confidentially, their criminal records
sealed, and possibly have those
records expunged.
To apply our secret juvenile
courts questionable proceedings at the very least; who
knows what happens to those
kids? to adults is no way to
practice American justice. As a
former prosecutor, the governor
should know better.
Open courts are a citizens
right, but also the right of all
the people to be able to assess
how our criminal justice system
works.
As we think about putting the
adjudication of more citizens behind a wall of secrecy, claiming in
part that their brains are not fully
developed, we should remember
that 18-year-olds can vote, they
can marry and be mothers and
fathers; by age 21 a person can
teach, become a military officer
and lead platoons into battle, or
design bridges as an engineer.
That is just for starters on what
we entrust 20-somethings to
accomplish.
We cannot erode basic Amer-

GUEST
COMMENTARY
JAMES H. SMITH
As a former prosecutor,
the governor should
know better.
ican rights in a gullible effort to
expunge criminal activity. Saying something never happened
when it did is simply Orwellian.
Rewriting history or claiming it
did not happen is an old Soviet
ploy unworthy of free societies.
The governor is already
dialing back from his initial
announcement last week about
more secrecy in our courts. He
floated the idea. Government
leaders are assigned to ponder it.
It is very simple it was written
down in the first 10 amendments
to the U.S. Constitution, our Bill
of Rights we have the right to
a speedy and public trial.
Longtime Connecticut newspaper editor James H. Smith is
president of the nonprofit Connecticut Council on Freedom of
Information.

smallest town, Sherman. Cope


would also be the first openly gay
candidate for Congress from the
state and would, in fact, double
the Republican gay caucus in
the House to two if hes elected.
Esty may have been referring
to this threat last week when,
in an email asking for $15, she
reported, rumor has it that the
GOP has found an opponent to
try to defeat me next year.
Pistone, who finished third
against Esty and Republican
Mark Greenberg in 2014, has a
campaign web site best described
as an anthology of Tea Party
truisms on the evils of big government and the wonders of the
Second Amendment. His biography is modest, as he describes
himself in full as a resident
of Brookfield, Conn., a proud
parent and happily married for
the past 26 years.
In October I emailed him for
more biographical details, like
his occupation and education,
but he hasnt replied. Maybe he
felt it was a gotcha question.
Pistone does confide on his
website that he is ready and willing to Buck the Barriers and fight
for Fiscal Responsibility, Limited
Government, Religious Freedom, Individual Liberty and Our
Constitution. And, in addition
to a fondness for capitalization,
he offers a very catchy slogan:
You are not alone when you
vote Pistone.
We assume the Koch Brothers
and the rest will help the congresswoman justify her maniacal
fundraising and come up with
someone even more formidable
than Pistone or Shermans first
selectman.
But if past history can guide
us, the party will not begin
herding its sacrificial lambs until
sometime this spring or early
summer its usual strategy in
dealing with Democratic congresspersons after theyve been
in office for a while.
In the meantime, Esty is not
alone, she has Pistone.
Correction: The 1986 immigration law signed by President
Reagan gave legal status, not
citizenship, to nearly 3 million
illegal immigrants. I apologize
for the dumb error in last weeks
column.
Simsbury resident Dick Ahles
is a retired journalist. Email him
at dahles@hotmail.com.

A16 THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015

Family & Friends

Donna DiMartino wins nursing leadership award

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Happy 100th birthday!


Betty Scribner turned 100 on Nov. 16. Born and raised in
Amenia, she raised her family in Sharon, where she has been
a member of the Sharon Womans Club since 1948. She has
lived in a cottage at Noble Horizons in Salisbury for the last 20
years. She is pictured with some of her many birthday cards.

SALISBURY Donna
DiMartino, hospice and palliative
care director at Salisbury Visiting
Nurse Association, was honored
Nov. 5 with the Judith Hriceniak
Award for Excellence in Nursing
Leadership by the Connecticut
Association of Home Care and
Hospice at its annual conference
in Hartford.
The Hriceniak Award is the
associations highest honor and
is presented to an RN who has
demonstrated excellence in nursing leadership.
To receive the Hriceniak
Award, a nursing supervisor or
CEO must serve as a visionary
role model in the development
and implementation of innovative projects that positively affect
the ever-changing home care and
hospice environment.
The recipient also must show
creativity, high energy and in-

spires others by creating an


environment that fosters staff development and lifelong learning.
Award recipients must achieve a
high level of clinical expertise and
collaborate with groups or individuals within the community.
DiMartino, who has led SVNAs hospice and palliative care
program for the last three years,
also volunteers with the Hospice
and Palliative Nurses Association,
serves as a board member for
the Tabor Foundation and is an
HPNA approved educator.
DiMartinos presence not just
within SVNA, but within the local
community and in the national
hospice community along
with her clinical expertise and
knowledge earned her the
Judith Hriceniak Award.

Send Family & Friends


announcements to
darrylg@lakevillejournal.com

LEGAL NOTICE
Salisbury Housing
Committee Annual
Meeting
The Salisbury Housing Committee is holding its annual meeting to elect officers for the coming
year on Wednesday, December 9,
at 5:00 p.m., at Salisbury Town
Hall. Members of the public are
invited to attend this meeting
and may submit nominees for
the board before the meeting.
Nominations may be made to
Anne Kremer, Board President,
28 Prospect St., Lakeville, 860596-4048. Salisbury Housing
Committee is the administrator
for Sarum Village and Faith
House, low rental housing units
located in Salisbury. Anyone
interested in renting at Sarum
Village should call Maura Reilly
at 860-435-0049.
12-03-15

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Donna DiMartino

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC HEARING
Thursday, December 17,
2015
To Whom it May Concern:
Notice is hereby given that on
Thursday, December 17, 2015
at 7:00 p.m., in the Canaan Falls
Village Town Hall, the Canaan /

Falls Village Planning & Zoning


Commission will hold a Public
Hearing on the following application;
Consideration of Renewal
of existing Special Use Permit
at Century Aggregates, 75 Sand
Road, Canaan, Connecticut.
At this hearing, interested persons may be heard and written
communication received.
Frederick Laser
P&Z Chairman
12-03-15
12-10-15
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO
FILE FOR FEDERAL
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
The Town of Salisbury and
the Town of Sharon, Connecticut
propose to file an Application for
Federal Financial Assistance with
the USDA, Rural Development.
This application for financial assistance will be for funding under
the Rural Utilities Service, Part
1780, Water and Waste Loans
and Grants (CFDA 10.760) and
is anticipated to be submitted by
November 25, 2015. The Towns
are proposing to construct and
operate a new solid waste transfer station on property owned

jointly by both towns located


at the southwest corner of the
intersection of Millerton Road
(Route 44) and Dimond Road
in Salisbury.
Proposed facilities include
four main structures: the vehicle
maintenance garage and transfer station office, the material
storage building and canopy,
the fabric storage canopy, and
the guard shelter. Other key site
improvements include: a paved
access road, paved parking areas
and travelways, material storage
bunker, a saw-tooth wall with
grade separation for the collection and management of municipal solid waste, recyclables,
construction & demolition debris and bulky wastes, drainage
and stormwater management
features, waste compactors and
other transfer station equipment,
perimeter fencing, gates, and signage and safety improvements.
The project is anticipated to cost
approximately $3,822,000.
Any comments regarding this
application should be submitted
to the Town of Salisbury within
fifteen days of this application.
12-03-15

To Place
an AdanCall
or Visit
www.tricornernews.com/classifieds
To Place
Ad860-435-9873
Call 860-435-9873
or Visit
www.tcextra.com/classifieds

Classifieds

LINE AD DEADLINE

Monday at 12:00 p.m. except holiday weeks


when a special deadline is published in advance.

RATES

$12 for the first 15 words or less. 40 for each


additional word. Call us for our special 4 time rate.
All line ads must be prepaid.
Mastercard, Visa and American Express accepted.

Lakeville
Journal
- The
Millerton
The Winsted
Journal
- www.tcextra.com
TheThe
Lakeville
Journal
- The
Millerton
NewsNews
- The- Winsted
Journal
- www.tricornernews.com

HELP WANTED
HELP
WANTED
FARM MAINTENANCE POSI-

TION: available
Amenia.
DRIVERS:
Up toin$350
perSumday
mer, temporary job. 40 hours per
and
benefits.
Class
A
CDL,
3
week. For details please call
Tom
years
minimum
experience. Part
at 845
518-1546.
time, with full time opportunity.
Weekdays
and weekends.
Local
GOLF
COURSE
LABORERS:
and
longfor
distance.
Safe record.
needed
up coming
season.
Team
work.
Judge Manning
Call Bill,
860 364-0146.
Horse Transport, Amenia, NY.
845 373-8700.
MACINTOSH
SUPPORT: Do your
friends call you first when they
have a problem or question
about their Mac, iPod, iPhone,
iPad or AppleTV? Can you
translate techno-speak into
plain English? Are you ready
to spend your workday enriching peoples lives while using
the coolest Apple technology
on earth? Drop us an email jobs@visionarycomputer.net

INSTRUCTIONS,
HELP
WANTED
CLASSES

HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED

RETAIL SALES POSITION LONG


SUBSTITUTE
PART TERM
TIME: available
at our
TEACHER:
Falls tile
Village
Day
newly expanded
and stone
Care
Center,
Inc. in
Vilshowroom
in Sheffi
eld.Falls
Looking
lage,
is seekingand
a long
term
for aCTmotivated
friendly
substitute
teacher
forGood
our
person to join
our team.
infant
and toddler
programs.
communication
skills
- ability
These
programs
a
to multi-task
and provide
basic comcaring,
nurturing and
creative
puter knowledge
a must.
Satenvironment
for the children
in
urdays required.
Will train
our

thecare.
rightCandidates
person. Please
call
413 297-6940 or e-mail: lisarocksolid@roadrunner.com,
Rock Solid Marble and Granite

should
at least
years exGUITARhave
LESSONS:
An3innovative
perience
with
young
program working
personally
designed
children.
Please
contact
Ashley
around the
music
you listen
to.
Allyn
860 824- theory,
0882 orchords
email
Learnat
technique,
and scales
from an experienced
her
at fvdccdirector@gmail.
college instructor. Explore songcom.
writing and recording. Electric
and acoustic guitars welcome.
.com
Call Jeff at 845.com
877-3311.
.com
IS YOUR NEW
PRIVATE
LESSONS
IN
IS YOUR NEW
REGIONAL
NEWSWATERSITE
IS
COLOR:
byYOUR
anNEW
experienced
REGIONAL
NEWS
SITE
from
NEWS SITEMy place
painter.REGIONAL
$50/2 hours.
The Lakeville Journal
from
or The
yours.
And/or
learn
from The Millerton
News to sell
Lakeville Journal
The LakevilleThe
Journal
youThe paintings
on
860
WinstedE-bay.
Journal
Millerton News
The Millerton News
596-4251.
The Winsted JournalWeve made it easier to find all the news,

TriCornerNews
TriCornerNews
TriCornerNews

THE TOWN OF PINE PLAINS: is


The Winsted Journal
accepting applications for the Weve made it easier to findartsallcoverage,
the news,photos, classified ads and more!
SATphotos,
TUTOR:
reading,
Weve
made ads
it easier
to find all the news,
position of truck driver/laborer. arts coverage,
classified
andCritical
more!
arts coverage,essay,
photos, classified
more!
grammar,
SATadsIIand
Literature,
Applicants must have a CDL
NY State Regents, college appliClass B license valid for the State
cation essays. Experienced eduof New York. Job will include
cator with excellent references.
seasonal
mowing,
operation
Tri-state location. Your home or
PAINTERS AND PAINTERS
of equipment and machinery
HELPERS: Pay according to
mine. 845 729-3193.
as well as a variety of manual
experience. Own transportation
tasks in connection with the
a plus. Monday - Friday. Call 518
construction, repair and main789-4185.
SERVICES OFFERED
tenance of Town owned roads,
PASTORALE BISTRO IN LAKEhighways and other properties. ALL SMALL HOME IMPROVEVILLE, CT: is currently seeking
Applicants must pass physical
MENTS: Handyman Services
an experienced Line Cook to add
Home Repairs Carpentry Paintand drug testing. Applications
to our kitchen team. Must have
ing Decks Tile Wood Floors
are available from the Highway
culinary background, ambitious
Licensed and Insured 35 Years
Superintendent during regular
outlook and great attitude.
Experience Good Prices I will
hours of business at 20 Highway
Clean & neat appearance a plus.
show up and do the job! Call
Blvd., Pine Plains, NY 12567. ApPlease call 860 435-1011.
George 860 435-6461.
plications are to be returned to
the Highway Superintendent or C A R E TA K E R AVA I L A B L E :
POOL/RECREATION DIRECTOR:
mailed to the Highway SuperYoung,energetic and very exThe North Canaan Recreation
intendent at PO Box 955, Pine
perienced person looking for
Commission is looking for ReESTATE
SALE
Plains,
NY
12567
by
the
close
a caretaker position full time
sponsible, reliable lifeguards to 15 Greystone Road Lakeville Ct.
Beautiful
sale
on
a
lovely
estate
in
Salisbury
on
Twin
Lakes.
The
sale
includes
lotsexchange
from for
of the business day on June 10,
or
a part
time in
work at town pool for the 2011
Friday Oct.5th From 5pm-7.30pm
housing.
2011. inThe
Town of including
Pine Plainsthe Van
many
known estates
Millbrook,
Alens. 860 318-1707 or 518
summer. Must have
current
and Early Buying $15pp (Friday only) to
696-5021. Peter.
lifeguard, first aid and CPR certi- Wine,
is Cheese
an E.O.E.
Benefit
5 & 6 9am-3pm
fications. Hours may vary. Must December
SALISBURY VOLUNTEER AMBULANCE SERVICE, INC.
CHAIRS CANED: Hand or pressed
be able to work evenings and
WHALE
RESEARCH
ASSISTANT:
357 Twin
Lakes
RoadOct
in6thSalisbury
and Monday
7th 8th
cane available. 860 824-0899.
weekends. Applicants shouldSaturday,Sunday
for NSF funded
9am-3pm.Arctic Research
email resume and cover letter
Items
include:
program
on the
Narwhal. Must
DONT
SPEND
with Items
references
to Adam
include:
signedBunce,
Stickley tables,
chairs on
andthe
armchairs.
Many
Limoges,
and YOUR
HerendWEEKbe skilled
computer,
andMeissen,
ENDS CLEANING! Lessen your
North
Canaan
Direc-crystalgood
figurines
and Recreation
bowls.Waterford
and lots
of
glass
and
China
sets.
Collection
of
porcelain
boxes.
with writing and editing
chores during thispillfun
time of
tor,
abuncencrecdir@hotmail.
Mahogany
linen press and slant top desk.
mahogany
etagere.
of beautiful
oval
gilt mirrors.
skills.Slender
Part-time
position
with Pair year.
Leave
the
cleaning
to me!
com.
New modern dining table with six chairs.
different
benches.
Signed artwork,
including
6 framed
about320
hours.oak
Please
call 860
Call Leigh
860 913-4471.
Cash and
checks only
AudubonASSISTANT:
quadrupeds, 1844-47.
cellarettes.
Many
pairs
of lamps.
and/or
fax resume
toTwo mahogany hanging shelves.
PROGRAM
North Two 364-0800
For directions and pictures go to
leaf Pembroke
Brass
coffee
table. Wood coffee table.HOUSCLEANING,
Several table lamps. OFFICE
Large
860
364-2600.
Collin-and-co.com
&
EastDrop
Community
Centertable.
seeksCrocks.
a
Bow-Front
mahogany
occasional
blue love
HOME: Blue
Verysofa
thorough.
Honest
part-time
Program
Assistant
for table. Silver tea service. Pair hanging tapestries.
GoodSleeper
references.
HELP club
IN AN
INSTANT:
Newyouth
orange
tweed love seat.FIND
Upholstered
chairs.
Many orientaland
rugsreliable.
and runners.
ourseat.
summer
employment
Call Fretwork
Ruth, 860-824-0795
or 860
Visit our
new web mirrors.
site www.
sofa. Red
leather
barrel-back
chair. Several
Chippendale
Gilt mirrors.
etagere. Huge
program.
Assist
with
Farm and
TriCornerNews.com.
hippoeducation
collection-marble,
etc. books, books books-toys toys318-1662.
toys! Planters. Beds. Bedside
Food
project,carved,
com- wooden,
plete
enrollment
paperwork.
tables.
Lots of designer
clothes in different sizes. Brass reading lamps. Standing lamps. Lots of dressers.
Drivers
license,
clean
record
Two round
tables,
one with
leaves. Many chair sets. Mahogany display coffee table. Pair of end tables.
required.
June
15 African
- August
Mahogany
cradle.
mask. Signed art platters for hanging. Memphis-style side tables. Linens.
20. Details at www.neccmilCash and checks only
lerton.org or call Sara at 518
Photos and directions on our website: collin-and-co.com
789-4259.

TWIN LAKES SALE TO DIE FOR

Mahogany Three Pedestal Dining Table; Oak Dining Table with Pull Out Leaves; 8 Chippendale Dining
Chairs; 8 Panel Coromandel screen; 4 Panel Max Kuehne Screen; Roche-Bobois Leather Sofa; Many
Period Candlestands & End Tables; 2 Butler's Trays; Chests of Drawers; Tall Case Clock by Earnshaw;
Blanket Boxes; Maple Carpenter's Workbench; Glassware including - Baccarat, Steuben, Waterford,
Kosta-Boda, Orrefors, Lalique,Tiffany,Simon Pearce, Etc. Pottery including -Fulper, Rookwood,
Roseville, McCoy. China Including -Royal Doulton, KPM. Limoges, Staffordshire, Crown Derby,
Wedgwood Etc.; Brass Fireplace Equipment; Old Town 16' Canoe; Lamps and Sconces; ; linens;
Upholstered Chairs and Sofas; Mirrors; Large Collection of 19thc Railroad Lithos and Broadsides; Two
Watercolors by Howard Fogg; Currier and Ives; Numerous Oil Paintings by Listed Artists; Some
Primitives; Including-J. Sobel, Rachael V Hartley, Walton Blodgett, R.V.Clem. Sterling Silver Flatware
and lots of serving pieces; Fine Jewelry including Tiffany, Cartier, Diamonds, Gold, Platinum, Silver
and Costume Jewelry; 3 Safes; Garden Pots, Statuary, Armillary, Weathervanes, Kingsley -Bate
Adirondack Chairs; TWO CAR GARAGE FULL OF TAG SALE ITEMS.

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

RESEARCH AND PERSONAL


ASSISTANT: for Doctor, including writing, organizational and
computer skills needed for Prop-

SERVICES OFFERED
HELP WANTED

SERVICES OFFERED
HELP WANTED

APARTMENTS
HELP WANTED
LIME ROCK: Large, 3 bedroom,

DOVER PLAINS: 2 bedroom


apartment.
$850/month
other
week (between
7 a.m.in- 5 2 bath apartment equipped
with
washer/dryer,
dishwasher.
cludes
heat,have
hotawater,
trash
p.m.). Must
valid, current
LEARN
THE NEWSPAPER
utilities.
Now
RN license
in the State ofCredit
CT and $1,200/month
and
lawn maintenance.
BUSINESS plus
WITH
A PAID
860 435-8149.
nursing required.
assessment skills
they available,
INTERNSHIP:
Qualified colcheck
845 as
877relate to adolescent children. To
lege students interested in
9343.
VILLAGE:
Beautiful,
view more details about our open MILLBROOK
learning the
ins and
outs
aff
ordable,
well
kept studio,
one
positions
and
to
submit
your
of
how
a
newspaper
works
EAST CANAAN: First floor, three
and
two
bedroom
apartments.
All
resume
and
application,
visit:
now
have
the
opportunity
rooms, $625. Second floor, four
appliances.
Includes
washwww.hotchkiss.org/abouthotch- major
to
apply
for
a
paid
summer
rooms,
$750. Heat.To
and
hot
erinternship
and dryer. Close
all amenikiss/employment/
submit
at ThetoMillerton
water
included.
Shared
yard,
$630/$990/$1,215/$1,175.
your resume
directly,
please
mail ties.
News.
The internship is to last
off
parking.
NoHuman
pets.
Call
845of
677-8180.
to: -street
The Hotchkiss
School,
a total
eight weeks. The New
Non-smokers
References,
Resources, 11only.
Interlaken
Road,
York Press Association (NYPA)
MILLERTON:
Spacious
1 bedsecurity,
860 824-5751.
Lakeville,lease.
CT 06039.
Foundation is
offering $2,500
DRIVE YOUR CAR: Anywhere.
room
apartment.
Walk
internship
stipends
toto
25town.
ranNY/CT airports, NY business/
$800/month
includes
heat &
domly selected
newspapers.
LAKEVILLE: Charming one
shopping trips, local trips,
hot
water, andinterested
garbage, utilities
Applicants
in a
bedroom, 2 bath apartment.
HOUSEHOLD
trains. Reasonable rates, courier
extra.
Credit
check required.
845
career
in
community
journalConvenient
location,
walk
service. 860 364-5950.
877-9343.
GOODS
ism must apply directly to The
to town. $700 per month,
Millerton News. Applicants
includes heat. Pets OK. Tenant PINE
HOUSE CLEANING - OUR VERY
PLAINS:
bedroom.
Hardmust
attend1 college
during
pays own electric. References.
BEST: Experienced. Thorough, FOR THE KITCHEN: Stainless
wood
floors. Heat
included.
the 2016-17
academic
year.
Steel
Traulsen
Refrigerator

GE
& honest.
Satisfaction
guaranFirst, last, security. For appointReferences.
Callare
518avail39880 Main
St., Canaan,
CT 06018
email: statelineauctions@gmail.com
Application$650.
forms
Profile(860)-453-4370
Electric Glass Top|Range
teed. Call Dilma 860 459-4383.
ment, please call 860 435-3023,
7683.
able online at: www.nynews Granite Counters & Sinks
or 413 229-5951.
papers.com. Mail completed
White Kenmore Refrigerator.
HOUSE CLEANING: DependNice, large
effiPINE
PLAINS:
forms
to The Millerton
News,
Good Condition, best offer. 860
able, honest and thorough.
apartment
on 2nd flNY
oor.
ciency
LAKEVILLE: 125 Millerton Road,
PO Box
AD, Millerton,
364-5929.
Flexible hours. No job too big
Central
$600/month
12546 location.
by Monday,
Feb. 15,
corner Belgo Road. Park like
or too small. Experienced with
includes
utilities.
474-5176.
2016. For
more914
information
setting. 3 large rooms,plus
references.
860 Thursday,
459-1878Friday & Saturday 10-5
PreviewCall
Hours:
845
462-7381
leave
message.at
contact
Rich
Hotaling
a kitchen and bath. $1,300
leave message.
APARTMENTS
and Sunday from 9am till Sale
Start
NYPA at 518 464-6483, email
includes heating, snow plowWEST
CORNWALL - 1/2 DUPLEX:
editor@millertonnews.com
or
Initial Pictures can be viewed at auctionzip.com,
ing, and garden maintenance.
LAWNS ETC.: Extremely reason- AMENIA: Two bedroom, deck,
Available
now. 2 bedrooms.
call 518 789-4401.
Auctioneer
ID#22549
Wired
for
cable
and
internet,
able rates. All phases of lawn
References and security deposit
yard. Heat included. Near Metrofor Online
Bidding
separate garage, washer/
care,Register
you pick
the day
and at liveauctioneers.com
required.
$800 per month
plus
North. Walk to village. $875.
WAIT STAFF/BUSSERS
NEEDED:
time. No job too small. Call 860
dryer on premises. No smoking
utilities.
860 672-6048.
845-373-9570.
No
experience
necessary.
Please
This
sale
features
a
fine
Miro
Lithograph
among
a
318-5280.
building. 1 year minimum. 860
stop by Four Brothers Pizza in
large cache of artwork, a huge amount of fireplace
435-2818 or 212 666-4513.
COLEBROOK
APARTMENT
Pleasant Valley to fill out an
equipment,
though off season
MANZ
CONSTRUCTION:
Ex- a large amount of iron
IN COUNTRY
FARM HOUSE:
CONDOS
application. FOR SALE
furniture,
2 large estates
and modern
cavation,
foundations,
heavyof country
LAKEVILLE/LIME ROCK: 1 &
room look
furnished
brush
removal
furniture
andfor
all property/
the accessories. 2Please
onlineapartment
2 bedroom apartments. $700 FOR SALE BY OWNER -LIONS
with full
bathroom, wood
fence linesfor
& slopes
boom
initialwith
photos.
A nice year-end
sale.
and up per month + utilities.
HEAD CONDOMINIUM: 2 bedstove (firewood provided),
mounted brush mower. 203
rooms, 2 1/2 baths, living room
Available immediately. Please
cable
andauction.
Dish connections,
Plan to attend this unreserved fast
paced
206-8306.
with fireplace, dining area,
call Dan at 860 435-7000 or ecloset kitchen. On 100 acre
terrace. Swimming pool and
OurCONSIDER:
Terms: We have
a 18% Buyers
Premium with
on Alllake, woods
mail dmason@kuhnsbrothers.
property
PARENTS
College
tennis available. $270,000. Call
Purchases
In House
with placea discount of pool,
3% for cash
and check
com.
sauna,
trap range,
and
Secondary
School
860 596-4040.
a 20% Buyers
Premium on allchickens,
Online Purchases.
dogs, cats, etc.
ment.andEnglish
preparation
tutoring
composition,
gramWein
accept
Master Card,
Visa, GoodHunting/fi
Check andshing
Cash. rights to limar, vocabulary
andSold
literature.
tenant. $650 monthly.
All Items
AS IS and AScensed
FOUND.
DaryFor
Dumham:
CounByrd Farm, Colebrook,
QuestionsCollege
or to leave
Bids pleaseWrite:
call 860-453-4370
selor and English Faculty of
CT 06021 with full biographiBerkshire School. Former Head
cal information. Available
of Indian Mountain School and
,L L C
June 1st.
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR/DIRECTOR
Foote School. 860 364-0039.

DAVID JAMES
VALYOU
REGISTERED
NURSE-THE
HOTCH- CARPENTER
- PAINTER
KISS
SCHOOL, LAKEVILLE,
CT:
- HANDYMAN:
Renovation
FULL
TIME / Benefit
Eligible! The
for homesNurse
and identifies
barns. Full
Registered
and
remodeling
kitchens,
treats
healthservice;
disorders
among
baths, and
additions,
students
providesroofing,
instruction
structural
repairs.
inpainting,
the maintenance
of good
health
Historic
and
and
diseasepreservation
prevention. The
emcare of
older
homes.
Long
ployee
must
evaluate
the physical
list of local
clientele,and
many
conditions
of students
refer
references.
860 364-9880
students
to appropriate

davidvalyou@yahoo.com.

TAG SALE CLEAN-UP SAVE


resources
as needed.
THIS AD: Have
truck - Decisions
will come
made
by haul
this employee
require
and
help
it away! 860
824discretionary
judgment and
7181,
leave message.
analysis as well as independent
WINDOWS
- WINDOWS
WINdecision making.
Nurses-utilize
DOWS!
Cleaning
residential
and
computer
software
to maintain
commercial
windows,
inside
and
proper record
keeping
and care
out!
860 913-4471.
planCall
management.
Scheduled
for 38 hours per week; 4-5 weekYARD
WORK: College
students
day evenings
shifts per
week
available
raking, p.m.),
lawn mow(betweenfor
2 p.m.-10
plus 1
ing,
cleanup.
Millerton,
weekend
dayAmenia,
shift every

Millbrook, Lakeville, Sharon 845


373-8832.

STATE LINE AUCTIONS


& ESTATE SERVICES

December Estate Auction

December 6, 2015 @ 11:30 AM

Salisbury School

EARLY DEADLINE
Deadline for the June 2ND and June 3RD issues
will be THURSDAY, MAY 26TH, at 12 NOON for ALL
Advertising. Classified Deadline is NOON on Friday,
May 27TH. This includes all sections of the newspapers.
Editorial Deadline Will Be THURSDAY, MAY 26TH at 4 p.m.

APARTMENTS
HELP WANTED

Urgent News Items & Late Letters to the Editor will be accepted until Noon Friday, May 27TH.

OF ALUMNI PROGRAMMING

Mature, Licensed & Insured


Salisbury School is seeking a professional person with development
Maintenance
Repairs
experience to oversee and execute alumni
programming
in the
Development Office. Responsibilities include event
and
fundraising
Renovations
management of Reunion Weekend and the Fall Classic Golf
Tournament, as well as 8-10 local and
gatherings on an
email:regional
cannoncarpentry11@gmail.com
annual basis. Candidate will play a key role 860-309-8846
in the volunteer management of the schools alumni governing body and will work to
CT HIC# 0641295
develop a targeted young alumni program. Must possess strong
event planning abilities, interpersonal and organization skills, attention to detail and proficiency in Raisers Edge and Microsoft Office.
Title and salary commensurate with experience. Preference will be
given to those with professional experience in Alumni Relations.

THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015

APARTMENTS

APARTMENTS

HOUSES FOR RENT

CANAAN: Sunny apartment,


updated kitchen/bath, wood
floors, quiet two family. No
dogs/smokers. $750 plus utilities. Security, lease, references
required. 860 989-8673.

SHARON: One bedroom, heat


included, second floor, no smoking $875/month. Bosworth Real
Estate 860 364-1700.

SHARON -COZY SALT BOX:


3 bedroom, 2 bath house
on quiet road. 1 mile from
Sharon. Washer/dryer. $1,400/
month plus utilities, first, last
and security. No dogs. Call 860
364-5814.

To Place
an AdanCall
or Visit
www.tricornernews.com/classifieds
To Place
Ad 860-435-9873
Call 860-435-9873
or Visit
www.tcextra.com/classifieds

Real Estate

LINE AD DEADLINE

Monday at 12:00 p.m. except holiday weeks


when a special deadline is published in advance.

RATES

$12 for the first 15 words or less. 40 for each


additional word. Call us for our special 4 time rate.
All line ads must be prepaid.
Mastercard, Visa and American Express accepted.

Lakeville
Journal
- The
Millerton
News
- The
Winsted
Journal
- www.tcextra.com
TheThe
Lakeville
Journal
- The
Millerton
News
- The
Winsted
Journal
- www.tricornernews.com

CONDOS FOR SALE

HOUSES FOR RENT

HOUSES FOR RENT

SALISBURY SALE: Quiet and


private in a woodsy setting.
2 bedrooms, one car garage.
$225,000 by owner. Call 860
309-9166.

LAKEVILLE/LIME ROCK: 2 bedroom house, large living room


with fireplace, study, 1 bath and
a gardeners shed. $900/ month
plus utilities. 860 435-7000 or
e-maildmason@kuhnsbrothers.
com.

SALISBURY: 3 bedrooms, 2.5


baths, deck patio, private 2
acres. $2,000 month plus utilities. 860 824-5601.

HELP WANTED

HOUSES FOR RENT

LAKEVILLE/LIME ROCK: 3 bed-

SEASONAL
RENTALS
CORNWALL: New 2 bedroom, 1.5
bath duplex home on 5 acres.
Large living room with 16 ceiling, kitchen/dining room with
all new appliances, office/study
area, laundry with washer/dryer.
Pictures at www.cornwalct.org.
Annual lease $1,800/month plus
utilities and security 860 6726309 or 212 534-0727.

SPACE FOR RENT


MILLERTON STORE FOR RENT:
Next to McDonalds, 750 Square
feet, recent renovation, good
parking. Available March 1,
2011. Telephone 518 7893636.

REAL ESTATE FOR


SALE
SHARON: 4 bedroom Cape,
deck, pool, barn on .97 acre.
$265,000 Bosworth Real Estate
860 364-1700.

LAND FOR SALE


ANCRAMDALE, N.Y. 28 estate
acres. 3 acre stocked pond.
Valley and Catskill range views.
Engineered driveway. B.O.H.A.
- Electricity - Several sites total
privacy - 5 minutes Millerton
center. Owner - 518-329-2244.
Price $995,000. Ready to go.

SERVICES
HOUSEHOLD
MOBILE HOMES
OFFERED REAL ESTATE
FOR
ITEMS
FOR SALE
SALE

SEASONAL
RENTALS

LIME ROCK: 2 bedroom apartments for rent. Includes heat,


garbage pickup & off-street
parking. Non- smokers only!
Please call JW at 203-725-1706
or email popwoerm@aol.com.

room house, 1.5 baths,


AMENIA: 3 bedroom,BUS
2 bath
IN ENGLAND?
SHARON: Close to town, apSCHOOL
DRIVER
- garage,
ALL-CHRISTMAS
large living room, kitchen, dinhome, deck/yard, washer/dryer.
Christmas in London? Swap
proved, 2 acres. $95,000. BoDOVER: 3 bedrooms, 2 baths.
ing room, social room, beautiful
my London flat for your place
$1200 includes heat, lawn
COPAKE LAKE - FOR SALE OR
sworth Real Estate 860 364$1,200/month includes trash &
STAR & garbage.
TRANSPORTATION:
wooden floors and lots of intein Sharon.email stephanie.
maintenance
No
RENT: 2 cottages on 1/2 acre.
1700.
snow
removal
and
law
mainteKIRBY
DELUXE UPRIGHT
VACUrior details. $1500/month plus
holm@fox.com .
SPACE FOR RENT
pets. Security & references 845
75 yards to the lake! Asking
nance. 845 877-9343.
utilities
860 435-7000 orNow.
e-mail
Paidor 845Training
Starting
$179,000 or best offer. 845
224-8454
373-9387.
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.
UM: Used 10 times. ALL attachMILLERTON: Several offices.
242-3996.
Great downtown location!
COPAKE
LAKE: 1 bedroom
loft,
Region
1Salisbury
CornMILLERTON
COTTAGE
FOR
Plenty of off street parking. 518 FALLS VILLAGE: Estate on 55
ments, including Power Suction,
close to lake, nice views. Rent
RENT: Small one bedroom
789-3623.
acres, call for details. $875,000.
negotiable. 845 242-3996.
HARNEY and
REAL Ewaxing,
STATE
wall-Sharon - Canaan
- Village,
Kent.
cottage, 1.5 miles from
Bosworth Real Estate 860 364floorELYSE
washing
LIME ROCK: ONE BEDROOM
suitable for single. Nice yard,
1700.
A Tradition of Trust
COPAKE, NY: 2 bedroom, living
quiet neighborhood,
cable
LAKEVILLE MAIN STREET: 3
Immediate
openings
for
school
room,
kitchen, landing, washer
carpetConnecticut
and upholstery
cleanNew York Massachusetts
available, $650/month plus
ATTRACTIVE and CLEAN,
exceptional offices available.
LAKEVILLE: Belgo Road with
and dryer hookup. 2 floors. $750
utilities, security, references. FURNISHED LAKEFRONT SUMExtremely well maintained
Great Southern Views, open
+bus
utilities.drivers.
Security deposit,
Paid
training
start518 789-3201.
ers (most unopened in original
MER RENTAL: Charming 3
building. Small , medium and
field, private. $459,000. Boreference and/or credit scores
comfortable and convenient,
bedroom, 2.5 bath furnished
large spaces. 860 435-2635.
sworth Real Estate 860 364required. No pets. Available.
VILLAGE - WALKbus
TO
country chic cottage on 1 acre
ing now to get MILLERTON
your
school
1700.
packaging)$1,200 new. Yours
6/1/11. Apartment is in a 2 family
private, separate entrance,
EVERYTHING! Great weekend
with 150 ft. direct lakefront,
dwelling in a Farm setting. 518
small cottage, ideal for one
gazebo,
private
dock.
Summer
license. NO experience
neces-2011 - $25,000; winter 2011-12
851-9854.
for $600. 860 435-2289.
person or couple! 1 bedroom,
screened porch, garden. Heat
den, living room, eat in kitchen,
$2,500/month plus utilities.
PUBLISHERS NOTICE: Equal Housing Opportunity. All real estate
sary. 20 to 30 hours
perandweek
screen porch
garage. Fur-onBest & Cavallaro
Real Estate
advertised
in this newspaper
is subject
to the Federal Fair Housing Act
AMERICAN
TREE
AND
LANDand Electric and Services - all
nished or unfurnished. $1200
860 435-2888.
of 1966 revised March 12, 1989 which makes it illegal to advertise any
utilities per month.
Security
preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color religion,
average. Cleanplus
driving
record
SCAPE:
Tree
Removal
Logand references. 845 677-3735.
SHARON, SILVER
LAKE COTsex, handicap
or familial status or national
origin or intention to make
Included. $1100. If + Full Cable
any such preference, limitation or discrimination. All residential property
TAGE: 1 bedroom, queen
required. Perfect
attendance
SHARON: Quiet, beautiful locaadvertised
in the State of Connecticut
General Statutes 46a-64c which
size bed, new ging
appliances. OnLand
HOLIDAY
COLUMN and Internet, Phone. $1,200.
clearing
Cabling
prohibitthemaking,printingorpublishingorcausingtobemade,printed
tion. One large bedroom, spaprivate dead end road. 3 minor
published
any
notice,
statement
or
advertisement
with
respect
to
the
enCH
AnTing
RiveRfRonT
CoMP
ounD
cious
kitchen,
washer/dryer,
bonus,
dental,
life
insurance
ute walk to private dock. Non Available
Pruning
Grinding
limitation or
LAKEVILLE: Three bedroom,
saleorStump
rental of a dwelling
that indicates any preference,
References, Credit Check &
living/dining with fireplace,
sH ARon. T his b ea utif ul property f ea tures 3 2 2 ' of
motorized lake.
July
discrimination based on race, creed, color, national origin, ancestry, sex,
1.5 baths, village home with
screen porch. Ideal for couples/
August. $2,500 per month.
f ron ta g e on the H ousa ton ic R iv er. T he M a in H ouse ha s
and kitchen
401and baths.
K available.
Applyand
marital status,
age, lawful source of income,
familial status, physicalCHRISTMAS
or
updated
single. Non smoking. $1,000 per
Trucking.
Fully
No smoking. NoExcavating
pets. 1 months
3 BR s, 2 BAs a n d a TREES
l of t ov erl ook in g the-K itcFRESH:
hen . T here
Deposit Requested. No Smokmental disability or an intention to make any such preference, limitation
On a side street with patio and
month plus utilities. Includes
security, cleaning fee and referis a l so a n An tiq ue 2 - BR G uesthouse w / n ew l y ren ov a ted
or
discrimination.
large
yard. $1,800/month
in rearperson.
40 snow
Farnum
Road,
removal and lawn.
Call
Cut and
All
Open
ences. afford71020@mypacks.
K itc hen . E carry.
n j oy d in in g in the
sc reen edsizes.
- in C ov ered Brid
g e
Insured. References Available.
ing. LIMEROCK, CT / off of Rt.
unfurnished. Best and Cavallaro
860 364-0319.
net.
spa n n in g the b rook . T en n is c ourts, g a rd en s a n d P erg ol a .
Real
Estate, 860 436-2888.
Lakeville.
860 435-0352.
ely se H arnand
ey Morris
& K athleen D ev an1:30
ey
Saturday
Sunday
p.m.
Veteran Discounts. Call Jason
112. Available Immediately.
W eb# eH 2202
$ 9 85 , 000
LAKEVILLE: 2.5 bedrooms, living
5
p.m.
21
Cardinal
Lane,
Salisroom, dining room, 1.5 bath.
860-435-2200 www.HarneyRE.com
203 994- 8707.
Pets MAYBE. stillp@comcast.
Remodeled kitchen with new
bury. Call if directions needed
appliances. Laundry room with
Bosworth
net 860 596-4111.
Real Estate
washer/dryer. Walking distance
LESSONS
&
to lake. $1,200
per month plus
860
824-5608.
utilities, references and security.
We Honor All Those Who Have Given Their Lives
860 480-2349.
INSTRUCTION
DAVID JAMES
VALYOU
- Day !
So That We May
Be Free This Memorial
LAKEVILLE: 3 bedroom house, 1
CHRISTMAS TREES: Cut your MILLERTON: Large 1 bedroom
bath, private yard, washer/dryer
860-364-1700
RENOVATION
AND CONapartment, convenient to evJen Bosworth
litchfieldhillsSIR.com
hook-up. $950/month plus utiliwww.theboz.com own or choose from trees
ties. References. No pets. 860
GUITAR
LESSONS:
An
innoSTRUCTION: Renovation
435-2533.
erything. $650/month. Heat
on
display,
wreaths,
garland,
Real
Estate
LAKEVILLE/LIME
2 bedvative ROCK:
program
personally
and restoration
homes
andESTATE kissing balls, and more. www.
included. No smoking, no pets.
ELYSEof
HARNEY
REAL
room house, 2 baths, large
Kent Brokerage 860.927.1141
kitchen,
outdoor
deck,
family
designed aroundLakeville
the Brokerage
music 860.435.2400
A Tradition of Trust
outbuildings. Painting
and
845 518-5413.
room, dining/living room, wood
seekonktreefarm.com. Great
Connecticut New York Massachusetts
stove. $1,200 per month +
you860listen
handyman services.
860 435utilities.
435-7000 orto.
e-mail Learn technique,
Barrington 413 528-0050.
P ubliC oP en H ouses
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.
ev ery satu rd ay an d su n d ay , 12: 00- 2: 00
theory, chords and scales
9799, davidvalyou@yahoo.
MILLERTON: Large, 1 bedroom
W est Main street, north Can aan , CT
RobiNSoN
LeeCh college
ReaL eSTaTe com.
from an
experienced
apartment in village. Ground
Distinctive Country Properties
instructor.
Explore
songwritA NUMBER OF YEARLY
RENTALS FROM
$2000/MO. AND UP, AVAILABLE.
level, newly renovated. $775/
APARTMENTS
ing and recording. Electric and HOUSEKEEPING: Cleaning
month, heat included. 518
acoustic guitars welcome. Call
homes and offices. Good experi- AMENIA, NY: Second floor apart398-0286.
1830 LAKEVILLE ANTIQUE
845 877-3311.
ence and references. Call Claudia
ment.
2
bedrooms,
1
bath,
park
An
immaculate
1830
Village
home
with
1,462
sq.
ft.,
blACK beRRy RiveR CoMMons
bedrooms, den, 1 bath, fireplace, screened porch, 1
and Alfredo. 860
453-4496
860villag e like 2carsetting.
Activ e Ad
u lt Con d om in iu m s in or
a H istoric
SHARON: Above Doctors Office,
Heat,
water
garage just a short
walk to thehot
Town Grove
and
VILLAGE LIVING:
MULTI-FUNCTIONAL MINI-ESTATE:
to tow n a n d a short d riv e to G rea t Ba rrin g ton , Sa l isb ury ,
On .46 acres with mature landscaping, peren480-8518. Waplanda n l k s.Norfolk.
Single-level living with beautiful open floor andlake.
need quiet individuals. 2 bedtrash
pickup
included.
Journal
C en tra l Air, f ul l Ba semen ts, a tta c hed 2 - c a r G a ra g e, 2
nial
beds and FactoryLakeville
Brook in the rear.
SERVICES
and 3 BR units, 2 full BAs, terrific Kitchens.
$299,000
room, 1xbath.
Coin operated washerSize:
dryer
on2 (3.15)
Three d esig n sty les: $ 269 , 9 00- $ 29 9 , 9 00
3 Center of town.
www.bestandcavallaro.com
W
eb#
eH
2162,
2163
,
2164
Juliet
Moore/Dave
Taylor
Selling properties in CT, Mass, and New York, since 1955
premises.
References required.
$950 per month, plus utilities.
OFFERED
5 Academy Street, Salisbury, CT 06068
318 Main Street Lakeville, Connecticut 860-435-9891
860-435-2200 www.HarneyRE.com
860-435-2888 fax:
860-435-6119
Issue
: 111-26
www.robinleechrealestate.com
$925 perphone:month.
1st,
last and
FREE
1st/last months rent security.
months rent deposit. Call 413
Call 860 364-5814.
896-2390
FREE FIREWOOD: Huge Sugar
A1 HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
Maple limb in pasture. Must reREMOVED AND TRUCKED
move all material from property.
AWAY: from basements, at860 364-5019.
tics, garages & barns. Insured.
Call 860 364-4653.
o

NE

Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated.

4-5 bedrooms, high ceilings, comfortable spaces, lovely


yard, and walk-to-school convenience. Also the lake
and restaurants. OFFERED AT: $398,000.

PR

SHARON: Three bedroom, 1 1/2


bath Duplex in 2 family house.
Newly renovated. Pantry with
washer/dryer hookup. Oil,
steam heat. Screened porch.
Off street parking. References,
credit check and security deposit required. No pets. $1,190/
month plus utilities. Call John
860 354-0449.

CE

6+ acres, horse stables, horse pasture, large capacity garages


for vehicles or other needs, work shop, home office, plus a
wonderful 3+ bedroom residence including an apartment
annex, and 2 car garage. Two additional homes also available.
All within 5 minutes of Sharon. ASKING $985,000

HOUSES FOR RENT


NORFOLK, CT: 2-3 bedroom
sunny and private house
close to town. 3 acres of land,
washer/dryer, attached 2 car
garage. $1,250/monthly. 860
307-5431.
PINE PLAINS - STANFORDVILLE, NY: 4 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, washer/dryer. Pine Plains
school. Horse shed and paddock. Convenient to Taconic
State Parkway and Rhinebeck.
$1,600 per month. Bill, 845,8681325.

TriCornerNews
.com
TriCornerNews
.com
TriCornerNews
.com
IS YOUR NEW
IS YOUR NEW
REGIONAL
IS YOUR
NEW NEWS SITE
REGIONALREGIONAL
NEWS SITE NEWSfromSITE

SHARON: 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath,


washer/dryer, garage. $1,500
per month plus utilities. No
pets, no smoking. 860 4359481.
SHARON: Brand New Log
Home, Delightful Setting,
3 Bedrooms $2800/month.
Bosworth Real Estate 860
364-1700.

A17

SEASONAL
RENTAL
SHARON WINTER RENTAL: Brick
house. Dining room, living room
with fireplace insert, kitchen
with appliances, 4 bedrooms,
2 baths, utility room with
new washer/dryer and garage.
$1,200 with security deposit.
December through April with
optional renewal. 860 364-5019
for details.

COMMERCIAL
RENTALS
MILLERTON: Commercial retail
space in center of town, excellent location, plenty of parking.
Formerly Pringle & Zimring. 845
518-5413.

OFFICE SPACE

SPECIAL HOUSE & LOCATION!


Very private 3 bedroom, 2 bath
Lakeville home on 13 acres near
IMS & Hotchkiss, furnished or
unfurnished, attached 2 car
garage; long term or academic
year. $3,000/month plus utilities, lawn, snow plowing. Best
& Cavallaro: 860 435-2888.

SHARON: Office near hospital,


1,200 sq. ft. for sale or lease.
Available immediately. Former tenant Nordicare Physical
Therapy. 860 567-2435.

E-Mail

your Classified Ads to:


classified@lakevillejournal.com

The Lakeville Journal


from
from The Millerton News
The Lakeville Journal
The LakevilleThe
Journal
Winsted Journal
The Millerton News
The Millerton News
The Winsted JournalWeve made it easier to find all the news,
The Winsted Journal

Rob inson L eech Real Estate


Distinctive Country Properties

artsallcoverage,
Weve made it easier to find
the news,photos, classified ads and more!
Weve
made ads
it easier
to find all the news,
arts coverage, photos,
classified
and more!
arts coverage, photos, classified ads and more!

L OOK ING

FOR A REAL ESTATE G EM, P OSSIB L Y NOT L ISTED?


IF SO, CAL L ME TO HEL P YOU FIND YOU RS.

Salisbury School
E-Mail

NEWS REPORTER
Full-time reporter wanted for The Lakeville
Journal. Includes benefits.
Please send resum and writing samples
to Cynthia Hochswender at cynthiah@
lakevillejournal.com
Your Independent,

Lakeville
JournalLocally Owned,
THE MILLERTON
NEWS
Community
Size: 2 (3.15)
x 3
The Winsted
Journal
Issue
: 11-26 Newspapers &
www.TriCornerNews.com

Regional News Website

Salisbury School
FULL-TIME LEARNING SPECIALIST

Salisbury School is seeking an experienced Learning Specialist to


work one-on-one with students in the Rudd Learning Center.
The ideal candidate will have a strong knowledge base for how
to support students with a variety of learning styles and academic needs. A degree in education and experience working
with students who have complex learning profiles is required.
A Masters degree is preferred.
Interested candidates should send a letter of application and
resume to:
Kati Frisina
Director of the Rudd Learning Center
251 Canaan Road
Salisbury, CT 06068
kfrisina@salisburyschool.org
Fax: 860-435-5750

Associate Director of The Salisbury


Fund and Alumni Relations
your Classified Ads to:

classified@lakevillejournal.com

Salisbury School is seeking an Associate Director of the


Salisbury Fund and
LOOKAlumni
FOR Relations. Individual will have a
significant role in engaging the Schools alumni through events
TRI-CORNER
and programming, increasing alumni participation and support
ESTATE
for the SalisburyREAL
Fund,
and connecting alumni to each other
and the school. Two
to four years of development and direct
NEXT WEEK
fundraising experience required preferably in an educational
setting. Bachelors degree preferred.
Interested candidates should send a letter of application and
resume to: Lakeville Journal
Size:
2 (3.15) x 3
Director of Human
Resources
Salisbury School
Issue : 11-26
251 Canaan Road
Salisbury, CT 06068
humanresources@salisburyschool.org

FURNACE HILL:

LIONS HEAD:

Light, cheery condo: 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, both floors,


Southern Cape style 3 bedroom home, 1770 SF,
outbuilding garage, shop, in-ground pool, nice yard, and work alcove, LR with gas fireplace, rear entertaining
deck, great kitchen, lovely trees, view, and other features.
fireplace. A great buy. Offered at $249,000.
Offered at $380,000. Call Jenn Good or Robin at
860-435-9891.

Selling properties in CT, Mass, and New York , since 1955


318 Main Street Lakeville, Connecticut 860-435-9891
www.robinleechrealestate.com

Salisbury School
Director of Summer Programs
Salisbury School is seeking a Director of Summer Programs who
will create, market and supervise the entire Summer Program
operation, including academic, arts, athletics, co-curricular and
off-campus offerings. Individual will work with CFO to develop
a budget and ensure the desired profitability of the program;
recruit and hire appropriate teachers and staff to organize and
run the program; produce a catalog of summer program
offerings; and implement effective advertising and promotion
for the program.
Interested candidates should send a letter of application and resume to:
Director of Human Resources
Salisbury School
251 Canaan Road
Salisbury, CT 06068
humanresources@salisburyschool.org

News Reporter Wanted

LIGHT-FILLED HOME WITH LAKE ACCESS


2,537 sq.ft. 1.32 acres 5 BRs 4 BAs
LAKEVILLE. Ideally situated off private road nearby
the villages of Salisbury and Millerton and minutes to
neighboring schools. Enjoy lake living with shared ownership to Long Pond for boating and fishing. Spacious
50 deck w/seasonal lake views. Also boasts a private
Office space with separate entrance.
Web# EH3186
Thomas Callahan
$648,000

NORTHWEST CORNER HISTORIC HOME


2,208 sq.ft. 2.539 acres 3 BRs 2 BAs
FALLS VILLAGE. Colonial Saltbox has been superbly maintained and stunningly renovated. This home
combines history with modern living. 3 large Bedrooms
(one on the main floor), modern Country Kitchen,
Living Room with stone fireplace, Den with fireplace.
Web# EH3076
Carol Staats
$485,000

COUNTRY RETREAT
1,536 sq.ft. 5.06 acres 3 BRs 2 BAs
SHARON. Light-filled Country Cottage with open floor
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Like to be up on the latest news? Want to work


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Send Rsum and Writing Samples


attn. Whitney Joseph
E-mail: editor@millertonnews.com
The Millerton News
P.O. Box AD, Millerton, NY 12546
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A18 THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, December 3, 2015


A18 THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, August 19, 2010

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Serving The Area Since 1983
Michael Root CT Arborist # 61802

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Well Drilling
Tri-State
News
louis
e. Allyn
& sons

Wel l D ril l ing


Wa ter Sys tems I ns ta l l ed & Servi c ed
Established 1917
C a na a n, C T
( 860)
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and information about towns,
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people, schools, sports and
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Do you have a family member or friend in the
military who would be interested
in the news from home?
Remember
The Lakeville Journal Company offers free online
subscriptions to our website, tricornernews.com, for
active duty military personnel from the Tri-state region.
For more information or to set up a subscription, contact
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Credit Cards Accepted
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NUnits from 25 to 300 Sq. Ft.
NProfessional On-Site Manager
NAsk about our Discount Specials
N

NATURAL STONE
POLISHING & RESTORATION
860-824-8149

Roofing

Computer Services
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- Estimates
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Brakes Tires &Trailer
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Since
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Lawn Treatments For Weeds /Insects
Stone Walls / Retaining Walls Paver Terraces
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APPLIANCE
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All Aspects Of Painting

R E ST O R E R S & C O N SE R V AT O R S
O F F I N E AN T I Q U E S

Canaan, CT

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277 Ashley Falls Road


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C a n a a n , C T
(8 6 0 ) 8 2 4 -5 6 0 0

COMPASS
Your Guide to Tri-State Events

Dec. 3 - Dec. 9, 2015

VICTORIA MAZZARELLI, Nutmeg Ballets artistic director,


instructs young dancers rehearsing for the Conservatorys upcoming
performance of The Nutcracker. Dancers from left are Simone
Muhammad, Nick Keeperman, Mazzarelli and Alma Evertz, right , 4
THEATER
A new and quirky
Snow White at the
Ghent Playhouse, 3

FOOD
Leftovers?
Turkey
Tetrazzini, 6

ART
The Wadsworth
Atheneum
makeover, 7

MOVIES
Brooklyn,
authentic,
touching, 15

CELEBRATE
WINSTED
Holiday
Events, 8

Art, Movies,
Theater, Food,
Music, Dance,
Recreation

PHOTO BY MARSDEN EPWORTH

HOMETOWN HOLIDAYS
Schedule of tree
lightings, parades
of lights, and more, 10

CALENDAR Auditions, Crafts, Dancing, Theater, Food, 16


SUPPLEMENT TO THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, THE MILLERTON NEWS AND THE WINSTED JOURNAL

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COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

W ON SALE S NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

THEATER: MARSDEN EPWORTH


Snow White, House of Dwarfs

It Takes a Lot of Loons


To Make a Panto

he Loons have done


it again. This is their
16th panto, a British
import and a holiday convention, and, as always, there are
rules, which narrator/music
director Paul Leyden outlines
for the audience at The Ghent
Playhouse. Boo the bad guys,
he tells us, warn the good guys
of danger. And expect lots of
gender confusion.
Its Snow White, of course,
who is in peril, and that peril
comes largely from a gaggle
of candidates for president,
starting with Evil Queen
Carly played by Mark Monk
Schane-Lydon. Tricked out
in long lashes, outrageous
curves and 4-inch heels, this
actor plays a 1940s movie star
to perfection. Eyelids aflutter,
bosom heaving this is one
outrageous vamp.
Following the outlines of a
fairy tale, in keeping with pan-

to rules, Carly calls upon the


Woodsman (Nellie Rustick) to
do in Snow (Sam Reilly). Get
your ax in here, Carly orders.
Snow, in a charming blue pinafore, brown curly tresses and
Revlon-red lips, is busy taking selfies with her little bird.
Warned of danger, she stows
her Apple iPhone 6 and heads
for the woods, a place filled
with big ominous organ
chord here conservatives.
Off she goes to a rustic
cabin where she meets the
seven dwarfs: Bennie, Bushie,
Chrissy, Lindsey, Marky, Teddy
and Trumpy. Here is where the
loons take flight, especially
with Dwarf Chrissy (Matthew
Coviello) who is, of course,
food mad, assuring one of his
fellows who asks about a bulge
in his pocket, Sometimes a
Twinkie is just a Twinkie, and
Continued on page 8

Encore II Consignment Shop


16 Main Street, Salisbury, CT
860-435-0202

Pre owned & new womens clothing,


designer handbags & shoes, jewelry, scarves & more
Visit our shop for your new scarves in various sizes & colors,
cashmere, wool, rayon, pashmina
Free gift wrapping for any new scarf purchase
Open Daily except Tuesdays 10-5 Sun 11-3

PHOTO BY DAN REGION

Evil Queen Carly, Mark Monk Schane-Lydon,


offers Snow White, Sam Reilly, right, a poison apple.

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

DANCE: THOMAS E. JENSEN


The Nutcracker

The Nutmeg Ballet


Prepares for an
Annual Event

PHOTOS BY MARSDEN EPWORTH

Victoria Mazzarelli, center, instructs young dancers at The Nutmeg Ballet Conservatory.
They are, from the floor, Alma Evertz, and left, her partner Nick Keeperman, Corrington
Pearson, Kelsey Morris, Noah Herron.

Baubles Bangles

&

utmeg Ballets artistic director, Victoria


Mazzarelli, is focusing
these days on the conservatorys annual production of The
Nutcracker. When I arrived
at the studio, Mazzarelli was
coaching partners featured
in the Arabian scene in Act
II. Four pairs of dancers will
cover the six shows.
By now, of course, each
dancer knows the moves, so
Mazzarelli was working on
the fine points eye contact,
quiet shoulders, an extension
here, a pause there. Things
were going pretty well. Now
and then she would step in to
demonstrate, take the womans part and lead the young

man.
Then she moved on to the
larger studio on the third floor
of Nutmegs school, administrative offices and student
quarters next to the Warner
Theatre on Torringtons Main
Street for a rehearsal of Act
II. There the Nutmeg's ballet master, Timothy Melady,
was rehearsing a brand new
section in The Waltz of the
Flowers, choreographed by
Kirk Peterson. This piece will
give the more experienced
dancers a new challenge and
features male dancers for the
first time.
The run-through continued, with Mazzarelli coaching individual dancers. Those

Arts & Entertainment


HOTCHKISS.ORG/ARTS
(860) 435 - 4423

Beads
Hotchkiss Orchestra AND
Right Brain Logic Jazz Ensemble

A Festival of
Lessons and Carols

FINDS
PRIME
Affordable Treasures for the Home
350 Main Street, Lakeville CT
Friday, December 11, 2015
5-8 pm, $20 donation
Add bling to your holidays with
our latest find of jewelry
In support of Prime Time House, Inc.
Other Lakeville businesses open are:
ARGAZZI ART
SomethinsGottaGive
The White Gallery

December 4 ~ 7 p.m.

December 6 ~ 7 p.m.

Original jazz works plus classical works by


Tchaikovsky, Saint-Sans, and Mascagni.

Non-denominational, traditional carol service in


the Hotchkiss Chapel.

free & open to the public

free & open to the public - limited seating

The Hotchkiss School | 11 Interlaken Road, Lakeville, ct | 860.435.4423 | hotchkiss.org/arts

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

Simone Muhammad at the barre.


dancers not onstage lined the
sides of the studio, and when
a partnership would pull off a
particularly demanding lift in
the Grand Pas de Deux, they
would applaud their fellows.
At the break I met some
of the young men who came
from places like West Virginia,
Tennessee, Colorado and
Illinois as well as Torrington
to study at the Nutmeg Conservatory. They said dancing
is hard work and they had
good days and off days, but
they kept their focus on their
goals, their overall development. They don't get too down
if things do not go right one
day, knowing that there is a
tomorrow. They support each
other; and they are there for
each other through the ups
and downs of dance training.
As for performance nerves,
music helps, they said, and
they rely on their training.
When the time comes, they
get out there, and let it happen.
Since these dancers work
very hard and have a demanding schedule, I asked them
what they do to decompress,
to relax. Anything, they said,
that allows them to get com-

pletely away from dance for a


short time. One plays piano,
another reads, some like
video games. They get away
completely, but briefly.
I also met two ballerinas,
Reilly McGregor, and Alma
Evertz, who say they are
encouraged to work out the
moves with their partners.
Having good male dancers inspires them to be at their best,
to be fully prepared. They
echoed the men in saying they
felt a lot of support from all
the other dancers.
As Melady says, Nutmeg
training is not just growing
dancers; its growing humans,
Nutmegs Nutcracker 2015
will be performed three times
at the Maxwell M. & Ruth R.
Belding Theatre in the Bushnell in Hartford Dec. 12 at
12:30 and 4 p.m. and Dec. 13
at 4 p.m. For tickets, call the
Bushnell box office at 860-9875900 or go to purchase.tickets.
com. Three performances in
Torrington are at the Warner
Theatre Dec. 19 at 2 and 7 p.m.,
and Dec. 20 at 2 p.m. For tickets and information, call the
Warner Theatre box office at
860-489-7180 or go to warnertheate.org.

Alma Evertz rehearses a pas de deux from


the Nutmeg Ballet with Nick Keeperman.

St. Pauls Lutheran Church

Christmas Fair

Saturday December 5th 9-2

30 Prospect Street, New Hartford, CT

HOLIDAY
MARKET

A light lunch served with homemade choices Baked goods Breads


Pies Preserves and canned goods Knitted items Handcrafted goodies
Cookie walk Finely crafted carvings Paintings by artist members.
at the church on Prospect Street in New Hartford. See you there!

Fri. - Sun.
December 4,5 & 6
White Hart Inn
Salisbury, CT
Sat., December 12
10 am - 4pm

Weve introduced

Falls Village
Center on Main
Main Street,
Falls Village, CT
For more info,
please visit
www.artisansale.org
facebook.com/
salisburyartisansgroup

Accepting custom framing orders


for the holidays through December 15th!

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

FOOD: MARSDEN EPWORTH

A Final Word (This Year)


On Thanksgiving

PHOTO BY MARSDEN EPWORTH

The start of a Turkey Tetrazzini.

h Turkey Tetrazzini,
the great American
dish following the great
American holiday: a simple
recipe for using up a lot of leftover bird after Thanksgiving:
Just add white sauce, mushrooms, spaghetti, maybe a
splash of white wine or sherry
and bake with grated Parmesan on top.
There are hundreds of recipes, credited to a wide range
of chefs from stars like August
Escoffier, to honor soprano
Luisa Tetrazzini, chef Ernest
Arbogast, also to honor Luisa
Tetrazzini, and then many
others such as Giada De Laurentis who makes her Turkey
Tetrazzini with chicken, and
Pioneer Woman Ree Drummond on Food Network who
does use leftover turkey and
then tarts it up with Monterey
Jack, peas, black olives, bacon

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and (good grief) cream cheese.


With Turkey Tetrazzini well
established on the American
table the only Italian aspect
to it, according to Almost Italian, the blog, is its name and
its use of pasta variations
including chicken, of course,
shrimp, lobster and (best of all,
at least when I made it with
my first white sauce at age 10)
tuna, abound.
Now Sylvia, my motherin-law, a beautiful and aristocratic woman could cook two
dishes. One: Cold cuts, which
she would array on a platter
and then pat with the palm
of her hand, enameled nails
gleaming, to judge if the temperature were right to serve.
And two: Turkey Tetrazzini.
As best we can recall, Sylvia
had grown up in a Manhattan
neighborhood known then as
Jewish Harlem and rejected
emphatically all efforts to develop ordinary domestic skills.
When she was required to
sew a simple slip to graduate
from high school, she talked
an acquaintance into making
it for her. In addition to being
beautiful and aristocratic, she
was a charmer.
My husband knows very
little about Sylvias growing up
except that her father, a furrier
with Scottish antecedents,
changed the family name from
Jacobs to Dettmar, a common
move in the beginning of the
20th century. Sylvias husband,
too, Brooklyn-born first-generation Avram Epstein with
Romanian antecedents, went
on to considerable success as
an attorney with the name of
Lincoln Epworth, moving his
family to Park Avenue.

And so, it was that Sylvia,


as a wife and mother of two,
without domestic help the day
after Thanksgiving, and spare
domestic skills of her own,
was obliged to cook a family
meal that had to be more than
bologna and Swiss cheese. The
meal she chose to make was
bland, unexceptional, American, pleasant, easy and, most
compelling of all, conforming. And just as she honored
every holiday of the year, sans
religious connotations, she followed many of her more experienced sisters in this country
in making Turkey Tetrazzini.
In keeping with family
tradition, I too make Turkey
Tetrazzini some time after
Thanksgiving. It is in spirit,
if not detail, a likeness of my
dear Sylvias.

TURKEY
TETRAZZINI

Ingredients: White meat


turkey, cubed; mushrooms
I like Shiitake best; a finely
chopped shallot sauted in
butter with the mushrooms; a
white sauce made with flour
and butter, milk, turkey stock,
a little white wine, salt and
pepper and a dash of nutmeg;
mix a copious amount of
this white sauce with lightly
cooked spaghetti, broken, and
the turkey and mushrooms.
Pour into a good-sized, buttered baking dish so that the
mixture is not more than two
inches deep, sprinkle grated
Parmesan on top and bake at
325 degrees until bubbly.
Serve with something fresh
and tart such as salad greens in
a lemony vinaigrette. And recall
the past, even one you did not
take part in, with pleasure.

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

ART: LEON GRAHAM

Taking In a
Museum Makeover

artford's Wadsworth
Atheneum has been
much ballyhooed by
art writers and publications
since its great unveiling. Like
the doyenne it is the Atheneum opened in 1844 and is
the country's oldest, continuously operating art museum
it could have chosen one
of those new buildings or additions that add lifeless and
mostly useless space.
Instead, museum director
Susan L. Talbott, who joined
the Atheneum in 2008, abandoned plans for an expensive
addition among other
things, the money wasn't
there and embarked on
a $33-million upgrade: repairs and refurbishment
that enhanced gallery space.
Centerpiece of the effort is
the redone Morgan Memorial
building.
The two-story 1910 Morgan
Memorial was the gift of J.
P. Morgan in memory of his
father, J. S. Morgan. Hidden
behind the off-putting Gothic
revival Wadsworth facade,
the Morgan Memorial is now
full of light, color from walls
and pictures, and a clever
mix of the museum's two
greatest strengths: Baroque
art and a truly remarkable,
popular cabinet of curiosities.
Of course the major movements of late 19th- and early
20th- century art are covered,
too; but more in a one-of-this,
one-of-that fashion.
The centerpiece of the
Morgan Memorial is the Great
Hall, now home to more than
70 paintings a few great,
some good, some mediocre
hung side by side and clam-

Museum director
Susan L. Talbott,
who joined the
Atheneum in 2008,
abandoned plans
for an expensive
addition among
other things, the
money wasnt there
and embarked
on a $33-million
upgrade.
bering over each other as they
climb the double-height, dark
blue walls. The hanging was
inspired by the museum's own
The Picture Gallery of Cardinal Silvio Valenti Gonzaga,
painted by Giovanni Paolo Panini in 1749. This magnificent
picture gives an aerial view of
the cardinal's soaring gallery,
hung cheek-to-jowl with hundreds of pictures. Of course
viewing and identifying the
paintings is a chore, with only
a poorly conceived diagram as
your guide. There is a certain amusement in watching
people work with the guide in
increasing frustration.
Upstairs in Morgan 2, the
expanded Cabinet of Art and
Curiosities shows the beginning of museum collections
by scientists, aristocrats and
royalty in the 18th century.
Prehistoric objects stand near
Egyptian jewelry and even a
nautilus shell made to be a
coach with gold trimming and
a tiny coachman perched on
top.
The other galleries in

PHOTO BY MARSDEN EPWORTH

A woman in the Great Hall tries to identify the painting from a museum chart.
Morgan 2 begin with the museum's strongest single area,
the Baroque. Caravaggio's St.
Francis of Assisi in Ecstasy,
the museum's greatest single
painting, hangs near a magnificent Poussin and a tremendous Zubarn. In other
galleries, pictures communicate with the Atheneum's enviable collection of porcelain
figures. In the last two galleries pictures from just before
and after the French Revolution are centered around a
massive, sentimental painting
of Louis VVI saying goodbye

to his family. It was painted by


an American, Mather Brown,
in 1793 and overlooks some
Svres once owned by Madame de Pompadour, Louis
XV's most famous mistress.
In a special exhibits section
of the museum a small but
fascinating show of photographs by Andy Warhol and
Robert Mapplethorpe demonstrate how imagination, artistry and technique informed
both men's work. Just the two
photos each produced of the
other are worth the whole
exhibition.

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845-789-1818
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The Wadsworth Atheneum


is at 600 Main St. in Hartford
( just follow Route 44 into the
city). The museum is open
Wednesday through Sunday.
Hours vary. Call 860-838-4171
or go to www.thewadsworth.
org. The museum has a small,
but very good cafe for lunch
and tea.

Hometown Holidays
Open House
December 5th & 6th, 2015
Refreshments Crafting
Door prize

Locally Hand Crafted Wreaths,


Garlands, Arrangements & Gifts
Fresh, Dried, or Faux
DIY Workshops & Ingredients
Home & Event Decorating
Wedding Services Year-round

TriCornerNews.com

Right Back Where We Used To Be!


7 Academy Street, Salisbury, CT

When you need to know whats happening in your area, were there.

(860) 671-7760
(860) 309-7132
www.sweethavenfarmct.com

The Best Regional News Site

Open Every day


10am - 5pm

SHOP:
CELL:

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

Snow
White
Continued from page 3

Celebrate Christmas on Main Street in Winsted


KENT PIZZA

Trumpy (Paul Murphy)


who aims to make fairy
Thank you to our customers!
land great again, insists,
Im gonna make them
love me and yearns to
see his favorite baked
Now Order Online: KentPizzaOnline.com
Alaskan. Somehow, Snow
860-379-0775 or 860-379-0776
morphs into Hillary, a
Dine
In
or Call Ahead We Accept Mastercard, Visa & Discover
candidate troubled by
electile dysfunction, but
an expert at cleaning hard
1971 - 45th Anniversary - 2015
drives.
And so it goes with a
terrific cast and an outraHair Designers and Tanning Salon
geous script that ends up
declaring Carly ineligible
Walk-In-Service
Janet Stack
for high office because she
Daily & Evening Appt.
Owner
is a foreigner, born in the
18 Elm St. Winsted, CT
(860)379-4153
tiny kingdom of Hewlett
Packard, and declaring
Creative Haircuts for Men & Women
Hillary (aided by Prince
William) the winner
(eliciting a couple of boos
from the audience).
This is one charming,
witty, slightly smutty and
irreverent production
with clever songs and totally unrepressed acting.
Snow White, House

of Dwarfs, created
by
the


716 Main Street, Winsted, CT 06098
716
M
ain
S
treet,
W
insted,
C
T
0
6098
Loons and directed and
www.WindowWorldArt.com
www.WindowWorldArt.com
written by Cathy Lee203 243 3069
Wednesday-Saturday
1 to 5 PM
Visscher who also plays
203 243 3069
Lindsey, is acted by Paul
Wednesday-Saturday 1 to 5 PM
Leyden, Sam Reilly, Sally
McCarthy, Mark SchaneLydon, Nellie Rustick,
Michael Meier, Matthew
Coviello, Joanne Maurer
and Paul Murphy. They all
perform with gusto and
entirely suitable naughtiness.
Snow White runs
Happy Holidays!
at The Ghent Playhouse
Q uilting Classes M achine Q uilting S ervices
through Dec. 13. For tickets
Gift Certicates Available
and information, go to
scane1 @ snet.net
4 9 2 M ain S treet Winsted, CT 0 6 0 9 8
ghentplayhouse.org or call
w w w .thecreativestitch.com
8 6 0 -2 4 8 -0 1 5 2
1-800-838-3006.

The New Image

Sat., Dec. 5, 12:30-4 pm


Eat Delicious Pizza Pies
And Hot Oven Grinders

Happy
Holidays!

228 Main Street


Winsted, CT 06098
(860)379-0747

Wi n s t e d Nu r s i n g C a r e Se r v i c e

Personal Care Assistants/CNAs/HHAs & Companions


Li v e - In s F u l l o r P a r t - Ti m e

Assisting clients for over 30 years


Darlene Eid-Grant, R.N. Owner
Phone: 860-379-3259
Fax: 860-738-9633
Winstednursingcare@yahoo.com
Winstednursingcareservice.com

F. & G. Richards, Inc.


JEWELERS

572 MAIN STREET, WINSTED, CT 06098 860-379-5366

Gift cards make great gifts!


47 Railroad Street
Gt. Barrington, MA
Tel: 413.717.4102

560 Main Street


Winsted, CT
Tel: 860.379.7415

www.MariosTuscanyGrill.com

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

Holiday Events in Winsted


Holiday Open House
Saturday, December 12,
11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Holiday Open House at A


Christmas at Beardsley and Memorial Library. Festivities will
include entertainer Roger Tincknell, with a holiday music sing-along with songs for all ages and
refreshments.
The holiday open house is free
and open to the public.

4th Freezin For A Reason


December 11-12

East End Park, Winsted


There is no registration fee,
however participants/teams are
asked to raise funds for the event
toward a goal of $12,000.
Grab your friends and join in

the 4th Annual Freezin for a


Reason. Spend the entire night
with community leaders on the
town green, while shining a light
on the persistent issue of homeless families and individuals
in our communities, and raise
funds for the Winsted Y Homeless Shelter.
Teams can set up a tent for the
night. Prizes will be awarded for
the team that raises the most
money, as well as the team that
has the most creative tent/display. Each team is required to
have at least one responsible
adult.

Holiday Lighting Competition

Homes and businesses are invited to participate in this years


holiday town lighting compe-

tition. Register your home or


business by Monday, Dec. 14, by
calling Tanya at the Recreation
Department at 860-738-6964,
or email the information to recreationdirector@townofwinchester.org.
Decorations need to be completed on the outside of your
home or business with any type
of lights and decorations by
Wednesday, Dec. 16. Judges will
be around on Thursday, Dec. 17,
between 5 and 8 p.m. The winners of the three categories (best
multi-colored lights for home,
best multi-colored lights for
business, and best white lights
for home) will be announced
by Friday, Dec. 18. Prizes will be
awarded.

Happy Holidays!
Breakfast - 7 Days a week
8am till 11:30am
Lunch 7 Days a week
11:30am till 4pm
Dinner Friday, Saturday &
Sunday 5pm 9pm
Sunday Brunch
10 am till 4pm

Small, friendly
Full Service Bar
Interesting Menus
Join us for amazing food
& a unique dining experience

WINSTED,
WERE
HERE
TO
STAY
WERE HERE IF YOU NEED US!
EMERGENCY ROOM OPEN 9 to 9 DAILY

Seasons Greetings
FROM YOUR CA REGI V E RS

AT H U N G E R F O R D E M E R G E N C Y & M E D I C A L C A R E
1 1 5 S P E N C E R S T R E E T, W I N S T E D , C T

CH AR LOT TEHUNGER FOR D.ORG

EMERGENCY
&
MEDICAL
CARE
EMERGENCY & MEDICAL CARE
AT

T H E

W I N S T E D

H E A L T H

C E N T E R

10

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

Happy Holidays!
52 MAIN STREET MILLERTON, NY 518-789-0252

Tri-State Chamber
Regional Hometown Holidays 2015
AREA TREE LIGHTINGS, PARADES OF LIGHTS
AMENIA, NY
Saturday, December 12,
3 p.m.

Holiday of Lights, beginning


with a musical review performed
by students in Amenias Free
Dance and Performing Arts program at 3 p.m. in the Amenia
Town Hall Auditorium.
Participants in the Holiday of
Lights Parade should line up at
4 p.m., at the firehouse on Mechanic Street, with the parade
stepping off at 5 p.m. sharp. Organizations and individuals are

Happy
Holidays!

encouraged to participate in the


parade with a lighted, motorized
vehicle or float, but no walkers
will be allowed.
At 4:30 p.m., at Fountain
Square, there will be caroling,
hot chocolate and tree trimming
activities with the Flock of Feathers 4-H Club providing wildlife
friendly decorations to trim a
dozen trees grown by Webutuck
students and donated by Indian
Rock Schoolhouse. All are welcome to join in and help light the
trees and square in time for the

5 Academy Street, Salisbury, CT 06068


phone: 860-435-2888
www.bestandcavallaro.com

parade. Santa will be in the last


firetruck.
The parade will proceed along
East and West Main Streets, then
turn down Broadway, then continue up Route 22 North to Town
Hall. Once inside, Santa will provide children with gifts and photos, courtesy of the Amenia Free
Library. Raffle prizes, Citizen of
the Year presentations, historical
exhibits, crafts and refreshments
will add to the festivities all
of which are free and fun for all
ages.

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1 John Street PO Box 656
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Salisbury Winter Sports Association 2009 27

Ice Carving Competition


By Willie Hallihan
The conditions were almost perfect for the 7th
never cease to amaze. Fourth place honors went to
Kowalski
Annual Salisbury Ice Carving Competition held Christopher
J.P. Hedbavney
from Branchville, N.J. (J.P. is also
last February 9th, the Saturday of the ski jumps,
co-chairman
the competition) with his Flying
CT
Lic. #E1of122250
Geese. Gary Costa from Burlington, Conn., a conon the green of the White Hart Inn. A light snow
Construction
Remodeling
Voice & finisher,
Data Wiring
sistent top-three
took third place with Balfell throughout the day to add a New
visual
wintry
Landscape
Service Upgrades
Generator
ancing Pixie.
ThorSales
was &
theService
title of the sculpture
touch, and the lack of sunshine
(ices Lighting
mortal enby
second-place
winner
emy) helped preserve the competitors
300-pound
Lakeville, CT 06039
800-435-0684 Phone
Richard Daley from
Masice blocks. But the 34-degree
temperature softened
cmelectric@optonline.net
860-485-3527
Cell
tic Beach, N.Y. And Chad
the ice enough to make it difficult for the carvers
to fashion sharp details in their sculptures. Still,
Gasiorek from Shohola,
Pa., won first place with
the finished works were spectacular in both the
Fighting Eagles.
amateur and professional divisions.
The annual ice carvIn the increasingly competitive amateur diviing competition is made
sion, Justin Reich from Newington, Conn. cappossible through the
tured third place with his Surfing Penguins.
Hometown favorite Jean Saliter took second place
generosity of lead sponwith her Lombardi Trophy and also won the
sor Klemm Real Estate,
Peoples Choice Award. Howard Freeman from
as well as the White Hart
East Hartford, Conn., won first place honors with
Inn, the Salisbury Winter
his Lighthouse View sculpture.
Sports Association and
Helping all people
The sculptures in the professional division
Trimp Ice Art.
live healthy lives

Happy Holidays
from your friends at

404 Ashley Falls Road (Route 7) Canaan, CT

(860) 824-5467

www.deckerandbeebe.com

Featuring:

Sub-Zero Wolf Viking Miele Bosch


Vent-a-Hood Fisher & Paykel GE
Hotpoint Miele Vacuums

Happy Holidays
from Dr. Livingstone!

In appreciation of SWSA
and its gift to our community

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

11

Hometown Holidays 2015

AREA TREE LIGHTINGS, PARADES OF LIGHTS


COPAKE, NY
Saturday, December 12,
at 5:30 p.m.

Happy Holidays!

The Holiday Light Parade will


take place starting from the Copake firehouse at 5:30 p.m. (line
up at 5 p.m.) and ending at the
Copake Park Building. Santa
Claus and his elves will be giving
out gifts to the children. There
will also be a bonfire with hot
chocolate and cookies.
Anyone interested in participating in the Holiday Light Parade should go to www.townofcopake.org for a form.

FALLS VILLAGE, CT
Sunday, December 6,
5 p.m.

Annual tree lighting at the Falls


Village Senior Center on Main
Street. Caroling, hot chocolate
and cookies. Visit with Santa
Claus, who will have gifts and an
ear for all with wishes to share.

KENT, CT
Saturday, December 5,
at 5 p.m.

Tree Lighting at the Town Hall.


All are welcome to start the holiday season with your neighbors.
Refreshments, carol singing.

SALISBURY, CT
Sunday, December 6,
from 4:30 to 6 p.m.

Hometown Holidays celebration at The White Hart inn on the


Green, 15 Undermountain Rd. Hot
cocoa and cookies provided by
The White Hart inn, and of course,
Santa Claus will visit from 4:30 to
6 p.m. with gifts and photos for the
children. Tree Lighting will be at 6
p.m, caroling with Fr. Joe Kurnath
and the Salisbury Band Christmas
Brass and Hot Chocolate Society.
Immediately following will be the
Parade of Lights by The Lakeville
Hose Company. Sponsored by the
Tri-State Chamber of Commerce
and The White Hart inn.

Working to improve & maintain


the health and wellbeing of
the people in our community.

The Foundation for Community Health 478 Cornwall Bridge Road Sharon, CT 06069

GIUMARRO REAL ESTATE

25 Main Street, P.O Box 1025, Canaan, Ct. 06018


Robert L. Giumarro - Realtor

www.hvdentalcare.com
60 Church St. Canaan, CT 06018 (860) 824-5101

Farms & Country Homes


Residential-Commercial-Acreage
Licensed in CT, MA, NY

CELEBRATE THE SEASON!


JOIN US FOR TEA, LUNCH,
& HOLIDAY SHOPPING.

HARNEY MILLERTON 1 RAILROAD PLAZA


HARNEY SOHO 433 BROOME STREET
SHOP ONLINE AT HARNEY.COM
OR CALL US AT 1.800.TEA.TIME

Looking for the perfect gift?


She is sure to love a
salon/spa gift certificate
from Hylton Hundt!

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

Shop

UNIQUE GIFTS

Office: (860)824-5885 Fax: (860) 824-1020


giumarrorealestate.com | giumarro.real.estate@snet.net

our
showroom for
your unique gift
ideas for the
holidays.
7 Holley Street
Lakeville CT 06039
860.435.9397

www.lakevilleinteriors.com

12

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

Hometown Holidays 2015

AREA TREE LIGHTINGS, PARADES OF LIGHTS


LIME ROCK, CT
Saturday, December 5,
at 6 p.m.; chili dinner
from 4 to 7 p.m.

Annual Christmas Tree Lighting


in Lime Rock Village. It will be at
the corner of Route 112 and Dugway Road, at Trinity Church. Join in
for the chili dinner, doughnuts, hot
chocolate, or just to sing carols and
see the tree alight. Wreath sale as
well.

MILLBROOK, NY
Friday, December 4, at 6 p.m.

Santas Visit to Millbrook With


Franklin Avenue Tree Lighting Ceremony, co-sponsored by Town of

Washington Recreation the Millbrook-Town of Washington Business Association.


The tree lighting ceremony will
take place at the bottom of Franklin Avenue between 6 and 6:30 p.m.
Then, continue on to the firehouse
where Santa Claus and Mrs. Claus
will greet the children and distribute gifts. Refreshments are served
courtesy of the Womens Auxiliary
of the fire company. Children preschool age through third grade may
sit on Santas lap and receive a gift.
Pre-registration is not necessary.
There is no fee for this program. For
information, go to www.towrecreation.com/holiday-activities.html.

Give the gift of News!


Contact Helen Testa, Monday through Wednesday
Phone: 860-435-9873 ext. 161 Or go to
www.tricornernews.com and click on Subscribe

THE MILLERTON NEWS


The Winsted Journal www.TriCornerNews.com
Your Independent, Locally Owned, Community
Newspapers & Regional News Website

usic
Live M nights
y
ida
on Fr

SHARON, CT
Saturday, December 5,
at 4:30 p.m.

The lighting of Sharons town


Christmas tree will take place on
Saturday, December 5, beginning at
4:30 p.m. The festivities will include
music by the Salisbury Band Christmas Brass and Hot Chocolate Society, holiday lights and carol singing.
The community is invited to the
Sharon Historical Society for hot cider and home-made goodies immediately following the tree lighting.
For information call 860- 364-5688
or email director@sharonhist.org.

ITS A WONDERFUL TOWN !

The Mentors Exhibit


NEW WORK BY THE
HVRHS ARTGARAGE ARTIST MENTORS
WEEKENDS 11-4 THROUGH JANUARY 3

17 Cobble Road, Salisbury | www.noblehorizons.org

A farm to table restaurant


in the heart of Amenia
A Monte Family tradition since 1906
from Brooklyn to Montauk to Amenia,
with the newest addition of
Executive Chef, Dafna Mizrahi
Wed.-Fri. 5-10 Sat. 12-10 Sun. 12-8
Bar Open After Hours

845-789-1818
3330 Route 343, Amenia, NY 12501
monteskitchen@gmail.com | www.monteskitchen.com
www.facebook.com/monteskitchenandtaproom

Happy Holidays!
North East Community Center
51 South Center Street, P.O. Box 35
Millerton, NY 12546

A local, organic and


sustainable health food
and specialty store

Happy
Holidays!

Wed - Sun 10a.m. - 6p.m.


51 Mechanic Street Amenia, NY 12501
845-789-1475
www.monteshealthnuthut.com

Lunch Coffee and Tea Wheat Grass Shots


Cold Pressed Juices Local meat, produce, cheese
and more

The Pediatricians and Staff at


MACONY Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine
Wish You Happy Holidays!
(413)528-4047
100 West Avenue, Great Barrington, MA 01230

MOORE & MORE


PRINTING

Phone: (518) 789-4259


Fax: (518) 789-9279
www.neccmillerton.org

Open 7 days a week 7am - 9pm


518-592-1313
19 Main Street Millerton, NY

Join Peerless as we celebrate our 70th anniversary


as we help to light trees in Norfolk, Millerton and Sharon.

Stacey L. Moore
17 Dutchess Avenue P. O. Box 880
Millerton, New York 12546
Tel: 518.789.4508 Fax: 518-789-4509
Email: mooreandmore@taconic.net

peerless1945@aol.com

(413) 229-8689

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

Hometown Holidays 2015

2015 HOMETOWN HOLIDAYS EVENTS


COLEBROOK, CT
Saturday, December 12,
8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

AMENIA, NY
Sunday, Dec. 6, 2:30 p.m.

The Amenia Free Library will


sponsor a Holiday Open House Dec.
7, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. as a thank you
to all the community for great support. For more information, call the
library at 845-373-8273.

The Colebrook Community Fair


begins with Breakfast with Santa
at 8:30 a.m. at the Congregational
Church. From 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
there will be a holiday fair, cook-

Remember your pets!


Fun Toys * Tasty Treats*
Warm Bedding
All for this Holiday Season
MONDAY - FRIDAY: 9 TO 5:30; SATURDAY: 9 TO 5
333 MAIN STREET, LAKEVILLE CT (860) 435-8833

PRIME FINDS

Affordable Treasures for The Home

350 Main Street Lakeville CT


(860) 435-9709

Open Thursday - Saturday 10 am - 4 pm


Sunday 11 am - 3 pm

Free Pick-up. Full Value Tax Deductions.

Benefiting the programs at PRIME TIME HOUSE, INC.


Creating pathways to independence for adults with mental illness

ieland and cafe at the Town Hall


and community center with more
than 30 vendors. Homemade soups,
sandwiches and desserts for lunch.
Fresh wreaths and trees sold by the
Scouts at the Town Hall, 9:30 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Colebrook Historical Society will have a gingerbread village.
Route 183, Colebrook Center. For
more information, call the community center at 860-738-9521.

FALLS VILLAGE, CT
Thursday, Dec. 3-23

The FFA Holiday Sale at Housatonic Valley Regional High School. It


was able to support itself with revenue from the holiday sales at the
school greenhouse last winter.
For more information, go to www.
hvrhs.org.

Saturday, December 12,


10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

KENT, CT
Friday, Dec. 4, at 7:30 p.m.

The annual Handels Messiah,


Sing-In at St. Andrews Church. Jim
Sinclair, conductor, and the Sherman
Chamber Ensemble will perform.
Admission is $15. Scores and
partial scores will be available for
purchase.

MILLBROOK, NY
Sun., Dec. 13, at 3 p.m.

Millbrook Chanukah Menorah


Lighting will be held on Sunday,
December 13 at on the lawn of the
Thorne Building. The festivities will
begin with refreshments at Grace
Church Parish House followed by
the lighting across the street from
the church. All are welcome.
This event is sponsored by the
Millbrook Chanukah Committee.

Artisan Fair: Shop Locally at This


Years 11th Annual Holiday Market,
the Center on Main. Go to www.artisansale.org for more information.

Exciting New Payroll Options


Available At
Riccardelli Accounting Inc.

SALISBURY, CT
December 4-6

Artisan Fair: Shop Locally at This


Years 11th Annual Holiday Market.
The White Hart inn on the Green, 15
Undermountain Rd.
Friday Night Reception ($10 Admission): 4 p.m.7 p.m., benefiting
the Corner Food Pantry
Saturday & Sunday: 10 a.m.5
p.m.. Go to www.artisansale.org for
more information.

Now showing through


Saturday, December 5
(Gala Party, Dec. 5
from 5 to 7 p.m.)

Festival of Trees, this years theme


is A Dickens Christmas - The small
trees, wreaths and centerpieces
have been hand-decorated for the
holiday season by area residents,
merchants and organizations. Open
daily noon to 4 p.m.; except Thursday and Friday, noon to 6 p.m. Noble
Horizons, 17 Cobble Road; open to
the public free of charge. For more

Salisbury Volunteer Ambulance Service

You do not need to be a bookkeeping client to


take advantage of our payroll services!
Call us today! 860-824-9955
Conveniently located across from Stop in Shop in Canaan.

8 Undermountain Road P.O. Box 582


Salisbury, Connecticut 06068-0582

(860) 435-1414 www.salisburywines.com wine@salisburywines.com


19 Main Street, Salisbury, CT 06068

Prindle Insurance Agency


22 West Main Street, Sharon, CT 06069

860-364-5000
Fax: 860-364-5072

Merry Christmas!
Canaan, CT
(860) 453-4148

Norf olk , CT
(860) 542-5518

Wine Spirits Beer Tastings Classes


Open Monday through Saturday 11-7 Sunday 12-5

Design Sales Installation Remodeling


210 East Canaan Rd, East Canaan, CT 06024
www.rosehillkb.com
Office: (860) 824-8051
Products & Services to Fit Your Needs & Budget

13

14

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

information or to reserve tickets for


the gala ($35 per person), call 860435-9851.

Saturday, Dec. 5, at 7 p.m.

Annual Victorian Christmas Concert sponsored by the Salisbury Association at The Academy Building,
24 Main Street; Tickets are $30 and
include a Victorian dessert buffet.
Seating is limited. Call 860-435-0566
to reserve seats.

Saturday, Dec. 5, 8 to 11 a.m.

Salisbury Winter Sports Associations Ski and Skate Swap. Lakeville Hose Companys firehouse on
Route 44/Main Street. Bring used
equipment to sell on Friday, Dec.
4, between 4 and 7 p.m. No equipment will be accepted on Saturday.
The sale on Saturday will run from
8 to 11 a.m. Pick up sale money or
unsold equipment from 11 a.m. to
noon after sale. Coffee and doughnuts will be for sale. Check SWSAs
website at www.jumpfest.org for
more details.

Sunday, Dec. 13, at 3 p.m.

A Christmas Concert with Vocal and Bell choirs. Guest soloists.


For information, call 860-435-2442
or go to www.salisburycongregational.org. Salisbury Congregational
Church, 30 Main St.

Sunday, Dec. 20, at 4 p.m.

Old and new arrangements of carols and seasonal songs by Chorus


Angelicus and Guadeamus. Salisbury
Congregational Church, 30 Main St.

LAKEVILLE, CT
Sunday, December 27, 3 p.m.

Lessons and Carols, all are welcome to join in song. St. Mary Catholic Church, 76 Sharon Rd.

NORTH CANAAN, CT
Saturday, December 5,
10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Geers Holiday Bazaar. New holiday vendors will be participating,


offering crafts, jewelry, clothing,
baskets, personalized ornaments,
sand art, drawings and more for
purchase. Children will receive a

free goodie bag and have a free picture with Santa. For information,
call 860-824-5137. Geer Nursing &
Rehabilitation Center, 99 South Canaan Road, Canaan, CT.

Saturday, Dec. 12,


6 to 11 p.m.

A Christmas Charity CannonBall


at the Couch Pipa VFW to benefit
the Fishes & Loaves Food Pantry
and VA hospitals.
The evening will feature prize
drawings, hors doeuvres and dancing to the music of a variety of local
band and performers, including
Two Guys, Mojo Nectar, K. Macchi
Band, Is, Molliekate Dionne and
Blue Eyed Fuel.
Tickets are available at the door
for $15 per person, or $10 with a donation of a non-perishable food or
hygiene item.

Church. Six performances on Dec. 4


at 8 p.m.; Dec. 5 at 2 p.m., 5 p.m. and
8 p.m.; and Dec. 6 at 2 p.m. and 5
p.m. Tickets can be ordered by calling the box office at 860-469-2100
or by visiting the Riverton General
Store. Ticket Prices are $10 per adult
and $5 per child under the age of 12.

Adopt-A-Family to benefit children and adults in need in the Millerton, Amenia and Pine Plains

RIVERTON, CT
December 4 through 6

A Christmas Carol, performed


at the Riverton Congregational

Lakme

Soy-Based Color

THE WHITE GALLERY THANKS YOU!


A service
REBECCA WELSH
PROPRIETOR
action
and their

We thank the Lakeville Hose Company for their quick


,
exceptional care and concern as they responded to a re at our gallery last
Wednesday. We will always be grateful to those volunteers as well as our
neighbors and friends who helped us during this difcult time.

To specically honor the Lakeville Hose Company, we are dedicating our


opening show, The Art of the Print and Works on Paper and we will donate a
portion of the proceeds of this exhibit to them.
Please join us for an opening artists reception, Saturday, May 24, 4 - 7
pm. The show runs from May 24 - July 6. Our location for this show is 349 Main
Street, Lakeville, behind the Boathouse Restaurant. Please park at 342 Main
Street. We will post signs to assist you in nding us.
Sincerely,
SHARON
OPTICAL

Happy
Holidays
Tino and Susan
Galluzzo
Hours:
MondayGallery
- Thursday 9am - 5pm
The White
Friday 9am - 6pm
Saturday 9am - 12pm

26 Hospital Hill Rd, Sharon CT

The
White
Gallery
FIN

E AR

Happy Holidays!

860-364-0878
The White Gallery
Open Weds,-Sun. 11-4 pm or by appointment.
For more information visit www.thewhitegalleryart.com or call 860-435-1029

IN PROGRESS
All season

area - send donations to P.O. Box


880, Millerton, New York 12546. For
more info call Stacey Moore at 518789-4508.
Corner Food Pantry, Lakeville,
CT. Volunteer organization that
provides regional residents with
ingredients for more than 10,000
meals a month.
Sunday in the Country Food Drive
send checks to WHDD, 67 Main St.
Sharon, CT 06069 to provide over
500 Christmas dinners.

The Tri-State Chambers annual Adopt-a-Tree


program is the areas signature tradition. Trees draped in
holiday lights sparkle like ornaments along main roads
of our communities, creating an instant holiday mood
every year. A $50 tree sponsorship is the perfect way
to commemorate a friend or a loved one and get area
residents and visitors alike in the holiday spirit. For $20
more we will add a special star to your tree. To adopt
your tree contact Susan Dickinson at 860-393-9171 or
via email at info@tristatechamber.com

William J. Cole Agency, Inc.


GENERAL INSURANCE

Happy Holidays!
Home Auto Farm Renters Commercial
VICKI BENJAMIN, AGENT/MANAGER
1 JOHN STREET
MILLERTON, NY 12546

518-789-4657
FAX 518-789-3576

WILLIAM PEROTTI & SONS, INC.

PLUMBING - HEATING - AIR CONDITIONING


Charles Perotti

Francis Perotti Sr. Francis Perotti Jr.

info@wmperotti.com

www.wmperotti.com

P.O. Box 248


11 Furnace Hill Road
East Canaan, CT 06024
PH 860-824-5181 ** Fax 860-824-5183

Womens Support Services


P.O. Box 341, Sharon, CT 06069
Office: (860) 364-1080
24HR Hotline: (860) 263-1900
Womens Support Services
has been providing services to
victims of domestic violence in
the northwest corner of CT since
1981. We offer free, confidential,
client-centered services focused
on safety, support advocacy and
community outreach.

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

15

MOVIES: LEON GRAHAM


Brooklyn

Finding a Way to
An Authentic and
Touching Film

t is easy to imagine the


sentimental and maudlin
way Colm Toibin's bestselling novel, Brooklyn,
might have been brought to
the screen. But director John
Crowley and screenwriter Nick
Hornby went, instead, for the
kind of melodrama American
filmmakers almost never make
anymore. Sincerity, tenderness, romance and a gentle,
but not overbearing, nostalgia
for a bygone era's look, feel and
customs give the film a wonderful authenticity of time,
place and emotion.
Eilis Lacey (Saoirse Ronan)
lives in a small Irish town after
the end of World War II. Her
sister (Fiona Glascott) arranges for an expatriate priest
in Brooklyn, Father Flood (Jim
Broadbent), to invite her to the
U.S. with a place to live and a
job already waiting. Soon she
is in Brooklyn where the
large community of expatriates rarely ventures into
Manhattan living in a rooming house, working in a fancy
department store and taking
night classes in bookkeeping.
All the anguish and fear of
leaving home for an unknown,

All the anguish


and fear of leaving
home for an
unknown, acrossthe-ocean place is
conveyed in Ronan's
still, luminous
performance.
across-the-ocean place is
conveyed in Ronan's still, luminous performance. Her face
seems to have its own internal
lighting, her looks and glances
she is a still actress, letting
the camera record the subtle,
almost imperceptible changes
in her eyes and face can
convey contradictory emotions simultaneously.
Eilis is intelligent and quickwitted, and as she settles into
a routine she loosens up, even
goes to church-sponsored
weekend dances where she
finds a boyfriend. Her world
blossoms as she slowly falls in
love with Tony, a young Italian plumber who likes Irish
girls (played with puppy eyes
and winning ease by Emory

SUPPORT THE ARTS


IN YOUR COMMUNITY.
Support coverage of the arts
in your local media.

The Winsted
Journal
The

MILLERTON NEWS

TriCornerNews.com
The Best Regional News Site

PHOTO BY KERRY BROWN - 2015 - FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES

Emory Cohen as Tony and Saoirse Ronan as Eilis in Brooklyn.


Cohen). Even at the department store her joy is noticeable to her glamorous boss,
Miss Fortini (Jessica Par of
Mad Men). But we know
this burnished world cannot
go on such is the nature of
melodrama and Eilis is soon
back in Ireland, where another
man tries to claim her heart
(bashful Domhnall Gleeson).
Eilis will make her choice,
and it will break her heart a
little, but it will be hers. She
has become an independent

woman in the U.S., influenced


by other strong women like
Fortini and her landlady (a
delightful, sharp-tongued but
playful Julie Walters). We have
journeyed with Eilis as she
discovers the possibilities and
excitement of self-invention.
We leave her a whole person,
embarking on a future of her
own, not one imposed on her.
Part of the pleasure of
Brooklyn comes from Yves
Belanger's lustrous cinematography and Francois Se-

At The Movies
How about dinner before a
movie? Check out the restaurants
advertising in Compass this week.

Now Showing
12/4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

BROOKLYN PG-13 7PM


MOCKINGJAY PART 2 PG-13 7PM
CLOSED MONDAYS
354 Main St., Winsted
354 Main St. Winsted Ct 06098
1-860-379-5108 www.gilsoncafecinema.com
Doors open at 6 p.m. 21 Years & Older

guin's production design. The


gorgeous authenticity never
crosses the line into sentimentality, nor does the poignant,
subtle score from Michael
Brooks. This is a movie for
adults who recognize and relish real emotion delivered by
an expert director, a prize-winning novelist-screenwriter and
a cast and lead actress who
could not be more perfect.
Brooklyn is playing widely.
It is rated PG-13.

16

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

TRI-CORNER CALENDAR
THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL THE MILLERTON NEWS THE WINSTED JOURNAL

Auditions
The Ghent Playhouse, 6 Town
Hall Place, Ghent, NY, 518 3926264, www.ghentplayhouse.
org Accepting proposals for
its 2016-2017 season. For full
details email Cathy Lee-Visscher,
ghentplayhouse@fairpoint.net.
Deadline for submission is Dec
15.
The Sherman Playhouse, 5 Route
39 North (next to the firehouse),
Sherman, CT, 860-354-3622,
shermanplayers.org Auditions
for Blithe Spirit and Tartuffe,
Dec 7-8, 7-9 pm. No appointment
necessary. Go to website for more
info.
TheatreWorks, 5 Brookside
Avenue, New Milford , CT,
860-350-6863, theatreworks.
us Auditions for Seminar,

Dec 5, 3-4:30 pm, Dec 6,


7-8:30 pm, no appointment
required. Rehearsals, January.
Performances, Feb 19-Mar 12. For
more info go to theatreworks.us/
actors.
West Hartford Art League
37 Buena Vista Road, West
Hartford, CT, 860-231-8019,
westhartfordart.org Call for
artists for juried exhibits, January:
Instagram exhibit; February:
Elected Artists and The Art of
the Flower. For more info go to
westhartfordart.org/call-forartists.

Books
Hotchkiss Library of Sharon,
10 Upper Main Street, Sharon,
CT, 860 364-504, www.
hotchkisslibrary.org Illustrated
lecture, Diverted Down the
Garden Path: from Michelangelo

to Italian Garden History by


Judith Chatfield, Dec 6, 4 pm.

The Nutcracker, Dec 10, noon,


Dec 11, 9:45 am and noon.

The White Hart, 15


Undermountain Road, Salisbury,
CT, 860-435-0030, www.
whitehartinn.com The White
Hart speaker series: Howard
Axelrod, The Point of Vanishing,
Dec 9, 6 pm; Carolyne Roehm, At
Home in the Garden, Dec 12, 4
pm.

The Bushnell, 166 Capitol Avenue,


Hartford, CT, 860-987-5900,
bushnell.org The Nutmeg Ballet
Conservatory presents The
Nutcracker, Dec12-13, 12:30 pm
and 4 pm.

Oliver Wolcott Library, 160 South


Street, Litchfield, CT, 860-4225142, www.owlibrary.org Book
discussion series led by Mark
Scarbrough featuring author
Willa Cather, Dec 6, O Pioneers!
Jan 10, Feb 7, 1-2 pm

Dance
Bardavon, 35 Market Street,
Poughkeepsie, NY, 845-473-2072,
www.bardavon.org Bolshoi Ballet,

Cornwall Town Hall, 24 Pine


Street, Cornwall, CT, 860-6726101, motherhouse.us Cornwall
Community Contra Dance,
traditional music by Still, the
Homegrown Band with calling by
Fern Bradley. All dances taught,
no partner necessary, Dec 5, 7 pm.
Mahaiwe Theatre, 14 Castle St,
Great Barrington, MA, 413-5280100, www.mahaiwe.org Bolshoi
Ballet, Lady of the Camellias,
Dec 6 at 1 pm; The Nutcracker,
Dec 20, 1 pm.
The Moviehouse, 48 Main St,

Millerton, NY, 518-789-3408, www.


themoviehouse.net Bolshoi Ballet,
The Lady of the Camellias, Dec
6, 12:55 pm; The Nutcracker, Dec
20, 12:55 pm. To buy tickets, go to
theater or website.
Warner Theatre, 68 Main Street,
Torrington, CT, 860-489-7180,
www.warnertheatre.org The
Nutmeg Ballet Conservatory
presents The Nutcracker, Dec 19,
2 pm, 7 pm, Dec 20, 2 pm.
Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of
Art, 600 Main Street, Hartford, CT,
860-278-2670, thewadsorth.org
The Nutcracker Suite & Spicy
by CONNetic Dance, Dec 11, 12, 8
pm, Dec 13 at 2 pm. For tickets go
to www.conneticdance.com.

Galleries
Argazzi Art, 22 Millerton Road,

Give the gift of News!


A gift subscription to your community newspapers, whether in print, digital or web, is the
perfect gift for anyone on your gift list ... a friend or relative who is away from the Tri-State
area but would like to keep up with the local news ... a student away at school or college... or
anyone who wants to know whats going on in the Tri-State area!

Give a gift subscription!


Contact Helen Testa, Monday through Wednesday.
Phone: 860-435-9873 ext. 161 Fax: 860-435-0146
Email: circulation@lakevillejournal.com
Or go to www.tricornernews.com and click on Subscribe

THE MILLERTON NEWS

The Winsted Journal

www.TriCornerNews.com

Your Independent, Locally Owned, Community Newspapers & Regional News Website

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015


Lakeville, CT, 860-435-8222, www.
argazziart.com Holiday Tree,
featuring works on paper by Rudy
Vavra, through Jan 3.
Berkshire Museum, 39 South
St, Pittsfield, MA, 413-443-7171,
www.berkshiremuseum.org
American West, a dual exhibition
with National Geographic
Greatest Photographs of the
American West, through Jan 3.
Lauren Clark Fine Art, 25
Railroad Street, Great Barrington,
MA, 413-528-0432, www.
LaurenClarkFineArt.com 17
Painters and a Sculptor, annual
invitational featuring new work by
sculptor Joe Wheaton and the work
of 17 artists from the Berkshires
and beyond, through Jan 10.
Cornwall Library, 30 Pine Street,
Cornwall, CT, 860-672-6874, www.
cornwalllibrary.org Sightings,
collages by John Perry, through
Dec 31.
David M. Hunt Library, 63 Main
Street, Falls Village, CT, 860824-7424, www.huntlibrary.org
Bill Blass, folk art paintings and
drawings, through Dec 5.
The Equis Art Gallery, 15 West
Market Street, Red Hook, NY, 845758-9432, equisart.com Paintings
by Joanna Keller Quentin.
Five Points Gallery, 68 Main
Street, Torrington, CT, 860-6187222, fivepointsgallery.org Victor
Leger, Avery Danziger, through
Dec 26, artist conversation, Dec
11, 6 pm.

354-3436, gregoryjamesgallery.
com Walking the Sea by Anton
Ginzburg, through Dec 15.
The Silo, Hunt Hill Farm Trust, 44
Upland Road, New Milford, CT,
860-355-0300 hunthillfarmtrust.
org Wonderment exhibit curated
by Jessica Jane Russell, featuring 7
women artists, through Jan 3.
Kent Memorial Library, Kent
Town Hall, 41 Kent Green
Boulevard, CT, 860-927-3761
www.kentmemoriallibrary.
org Kinetic Fields, paintings by
Heather Scofield, through Dec
28.
The M Studio Gallery, 48 Main
Street, Millerton, NY 12546, 518789-3408, www.themoviehouse.
net Vanishing America, oil and
watercolor paintings by Jeffrey L.
Neumann, through Jan 9.
MASS MoCA, 1040 MASS MoCA
WAY, North Adams, MA, 413-6622111, massmoca.org Francesco
Clemente: Encampment, through
Jan 3.
Millbrook School, Hamilton
Math and Science Center Gallery,
Millbrook School, 131 Millbrook
School Road, Millbrook, NY,
millbrook.org Metal on Metal, A
Toolmakers Tool, photographs by
Helen Hamada, through Jan 29.
Noelke Gallery, 15 Water Street,
Torrington, CT, 860-618-0276,
noelkegallery.com Jeremy J. Starn,
satellite images, Mirrors In The
Sky, through Jan 21.

The Good Gallery, 13 Railroad


Street, Kent, CT , 860-927-5065,
www.thegoodgallerykent.com Art
Collective Extravaganza 2015, a
group show, Dec 5-Jan 3, artists
opening reception, Dec 5, 3-8 pm.

Norman Rockwell Museum, 9


Glendale Road, Stockbridge,
MA, 413-298-4100, www.nrm.
org Meet Rockwells models, Dec
4, 2:30 pm; Norman Rockwell in
detail, Dec 11, 2:30 pm; Coming
of Age: Rockwells children grow
up, Dec 13; Norman Rockwells
Spirit of the Holidays, through
Jan 8; Masters of the Golden Age:
Harvey Dunn and his students,
through Mar 13; Love a Vet:
Honoring Our Veterans, through
Jan 5.

Good Purpose Gallery, 40 Main


St, Suite 1, Lee, MA, 413-394-5023,
www.goodpurpose.org Holiday
Glow, with artwork by Terry Wise
and Susan Himmel and others,
through Jan 12.

Ober Gallery, 10 North Main


Street, Kent, CT, 860-927-5030,
www.obergallery.com Robert
Andrew Kelly and Geoffrey Parker,
paintings, prints and sculpture,
through May 1.

Gregory James Gallery, 93 Park


Lane Road, New Milford, CT, 860-

Pinacoteca, 896 Bantam Road


(Route 202), Bantam, (Litchfield),

The Gallery @ Sharon Historical


Society & Museum, 18 Main
Street, Sharon, CT, 860-364-5688,
sharonhist.org Whats the Big
Idea?, a juried exhibition and sale
of artworks, through Dec 18.

CT, 860-480-0100, www.


pinacoteca.us Wallace Harding,
through Dec 23, Sat and Sun, 1:305:30 pm, or by appointment.
Sohn Fine Art Gallery, 69 Church
Street, Lenox, MA, 413-551-7353,
www.sohnfineart.com Muse,
through January.
Souterrain Gallery of The Wish
House, 413 Sharon Goshen Tnpk.,
West Cornwall CT, 860-672-2969,
www.wishhouse.com Magaly
Ohika, Art Evolves, through Jan 3,
artist reception, Nov 28, 3-6 pm.
Tremaine Gallery at The
Hotchkiss School, 11 Interlaken
Road, Lakeville, CT, 860-435-4423,
hotchkiss.org/arts Field Kallop:
The Melody of Structures, through
Dec 13.
Wadsworth Atheneum Museum,
600 Main Street, Hartford, CT,
860- 278-2670, wadsworth.
org Andy Warhol and Robert
Mapplethorpe, Warhol &
Mapplethorpe: Guise & Dolls,
through Jan 24.
West Hartford Art League
37 Buena Vista Road, West
Hartford, CT, 860-231-8019,
westhartfordart.org Members
Juried Exhibit, through Dec 20.
The White Gallery, 344 Main St,
Lakeville, CT, 860-435-1029, www.
thewhitegalleryart.com Clay,
through Dec 13.
Window into the World of
Art Gallery, 716 Main Street,
Winsted, CT, 203-243-3069,
windowworldart.com All in the
family exhibit, through Dec 11.

Holiday
Events
Bardavon, 35 Market Street,
Poughkeepsie, NY, 845-473-2072,
www.bardavon.org New Paltz
Ballet Theatres The Nutcracker,
Dec 12, 2 pm and 7:30 pm, Dec 13,
3 pm.
Battell Chapel at the Church of
Christ Congregational, 12 Village
Green, Route 272, Norfolk, CT,
www.norfolkfarmersmarket.org
Norfolk Farmers Market Annual
Holiday Market: Dec 5, 10 am2
pm.

Beekley Library, 10 Central Ave.,


New Hartford, CT, 860-379-7235
Holiday marketplace, vendors,
teacup and silent auctions, Dec 4,
6-9 pm.
Falls Village Center on Main,
Main Street, Falls Village, CT The
Artisans Group holiday market,
Dec 12, 10 am-4 pm. For more
info. go to www.artisansale.org.
Geer Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, 99 South Canaan Road,
Canaan, CT, 860-824-5137 Holiday
Bazaar, Dec 5, 10 am-3 pm.
Grace Episcopal Church, 3328
Franklin Avenue, Millbrook,
NY, 845-677-3064, www.
gracemillbrook Festivities
with refreshments, Dec 13, 3
pm, followed by the Millbrook
Chanukah Menorah lighting.
Gunn Memorial Library And
Museum, 5 Wykeham Road,
Washington, CT, 860-868-7247,
www.gunnlibrary.org Annual
Community Festival of Trees &
Lights cocktail party, Dec 4, 5-7
pm; tree display, Dec 5, 10 am-2
pm.
The Hotchkiss School, 11
Interlaken Road, Lakeville, CT,
860-435-2591 www.hotchkiss.org
56th Annual Festival of Lessons
and Carols in the Hotchkiss
Chapel, Dec 6, 7 pm.
Hudson Opera House, 327 Warren
Street, Hudson, NY, 518-822-1438,
www.hudsonoperahouse.org
Winter Walk! Hudsons mile-long
Warren Street is transformed into
a festive boulevard, Dec 5, 5-8 pm.
The Silo, Hunt Hill Farm Trust, 44
Upland Road, New Milford, CT,
860-355-0300 hunthillfarmtrust.
org Gingerbread House classes,
through Dec 13; free holiday choir
concerts, Dec 5, 6, 12, 19. Go to
website for times.
Kent Gingerbread Festival, Main
Street, Kent, CT, 860-592-006,
http://kentct.com/events Dozens
of gingerbread creations will be
revealed in participating shops,
through December.
Kent Historical Society, Kent
Town Hall, 41 Kent Green
Boulevard, Kent, CT, 860-9274587, www.kenthistoricalsociety.
org Festive Holiday Party, wine,
cheese & savories, Dec 12, 5-7
pm; Annual Holiday Boutique,

17

through Dec 31. Go to website for


times.
Lichtenstein Center for the Arts,
28 Renne Avenue, Pittsfield, MA,
413-499-9348, www.discoverpittsfield.com Holiday Wreath Art
Auction, Dec 4, preview, 5-6:30
pm, live auction, 6:30 pm.
New Hartford/Torrington Home
Depot, 1580 Litchfield Tpke,
New Hartford, CT Pre-Hanukkah
Menorah Workshop, children will
create Chanukah menorahs out
of wood, Dec 3, 4:30 pm. RSVP
required chabadNW.org/homedepot.
New Milford Home Depot, 104
Danbury Road, New Milford, CT
Pre-Hanukkah Menorah Workshop, children will create Chanukah menorahs out of wood, Dec 6,
10 am. RSVP required chabadNW.
org/homedepot.
Noble Horizons, 17 Cobble Road,
Salisbury, CT, 860-435-9851, www.
noblehorizons.org 19th Annual Festival of Trees, A Dickens
Christmas through Dec 5, noon-4
pm, Thursday and Friday, noon6 pm; Gala Party, Dec 5, 5-7 pm,
reservations requested.
Riverton Merchants Association,
2 Main Street, Riverton, CT, 860738-9958, rivertonct.com 12th
Annual Christmas in Riverton
celebration, Dec 4, 5:30-8:30 pm,
Dec 5, noon-5 pm; A Christmas
Carol, Dec 6, 2 pm, 5 pm.
The Salisbury Association, Academy Building, 24 Main Street,
Salisbury, CT, 860-435-0566
Victorian Christmas Concert with
Judith Dansker, Marcia Young,
Chrisopher Morrongiello, Alicia
DePaolo, Dec 5, 7 pm. Reservations recommended.
Salisbury School, 251 Canaan
Road, Salisbury, CT, 860-4355700, www.salisburyschool.org
A Service of Nine Lessons and
Carols, Dec 13, 4:30 pm.
Salisbury Winter Sports Association, The Lakeville Hose Company, Lakeville, CT Annual SWSA
Ski Swap n Sale, Dec 5, 8-11 am,
residents can bring equipment to
be sold, Dec 4, 4-7 pm. For more
info go to www.jumpfest.org.
Sharon Historical Society &
Museum, 18 Main Street, Sharon,
CT, 860-364-5688, sharonhist.

18

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

org The Sharon tree lighting and


Sharon Historical Society Holiday
cookie party, Dec 5, 4:45 pm.
Southern Berkshire Chamber
of Commerce, Great
Barrington, MA, 413-528-4284,
Southernberkshirechamber.com
Holiday Stroll, Shop, Sip & Stroll
in downtown Great Barrington,
Dec 12. For more info. go to
website.
St. Thomas Church, 71 North
Street, Goshen, CT, www.
goshenfarmersmarket.com Goshen Farmers
holiday market, through Dec 20,
Sundays 1-4 pm.
Wadsworth Atheneum Museum
of Art, 600 Main Street, Hartford,
CT, 860-278-2670, thewadsorth.
org 42nd Annual Festival of Trees
& Traditions, Dec 4-13; Night
of Illumination!, Dec 3, 5-8 pm;
Santa & Mrs. Claus, Dec 6, 10:30
am-1:30 pm, Dec 12, 2-5 pm, Dec
13, 10:30 am-1:30 pm. For full
schedule go to thewadsworth.
org/festivaloftrees.
Warner Theatre, 68 Main Street,
Torrington, CT, 860-489-7180,
www.warnertheatre.org A holiday
concert with The Torrington
Symphony Orchestra and the
Connecticut Yankee Chorale, Dec
5, 8 pm. For concert info. go to
www.torringtonsymphony.org.
Washington Art Association
& Gallery, 4 Bryan Memorial
Plaza, Washington Depot,
CT, 860-868-2878, www.
washingtonartassociation.com
Holiday Home Gift Fair, through
Dec 24.

Group holiday market, Dec 4,


4-7 pm, Dec 5-6, 10 am-5 pm. For
more info. go to www.artisansale.
org.
Oliver Wolcott Library, 160 South
Street, Litchfield, CT, 860-4225142, www.owlibrary.org Old
Fashioned Yuletide Caroling
Party, Dec 13, 5-7 pm.

Movies
Crandell Theatre, 48 Main Street,
Chatham, NY, 518-392-3331,
www.crandelltheatre.org Free
preview screening of Masterpiece
Theatres Downton Abbey, the
1st hour of Season 6, Dec 12, 2
pm.
Digiplex Torrington, 89 Farley
Place, Torrington, CT, 860-4894111, www.cinerom.com
Kent Memorial Library, Kent
Town Hall, 41 Kent Green
Blvd., CT, 860-927-376, www.
kentmemoriallibrary.org
Minions, Dec 28, 1 pm, popcorn
will be served, please register.
Mahaiwe Theatre, 14 Castle St,
Great Barrington, MA, 413-5280100, www.mahaiwe.org Its a
Wonderful Life, Dec 20, 7 pm;
Home Alone, Dec 26, 4 pm.
The Moviehouse, 48 Main St,
Millerton, NY, 518-789-3408,
www.themoviehouse.net Its a
Wonderful Life, Dec 13, 11 am,
free.
Triplex, 70 Railroad St, Great
Barrington, MA, 413-528-8885,
www.thetriplex.com

Western Connecticut State


University, 181 White Street,
Danbury, CT, 203-837-8732, www.
wcsu.edu Holiday Jazz featuring
Frankensax, Dec 6, 3 pm; Amahl
and the Night Visitors, Dec 11, 7
pm, Dec 12, 1 pm. For tickets go
to wcsu.edu/tickets.

Music

WCSU Department of Theatre


Arts, 43 Lake Avenue, Danbury,
CT, 203-837-8732, www.wcsu.edu
The Snow Queen, Dec 12, 3 pm,
7 pm, Dec 13, 3 pm. For tickets
go to www.eventbrite.com/e/thesnow-queen-tickets-17831695080.

Bardavon, 35 Market Street,


Poughkeepsie, NY, 845-473-2072,
www.bardavon.org Met Opera
Live in HD, Bergs Lulu, Dec 5,
12:30 pm; Brandi Carlile: Winter
Acoustic Tour, Dec 5, 8 pm.

The White Hart, 15


Undermountain Road, Salisbury,
CT, 860-435-0030, www.
whitehartinn.com The Artisans

St. Andrews Church in Kent, 1


North Main Street , Kent. CT, 860927-3486, www.standrewskent.
org 5th annual Messiah Sing-in,
Dec 4, 7:30 pm.

Club Helsinki Hudson, 405


Columbia St., Hudson, NY,
518-8284800, helsinkihudson.
com Jackie Greene, Dec 4, 5, 9
pm; Elvis Perkins, Dec 10, 8 pm;

Holidelic, Dec 11, 12, 9 pm; Hedda


Lettuce, Dec 13, 8 pm; Club dElf
with John Medeski, Dec 20, 8
pm; Jon Cleary and the Monster
Gentlemen, Dec 31, 9 pm.
Fisher Center, Bard College,
60 Manor Ave, AnnandaleOn-Hudson, NY, 845 758-790,
www. fishercenter.bard.edu
Conservatory Sundays: Bard
College Conservatory Orchestra,
Dec 6, 3 pm; Winter Songfest, Dec
13, 3 pm; Bard College Symphonic
Chorus, Chamber Singers and
Red Hook School Concert Choir
Fall Concert, Dec 15, 8 pm. Go to
website for times and tickets.
Infinity Music Hall & Bistro,
32 Front Street, Hartford, CT,
866-666-6306, www.infinityhall.
com HBO Live: An Evening with
Richard Plepler, the CEO of HBO,
Dec 3, 7:30 pm; Javier Colon, Dec
4, 8 pm; Neko Case, Dec 5, 8 pm;
New England Jazz Ensemble, Dec
6, 1:30 pm; The Jackie McLean
Institute of Jazz, Dec 6, 7:30 pm;
Jason Gray Christmas Stories with
Carrollton and Jonny Diaz, Dec
10, 8 pm.
Infinity Music Hall & Bistro,
8232 Route 44, Norfolk, CT,
866-666-6306, www.infinityhall.
com Sister Sparrow & the Dirty
Birds Infinity Hall Live TV
Taping, Dec 4, 8 pm; Martha
Davis & The Motels, Dec 5, 8 pm;
Jackie Greene, Dec 6, 7:30 pm;
Pat McGee Band reunion show to
benefit Adopt-A-Family with Jeff
Przech, Dec 10, 8 pm.
Mahaiwe Theatre, 14 Castle Street,
Great Barrington, MA, 413-5280100, www.mahaiwe.org Dually
Noted, music for four hands, Dec
12, 6 pm; Met Opera Live in HD:
Mozarts The Magic Flute, Dec
13, 1 pm; John Pizzarellis Frank
Sinatra Centennial Celebration
Saturday, Dec 19, 8 pm. Go to
theater or website for tickets.
MASS MoCA, 1040 MASS MoCA
WAY, North Adams, MA, 413-6622111, massmoca.org San Fermin
with Sam Amidon, Dec 5, 8 pm.

org Handels Messiah, Dec 19,


2 pm.
Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of
Art, 600 Main Street, Hartford, CT,
860-278-2670, thewadsorth.org
Hartford Gay Mens Chorus, Dec
8-9, 8 pm. For tickets go to www.
hartfordgaymenschorus.org.

Potpourri
Noble Horizons, 17 Cobble Rd,
Salisbury, CT, 860-435-9851,
www.noblehorizons.org Energy
efficient discount lighting sale,
Dec 5, 10 am-2 pm; annual Red
Cross holiday blood drive, Dec 16,
1-6 pm. Call 1-800-RED-CROSS
or visit www.redcrossblood.
org to schedule a donation
appointment.

Talks
The Salisbury Forum, Hotchkiss
School, Walker Auditorium,
11 Interlaken Road, Lakeville,
CT, salisburyforum.org
Why Architecture Matters
with Pulitzer Prize-winning
architecture critic Paul
Goldberger, Dec 11, 7:30 pm.

Theater
The Center for Performing Arts
at Rhinebeck, 661 Route 308,
Rhinebeck, NY, 845- 876-3080,
www.centerforperformingarts.
org Miracle on 34th Street, Dec
4-20.
Fisher Center, Bard College,
60 Manor Ave, Annandale-OnHudson, NY, 845 758-790, www.
fishercenter.bard.edu The Object
Lesson, Dec 17-19. Go to website
for tickets and times.
The Ghent Playhouse, 6 Town Hall
Place, Ghent, NY, 518-392-6264,
www.ghentplayhouse.org Snow
White: House of Dwarfs, Dec 4-6,
11-13, The Weir, Jan 22-24, 29-31,
Feb 5-7.

Twelve Moons Coffee House at


St. Johns Church (back door
entrance), 12 Main Street,
Salisbury, CT, 860-435-1060,
tinyurl.com/12Moons Breathless
Charm, Dec 5, 7-10 pm.

Half Moon Theatre, Culinary


Institute of America, Marriott
Pavilion, 1946 Campus Drive,
Hyde Park, NY, 845-235-9885,
halfmoontheatre.org A
Christmas Carol, Dec 4-19. For
tickets and times go to website.

UPAC, 601 Broadway, Kingston,


NY, 845-339-6088, www.bardavon.

The Institute for American


Indian Studies, 38 Curtis Road,

Washington, CT, 860-868-0518,


www.iaismuseum.org Listen
to traditional Native American
stories as told by Janis Us,
Mohawk/Shinnecock descent, A
Time For Stories, Dec 12, 12:30
pm. Please call for reservations.
Mahaiwe Theatre, 14 Castle St,
Great Barrington, MA, 413-5280100, www.mahaiwe.org Londons
National Theatre in HD, Jane
Eyre, Dec 27, 3 pm.
The Moviehouse, 48 Main St,
Millerton, NY, 518-789-3408, www.
themoviehouse.net Londons
National Theatre in HD, Jane
Eyre, Dec 8, 7 pm, Dec 13, 1 pm;
NTLive: Hamlet, starring
Benedict Cumberbatch, Dec 12, 3
pm, Dec 16, 7 pm.
The Sherman Playhouse, 5 Route
39 North (next to the firehouse),
Sherman, CT, 860-354-3622,
shermanplayers.org Alices
Adventures in Wonderland, Dec
4-27, half-price preview night, Dec
3, 8 pm. Go to website for times
and tickets.
TheaterWorks, 233 Pearl
Street, Hartford, CT, 860-5277838, theater- workshartford.
org Christmas on the Rocks,
through Dec 23; staged
reading The Eight: Reindeer
Monologues, Dec 23, 8 pm.
For tickets and times go to the
website.
TheatreWorks, 5 Brookside
Avenue, New Milford , CT, 860350-6863, theatreworks.us Bell,
Book & Candle, Dec 4-Jan 9, gala
fundraising performance, Dec 31,
8 pm. For tickets and times go to
website.
Vassar College, Martel
Theater, 124 Raymond Avenue,
Poughkeepsie, NY, 845-4375599, www.vassar.edu Love and
Information, Dec 3-5, 8 pm.
Warner Theatre, 68 Main
Street, Torrington, CT, 860-4897180, www.warnertheatre.org
Comedian Bo Burnham, Make
Happy Tour 2015, Dec 5; Sisters
Christmas Catechism, The
Mystery of the Magis Gold, Dec
10-13. Go to website for tickets
and times.

For free access to


our full calendar,
go to our website at
www.tricornernews.com

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

Holiday Cheer

at the Sharon Plaza

Open House Saturday, December 5, 1-4 pm


Wine, cheese and crackers
Stop by and say Cheers!

A Service

(860)-397-5001

Tree lighting and carol singing


Sharon Town Green @ 4:45

19

20

COMPASS, Thursday, December 3, 2015

WHITING MILLS

9th Annual Holiday Open Studios


December 5 th & 6 th from 11 am - 5 pm
One of the most unique & interesting artist communities in Litchfield County!
Over 50 artists, crafters and specialty shops of Whiting Mills will open
their doors to the public for a creative, fun & festive weekend featuring....
Studio Demonstrations, Guest Artists,, Live Entertainment, and Free Refreshments!
Air Brush Painting Artists Authors Basket Weaver
Carpenter Shops Craftspeople Encaustic Painting Fiber Art
68 68
M ain
M ain
Stre
Stre
et et Gourd Art Hand-Made Gifts Herbal Products Holistic Wellness
| 860.
T orrington,
T orrington,
C TC|T860.
489.
489.
7180
7180
Jewelry Lotions & Soaps Maternity Belly Bands Mixed Media
w ww ww .
ww .
arne
w arne
rthe
rthe
atre
atre
.
org
org
Railroad
Model
&.
Hobby
Supply Painters Pianos Personal
Trainer Pewter Bowls & Ornaments Photography Studios
Pottery Portrait Artist Sculpture Silver Jewelry
Upholstery
& Window
Treatments Woodworkers Yoga Studio
COMINGCOMING
SATURDAY
SATURDAY
, AUGUST
, AUGUST
15 AT 7PM
15 AT 7PM

Win a Whiting Mills T-Shirt!


Fill out name, e-mail & bring to Whiting Mills
during our Open Studios Event. Drawings every hour.

Name: ________________________________________
E-mail: _____________________________________***

100 Whiting Street, Winsted, CT 860.738.2240 whitingmills.com facebook.com/WhitingMillsLLC


Its not just
Its not just
a movie...a movie...
its a movie
its a movie
at the Warner!
at the Warner!
our it on our
Watch it on
Watch
50 foot screen.
50 foot screen.

SCARY!
SCARY!

All All
Seats Seats

$5 $5

68 M ain Street
T orrington, C T | 860.
489.
7180

www.
w arnertheatre.
org

National
Recording
Artists

LIVE!
CD Release Event and
Live DVD Taping for

No Boundaries 2016 Tour

JJanuary
anuary 9, 2016
8:00 PM

BO BURNHAM
DECEMBER 5-8PM
SISTERS CHRISTMAS
CATECHISM
DEC 10-13
Nutmeg Presents:
THE NUTCRACKER
DEC 19 & 20, 2015
National Recording Artists
LUCINDA and MICHAEL
LIVE! NO BOUNDARIES
JAN 9, 2016
MOMIX OPUS CACTUS
JAN 9 & 10, 2016
Met Opera presents:
Les Pecheurs de Perles
JAN 16, 2016 AT 1PM

CHARACTERS!
CHARACTERS!
THETHE
MEET
MEET

The Nancy Marine


Studio Theatre

Dirty Dancing (Movie)


JAN 22, 2016 7PM
Met Opera presents: Turandot
JAN 30, 2016 AT 1PM
ROCK OF AGES
FEB 6-14, 2016
Young Actors Series Presents
PLAY ON
FEB 12-14
JEFF FOXWORTHY & LARRY
THE CABLE GUY
MARCH 4, 2016 AT 7PM
**JUST ANNOUNCED:
9:30 PERFORMANCE**
Met Opera presents: Manon
Lescaut
MARCH 5, 2016 AT 1PM
In The Nancy Marine Studio
Theatre
LOST IN YONKERS
MARCH 5-13, 2016
With support
With of
support of

The Nutme
a division of

NO BOUNDARIES

doors open at 7:30 pm

TORRINGTON SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
DEC 5

68 Main Stree
Torrington,
www.warne

Bring the children,


Bring your parents a

Sharon E. Dante

Founder & Executive Direc

See Tomo
Stars

at The Warner Theatre

Tickets: $20

includes their new CD No Boundaries

Special Guest

STEVIE THE
WONDER DOG

COMING SATURDAY, AUGUST 15 AT 7PM

Nutmeg Presents:
IMPACT
MARCH 19-20,
2016
Its not just
a movie...
COLIN MOCHRIE
its a movie & BRAD
at the Warner!
SHERWOOD:
on our Man Group
Watch it Two
foot screen.
JUNE 10, 502016
AT 7PM
All
SCARY!
Seats
$5
BEST LITTLE
WHOREHOUSE IN TEXAS
MAY 7-15, 2016
NUTMEG GRADUATION SERIES
MAY 18-21, 2016
PILOBOLUS, The Next Adventure
MAY 27-28, 2016 AT 8PM

Stevie says:

Please bring an item


(dog food, toy, blanket)
for donation to
Little Guild of St. Francis
Shelter & Rescue.

PRESENTED BY

FLYING KEY ENTERTAINMENT

FEATURING OUR BAND:


Nick Bukuvalas
David Jayne
Gary Fiandra
plus special guests!

Purchase you
www.nutm

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