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UNIDAD EDUCATIVA BILINGUE NUEVA SEMILLA

Student name: _____________________________________________________________


Subject: MANAGEMENT
Class: II A /B
BLOCK 6 : MARKETING MIX
CONTENT
1. People 2. Process 3. Physical Evidence 4. Packaging
GRADES:
1. Homework: Print/Photocopy all the ARTICLES, ARTICLE activities
2. Individual Participation: In class Lectures + ARTICLE activities
3. Group Activity: In class Lectures + ARTICLE activities
4. Quiz: Project: Record a TV Commercial showing the promotion of a product! January 5th
5. Block Quiz: Written quiz all block 6

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ARTICLE # 1
Heres why human resources is your most important department
Martin Birt | February 9, 2015 | Last Updated: Feb 9 10:11 AM ET
Tangerine's promises We Dare, We Care, We Share and We Deliver are made
not just to customers, but to employees as well.
Youtube.com/screenshotTangerine's promises We Dare, We Care, We Share and
We Deliver are made not just to customers, but to employees as well.
Twitter Google+ LinkedIn Email Typo? More
Ive come to believe that if I could only rescue one department from a burning building, it
wouldnt be marketing. It would be HR. I think its on its way to becoming the critical
branding skill of the 21st century, and the more experiential brands become, the truer
that will be. The challenge for corporations will be to get leadership to see that, and to
make HR a strategic partner with both a mandate and accountability.While establishing the
ING brand in North America I think that the HR manager was as close to bank president
Arkadi Kuhlmann as Jony Ives was to Steve Jobs.
Bruce Philp, ING Direct brand adviser and co-author of The Orange Code: How ING
Succeeded by Being a Rebel with a Cause
Tangerine is a company that gets it. Their head office is located on the northern boundary
of Toronto, about as far from Bay Street as you can get. Employees are encouraged by HR
to dress as casually if they so choose again, about as far from Bay Street as you can
get. The idea is to encourage authenticity, an ideal supported by the HR-managed and
company-sponsored diversity council. These sorts of HR policies foster a unique
environment in which employees feel they have a personal stake a feature the firm took
steps to preserve when it was acquired by Scotiabank in 2012.
Something as profoundly disruptive as a takeover can, at its worst, undermine and erase
the unique qualities that made a firm successful in the first place. Under the leadership of
managing director Natasha Mascarenhas, Tangerines HR department served as a
strategic partner in the transition, keeping its eye on the ball during a sensitive time by
focusing on delivering HR fundamentals and, in so doing, helping preserve and strengthen
the banks brand, culture and business objectives.
Based on Tangerines experience, here are five key expectations your business
should have for your HR department during complex and sensitive business
transitions.
1. Keeping employees grounded
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Once it became clear a sale was possible, Ms. Mascarenhass department focused on
delivering HR programs that built on the banks existing foundations. These included a
recruitment program involving leaders and peers in the hiring process and learning and
development programs reflecting established values and competencies. Maintaining this
alignment, Ms. Mascarenhas says, eased the anxieties and concerns of employees who
worried the takeover would strip their organization of the unique characteristics that
attracted them to it in the first place. By focusing on assuaging their fears about the future,
employees were able to remain focused on their business responsibilities.

2. Providing communications leadership


HR worked with Tangerines senior leadership and internal communications team to build
and implement a communications plan when a takeover became a possibility. Before a
potential buyer was even identified, Ms. Mascarenhas says employees were kept aware of
the changes that were afoot. Information was shared as quickly and as completely as
possible. They accomplished this through small meetings, town-hall sessions and an
intranet hub where employees could have questions answered by anybody in the
company. Additionally, President and CEO Peter Aceto was visibly active and available in
the communications.
3. Contributing to negotiations
Maintaining ING Direct Canadas people principles was part of the negotiating framework
with potential buyers, says Ms. Mascarenhas. These principles included core values,
current benefits (including a sabbatical benefit) and hiring practices that made the bank
unique and attractive to employees. Importantly, ING Direct Canadas desire to preserve
these characteristics was communicated to employees, instilling confidence that their
individual and collective interests were front and centre.
4. Acting as change agents
Tangerines HR department participated in and led change initiatives during the transition,
including the consolidation of all employees into one office and translating the firms values
into a set of promises to employees. These promises were (and are):
We Dare (push boundaries)
We Care (work tirelessly)
We Share (empower others)
We Deliver (act on promises)
These promises helped reinforce that Tangerine would continue ING Direct Canadas
legacy of being different, special and something in which employees could take ownership.
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ARTICLE # 2
Customer Service
ENTREPRENEUR STAFF
Definition: The degree of assistance and courtesy granted those who patronize a business .
Excellent customer service is more than what you say or do for your customers. It also
means giving customers a chance to make their feelings known. Here are some suggestions
for finding out what your customers want--and what they think about your customer service:

Attend trade shows and industry events that are important to your customers. You'll find
out what the competition is doing and what kinds of products and services customers are
looking for.
Nurture a human bond, as well as a business one, with customers and prospects. Take
them out to lunch, dinner, a ballgame or the opera. In a relaxed social atmosphere, you'll
learn the secrets that will allow you to go above and beyond your competition.
Stay abreast of trends; then respond to them. Read industry trade publications, be active
in trade organizations, and pay attention to what your customers are doing.
Ask for feedback. Survey your customers regularly to find out how you're doing. Send
postage-paid questionnaire cards or letters, call them on the phone, or set up focus
groups. Ask for suggestions and then fix the trouble areas revealed.
Whatever you do, don't rest on your laurels. Regularly evaluate your product or service to
be sure it's still priced, packaged and delivered correctly.
Put your customer service policy in writing. These principles should come from you, but
every employee should know what the rules are and be ready to live up to them. It doesn't
have to be elaborate. Something as simple as "The customer is always right" can lay the
necessary groundwork, although you may want to get more detailed by saying, for
instance, "Any employee is empowered to grant a 10-percent discount to any dissatisfied
customer at any time."
Establish support systems that give employees clear instructions for gaining and
maintaining service superiority. These systems will help you outservice any competitor
by giving more to customers and anticipating problems before they arise.

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ARTICLE # 3

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ARTICLE # 4
Why Your Product's Packaging Is as Important as the Product Itself
BY JOSHUA CONRAN
Your product's packaging is meant to communicate a purpose: what your brand stands for
and what it means for your customer.
Every year, 95 percent of new products fail. The reason is simple: Most customers don't
have the time or energy to weigh the advantages and disadvantages of the products in their
shopping carts, so they use a shortcut to make their decision. That shortcut is your product's
packaging. Think of Tiffany & Co. For most people, the iconic robin's-egg blue box is more
recognizable than the jewellery itself.
Packaging is powerful because it tells consumers why your product and brand are different.
Apple is known for its clean, minimalist packaging. If you've ever watched an unboxing
video for a new iPhone, you know people love Apple's packaging.
Plenty of savvy startups are mastering the unboxing experience as well. Pad & Quill, a
company that sells artisan iPhone and iPad cases, wraps its products in brown paper with
friendly messages printed on the inside and a Roman seal for a distinctly hand-wrapped feel.
Great packaging is especially significant for growing startups because it can have a direct
impact on sales and a company's overall appeal. Take Trunk Club, for example. This
company hand-selects clothing for men and sends its stylist-curated outfits in cardboard
"trunks" that fit the convenience and style of its service. After five years in business, Trunk
Club garnered Nordstrom's attention, and the high-end department store bought the startup
for $350 million.
Packaging can continue to influence a company's sales as it grows larger, too. MillerCoors'
sales slumped last year, but the Miller Lite retro can bumped sales by nearly 5 percent.
MillerCoors didn't change its beer; it just changed the can it came in.
Poor packaging can have an even more dramatic effect. Australia recently instituted a plain
packaging law for cigarettes. The government's removal of packaging branding rights aimed
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to discourage young people from smoking. Not only can Marlboro not use its logo, but it
also can't use its typeface. The packages, covered with health warnings and graphic images
that deter smoking, resulted in the biggest smoking decline Australia has seen in 20 years.
How to Design Packaging That Makes an Impact
All startups want to achieve the instantly recognizable status of Apple and Tiffany & Co.,
and that type of brand power starts with a product's packaging. How can you make your
packaging stand out from the competition?
1. Know your demographic. Stark white and robin's-egg blue won't work for every
brand.
2. Make cheap packaging look chic and personalised. Good packaging doesn't have to
be expensive.
3. Make the package part of the experience. Part of the reason it's so fun to unbox a new
Apple product is that its packaging reflects the sleek, user-friendly experience of the
product inside.
4. Consider eco-friendly options. Packaging that's recyclable or reusable is always a
reason for a consumer to choose your brand over your competitor's. In fact, 52 percent
of people around the world make purchase decisions partially due to packaging that
shows a brand making a positive social and environmental impact.

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