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720hp BLOWN AND STROKED LS3

720hp BLOWN AND STROKED LS3 September/October 2015 Explosive C4 Corvette Hitting the Track Non-Stop for 15

September/October 2015

Explosive C4 Corvette

720hp BLOWN AND STROKED LS3 September/October 2015 Explosive C4 Corvette Hitting the Track Non-Stop for 15
720hp BLOWN AND STROKED LS3 September/October 2015 Explosive C4 Corvette Hitting the Track Non-Stop for 15
720hp BLOWN AND STROKED LS3 September/October 2015 Explosive C4 Corvette Hitting the Track Non-Stop for 15

Hitting the Track Non-Stop for 15 Hours

Hitting the Track Non-Stop for 15 Hours

720hp BLOWN AND STROKED LS3

720hp BLOWN AND STROKED LS3 September/October 2015 Explosive C4 Corvette Hitting the Track Non-Stop for 15

September/October 2015

Explosive C4 Corvette

720hp BLOWN AND STROKED LS3 September/October 2015 Explosive C4 Corvette Hitting the Track Non-Stop for 15
720hp BLOWN AND STROKED LS3 September/October 2015 Explosive C4 Corvette Hitting the Track Non-Stop for 15
720hp BLOWN AND STROKED LS3 September/October 2015 Explosive C4 Corvette Hitting the Track Non-Stop for 15

Hitting the Track Non-Stop for 15 Hours

Hitting the Track Non-Stop for 15 Hours
Have Speedster Will Travel Viper Bites Cobra Porsche Repro: ‘64 904 GTS

Have

Speedster

Will

Travel

Viper

Viper Bites Cobra

Bites

Cobra

Have Speedster Will Travel Viper Bites Cobra Porsche Repro: ‘64 904 GTS
 

Porsche Repro:

‘64 904 GTS
‘64 904 GTS
‘64 904 GTS

‘64 904 GTS

Have Speedster Will Travel Viper Bites Cobra Porsche Repro: ‘64 904 GTS
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TABLE OF CONTENTS

COOL CARS

Battle-Hardened Endurance Racer: Factory Five GTM

22

‘Cobra Decisions: Unique Motorcars 289 or 427?

30

No Fear on This CapeFear 7

56

Viper Bites Cobra

68

Porsche 904 Repro on an Epic Drive

76

Explosive C4 from Shinoda

100

Lambo in Limbo -- Lifting it up to Top Level

110

Have Speedster, Will Travel -- Ruby Road Trip

122

ERA 289 Slab Side Cobra

130

TECHICAL

STUFF

720hp Blown and Stroked LS Engine

88

Electrifying a Project Car

112

EVENTFUL EVENTS

Rollin’ Into Reno for Hot August Nights

42

DEPARTMENTAL MATTERS

Throttle Steering ..............................................................................8

FYI

.......................................................................................................

12

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015 Car Builder Staff: Steve Temple – Editor/Publisher Larry Weiner – Marketing Debp tion at www.kitcarclub.com Editorial and Advertising inquiries should be sent to sctemple55@yahoo.com Cover Photos: Main image by Austin Price; inset photos by Steve Temple; Viper image courtesy of Chrysler Corporation Contents page photo by Steve Temple; feature on this “Copper Topless” Corvette to come next issue. " id="pdf-obj-6-3" src="pdf-obj-6-3.jpg">

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

Car Builder Staff:

Steve Temple – Editor/Publisher Larry Weiner – Marketing Deb Murphy – Art Direction Tina Temple – Maven of Morale Jim Youngs – Editor Emeritus

Car Builder magazine (formerly Kit Car Builder Magazine) is published bi-monthly by SCT Communications, Inc., 1427 Sioux Trail, Reno, NV 89521

All Rights Reserved

Free Subscription at www.kitcarclub.com

Editorial and Advertising inquiries should be sent to

Cover Photos: Main image by Austin Price; inset photos by Steve Temple; Viper image courtesy of Chrysler Corporation

Contents page photo by Steve Temple; feature on this “Copper Topless” Corvette to come next issue.

THROTTLE STEERING New Legislation Pending for Turnkey Replicas W hile the core of our readers’ passiony der at erics@sema. org . SEMA urges readers to forward this Alert to fellow automotive enthusiasts, and also to join the SAN (SEMA Action Network) to help defend the hobby. Click here to find y our U.S. Re p resentative: http:// semasan.com/lookup. asp?g=semaga —Steve Temple, Editor ADDITIONAL INFO To provide further detail, here’s a condensed and slightly edited version of the article written by Eric Snyder for SEMA News: U.S. Representatives Markwayne Mullin (R-OK) and Gene Green (D-TX) introduced bipartisan legislation that would enable low-volume car 8 " id="pdf-obj-7-2" src="pdf-obj-7-2.jpg">

THROTTLE

STEERING

New Legislation Pending for Turnkey Replicas

W hile the core of our

readers’ passion

is building cars, in

recent years fully assembled, turnkey replicas have developed a following, since not everyone has the time and skills to complete a project. Since we cover both types of vehicles, some proposed legislation for turnkey replicas recently caught our eye, as noted in an article by Eric Snyder in the pages of SEMA

News. If passed, it could have a

significant impact on the way

many replica companies do business. Introduced in the U.S. Congress, this measure would allow companies to produce

turnkey replicas for customers nationwide. The bill would enable enthusiasts to purchase a completed replica car, while still providing the option of building a replica car from a kit. As described by a SEMA Action Alert, the bill basically consists of the following:

H.R. 2675 would provide companies with the option of selling replica cars to consumers as completed vehicles (500 per year, and resembling production vehicles manufactured 25 or more years ago), while still selling kits to enthusiasts who prefer to build the vehicles themselves. Enthusiasts would also still have the ability to build specially constructed vehicles that don’t replicate older vehicles. Many states have categories for these replica and kit cars, and allow them to be titled and registered by the model year that they most closely resemble (ex: ’32 Roadster, ’63 Cobra, etc.). H.R. 2675 would remedy

the current “one-size-fits-

all” method for regulating car manufacturers and enable smaller companies

to produce ready-to-drive

replica cars for consumers that prefer that option.

If there is enough support for the bill in Congress, lawmakers will vote on H.R. 2675 during the 2015-2016 session. Those readers of CAR BUILDER Magazine who wish to voice their support for this legislation should contact their U.S. Representative in Washington, DC as soon as

possible. When doing so, they should also email a copy of their letter to Eric Snyder at erics@sema. org. SEMA urges readers to forward this Alert to fellow automotive enthusiasts, and also to join the SAN (SEMA Action Network) to help defend the hobby.

Click here to find your U.S. Representative: http:// semasan.com/lookup. asp?g=semaga

—Steve Temple, Editor

ADDITIONAL

INFO

To provide further detail, here’s a condensed and slightly edited version of the article written by Eric Snyder for SEMA News:

U.S. Representatives Markwayne Mullin (R-OK) and Gene Green (D-TX) introduced bipartisan legislation that would enable low-volume car

THROTTLE STEERING New Legislation Pending for Turnkey Replicas W hile the core of our readers’ passiony der at erics@sema. org . SEMA urges readers to forward this Alert to fellow automotive enthusiasts, and also to join the SAN (SEMA Action Network) to help defend the hobby. Click here to find y our U.S. Re p resentative: http:// semasan.com/lookup. asp?g=semaga —Steve Temple, Editor ADDITIONAL INFO To provide further detail, here’s a condensed and slightly edited version of the article written by Eric Snyder for SEMA News: U.S. Representatives Markwayne Mullin (R-OK) and Gene Green (D-TX) introduced bipartisan legislation that would enable low-volume car 8 " id="pdf-obj-7-64" src="pdf-obj-7-64.jpg">

manufacturers to produce turnkey replica vehicles for customers nationwide. Called the “Low Volume Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Act of 2015” (H.R. 2675), the SEMA-supported bill would

allow companies to construct up to 500 replicas a year. These are cars that resemble another production vehicle manufactured at least 25 years ago. Why is the legislation necessary? The National

Highway Traffic Safety

Administration (NHTSA) currently treats all automakers the same. The regulatory system and paperwork burdens created by NHTSA were designed for companies that produce millions of cars. There is no alternative method for overseeing companies that produce only a handful of custom cars. H.R. 2675 provides separate regulations that will enable smaller companies to produce ready-to-drive replica cars for consumers that prefer that option. “The current law does not take into account the unique challenges that small auto manufacturers face when it comes to recreating historic cars,” said Rep. Markwayne Mullin. “We can’t expect these companies to be able to comply with a law that was established over 40 years ago for automakers that mass-produce millions of

vehicles every year. We need to encourage growth in our manufacturing market, not create unnecessary barriers.” Very few completed low- production vehicles are built in the U.S. today. Nearly all of the replica vehicles on the road began life as a kit car—an incomplete vehicle or collection of parts sold without an engine and transmission. Since the consumer is responsible for installing the powertrain, NHTSA technically considers the individual rather than the kit car maker to be the vehicle manufacturer. The states have categories for these cars. Many have enacted SEMA model legislation which allows these cars to be titled and registered according to the model year that they most

manufacturers,” said Rep. Gene Green. “This bill will promote job growth and consumer choice. Replica vehicles produced under H.R. 2675 would be regulated under a framework similar to the model used for kit cars, which are subject to NHTSA’s equipment- based standards for vehicles components like lighting, glass, brake hoses and tires. Under H.R. 2675, low volume manufacturers would register with NHTSA and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and submit annual reports on the vehicles they produce. These turnkey cars would be required to meet current model-year emissions standards. In order to comply with this provision, the bill would allow

a significant impact on replica

This measure could have

manufacturers

closely resemble (ex: ’32 Ford, ’63 Cobra, etc.). They are collector cars shown at car shows, exhibitions and on the weekends, and not used as daily drivers. “While the market for these vehicles has been historically small, the enthusiasm hobbyists have for these cars shouldn’t be stymied by regulations that are clearly designed for large scale

low-volume manufacturers to install engines already

certified for equivalent vehicle configurations by the large

automakers, along with an on-board diagnostics (OBD) system. Although this is already permitted, current law requires the companies to then retest the engines and submit volumes of duplicate paperwork to the EPA.

FYI

FYI Rock West Racing Launches Electric Speedster R ock West Racing is entering the EV (electric

Rock West Racing Launches Electric Speedster

R ock West Racing is entering the EV (electric vehicle)

market with a tribute to the

Fifties classic Speedster that will run solely on battery power. This component car, based on the company’s RW Speedster, is engineered to accommodate a battery conversion kit designed and developed by EV West. The RW Speedster Electric kit can be purchased in three different levels depending on the builder’s time and ability. The Speedster Electric’s

design is a derivation of the original RW Speedster in

that it has been modified specifically to accept the

electric powertrain kit from EV West, electric vehicle conversion specialists. The car’s power comes

from eight lithium-ion battery packs providing 120 volts with 24kWh storage. This gives the vehicle a range of up to 100 miles, which is comparable to recent auto industry offerings. The

FYI Rock West Racing Launches Electric Speedster R ock West Racing is entering the EV (electric

stored electrical energy is converted to velocity through a programmable 72-130V AC controller driving a Curtis AC-50 brushless motor delivering

71 hp and 120 lb/ft of torque. The motor shaft power is transmitted to the wheels via a conventional Volkswagen transaxle. Initial tests indicate the 0-to-60 mph acceleration time is under six seconds,

but that figure has not

been documented yet. Recharging the battery from 100 percent depletion takes eight hours, but this time can be cut in

half with the addition of a second onboard charging system. The Speedster Electric is equipped with

a regenerative braking system, which is another

technical benefit.

“The technology developed in the last few years has completely changed the viability of the electric car,” said Jim Gormican, CEO of Rock West Racing. “And the growth interest in electric vehicles

is too important to ignore. There is no reason you can’t help the environment while driving a fun, fast, and stylish car!”

The company currently

offers other component

cars that are tributes to classics such the Speedster, Spyder, RSK and GTS. Rock West Racing is an emerging business in the replica car industry and

is headquartered in San Diego with manufacturing facilities in both El Cajon, California and West Jordan, Utah. The Rock West team has a background in advanced composites for the aerospace, industrial, and sporting goods industries and currently produces racing products such as the HANS safety

device, carbon fiber drive

shafts, and structural composites for racing suspension components. For more information on

this new offering, visit:

stored electrical energy is converted to velocity through a programmable 72-130V AC controller driving a Curtisg , visit: www.RockWestRacing.com 13 " id="pdf-obj-12-39" src="pdf-obj-12-39.jpg">
stored electrical energy is converted to velocity through a programmable 72-130V AC controller driving a Curtisg , visit: www.RockWestRacing.com 13 " id="pdf-obj-12-41" src="pdf-obj-12-41.jpg">

FYI

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Ford Coyote and Porsche Transaxle

C hris Ardern of Active Power let us know about a

new way to combine a Ford Coyote engine with a

Porsche 997 transaxle. This is an ideal pairing for

mid-engine projects such as the GT40 replica offered by his company. After many months of development with Active Power Cars, Kennedy Engineered Products now offers a 997 to Ford Coyote conversion. Also in the works is a 997 to Ford Windsor. Stay tuned for details, or contact Chris at: http://www.activepowercars.com

FYI at SEMA See us 22693 Booth www.vdo.com/usa VDO PRT Tachometers – taking your ride toy tuned for details, or contact Chris at: http://www.activepowercars.com Tom Weber Paint and Body Specializing in Cobra Kit Bodies Tom Weber Owner 513-907-3550 ALL MAKES AND MODELS SERVICED ALL MAKES AND MODELS SERVICED NATIONWIDE 14 " id="pdf-obj-13-20" src="pdf-obj-13-20.jpg">
Tom Weber Paint and Body Specializing in Cobra Kit Bodies Tom Weber Owner 513-907-3550 ALL MAKES
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FYI

FYI Future History F or more than two decades Danko Reproductions has been offering a varietyhttp://www.dankoreproductions.com/ www.bbmotorsports.us Experience Shows – More than 170 Factory Five cars built in the last 19 years Pro-Quality, Pro-Builder with a Full-Service Facility: • Engines • Transmissions Custom Street & Race Suspensions Stack & Throttle Body EFI Systems Plus: Body & Paint • • Gordon Levy (520) 494-2745 www.levyracing.com www.facebook.com/levyracing 15 " id="pdf-obj-14-4" src="pdf-obj-14-4.jpg">

Future History

F or more than two decades Danko Reproductions has been offering a variety of body conversions, starting

with the sleek Inferno for ’82-’92 Camaros. The company has recently introduced a new body conversion for the 2006-2010 Dodge Charger. Inspired by the ’68-’70 models, it even has rotating headlight covers like the original car. The body parts are

made of FRP, and the nose is Duraflex with

welded aluminum internal bracket supports throughout. The custom grille work is all polyurethane plastic, and the mechanicals are all welded billet aluminum. The package includes vented front fenders, a rear two-

inch widebody with flip up gas cap, either

‘68 or ‘69 taillight package and a three-piece

rear spoiler and rear lower diffuser. Pricing starts at $6,995, and Danko also offers a shaker hood and turnkey installation service of all parts at its Miami facility. Details:

FYI Future History F or more than two decades Danko Reproductions has been offering a varietyhttp://www.dankoreproductions.com/ www.bbmotorsports.us Experience Shows – More than 170 Factory Five cars built in the last 19 years Pro-Quality, Pro-Builder with a Full-Service Facility: • Engines • Transmissions Custom Street & Race Suspensions Stack & Throttle Body EFI Systems Plus: Body & Paint • • Gordon Levy (520) 494-2745 www.levyracing.com www.facebook.com/levyracing 15 " id="pdf-obj-14-25" src="pdf-obj-14-25.jpg">
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FYI

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4R70W

a Ford engine, this company has a Ford transmission to fit it. To find out more: www.

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transmission, the Smart Shift stand-alone transmission controller

that’s user friendly (no laptop required), custom torque converter, dipstick/

filler tube, complete

transmission wiring harness,

block plate, flexplate, flexplate bolts, bell-housing

bolts, and torque converter nuts. These Street Smart Systems will handle 650 horsepower and come with Performance Automatic’s lifetime warranty. Performance Automatic also offers a Street Smart Systems for the Ford Small Block, Big Block, Modular and FE engines. If you have

www.KoolMat.com
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FYI

FYI Ultimate’s New Cobra T he origin of Ultimate Classic Cars, and its new Cobra replica,
FYI Ultimate’s New Cobra T he origin of Ultimate Classic Cars, and its new Cobra replica,
FYI Ultimate’s New Cobra T he origin of Ultimate Classic Cars, and its new Cobra replica,

Ultimate’s New Cobra

FYI Ultimate’s New Cobra T he origin of Ultimate Classic Cars, and its new Cobra replica,

T he origin of Ultimate Classic Cars, and its new Cobra replica, started out with a customer order from an an-

other company, Lone Star Classics. Dennis Cahill, a geophysicist by profession who has located oil and gas deposits all over the world, was looking for a special kind of Cobra. Since he’s bigger guy (over six feet tall, and built like foot- ball player), he wanted a slightly larger cockpit than most. After ordering his components in the Spring of 2014, and then waiting for several months, he grew impatient and discovered that Lone Star was having

some financial difficulties. So he ended up

purchasing all the tooling from the bank,

and starting afresh with Ultimate Classic Cars.

FYI

The prior manufacturer had already been develop- ing a larger Cobra called the 427GT with a number of innovations, which CAR BUILDER has previously reported on. Cahill also hired most of the former Lone Star staff that had been working on the car, and wants to move the operation to a new 20,000- sq. foot facility early next year to Boerne, Texas, near San Antonio.

Besides refining the

design with better brake

cooling and using new manufacturing process- es (laser cutting, welding

jigs, and fiberglass molds),

Cahill also plans to offer other models, such as a ’32 Ford. He recently sold a 427GT to a local high school as a project for a

shop class, which will be raf-

fled off once it’s completed.

“It’s good for the school and

good for the community,” he points out, and has plans

to repeat this program with other high schools as well.

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The Hellcat for Everyone:

The SuperCat GSS Challenger

W ith

Challenger Hellcat’s price skyrocketing, this exciting Mopar muscle car is now out of reach for the average enthusiast. So leave it to none other than the legendary Mr. Norm to come up with an affordable alternative: the SuperCat GSS Appearance Package. Now available for all 2015 and 2016 Challengers, the SuperCat GSS is the Hellcat for everyone. It features all of the same parts that are used on the front of the Challenger Hellcat that give this wild muscle car its unique appearance, but at a much more reasonable price. The SuperCat GSS Appearance Package includes the Hellcat front fascia, upper and lower grilles, spoiler and headlight bezels, along with the hood and scoops.

The Hellcat for Everyone: The SuperCat GSS Challenger W ith Challenger Hellcat’s price skyrocketing, this excitingwww.mrnorms.com . 28 " id="pdf-obj-19-11" src="pdf-obj-19-11.jpg">

The front end is even assembled using the same kind of plastic rivets, screws and hardware that are used on the production line on the Hellcat. The Supercat GSS Appearance Package is just $5,995. It will give your Challenger the look of an $80,000 Hellcat, but at a fraction of the price. In fact, it looks so real that after talking to hundreds of people at the Mopar Nationals, it was obvious that only a few realized that the SuperCat wasn’t really a Hellcat. Like most

things in life, perception is nine tenths of reality. The SuperCat looks so much like a Hellcat that most will never know the difference. Just think, the money you’ll save would be enough to have his-and-hers SuperCats in your garage! For more information about the SuperCat GSS Appearance Package for late-model Challengers, contact Mr. Norm’s today at 760/630-0547 or check out his website at www.mrnorms.com.

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BATTLE H What it Takes to Build a Endurance 25-Hour Racer

BATTLE H

What it Takes to Build a Endurance 25-Hour Racer
What it
Takes to
Build a
Endurance
25-Hour
Racer

ARDENED

As Told by Richard Migliori

PHOTOS BY AUSTIN PRICE

TRACK PHOTOS COURTESY OF TRUE TOURTILLOTT

Editor’s

Note:

We first met Richard Migliori a few years ago when he was just starting on the buildup of his Factory Five GTM, and we did an install article on heat/sound insulation from Quiet Ride Solutions. Little did we (or even he) know back then how far he would go with his project. Later on, his also brought his crimson Cobra roadster to a cover shoot involving a stroker engine buildup. So he’s no stranger to this magazine, and we appreciate his willingness to help out with our editorial coverage. While his cars in those articles were more of a visual prop, he’s certainly no poster boy. The GTM shown here has really been through the ringer in a number of ways. As detailed on True Tourtillott’s blog, TheDamnTrueExperiment (see Sources below for link), it has enjoyed an impressive string of competition successes, and also caught fire on the track at Thunderhill a couple years ago, burning up about 70 percent of the car. Fortunately, Migliori’s pro driver Davy Jones emerged unscathed. Remarkably, Migliori and his crew at Prototype Development Group (PDG), with some help even from competing pit crews, managed to get the car running and back on the track in just 15 hours. Which in hindsight seems like more of an achievement than competing in the event. What follows are his comments on his experiences with the project, and some hands-on practical advice for fellow car builders looking to take on the track.

Editor’s Note: We first met Richard Migliori a few years ago when he was just starting

T ransforming a Factory Five

GTM from a component car

for the street into full-on

endurance racer has put me through more twists and turns than a competition road course. Most of us think that race cars are just race cars, but this one grew up to have a mind of its own! When the word got out about the project, volunteers from all over the country, by way of online forums, chimed in to lend a hand, becoming fast friends that I never even knew I had. It became a passionate affair of friendships, competition, ideas, local high schoolers, fun, enthusiasm, tech support— the list goes on and on.

  • I have seen more than 100 volunteers

pass through my garage door, all of them earnestly and willing helping to mold this

creation. Many people say that their build becomes a part of the family. But I would say his GTM created a family!

  • I should point out, though, that I had some competition history that helped all

this happen. I had done some dirt circle track racing back in the ‘90s for about

this happen. I had done some dirt circle track racing back in the ‘90s for about 10 years. That’s where I developed my racing contacts. When the car was delivered, all my friends said, “Let’s make it an endurance road racer!” It was like the old days of Sprint car racing, when we made our own parts. Also, when traveling, the GTM has attracted a

following that has led to free lodging, temporary workshops and remarkable memories that could never be scripted. Who would have guessed that over 1,000 men, women, and children crossed the

threshold for a chance to sit in the carefully crafted seat and not want to get out? The excitement

of people slithering into the cockpit has its own special place in my heart, unleashing a big smile that could not be washed away with the most toxic of cleaning solvents. The attraction is partly because the car was

modified for a center-

steer application, making

it easier to drive. Moving the driver to the middle of the car was a safety feature that proved very exciting to pilot. With endurance engineering in its design,

the dash looks like a fighter

plane ready for its next tactical mission, provided with switches, gauges and gadgets perfectly laid out for night racing. Modifying the car’s frame for center steering required cutting out the backbone, and transferring loads to the outside by adding new tubing that connects the pickup points for the front and rear suspension. The rack is a Unisteer part changed from a left-hand to a center setup. Coming into its own,

this thoroughbred demanded more and more involvement. It grew out of the adolescence of budget building, making something out of nothing, and then went onto accumulate a respectable track record, thus making car-builder history for Factory Five Racing. What’s next? I will be

the first to admit that the

GTM is a sexy and unique car, one which can be built in the privacy of your own home. But a top level competitive race car? Go

figure. I still don’t quite

believe it myself. The adventure took another twist in becoming a very desirable car to drive. The GTM grew up

in the unlimited classes of NASA and SCCA, jockeyed by some very talented locals, tallying 94 percent

podium finishes and

four championships. Our humble garage build is now catching the eye of some professional drivers that just can’t stay away. Today, there seem to be more professionals grabbing the reigns than you can

imagine. When the first pro

driver was attracted to the car, we realized that we’re actually better than we thought we were. The 2015 season has

been an exciting one, and

our first year in a pro series

running in the GT class with the United States Touring Car Championship (USTCC). Piloting the GTM, drivers Mike Holland (a

five-year veteran with our

team, PDG) and Ken Dobson (development driver for Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus) scored three First-place wins and one

Third-place finish in the first four rounds of racing.

So we’re leading the points and now have a strong possibility of winning the GT championship! Our primary Series is the Western Endurance Racing Championship, an amateur competition of day- and night-racing where we are Second in overall points and

will likely finish behind the

efforts of Truspeed, a professional Porsche Cup

team. Our final effort is the finale at Thunderhill

Raceway Park at the 25 hours of Thunderhill, the longest closed circuit road race in North

Raceway Park at the 25 hours of Thunderhill, the longest closed circuit road race in North America. In the 13 years of this race,

the GTM and team of all volunteers are the only recipient of the prestigious “Spirit of Thunderhill” award (for rebuilding the

car after it caught fire and

then completing the event). Getting down to the details of endurance racing, it’s not necessarily about running 10/10ths, but instead reliability and strategy. Surviving an endurance race comes down to two key words:

preparation and planning. That means researching the right components, and not using throw-away parts. We purchase for the long haul, since we can’t afford

Raceway Park at the 25 hours of Thunderhill, the longest closed circuit road race in North

to buy cheap. For instance, the stock C5 Corvette hubs only last about 20 hours in racing conditions, since the plastic races melt and the bearings go bad. For twice the money, but four times the wear, we went with SKF units that last two years and two

25-hour races. The Unlimited class provided the perfect platform for all the volunteers. A center-driver

configuration allows for

installing a 22-gallon fuel cell on each side of the driver’s seat, as done in Ford’s GT40 back in the Sixties. All told, 44 gallons of 91 octane pump gas gives this steed the ability to run 2.5 hours without fueling. (We’ve found that race gas runs hotter, and with 25 percent lower mpg, and the engine computer prefers standard fuel anyway). Our custom-built sway bars and engineered Bilstein shocks are a proven combo over the years, reducing lap times by more than10

seconds. Having outgrown the C5 wheels and DOT tires, we’ve moved up to three-piece CCW race rims. As for the engine, this GTM started out with a used LS1, an ASA-prepared V8, but now switches between race series with either LS3 367/480 or LS3 367/525 crate motors. The 480 gets better mpg for endurance racing, and

meets the USTCC’s power/ weight rules. But the higher powered 525 is better for faster, shorter duration events at Thunderhill and in Utah. We have plug-n- play setup for quick swaps between races. The engines were provided by a local dealer, Chase Chevrolet, where we display the car on weekends and get lots of enthusiastic onlookers

to buy cheap. For instance, the stock C5 Corvette hubs only last about 20 hours in

(especially younger ones who are amazed by the cockpit). Both engines are backed by the same Mendeola 5-speed sequential dog box, which doesn’t require actuating the clutch to shift. Axle reliability and custom control arms were engineered by Myraceshop.

com. This firm (headed up

by one of our drivers, Mike

Holland) also fabricated five

different wings for various levels of downforce. We’ve found more downforce is better in the turns, which is where we often beat the faster cars. The custom glass windscreen with wiper provides a great visual

platform for rain and fog conditions. Bajadesign

lights up the night with

38 LED fixtures. The

gullwing/lambo-style doors are trimmed and strutted for quick driver changes and egress in the event of an engine

fire (don’t ask me how I

know this). The initial setup sported front C5 brake calipers, installed both front and rear, but quickly outgrew them. Next step was to install StopTech fronts and rears. This made for better stopping and longer life in the annual 25-hour race. To manage the brakes, one

of our volunteers built a brake bias that can be read instantly by the driver to make corner-to-corner

adjustments to fit his or her

driving style. Airjacks provide the lift for tire changing, while machined rims mated with a circle-track type of spacer

indexes the rims for quick tire changes. The Factory

Five’s fiberglass main body

is cut behind the doors to provide quick access to

the engine compartment.

The inventory of several different wings has been made by volunteers throughout the campaign. I look back at all that has happened and there just isn’t enough space to tell all the adventures and many memories of people we have met, places we have stayed, support, and the generosity. I know one thing, though: this was never a dream of mine,

but surfing this wave has

Decisions, Deci

By Steve Temple

Photos by Steve Temple

W hen it comes to Cobra roadsters, you have two basic choices: either the

small-block racer or the big-block behemoth. (The slab-side street Cobra is a third option as well, but that’s a whole ‘nuther story.) Proponents of the former point to its lighter handling, and the fact that a stroked small-block can generate

substantial amounts of power. As for the fat-fendered 427, there’s no substitute for cubic inches, even at the expense of extra weight up front (unless you go with a pricey all- aluminum engine). It really all depends on what sort of statement you’d like to make, and how you plan to use the car. For charging around on a road course and twisty,

sions, Decisions

Either One Is Great -- As Long as It’s Black

289 or 427 Cobra?

two-lane country roads, the 289 is right at home. But for going mano y mano with other muscle cars, the 427 is the baddest dude in town. To provide some personal perspectives, we rounded up two nicely sorted examples from Unique Motorcars, and let the builders of the cars share their experiences. It’s not always a simple decision

between these two types of Cobras, but whichever way you go, the main thing is to just make it happen. Which is what each of these builders did in their own special way.

SOURCE:

W hen we met the Unique Motorcars

family in the spring of 1997 at the Carlisle show, I was hooked! They had a product that would meet all of my expectations of what a quality replica should be. As Maurice Weaver stated during this initial conversation, “We’re not ‘selling you a car,’ we are inviting you to join our family.” Having owned and restored several classic muscle cars, it was going

to be so nice to start with a solid clean product. At this point I had my work cut out for me—raising three children, purchasing a new home and running a small business didn’t leave a lot of extra funds for this project.

  • I decided that if this was going to happen I would

have to find extra work

to accomplish my goal, so

  • I took on building decks,

installing tile floors and

other small home repairs along with painting cars at home in a small two-car

garage. At this point we also began the process of building the powerplant for the car the year before we even purchased the deluxe pallet car from Unique. We decided that the small

block 1964 FIA car was our choice, so the only answer was a small-block stroker. We purchase a new Ford

Motorsport block (351 Windsor) and stroked it to 393ci. We purchased a Scat crank 3.85 stroke , 6.2-inch H-beam rods and

W hen we met the Unique Motorcars family in the spring of 1997 at the Carlisle

DIY FIA Building a Cobra in

As Told by Bob Diodato

Wiseco pistons to match the Twisted wedge “R” heads. These heads would

require the headers to be custom made, so Maurice Weaver took the provided

flanges and made a perfect

set of large-tube headers to allow these large port heads

We topped the engine with an Edelbrock Super Victor manifold with

a Holley Ultra HP carb

flowing 850 cfm. This

engine would require a high-energy ignition so the system we chose was all

made by MSD. We used the

box and plug wires. Once all of the machine work was completed we assembled the motor in a matter of one weekend. With the engine nearing its completion and the Spring of ’98 coming fast, we

to flow all the air necessary.

small-

The valvetrain is a solid

base

roller cam (.672) lift from

billet

Competition Engineering

distrib-

along with solid roller

utor

lifters and S.S. 1.6 roller

and

rocker arms also from

6AL

Comp.

ignition

a “Family Way”

Wiseco pistons to match the Twisted wedge “R” heads. These heads would require the headers to

moved forward and contacted Unique and placed our order, Maurice assured me that even with the tight timeframe, our car would be delivered to the show at Carlisle in May. At this point we ordered a Tremec 5-speed and Lakewood bellhousing to be mated to the completed engine. Showtime! Our car arrived as promised and all parts to be delivered with our deluxe pallet car were complete. Leaving the car at the show all weekend after waiting and planning

by going to the 17” wheels we were able gain width in the rear, avoiding the
by going to the 17” wheels
we were able gain width in
the rear, avoiding the strut
bars supporting the Jag rear.
We recently installed the
Mickey Thompson ET Street
Radial in a 315/35/17 in
the rear and Goodyear eagle
Having no formal paint
experience other than
“trial and error” over the
years of painting, anything
that someone would let
me paint, we applied our
stripes first, then taping

so long made this the longest weekend of my life.

I wanted to get this thing home and begin the process

of finally assembling a

lifelong dream. During the show we also purchased several parts needed like the Compomotive wheels, size at 17” x 8” fronts and 17” x 12” rears. I knew that with

this motor, we were going to need as much tire as possible to get this car to hook up and go straight, so

F1 245/40/17 in the front. Finally Sunday and home we go. We began by removing the body from the frame and began the bodywork. Since the car was going to be black, the prep and painted was going to be a challenge, since the only quality tool I had was a great spray gun! Once the body was straight and smooth we built a temporary paint booth inside of our two-car garage and a makeshift exhaust system to vent the booth.

them off, we applied the black over the remaining

car. Then five coats of clear

were applied and left to cure. We then began the wet sanding an polishing process. At this point we also began the mechanical assembly to prepare the chassis to be mated with the body. I would have to say this was the easiest and most enjoyable car I have every worked on. If “A” part was

to bolt to “B” part, it fit

without any modification,

thanks to the Weaver family and their business ethics. They have spent the necessary time and money to ensure that their manufacturing process is perfect. The reminder of the car was assembled in a matter of a couple weeks working on it during my free time in the evening and weekend hours. This would not have been possible without

were applied and left to cure. We then began the wet sanding an polishing process. At

the help of my sons Mike and Brad, along with my daughter Makenzee who was only three then and was kind enough to bring me food and water since most of my free time for a month or so was spend crawling around the garage assembling the car. Even though the boys were just teenagers at the time they were there to help when needed. Mike is the most mechanically inclined and gained experience that he continues to apply to this day. We assembled the reminder of the car performing many of the tasks needed to complete the project with only simple tools and time. Having performed all of the work that it took to build this car at home was truly a rewarding experience and most people

were applied and left to cure. We then began the wet sanding an polishing process. At

that we meet are surprised that even the paintwork can be completed in a simple two-car garage! With the car having been completed for many years now, we having continued enjoyed the experiences that it has provided my family and myself in both the people that we have meet and the pure excitement of driving a truly wild machine. Car guys: You can do this!

Wish

Fulfilment

Finally Getting What I Wanted All Along

As Told by Tim McHenry

I ’ve been toying with the idea of building a Cobra replica since I was about 18 years

old. I am now 53. After finally having one of

these beasts, it was a good thing I could not afford one at 18 or I probably wouldn’t be around today. I have always liked wrenching on my own cars and/or bikes since forever, usually money always being the limiting factor. My ‘69 Fastback Mustang was originally a 302 auto, which I changed over to a four

speed and built the 302 to an 11:1 3/4 cam motor. I left the stock 2.70 open rearend in, again no money to put a good rearend in, and promptly destroyed it. Great fun for a kid that likes going to junk

yards for parts. The ‘69 Mustang Grande is my current car, along with the Cobra and that Mustang was just a total suspension and interior refurbish, a good driver and bad-weather car. As long as I can remember I was always taking apart something, from my grandfather’s lawn mower to my uncle’s 3.8 Jag engine. Needless to say, neither one was happy about my foray into mechanics. I did however manage to put everything back together.

As for the Cobra, the car came to me as a painted roller. I did not have to do a heck of a lot. The wiring harness was in, so all I had to do was make the connections for lighting, dash, and ignition. The interior had to be put in with heat insulation, carpet,

seats, e-brake, and five-point seat belts.

I originally wanted to build more of the car myself, but the painting of the car was not an option for me. Since I could not do this portion, Maurice Weaver, the owner of Unique, advised me that trying to stuff a big-block Ford along with a Tremec TKO 600 down through the small hood opening of a painted car was asking for trouble. (BTW, the color is PPG 2013 Mitsubishi

speed and built the 302 to an 11:1 3/4 cam motor. I left the stock 2.70

Tarmac.) I only have one-garage space for this car, so I had to have Unique install the driveline and body. Kind of disappointing because I wanted to do as much as I could but things kind of snowballed because of

the lack of garage space. On the other hand, the time it took for me to do what was left

was only about five or six months worth of weekends, four to five hours each day.

If I had to guess the car was probably

  • 80 prcent complete. If I were going to say to

people considering a project like this one, it would be to make sure you have the room for both the body and chassis, with some room left over to work comfortably. And to try to think of doing things that might not sound too important but are connected to other tasks, so you can avoid making an

easy task more difficult.

For the engine, I went with a 390 Ford

FE, bored and stroked to 447 cubes. It’s

fitted with Eagle H-beam rods and an Eagle

cast crank. All told, it delivers more than

  • 500 horses and 550 lb/ft of torque. (The

  • 390 doesn’t cost as much as a 427 but

can be built to deliver the same power.) I used a .040 over bore with a 4.250 stroke,

Tarmac.) I only have one-garage space for this car, so I had to have Unique install@.050 .2 42 int. .251 exh.). The intake is a Blue Thunder medium rise, topped by a Holley 750, assembled by Southern Automotive engines. In compari- son to my other cars, getting into a big-block Cobra is a huge 38 " id="pdf-obj-37-30" src="pdf-obj-37-30.jpg">

plus a Comp cam (.528 int. .533 exh. dur. @.050 .242

int.

.251 exh.).

The intake is a Blue Thunder medium rise, topped by a Holley 750, assembled by Southern Automotive engines. In compari- son to my other cars, getting into a big-block Cobra is a huge

step up in power, and in a much lighter car to boot. Now that I’m older and wiser, I know how to handle it, so the time was right to make this project

finally happen.

step up in power, and in a much lighter car to boot. Now that I’m older
Celebrating 50 years of the Shelby Cobra 1965-2015
Celebrating 50 years of
the Shelby Cobra 1965-2015
800-297-6253 www.Superformance.com Own a legend today!
800-297-6253
www.Superformance.com
Own a legend today!
As seen on
As seen on
Sizzlin’ Rides at Hot August Nights Text and photos by Steve Temple W hile northern Nevadag ust Ni g hts http://www.hotaugustnights.net " id="pdf-obj-41-2" src="pdf-obj-41-2.jpg">
Sizzlin’ Rides at Hot August Nights Text and photos by Steve Temple W hile northern Nevadag ust Ni g hts http://www.hotaugustnights.net " id="pdf-obj-41-4" src="pdf-obj-41-4.jpg">

Sizzlin’ Rides at Hot August Nights

Sizzlin’ Rides at Hot August Nights Text and photos by Steve Temple W hile northern Nevadag ust Ni g hts http://www.hotaugustnights.net " id="pdf-obj-41-8" src="pdf-obj-41-8.jpg">

Text and photos by Steve Temple

W hile northern Nevada

lode of gold and silver,

is known for its mother

precious metal of another sort rolls into Reno every year for Hot August Nights.

live entertainment, bringing back bygone eras at outdoor venues. Displaying everything from classics to kustoms, rods to muscle cars, restos to restomods, along with swap meets and nostalgic automobilia, you name it, you

can find it at HAN. It shows

off so much automotive innovation and creativity,

that car builders find all

sorts of ideas and examples for their own projects. So enjoy our choice selection of these sizzlin’ rides.

It’s one of the world’s largest gatherings of ’72 and earlier vehicles. Primo collections of cars and trucks gather at all of the major casino resorts and surrounding venues, about two dozen locations in all, and showcase spectacular rides, cruises, auctions, and entertainment. More than 6,000 classic vehicles motor through the streets and take part in events such as controlled cruises, Show-n-Shines, Drag Races and Burnouts, a Swap Meet,

fireworks and AutoCross, and

more. Thousands of classic car buffs and nostalgia enthusiasts dance each night away to free

SOURCE:

Coast-to-Coast created this swanky version of a ‘39 Ford. All kinds of colors to daz- zle
Coast-to-Coast created
this swanky version of a
‘39 Ford.
All kinds of colors to daz-
zle the eye
The crowds went wild for a sip of this Pink
Lady
All sorts of wild and wonderful treat-
ments are welcome.

An old prospector looks down on precious metal of another sort.

An old prospector looks down on precious metal of another sort. Looking truly grand in front

Looking truly grand in front of the Grand Sierra Resort.

A ’40 Merc that’s greener than Kermit the Frog.

An old prospector looks down on precious metal of another sort. Looking truly grand in front
Looking for a new use for old rebar? Check out the top of the air cleaner

Looking for a new use for old rebar? Check out the top of the air cleaner and the steer-

Now here’s some easy engine access

on a flip-top rod

Looking for a new use for old rebar? Check out the top of the air cleaner

No end in sight to all the cool cars at HAN.

No end in sight to all the cool cars at HAN. A screaming-yellow Nash with a

A screaming-yellow Nash with a nasty atti-

Save Mart’s gargantuan grocery getter

Cobra replicas are big favorite at HAN, and this one got a quick touchup at Griot’s booth.

A wide-bodied Speedster with some modern touches ..

Cobra replicas are big favorite at HAN, and this one got a quick touchup at Griot’s
Wiley Coyote mans the wheel of a ’35 Ford Cabriolet.
Wiley Coyote mans
the wheel of a ’35 Ford
Cabriolet.

Old rodders never die, they just fade away…

Larry Johnston had some colorful experiences involving a fire hydrant with his

Classic Roadsters Cobra, which we plan to share in an upcoming issue.

Larry Johnston had some colorful experiences involving a fire hydrant with his Classic Roadsters Cobra, which

A ’54 Chevy Sedan Delivery that really de- livers the goods.

Some nice stacks on this ’30 Ford.

How often do you spot a ’21 Stuta pickup?

How often do you spot a ’21 Stuta pickup? This little-seen ‘68 Meyers Tow’d, owned by

This little-seen ‘68 Meyers Tow’d, owned by Eric Amberson, is planned for a feature in an upcoming issue.

How often do you spot a ’21 Stuta pickup? This little-seen ‘68 Meyers Tow’d, owned by

This two-tone gray ghost with orange trim from famed customizer Art Himsl is one of the nicest treatments we’ve ever seen on station wagon.

How often do you spot a ’21 Stuta pickup? This little-seen ‘68 Meyers Tow’d, owned by

Even a McLaren made the scene, despite being much younger in years than most cars on display.

Got flames?

This hot rod is a veteran of

the Woodward Dream Cruise.

This ‘68 Buick Riviera is a real beauty, gracing the streets of nearby Sparks
This ‘68 Buick Riviera is
a real beauty, gracing the
streets of nearby Sparks
Got flames? This hot rod is a veteran of the Woodward Dream Cruise. This ‘68 Buick
Got flames? This hot rod is a veteran of the Woodward Dream Cruise. This ‘68 Buick

ABOVE: A ‘50 Ford Deluxe that outshines its

original configuration in every possible way.

LEFT: Jim Farcello of Kustom Kreations (whose ‘57 Buick was featured in a previ- ous ssue) restored this ‘51 Merc to its for- mer glory. It’s customized with ‘57 Chrysler headiights and a DeSoto grille and bumper,

among many other mods.

Muscle car row – just one of many at the show. This ‘66 Mustang, mod- ified

Muscle car row – just one of many at the show.

Muscle car row – just one of many at the show. This ‘66 Mustang, mod- ified

This ‘66 Mustang, mod-

ified with a Fiberfab

Hemi Stang Daytona body conversion, is said to be one of only 50 ever built. It also has a Hemi under the hood.

Muscle car row – just one of many at the show. This ‘66 Mustang, mod- ified

An unusual “pony wagon” that’s sporty yet practical.

A primo ‘35 Ford with a predatory

A red ‘65 Deville that gave us “Cadillac arrest.” A ‘26 Buick two-door coupe is a

A red ‘65 Deville that gave us “Cadillac arrest.”

A red ‘65 Deville that gave us “Cadillac arrest.” A ‘26 Buick two-door coupe is a

A ‘26 Buick two-door coupe is a really rare rod

A red ‘65 Deville that gave us “Cadillac arrest.” A ‘26 Buick two-door coupe is a
A red ‘65 Deville that gave us “Cadillac arrest.” A ‘26 Buick two-door coupe is a

If we were giving out rib- bons, this ‘60 Buick Electra 225 would surely get one. It’s one gorgeous ride!

No FeaR-

READER’S RIDE
READER’S
RIDE
When Building a CapeFear7 With One-Donor Miata Mechanicals
When Building a CapeFear7 With One-Donor Miata Mechanicals
When Building a CapeFear7 With One-Donor Miata Mechanicals

When Building a CapeFear7 With One-Donor Miata Mechanicals

When Building a CapeFear7 With One-Donor Miata Mechanicals
When Building a CapeFear7 With One-Donor Miata Mechanicals
When Building a CapeFear7 With One-Donor Miata Mechanicals
When Building a CapeFear7 With One-Donor Miata Mechanicals
When Building a CapeFear7 With One-Donor Miata Mechanicals
When Building a CapeFear7 With One-Donor Miata Mechanicals
When Building a CapeFear7 With One-Donor Miata Mechanicals
When Building a CapeFear7 With One-Donor Miata Mechanicals

As Told by David Culp Photos by Steve Temple

M y firm C.R.S.

began in 1983 as

a custom coach

works and restoration shop. Our chief body man,

Martin Rudholzner, and I have worked together (off and on) since 1969, but in opposite positions. Well, I should say that I was the

chief fiberglass man, having

been making surf boards and doing small boat repair since 1964 prior to getting

into project cars. We started out building Meyers Manx dune buggies, then a Kelmark Toronado GT, Fiberfab Valkyrie GT, CMC 356 Speedster and

a Meyers Tow’d (mine). Martin, having a coach- building background from Germany, put many

finishing touches to make

these kits look more like factory cars. In the early Eighties we were asked by a kit manufacturer to modify his buck (prototype) to make it more street-able without changing the basic look of the car. The design was beautiful but not practical, with a long, low nose that would scrape on driveway ramps. And when its gullwing doors opened water would pour onto seats, and there were no air vents inside the main cabin and the door windows were

fixed with a small opening.

So we added seals and drip channels to doors and trunks, rotated the inner fender and shortened the nose, and made door windows that opened. The manufacturer was happy with our mods, as he was more of a designer, and the shape had been his main focus. It is easy to get caught up in great looks and lose practicality. When we started to build our CapeFear7 CF7 we sat down and listed what we wanted our end product to be. We wanted a daily driver that would be fun to autocross, possibly use on track days or vintage race. Not really after a race car,

but would be able to easily make it into one. Flexibility in four- and six-cylinder

engines, transmission and rearend selection. By having this list, it kept us focused, we knew that the Locost 7 area is where we wanted to be. This made the design easy, since Lotus had led the way. Parts were sourced, a prototype was built. It showed us that we needed a wider chassis, plus the suspension did not handle as well as expected with wide tires. We paused and then made the decision to source our car parts from a single vehicle. The Mazda Miata NA/

NB fit the bill. A Miata

Maintenance Manual is

your best guide in torque settings and guiding the build. We also supply a set of instructions for areas not covered in the Miata Maintenance Manual.

We modified our focus

list somewhat, with ease of

build moved up to the top, and built a new prototype. We now would use the complete rear subframe, differential, and suspension, jig the NB front suspension

with one modification

but would be able to easily make it into one. Flexibility in four- and six-cylinder engines,
but would be able to easily make it into one. Flexibility in four- and six-cylinder engines,
but would be able to easily make it into one. Flexibility in four- and six-cylinder engines,
on the placement of the lower control arm slot and adjuster ring for more camber if
on the placement of the lower control arm slot and adjuster ring for more camber if

on the placement of the lower control arm slot and adjuster ring for more camber if needed. As for the Miata wiring harness, we disconnect door wiring and anything else you are not going to use, but we do not recommend cutting any wires. All the extra wire is looped together under the dash area and taped together. This keeps all the factory codes for service. The instrument panel is used either in the center of the dash or with our optional scuttle centered

over the steering shaft. We lengthen the steering shaft and shorten the (new) drive shaft. Parking brake cables are crossed left to right which takes care of the difference in distance. Two holes need to be drilled in the rear subframe to locate the newly crossed wires. After adding about 21 nuts, bolts, screws, and brake lines, the rear suspension is complete. The front suspension and steering come off the car and onto the frame mounting points just as you would replace them

on the car. Again, a Miata maintenance manual is your best guide in torque settings and guiding the build. The front fenders are attached to fender stays on the front spindle. Rear fenders mount onto the

body of the CF7 with five

bolts. The nose section is hinged to the front lower frame rail with hinges with removable pins. There are two stops, one on each hinge to locate the nose section when it is opened. We use the seats from the Miata, right seat to

the driver side, left seat to passenger side. We can put them in differently, but most

the driver side, left seat to passenger side. We can put them in differently, but most Miata passenger seats

have much less set to them and therefore are usually more comfortable than the driver’s seat. Regarding windshield

stanchions, we have a fixed

or a folding model at 13

inches, or 16 inches for tall drivers. Windshield

glass is not furnished with the kit but a template and instructions are. Since this was going to be my daily driver, I needed some where to carry groceries, parts, helmet, etc. I added nine inches to the rear which gave me a 12- inch opening at the top and 16 inches at the bottom. With a frame that worked very well, it was

time to design the body, and it being a replica made this step easier. We built a wireframe buck on top of the prototype frame, using 1990 Miata parts. Knowing the basic differences of NA/NB Miatas, we made allowances for the larger differential in the tunnel. Not having seen a VVT engine, we did not realize that the tallest part of the

the driver side, left seat to passenger side. We can put them in differently, but most
engine had move to the front. So bonnet prototype was very close to the Lotus7’s, but

engine had move to the front. So bonnet prototype was very close to the Lotus7’s, but a little taller due to no engine part hanging below the frame bottom. While showing off our full conforming prototype, I noticed an autocross 2002 Miata with this part sticking up in front of the engine. I made a copy of the part and found it stuck through our top over an inch. That required some more designed work.

We could have made a bubble, but it’s not a look I like so we are now making bonnet prototype #2. Now we take a much closer look at all the engine types that we might use. This caused

us to use a filler piece on

the frame and widen the new bonnet cover for V8, V6, and taller, straight-6 and 4-cylinder engines. If the builder wants a lower look they can still lower the engine in the frame and cut the lower sides of the

bonnet and scuttle. We built the mold of our bonnet where the front nose section could be a separate piece. This allows a Locost traditional aluminum bonnet for the back section, again trying to get different looks from the same parts. In this same theme we make our scuttle for our current CF7 from a portion

of the rear full bonnet by

adding a firewall piece

to it. By adding a newly created full-width scuttle to the full bonnet length you move the windshield back six inches, and again have a more traditional Locost look. However, it is much harder to get into with a top that a daily driver would have with this new scuttle placement.

The rear of the car can be any length the customer would like, from traditional to

The rear of the car can be any length the customer would like, from traditional to 18 inches at the top. Our current demo car has a 12- inch trunk and will hold two carry-on suitcases. We think this size balances the car’s look, but that’s a buyers choice. Autocrossing has helped us make a few changes to the roll bar, but a lack of choice 15-inch tire sizes has prompted us to add about 1.5 inches to the rear side height to make room for taller tires and wheels. We also now have a second style of frame, with the rear suspension jigged onto the frame instead of

using the Miata subframe. This is done mainly for people that want the lowest weight possible for their car. This frame also has a new adjustable front and rear upper control arm, these are optional on the standard frame. In the near future our Honda S2000-powered CF7 is taking shape. The prototype should be auto crossing before the end of the year. If all goes as planned it will be a 2016 model. The design work on our removable hardtop has been completed and should be ready in the second quarter 2016. Looking farther forward,

we are exploring the use of an NC Miata donor version. (Note the Editor’s commentary on this same subject in his Throttle Steering column in the July/ August 2015 issue.) As the new ND Miata has just come

out, the first years of the NC

Miata are eight to ten years old now, which price wise makes a case for their use as a donor. Even though we are making optional-power

chassis configurations and

some different suspension parts, we still feel that for most people the single donor is the best way to go.

It is easy to maintain, repair, and service. We recently helped a new owner of a replica dial in his car at an autocross at ZMax Drag way parking lot and had our choice of the single-donor

project car solidified. We

compete against European Lotus replicas and hear their owners talk of the

challenges in getting replacement parts. Even consumables such as brake pads front to rear are fromhttp://www.capefear7.com " id="pdf-obj-64-2" src="pdf-obj-64-2.jpg">

challenges in getting replacement parts. Even consumables such as brake pads front to rear are from different car manufacturers. And some of these parts are not imported to the USA. When asked about our components, we tell them they are just an NA or NB Miata part and usually get a blank stare, then more questions about our A/C,

challenges in getting replacement parts. Even consumables such as brake pads front to rear are fromhttp://www.capefear7.com " id="pdf-obj-64-6" src="pdf-obj-64-6.jpg">

hood (top), doors and boot (trunk). Then we tell them of driving our CF7 as a daily driver. Total mileage on the mechanicals is approximately 175K, and approximately 65K since the car was built. During this same time period we auto-crossed over 650 laps. We dyno’d last year and saw 120 hp at the rear wheels, and we have had a great

time. Myself and a friend have driven the car for the last two years and have been competitive and had a lot of fun for not much money. So there’s nothing to fear here!

SOURCE:

C.R.S.

challenges in getting replacement parts. Even consumables such as brake pads front to rear are fromhttp://www.capefear7.com " id="pdf-obj-64-18" src="pdf-obj-64-18.jpg">

Available now, ch

eck your dealer for inventory! Own a legend today!

800-297-6253

Snake

Snake

Bitten

Bitten

How the Cobra’s Venom Lives on in the Viper
How the Cobra’s Venom Lives
on in the Viper

By Larry Weiner Photos and Quotes Courtesy Chrysler Communications

W hile Ford

has been

content

with developing ever-higher performance versions of the Mustang, for some strange reason it has never attempted to resurrect the Shelby Cobra. It took the vision of two principals at

a competing auto company to bring it forward with the Viper GTS-R. The story begins back in 1988 when Chrysler President Bob Lutz suggested to Tom Gale at Chrysler Design, that they consider developing a modern-day version of the original Shelby Cobra. They astutely recognized that there was an opportunity to capture the nation’s attention with an ultra-high

performance sports car unlike anything else on the market. A clay model was prepared within a few months, followed by an actual full-scale prototype that was built by Metalcrafters in California. The prototype Viper debuted in the Dodge exhibit at the 1989 North American International Automobile Show in

Viper GTS-R leads C7R Corvette through corner at Watkins Glen.

The Dodge Viper SRT GTS-R pierces the darkness at the Petit Le Mans race at Road Atlanta.

Detroit, where it was the hit of the show. Response from the public was so overwhelmingly positive that the green light was given by management to move the program forward and Team Viper was born. Chief Engineer Roy Sjorberg was chosen to head it up, and along with 85 engineers, the team went right to work developing the Viper as an actual production vehicle. When Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca personally approved the program in 1990, consumer excitement for the vehicle hit a new high, and many went to their local Dodge dealer to

place a deposit to secure an early car. The most highly anticipated sports car of the

place a deposit to secure an early car. The most highly anticipated sports car of the new decade, the Viper was chosen as the Pace Car for the 1991 Indianapolis 500 Race. Fittingly, since it

was inspired by the original

Cobra, it was driven by none other than racing legend Carroll Shelby. Production commenced later that year

and by 1992, the first new

Vipers were being delivered to enthusiastic buyers.

One of the things the Viper accomplished was proving that Chrysler was back in a big way after its near brush with extinction in 1980. Since the day it went into production, this ten-cylinder Viper has left

an indelible mark on both the street and the track as one of the ultimate sports cars in the world. Over the years, the Viper has continued to evolve

since it was first conceived.

And like the Cobra that

originally inspired it, Vipers have raced in sanctioned events and achieved podium performances all over the world. During the last several years in particular, the successes have come at an incredible pace, a testimony to the high degree of sophistication that this

vehicle features, especially the SRT GTS-R racing versions. In fact, it’s the red-hot American supercar that has forever earned its stripes and left an indelible mark on the record books. At the Petit LeMans, held at Road Atlanta in Braselton, Georgia, the two-car SRT Motorsports team won the team and driver (Kuno Wittmer) titles in the inaugural IMSA TUDOR United SportsCar Championship GTLM- class. In addition, SRT Motorsports won two- of-three championships

contested in the class

and finished second in

the GTLM manufacturer championship in just the second full year of the program. While Chrysler Group LLC discontinued the factory-backed SRT (Street and Racing Technology) Motorsports racing program in IMSA (International Motor Sports Association) with the conclusion of the 2014 season, it’s certainly safe to say that we have not seen the last of Vipers racing in competition.

Cutaway illustration of Dodge Viper GTS by David Kimball shows how racing real- ly has improved
Cutaway illustration of Dodge Viper GTS
by David Kimball shows how racing real-
ly has improved the breed when it comes
to this sophisticated sports car.

Ralph Gilles, Senior Vice President of Product Design, Chrysler Group LLC said it best: “We are very proud of the amazing achievements our fantastic teams, drivers and partners have achieved on track the last few seasons. We thank

them for their hard work, effort and commitment to SRT Motorsports. It’s been an honor to be a part of the inaugural IMSA TUDOR United SportsCar Championship season and we wish them every success in the future.”

In celebration of the achievements of one of the premier racing vehicles in the world, join us for this pictorial celebrating the Viper GTS-R in its element, on the track, winning races.

Team Viper SRT GTS-R racing into the sunset, literally and figuratively.
Team Viper SRT GTS-R racing into the sunset, literally and figuratively.

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MISSION

A Former Rocket Scientist Goes From Piloting a Cobra to Launching a Mid-Engine Missile, the Beck GTS, on an Epic Road Trip

CONTROL

As Told By Pierre A. Grellet-Aumont Photos by Steve Temple and courtesy of Carey Hines of Special Edition

B y way of background, I

am an ex-rocket scientist,

transplanted from the south

of France to the East coast of the

United States about 20 years ago. In addition to computers, mathematics, physics and science in general, I have multiple interests and hobbies

such as B&W film photography, flying

gliders, and driving classic cars. I have owned a few classic cars before, but lately I have been amazed by the price increases of some of my favorite bucket-list cars (E-type Jaguar, some Ferraris, Porsche 356, 912 and some older 911s, for example). So I began to realize, probably also thanks for the internet and online forums, that there are lots

of replicas out there of pretty good quality.

In fact, I own a 20-year Cobra replica from Unique Motorcars, and up until

now I was always under the impression that replicas were pretty much a Cobra-

specific phenomenon. But

by doing a bit of homework,

  • I discovered the main

players in the Porsche Spyder 550 replica market, so I bought one and liked it. Also around that time I

considered buying a new Porsche Cayman GTS as well, but quickly realized it might be a lot cooler to own an older GTS, such as a 904GTS. I own several books about Porsches, and

  • I have always loved the

chapters about the 1964 904 Carrera GTS Coupe. Compared with my Cobra, they certainly are different approaches, but

  • I don’t look at it as Cobra versus Porsche. For me it’s complementary, as I like to try everything (I also drive a Tesla P85D as my family car). Getting back to the 904,

  • I found a fair amount of information about the two main replica manufacturers, one in Europe, one in the U.S. Clearly I was going to pick the U.S. guys if possible. Having imported classic cars from Europe before, I knew from experience that it could

become a nightmare (not to mention dealing with the New York DMV). Once I decided the Beck GTS would be the best route for me, I contacted the company, which is basically when I met Carey

Hines, entirely by email

until we finally spoke and

met in person mid-2015 when I went to Indiana to pick up the car myself.

After my research online, some discussions with other Porsche collectors, I had narrowed down the design I wanted to a repro of the 1964 Porsche 904 GTS by Scuderia Filipinetti

as shown here: http://

RIDE READER’S
RIDE
READER’S

last summer, and decided to commit some serious money on people who I had never met and who I only saw traces of on internet forums, websites and YouTube videos. Considering that a real 904 was far out of my budget and too special to drive on the street, this project was a worthy alternative, once properly researched and sorted. To that end, the specs

  • silodrome.com/porsche- for the build included a 300hp, 3.6-liter engine from a 1995 Porsche 911 (993), controlled by a 993 Motronic ECU. Mods to the engine included new top- end gaskets, cleaned-up hardware, deleted power steering pump, adding a CNC aluminum cam cap, deleting the secondary air injection pump (SAI), modifying both the engine cradle bracket and intake (in order to rotate the plenum for clearance), plus adding a short runner intake and milling a custom

I picked #42 because it the street number for my house in Long Island, and

also because my wife says, “I only buy cars for two people lately.” But really it’s a joke in reference to the movie http://www.imdb.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide

to the Galaxy where 42 is the “Answer to The Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything” as seen here https://en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/42_(number) My car is now nicknamed “42” in my family. So I started the process

60-2 flywheel.

The engine is backed by a 915 transaxle from

a 1985 Porsche 911. The latter item was completely rebuilt and resealed, and

fitted with new dog teeth.

It was also machined for

a flipped ring-and-pinion

for mid-engine use. The bellhousing was notched for the Motronic reference sensor as well. A Wevo G50 internal gate shifter was added to improve upon the 915 shifting. As for locating extra components to complete the vehicle, Carey Hines sourced all the parts, when available, otherwise most were fabricated in-house by Special Edition. The CNC aluminum uprights, front and rear, were outsourced to a local machine shop near Special Edition in Indiana, and they are made to accept all 911 bearings and rotors.

Carey and I never spoke on the phone; all our discussions until delivery were done by email exclusively. He sent me weekly updates every Friday afternoon. Soon enough it became a ritual at the end of the week when I anxiously waited for his email update, often with photos showing the actual progress on my car. Carey and I also exchanged lots of emails to discuss every the detail of the project:

engine displacement, the cable shifter, the Wevo gated shifted for the 915 transmission, the exact color code for the paint (not all reds are the same), the exact location of the white stripe, the wheel style, the decals, the color and material of the straps,

seats and belts colors, the location of the mirrors and the gas tank opening, the

rear reflectors, the shape

and origin of the Hella foglights, the dashboard fabric, the location of the killer switch, etc, etc, etc ... Carey was always very careful in offering me different options, constantly verifying my own taste and opinion before making any major decisions, and always offering kind and good advice if I did not understand his questions (too technical for me) or if I hesitated on certain choices. As for the body hue, I did not want the car to be gray like most of the originals were, mostly because I was concerned that a car so low on modern road would be invisible (since it’s nearly

car to be mine and unique, not seen much before, and the other color choices (blue,

car to be mine and unique, not seen much before, and the other color choices (blue, or green) were not so exciting. I had found that several original 904s had been painted in Signal

the same color as the road). Also, today other cars are too big and too careless to

Red, in addition to my Scuderia Filipinetti reference, so it sounded true to the original to pick DuPont’s Porsche Signal Red (as seen in Great Cars of Great Collections Vol. 3 by Yoshiho

car to be mine and unique, not seen much before, and the other color choices (blue,

risk being invisible around them (people texting and driving). Also I wanted the

Matsuda). I sometimes second- guess myself about the red color, because I hear

car to be mine and unique, not seen much before, and the other color choices (blue,

often, “Hey kids, look at the amazing ‘Ferrari’ parked over there!” or similar statements which I think are partially due to the color. In addition, that color attracts the attention of local highway troopers a lot more than gray would have. But in the end I have no regret because this car came out sooo awesome looking. I will not pay

attention to people who think it’s a Ferrari and if it costs me a few tickets, that’s still worth it. Did I tell you how awesome looking this car is?! Speaking of people who don’t recognize that the car is, I must talk about those who do recognize it. When I drove the car back from Carey Hines’ shop in Indiana, back to New York, I crossed a few other states.

That first day of my two-day

drive, after leaving South

Bend, I quickly reached Ohio on I-80, and I had to

do my first pit stop (to feed

the driver mostly). I parked on one of those standard Ohio highway rest areas, but I tried to park far from the other cars, for fear of getting my new Beck GTS

too close to a truck or something big that might hit it. I also worried that I was not too comfortable driving it around a parking

lot yet, so I put it far from the pack. Then I realized another car was following me, and that car had been following me for quite a while on I-80. When I got out, the other car parked near me, and an older gentleman came out, very agitated and excited. An older lady, his wife probably, who was traveling with him, waited inside their car, and did not say a

minutes, I ended explaining where I was coming from and where the car itself was coming from, he was not disappointed and told me he understood. It made sense to rebuild such a great car and that mine looked exactly what he had seen back then in 1964 when he saw that same 904, same design that is, on a racetrack somewhere on the East coast and was

Clearly she was not sharing his enthusiasm about the old GTS design, but she had tolerated this detour so he could talk to me. That was a very touching moment of my trip! Why did I take on driving a vintage-style road-course racer all the way from Indiana to New York? When Carey told me the car was going to be ready, we begin discussing ways to bring

lot yet, so I put it far from the pack. Then I realized another car was

word (while fuming a bit, as I found out later). He came to me with the smile of a little boy and immediately said, without any introduction, “It’s a 904GTS isn’t it? I remember these Porsches when they came out back in the day.” I did not immediately correct him and rather asked him what he remembered. We spoke for maybe 15

dreaming of being able to get one for himself. He was clearly on a little cloud, being able to see his beloved dream car again, and he confessed he had been following me for over 30 miles on I-80, out of his original way. After a while admitted that he was going to have to leave because his travel companion was running out of patience.

it back East, to my house on Long Island, NY. One possibility was always to put it onto a truck an ship it to me. I did not like that idea, one because I knew the wait would be killing me. (I had cars shipped to me from Europe or from California and each time I began counting the days hours and minutes from the time the sender put it on

the truck.) Carey suggest that we meet halfway during a trip

he did to a car show in Pennsylvania, but when that event occurred he told me the car was not 100 percent ready and he still wanted to spend some time working on it. So I waited some

more and ended up flying

to South Bend Indiana one night, slept at the local Hilton hotel, and got picked up by one of Carey’s colleagues to go visit their shop and pick up my car a few weeks later. I did not think Indiana was too far away from me, but even after 20 years of living in the US, I still often forget that 800 miles is almost 1300 kilometers, which is about the length of a round trip from Marseille to Paris, France. When I was younger, living in France, I had driven one way from

Paris to Marseille several times, at some seriously fast speeds, with fast modern

comfortable cars, but I had not done the roundtrip in one shot. So thinking about the 800-mile drive

  • I hypnotized myself into

delusion, thinking that a 800-mile drive from South Bend to Long Island was about the same thing as the 777 kilometers on clean, fast French highways that

  • I had done before in one

drive, in less than a day. Anyhow, I thought it would a nice shakedown trip, and it turned out it was. I only broke the speedometer cable, about one hour into the trip (I drove the rest of the way by estimating my speed based on the Waze app on my phone). Carey and his team had marked all the screws in the engine bay so that I could monitor if anything

was getting unscrewed, and it all went pretty well. After two days driving

this ferocious beast, only my feet hurt a little bit. I had found a great way to sit so that my back and my butt

did not hurt. But I was tired of pushing that heavy racing clutch while maintaining my other foot on the gas, so

  • I cramped on my right foot

toward the end, while the

rest of my body was carried

by my high adrenaline level the whole two days it took me for the drive. I basically was missing the “automatic cruising mode” from my Tesla. (But no such option was available back in the day, of course, so how could

  • I rightly expect to have that

on my Beck? And I soon

encountered some other old-school aspects in the cockpit.) The drive went well until I reached the middle

the truck.) Carey suggest that we meet halfway during a trip he did to a car

of Pennsylvania at night. I realized then how low the car was on the road, and that driving at night, looking for a hotel in the middle of nowhere, was very uncomfortable. Each car I crossed seemed to have their lights stuck in high position. And the temperature dropped quickly in the cabin, misting and fogging the windshield, which turned out to be challenging in car so minimalist, since there is no way to blow air toward the windshield. I made it safely to a

town I know a bit from my past experience as a glider pilot, because of its great aerological environment

(I had flown there in the

late 1990s with a famous american glider pilot) and so I reached State College, PA and spent the night there at a local Marriott

hotel. I was a bit nervous letting my new Beck GTS sleep outside on that hotel parking lot, but when I laid on my bed that night I felt immediately asleep while feeling the vibration of my all-day drive shaking all my bones. Only after I reached New

Jersey did I finally see a

police patrol car following and looking at my Beck GTS. Since I was not driving

of Pennsylvania at night. I realized then how low the car was on the road, and

faster than the rest of

the traffic, no tickets

followed, and I actually

got a nice thumbs-up

from one of the officers.

On the other hand,

was also reminded

I

I

sitting in this

magnificent

I

reached

I

that in this part of the

country lots of drivers are a bit reckless and absorbed by other things than driving (texting and talking on their cell phone).

began to become

severely aware that I could get run over while

car at about 40 inches above the asphalt. The worse part was when

New York city. Trying to avoid it, I drove north toward

Long Island, but crossing the George Washington bridge was the biggest challenge. First the fact was that I had forgotten to carry my EZ- Pass with me, and each time

had to pay toll during

of Pennsylvania at night. I realized then how low the car was on the road, and
of Pennsylvania at night. I realized then how low the car was on the road, and
the trip I had to literally stop the car, untie my five- point seatbelt and reach
the trip I had to literally stop the car, untie my five- point seatbelt and reach

the trip I had to literally

stop the car, untie my five-

point seatbelt and reach up through the window and with the door half open, in order to throw some cash at the laughing attendant. It was a pain and I will never

forget my EZ-Pass at home again!

So entering the GWB bridge was a challenge because I had no EZ-Pass,

traffic was extremely dense,

and I was very nervous of getting run over by a crazy NJ driver, all the while keeping the car in First gear and trying not to rev it too much nor stalling

it. That was all around noon, when I also started feeling seriously hungry,

with absolutely no options to stop for a nice meal anywhere close from my path. It got better once I reach the Long Island Expressway and carefully drove on the

middle lane, with the traffic,

as not to attract too much

attention. But it turned out

that pretty soon a NY State Patrol car was following me, tailgated me I should say, and I recall that he did it for a good 15 minutes. I did not immediately realize that it was a police car, as the mirror on the GTS is very small and the rear visibility is marginal at best. (You basically can’t tell what’s happening behind you, so your only option to be safe when passing is to accelerate). Once I realized I was being tailgated by a police car, I pulled over, thinking he was about to pull me over anyway, might was well do it sooner than later. At that point of the trip I was still carried by adrenaline, and I was ready

to get my first ticket. So

I signaled changing lane from middle to right lane, and began slowing down to get ready for my ticket. (Incroyable!)

The police car stopped following and actually slowly began to pass me,

the officer driving the car

gave some sort of military salute and a big smile followed by a thumbs up, and then he took off. He

was probably running my plates the whole time,

trying to figure out what

kind of car it was, and because it’s a very unusual

car, it took him a while to

do it, I figured, now feeling

a bit relieved (I have not

received a speeding ticket, knock on wood, in a long time, even though I tend to drive fast, in fast cars.) Once I made it to my house, I dropped my bag, got myself a nice, hot coffee, and proceeded to drive

another 20 minutes to bring the car to my mechanic in the next town. I needed to get the car inspected for completing my NY States registration. Before leaving to Indiana, I had managed to get the car registered, and I had temporary plates, but after you are done with that you have 10 days to get the car inspected in order to keep it legal on NY roads. The day I drove it back and reached NY was day number nine on this 10-day

window. Needless to say that when I drove my new Beck GTS on the parking lot of my favorite classic car shop in Southampton NY (it’s called GrandPrixCafe, their website is here http:// www.grandprixcafe.com/

), I made quite an entrance and everybody came to see me—I mean the car.

  • I felt like some warrior

coming back from the

crusades or something, and

  • I was bringing back some

treasure they all wanted to touch. It was a priceless

SOURCE:

Special Edition / (866) 396-2325) http://www.beckspeedster.com

Insurance Coverages Available: www.worldclassins.com
Insurance Coverages Available:
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full gallop
full gallop
full gallop
full gallop
full gallop

full gallop

Edelbrock Unleashes a Stampede of 720 Horses From a Blown-and-Stroked LS3

Text by Steve Temple Photos by Steve Temple, and Courtesy of Edelbrock

full gallop Edelbrock Unleashes a Stampede of 720 Horses From a Blown-and-Stroked LS3 Text by Steve

W hile GM’s stock LS3 has

proven itself in wide variety of

applications for various project

and competition cars, the standard output

of 430hp could be better—way better.

What’s it take to achieve more than a 65-percent increase in power? Two basic elements: Higher pressure and more volume. Working together, they pull 720hp and 695 lb/ft from Edelbrock’s hard-charging LS3 crate engine. The higher pressure results from the forced induction of an E-Force twin-rotor blower. And more volume comes from a stroked crank and rods. All easier said than done, of course. So we spent some time sweating the details

with the engine guys at Edelbrock to find

out what it takes to whip an LS3 into a lather. After all, getting a thoroughbred to run harder and faster requires way more than just ringing a bell. Consider the performance parts that Shaver Racing Engines installed into the LS3 block. Increasing the swept volume of the cylinder from 376 to 416 cubes begins with a Manley crankshaft boasting a 4.0-inch stroke (increased from 3.62 inches stock). It in turn pumps elongated H-Beam connecting rods and aluminum pistons through a 4.065-inch bore. While this stroked setup is a well proven path, some background info shows just how far we’ve come in the last 16 years or so. Recall that the old 5.7L LS1 was inherently constrained by its 3.900-inch bores, so that even when honed almost to the water jacket, a 4.000-inch-stroke crank achieved only 383 inches. A larger bore required sleeving the cylinders—an expensive and not always reliable option, since coolant leaks and poor cylinder sealing can result. In 2005, the LS2 featured siamese cylinder bores, making a 400ci displacement possible with

out what it takes to whip an LS3 into a lather. After all, getting a thoroughbred

Normally, the top of the supercharger measures 21.54 inches from

crank centerline, but a low-profile version is available as well.

out what it takes to whip an LS3 into a lather. After all, getting a thoroughbred

Cam profiles for blown engines typically have wide lobe separa- tions and minimal (or negative) overlap, which explains the 121-de- gree LSA of the bumpstick. The hydraulic roller camshaft offers up to 215 degrees intake/247 degrees exhaust duration at 0.050 in., and .629 in. intake/.656 in. exhaust valve lift using the included 1.7:1 ratio roller rocker arms

Rather than a press-fitted pin, the Manley pistons have low-friction, floating pins with an offset design
Rather than a press-fitted pin, the Manley pistons have low-friction, floating pins with an offset design

Rather than a press-fitted pin, the Manley pistons have low-friction, floating pins with an offset design to reduce piston slap.

a stroker crank. Then just two years later the 6.2L block (basically the same one found in the LS3), featured a 4.065-inch bore. Now, hone out the bores

by 0.005 inches and fit in

a 4.000-inch crank, and voila—the displacement goes from 376 to 416 cubic inches.

What are sort of crank does Edelbrock use? Manley’s lightweight design consists of 4240 forgings, nitrided for added strength, along with other treatments such as stress relieving, shot-peening

At 6500 rpm, Edelbrock’s 416ci stroked and supercharged LS3 hits its peak horsepower of 720hp. Peak torque of 695 lb/ft is at a much lower point in the powerband, at 4500 rpm.

and magnafluxing. The

large, .125 radius journals are micro-polished and

lightened as well. For

sufficient clearance from

the piston skirts, the

counterweights are fully

profiled, and the main

bearings are gun-drilled for further weight reduction. The aforementioned Manley H-beam rods measure 6.125 inches (versus 6.098 inches stock),

with the block clearanced to prevent interference with the rod bolts. As for the forged, 2618-aluminum pistons, they have an 18cc dish, for a comparatively lower 9.5:1 CR to offset

the increased airflow from

the blower and ensure a

smooth, knock-free burn of 91 octane pump gas. (In a normally aspirated LS3 stroker, a CR of 11.7:1 is not uncommon, delivering an output of 600 horses or more.) The pistons features low-friction, 0.150-inch

floating pins instead

At 6500 rpm, Edelbrock’s 416ci stroked and supercharged LS3 hits its peak horsepower of 720hp. Peak

Closeup of Manley’s H-beam rod and dished piston with valve clearance.

of pressed-fit units. In

addition, Manley employs a

one-fixture manufacturing

process to maintain an optimum ring groove to skirt squareness. An offset wrist-pin design reduces piston slap, and a bridging ring spans the pin area. Total Seal’s package has 1.5, 1.5 and 3mm rings. Roundwire locks, tool steel

wrist pins and pressure balance grooves are included with every set. As already noted in passing, a normally aspirated stroker motor leaves some ponies on the table, which leads us right into supercharging— the source of the higher pressure mentioned at the outset. Edelbrock’s E-Force

At 6500 rpm, Edelbrock’s 416ci stroked and supercharged LS3 hits its peak horsepower of 720hp. Peak

The camshaft is specifically configured for a supercharged applica- tion with a 121-degree lobe-separation angle.

91

Manley’s 4.000-inch crank not only has a longer throw, but also profiled counterweights for clearance. The

Manley’s 4.000-inch crank not only has a longer throw, but also profiled counterweights for clearance.

Manley’s 4.000-inch crank not only has a longer throw, but also profiled counterweights for clearance. The

The standard supercharger assembly and matching aluminum coil covers are black powdered coated for durability.

A low-profile Corvette lid (shown here) is available for the blower case, to provide an extra

A low-profile Corvette lid (shown here) is available for the blower

case, to provide an extra two inches of clearance.

A low-profile Corvette lid (shown here) is available for the blower case, to provide an extra

LS3 blower spins Eaton TVS 2300cc/rev four-lobe rotors with 160° of twist. They’re designed for maximum

flow, minimum temperature

rise and quiet operation for better drivability. An integrated bypass valve helps eliminate parasitic loss under light throttle for improved mileage potential

(as if fuel efficiency is

even a consideration when

running blown stroker motor). E-Force superchargers have an innovative inlet

configuration with a

shorter, less restrictive intake path for improved air

flow, and no need for a jack-

shaft. Keeping the air cool is a high-capacity, air-to-water intercooler and low temp heat exchanger. The supercharger features a driver-side throttle body orientation for ease of intake routing in a variety of project vehicles, and a Corvette belt offset for a compact installation. The top of the supercharger measures 21.54 inches from crank centerline in its

standard configuration (but

a special order is available

This closeup of the low-profile

blower case shows the driver’s

side throttle body orientation for ease of intake routing.

The standard pulley size delivers 12 psi of boost. for a lower profile, Corvette C6 lid

The standard pulley size delivers 12 psi of boost.

for a lower profile, Corvette

C6 lid for additional two inches of hood clearance, and Edelbrock is receptive to other custom requests). With the supplied 2.75- inch supercharger pulley, boost is approximately 12

psi. Even more pressure is possible, up to about 14psi, by adding an optional overdrive crank pulley. To keep pace with increased

airflow of the blower,

Edelbrock supplies 60 lb/ hr injectors and custom fuel mapping with its pre-

The Bosch sensor comes mounted on the blower case.

The standard pulley size delivers 12 psi of boost. for a lower profile, Corvette C6 lid
Here’s a closeup of the bridge ring in the wrist-pin area. 46750 Included components 95

Here’s a closeup of the bridge ring in the wrist-pin area.

Here’s a closeup of the bridge ring in the wrist-pin area. 46750 Included components 95

46750 Included components

46760 Included components

programmed ECU. But for

the higher psi figure noted

above, a custom tune and bigger fuel pump would be

required.

Typically positive- displacement, supercharged

cam profiles have wide lobe

separations and minimal (or negative) overlap, hence the 121-degree LSA of the bumpstick. The hydraulic roller camshaft offers up to 215 degrees intake/247 degrees exhaust duration at 0.050 in., and .629 in. intake/.656 in. exhaust

valve lift using the included 1.7:1 ratio roller rocker

arms. The heads are high-

flow LSA units designed for supercharged applications with a swirl feature on the

intake ports that allows for more spark advance.

The Edelbrock GM LS 416 c.i.d. E-Force supercharged long- block, crate engine come comes complete with essential supercharger kit components, such as the electric intercooler water pump, intercooler plumbing and intercooler recovery tank, as well as fuel rails, 60 lb./hr. fuel injectors, a mass

airflow sensor housing,

and a reusable air filter. A

turnkey package with all the front-drive accessories is also available to suit the

particular needs of vehicle builders. Either way, this

racehorse is ready to run in a Corvette or other projects

cars. Just spank the flanks

and you’re off!

SOURCE:

Edelbrock, LLC

com

Torque: 695 ft-lbs. Compression: 9.5:1 Block: GM LS3 Aluminum Crankshaft: Forged

Specs

Displacement: 416 c.i.d. Horsepower: 720 hp

Induction: E-Force Supercharger System #1540

GM with Edelbrock Valve Springs #5768

Warranty: 2-year / Unlimited mileage

Rocker Arms: LS3, 1.7 ratio

215°/247°, .629/.656, 121 LSA

Pistons: Forged Aluminum - 18cc

Finish: Black powder coated

Rods: Forged H-Beam

Cylinder Heads:

Camshafts:

4340

Turn - key Commission

·

Kick - Out

Kick - Out

· DualSport

DualSport

· Manxter 2+2

Manxter

2+2

Professional assembly for

your

nex

Builds

t adventure

DENMATCARS

Cape Cod, MA

774 487 7826

A C4 Bombshell Molded by

Larry Shinoda, Designer

of the ’63 Corvette Split-

Window Coupe

Text and Photos by Steve Temple

W hat’s needed

to transform

a so-so shape

into an exciting

new design? Well, in the case of the rare Corvette conversion shown here, it took the combined efforts of a three-time Indy winner, a fast-food magnate and

a Japanese/American designer. Called the Rick Mears Special Edition, it was developed by famed Sting Ray designer Larry Shinoda. Although not a high-

volume seller, its execution decisively demonstrates to enterprising car builders of all stripes what can be achieved with some automotive artistry. Near the end of his illustrious career, Shinoda had always wanted to give the C4 some “sex appeal”, as he put it. He designed the body package in 1989, and at the Long Beach CART race that year showed his sketches to a friend, Jim Williams (president and CEO of Golden State Foods, a key supplier to the McDonald’s fast-food chain.) He also happened to be an associate sponsor of the Penske racing team, which led to the involvement of

an additional person of note. Shinoda asked racer Rick Mears to look at the renderings as well, who also was impressed by the design, so they green- lighted the project. While the program started with high hopes after an auspicious debut in 1990 on a ’90 C4 at the Los Angeles Auto Show, the total number of Rick Mears conversions ever completed amounted to barely more than a couple dozen (according to one owners’ forum), possibly due to its high price. In addition, the installation was fairly involved, especially on the roadster. Even so, initial response to the body treatment was

very positive, as it gave

the C4’s chunky, clipped lines a whole new level of sleekness, in both a visual and functional sense. Not only did it create a more stylish Corvette, but also provided an improved drag

coefficient, lowering it from

.34 to .30 Cd. Ironically, this

conversion for America’s sports car came from a man interned as a youth by the U.S. government during WWII for his Japanese ancestry. He would later

become an influential—

pivotal, in fact—designer for major changes in the shape of the Corvette. During those early dark

years, the young Shinoda was sent with his family to

a “War Relocation Camp” in Manzanar, California, a bleak area between Death Valley and the eastern slopes of the Sierra Mountains. He kept up his

spirits, though, by building a reclining armchair for his parents from some castoff wooden crates. After his release from the camp, Shinoda let off

steam by building hot rods.

He won the first NHRA

nationals in 1955, driving a ’29 Ford roadster. He later

attended the renowned Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. He soon discovered that he

simply didn’t fit in there,

and left his studies to join GM in 1956 under Bill Mitchell, following brief stints at Ford and Packard. Shinoda’s combined traits of ingenuity and nonconformity held him in good stead, as he found a kindred spirit in Corvette

Chief Engineer Zora Arkus-Duntov. Yet their independent, contrarian natures inevitably locked horns (note sidebar), particularly over the ’63

Sting Ray’s Split Window

configuration. Shinoda’s

distinctive design feature grated on Zora’s practical preference for driver visibility. While the single- piece rear window won out the following year, in hindsight the Split Window later proved to be a compelling styling element that gave the ’63 Sting Ray a special allure. So too with the shape of

the Mears Special Edition. To give the C4 a more sensual, less sterile quality,

Shinoda’s design approach was to soften the lines, with a bit of the coke bottle shape from the ’68 Stingray that he crafted, based on his ’65 Mako Shark II concept. He also objected to the belt line on the C4 production car, so he eliminated the rub strip that concealed the body seams. While Shinoda was pleased with the

improvements in airflow

resulting from the wider rocker panels that kept

the wind from boiling off the sides, his

helping the airflow stay

attached to the rear deck and spill off it more cleanly,

with less turbulence. Wind- tunnel testing indicated that it also generated downforce, cutting down on the body’s excess lift at speed. The particular roadster shown here is owned by Dave Glass of D&M Corvette. The previous owner, Ed Rensi, coincidentally an exec for McDonald’s, initially contacted Glass about selling the car on consignment, but Glass collects all sort of

significant cars, and bought

favorite element was the stinger tail treatment. This five-inch spoiler tapered the shape,
favorite element
was the stinger tail
treatment. This
five-inch spoiler
tapered the shape,
Chief Engineer Zora Arkus-Duntov. Yet their independent, contrarian natures inevitably locked horns (note sidebar), particularly over

it outright, along with a set of spare body panels. “I don’t care if I sell it,” he says. “I’ve seen some body kits over the years that really screw up the lines of a Corvette. But an experienced Corvette owner—a true Corvette

guy— really loves Shinoda’s design.” The one shown here is one of only 11 or so convertibles built, he adds, and repainted in Pearl Yellow using a three-coat system. The 11 body parts, made of injection-molded polyurethane, were actually the least expensive aspect of the build, amounting to $1800 back in 1991,

according to financial

documents for

this specific

order. They consisted of upper and lower front fascias, a four- piece aluminum air dam, front fender emblems, rocker panels, and upper and lower rear fascias. Also adding to the price were custom wheels, mounting brackets, assorted lights and lamps, various

it outright, along with a set of spare body panels. “I don’t care if I sell
accessories, and a tailpipe extension. Fit and finish of all these components ran $8000, and paint

accessories, and a tailpipe

extension. Fit and finish

of all these components

ran $8000, and paint was another $6400, for a grand total of $19,115. And that was on top of the $46K sticker price for the production car. So as noted at the outset,

Shinoda’s upfit commanded a significant upcharge, and

that didn’t include nearly $10K worth of Lingenfelter

accessories, and a tailpipe extension. Fit and finish of all these components ran $8000, and paint

drivetrain mods done to some of the Mears Special Edition cars. This package raised the LT1’s 300hp factory output to a much more vigorous 390 horses.

While nothing was changed on the suspension, a shift kit on the automatic quickened upshifts. Max speed, helped by Shinoda’s wind-cheating wizardry, was measured at 179 mph, besting the 171 mph top end of a ZR-1. All told, the Rick Mears

Special Edition was a fitting finale to an exceptional

design career spanning three eras of Corvettes, from C2 to C4. For that, Mr. Shinoda, we can never thank you enough.

While nothing was changed on the suspension, a shift kit on the automatic quickened upshifts. Maxhttp://dmcorvette.com SOURCE: 630-968-0031 " id="pdf-obj-106-8" src="pdf-obj-106-8.jpg">

D&M Corvette 1804 Ogden Ave,, Downers Grove, IL 6051

SOURCE:

630-968-0031

A Dinner to Remember With Larry Shinoda And a Missed Opportunity for Another Concept Car By
A Dinner to Remember With Larry Shinoda And a Missed Opportunity for Another Concept Car By
A Dinner to Remember With Larry Shinoda And a Missed Opportunity for Another Concept Car By

A Dinner to Remember With

Larry Shinoda

And a Missed Opportunity for Another Concept Car

By Larry Weiner, of Performance West Group, Inc.

A Dinner to Remember With Larry Shinoda And a Missed Opportunity for Another Concept Car By
  • I ’ve been captivated by Corvettes as far back as I can remember. But there’s one above all others that really stops me in

my tracks; the Split Window Coupe. When

I saw the first one in person in 1963, I was

smitten, and knew from that moment that one day I would own one of these amazing vehicles. Over the years, I have learned as much as I could about the history of the ’63 Corvette, the talented people who were responsible for its creation and how it came to exist. The design was inspired by the Corvette

Stingray race car that was first penned by Pete Brock and refined by Larry Shinoda

under the direction of Bill Mitchell who succeeded Harley Earl as the head of

General Motors Design. The appearance of the 1963 Corvette Sting Ray was directly

influenced by the Stingray race car, and

Larry Shinoda designed a real world production sports car whose appearance rendered nearly all others obsolete the day it debuted. Over the years, my passion for the ’63 Corvette burned brightly and ultimately I did purchase and restore a Split Window Coupe. So imagine my surprise, when I was working at the 1997 SEMA show debuting a new concept for another auto

manufacturer, and saw a man sitting in a chair just across from our display. I immediately recognized him as none other than Larry Shinoda. Not the bashful type, I walked over and introduced myself. He was outgoing and

we spent several hours on the show floor

talking about cars and vehicle design. As the day wound down, I asked him if he had any plans for dinner. When he said that he didn’t, I invited him to join us and he

graciously accepted. We spent a memorable evening at an excellent restaurant, and Shinoda regaled us with stories about his time at General Motors, working with legends such as Bill Mitchell and Zora Arkus-Duntov, Corvette Chief Engineer. One of the stories he shared with us was about the split window on the ’63 Corvette, and how Duntov hated it. Duntov’s issue was that during the heat of battle in racing, it would be hard to see out the back window, and he fought to have it removed from the production vehicle. Mitchell and Shinoda were determined to preserve the purity of the design, with the uninterrupted spine that stretched front the top of the windshield to the tip of the tail, bisecting the rear glass. While Shinoda and Mitchell won the skirmish

with the ’63, in the long run, Zora won as the split window was removed beginning with the 1964 model year, in no small measure because it did block rearward vision. Larry followed right up another story on Duntov, this time surrounding the Mako Shark-inspired 1968 Corvette. Zora was not a fan of the voluptuous Coke-bottle styling on the new model, and made his feelings known to Shinoda, who was responsible for the design of the new Corvette. However, one day on the General Motors high-speed track, Zora scraped one of the barriers with the side of a prototype in testing and quipped that, “The bulges saved Zora! Maybe not so bad.” While Larry Shinoda recounted many great stories that night, when it comes to anecdotes about the Zora, these are truly unforgettable and made for a memorable evening I’ll never forget. As a testament to his relentless creativity, even in his waning years, Larry told me about a new Mustang program he was very interested in developing, and had meetings scheduled with Ford management in Dearborn in early December, 1997. The day after the dinner, he asked me if I would consider going to the meetings with him for the presentation and I immediately agreed. We were to go over the details of the presentation later in November. Unfortunately, he succumbed to kidney disease on November 13, less than two weeks after we met at the SEMA show. What a missed opportunity with one of the great ones.

RIDE READER’S
RIDE
READER’S

LAMBO RESCUE

Redos to Get it Right

As Told By Reed Henrichsen

Photos by Reed Henrichsen

A bout six years ago I

bought this partially

finished Lambo

replica from some guy in California, and after some

investigation figured out

it is a B and B Customs body. To complete it, Bob at B and B Customs helped me out a couple of times by hooking me up with other

builders who could answer my questions. Fortunately, I have been around cars my whole

life, since I was ten years old, and have been in the automotive industry for 35 years. Mostly in the body shop sector, which really came in handy for this project. I used to do bodywork for a living but now I work for a paint distributor. As for the assembly

quality, when I first came

across this car, well, let’s

just say the first builder

didn’t do things right. I had

to redo most everything, including the drivetrain, suspension, interior, and

wiring, before finishing the

build. The frame is a stock 1985 Pontiac Fiero, but lengthened 9.5 inches. It runs a stock V6 Fiero with a slight cam and custom exhaust, and I added a cover that is fully detailed to really set it off. The suspension has adjustable coil-over shocks in the rear, and Held Motorsports control arms 2.5 inches wider than stock, in order to get the

tires out where the belong on a Lamborghini body. The front also has air bags tohttp://www.bandbcustoms.com SOURCE: " id="pdf-obj-110-2" src="pdf-obj-110-2.jpg">
tires out where the belong on a Lamborghini body. The front also has air bags tohttp://www.bandbcustoms.com SOURCE: " id="pdf-obj-110-4" src="pdf-obj-110-4.jpg">
tires out where the belong on a Lamborghini body. The front also has air bags tohttp://www.bandbcustoms.com SOURCE: " id="pdf-obj-110-7" src="pdf-obj-110-7.jpg">
tires out where the belong on a Lamborghini body. The front also has air bags tohttp://www.bandbcustoms.com SOURCE: " id="pdf-obj-110-9" src="pdf-obj-110-9.jpg">

tires out where the belong on a Lamborghini body. The front also has air bags to raise the car up approximately four inches for those curbs and speed bumps, because it is pretty low in the front. Bodywork and paint probably took the longest,

as the fiberglass moves

until it is permanently mounted. I painted the car in my garage with PPG Envirobase paint which adds a lot of depth and vibrancy to the color. In

other words, it really makes it pop! It was cleared with PPG DCU-2021 clearcoat.

The interior is all leather done by myself, except the seats. The doors were the hardest part, since I

needed to fit power glass

windows in a door that was never designed for it. The glass I got from AGP.

You have to fit a frame that

attaches to the hinge for stability, window regulator, solenoids and cables for the latch, hydraulic piston, and

a speaker in a door that is 15 inches tall—not easy to do and a lot of redos. I think the doors took a year of Saturdays and Sundays. I haven’t driven the car all that much, but when I do it really turns heads

and literally stops traffic.

Everyone notices the car from guys to kids to even house wives who crane

their necks to get a look.

B and B Customs http://www.bandbcustoms.com

SOURCE:

Future Th

How electric Vehicle Become Car Builder P

64
64

By Ken Clayton, President; Green Cycle

Design Group

Photos by Steve Temple

ink

s Can rojects

  • D o alternative-fuel vehicles have a place in the car- builder market?

Is there a way to create new, great-looking designs for everyday driving? Using electric drives,

clean diesel engines, or a combination of both, is really just a matter of time. We’ve already seen a few examples from various companies. And individual car builders are known for their innovative abilities, so there’s no reason they can’t apply those same talents to creating all sorts of electric- powered versions of proven designs. Green Cycle Design Group believes it is possible to marry the talents of specialty-car builder companies together in order to create a more marketable vehicle. As

just one example, while attending the Carlisle Kit & Import Show last Spring, we had the opportunity to talk shop with several car builders, along with displaying our electric drive system in an Allison Daytona Dune Buggy. (More about that particular car in a moment.) We saw vintage vehicles that have attracted a large crowd of followers for more than 50 years. Thinking beyond these popular categories, we feel that EV technology could applied to a number of special- use, niche vehicles, be they resort rentals, delivery vans, city cars, municipal trucks, and off-road UTVs. Whether electric, gas/

diesel, alternative fueled, or hybrid system, the ability to build these vehicles for a

specific market class would

open up new business opportunities, albeit requiring several different companies to collaborate, using each other’s specialized skill set and

resources to increase profit

and revenue potential. How should electric vehicles be viewed and what purpose do they have in today’s marketplace? Even though Tesla has broken the mileage barrier, the price is still a bit high for the average working- class individual. Moreover, in practical terms, how many people really need to go 250-plus miles every day? So taking the average EV on a cross-country tour is not their optimum application. EVs work better on short trips and taking advantage of opportunity charging stations. In contrast,

starting up a gas engine and driving it just five miles is the harshest part of

starting up a gas engine and

driving it just five miles is

the harshest part of the trip

and the least fuel efficient.

Given those facts, let’s look at vehicle design in a different way. Note that most business people use the well-known 80/20 rule in determining the practicality of certain decisions. Applying that rule to EVs in particular, 80

percent of our daily usage

can be made more efficient,

and 20 percent can still use

more traditional means. If we apply this business sense to our personal lives, we

would find that most of our

trips are less than 50 miles per day. As such, using an EV

for those 50 miles is very practical and can prolong the life of a gas car by more than 10,000 miles per year. This means gas-car maintenance is reduced as well, with less wear and tear, and gasoline expenditures can be saved for longer trips. And should you have the opportunity to charge an EV at work, you would have an additional 50 miles of range to drive after quitting time. As one possible example noted at the outset, Green Cycle’s demo vehicle is a replica of the Allison Daytona Dune Buggy, with a

few mold modifications. The

original buggies were built in the Sixties and Seventies by Ken Allison from Daytona

Beach, FL. Notice the lid in the hood to allow for easy access to a gas tank, trunk storage, or electronics. The mold changes we incorporated still allow for a full-size Volkswagen Beetle chassis, and can be assembled in either gas or electric versions. The buggies use all standard VW components and the VW transaxle is easily adapted to an electric motor. In selecting an electric motor, you have two choices:

DC or AC. They each have subtle differences in both speed and torque between the two systems, but both can easily achieve highway speeds and quick off-the- line performance (since

100 percent of the electric motor’s torque is available from the get-go). Deciding between them is a matter of gearing and also picking the right company with experience using both systems to help

design your system. The really cool part is, you can build a two-second 0-60 mph EV for less money than a gas version, and still use it as a daily driver without hurting the drive system or draining your gas tank! The practicality of electric drives far exceeds merely saving money at the pump. As for pros and cons of each type, DC electric systems operate in the 2,000 to 3,500 rpm range,

and definitely require a

minimum use of Second and Third gear to achieve

proper secondary road speeds. They have better torque at the low-rpm range, but do not provide regenerative braking options. They cost a bit less, and are easily customizable from 72 to 220 volts. On the other hand, AC electric systems prefer 4,500 to 6,500 rpm or more to hit their sweet spot. Those AC systems that can achieve 14,000 rpm and higher are the reason that high-performance cars like Tesla, which use a low gear reduction of about 10:1, have lightning-quick acceleration off the line and still achieve 120-plus mph. Regenerative braking is standard and powerful AC systems are now available in voltages at 154 volts or less. AC systems are rare

100 percent of the electric motor’s torque is available from the get-go). Deciding between them is

between 154 volts to 240 volts, but, at 240 volts and above, these systems are extremely powerful and

quite efficient. Systems

above 240 volts tend to be a

bit pricey for the motor and controller; however, this cost can be offset quickly by sizing the battery pack for a mileage suitable for your daily needs. Our choice for this demo vehicle uses an AC drive system at 115 volts, and which can achieve 62 mph in Second gear. Third and fourth gears are still available. At present we are very pleased with 62 mph and have considered removing Reverse, First,

100 percent of the electric motor’s torque is available from the get-go). Deciding between them is
100 percent of the electric motor’s torque is available from the get-go). Deciding between them is
Third, and Fourth gears to reduce friction and internal resistance to improve range. The VW transaxle,

Third, and Fourth gears to reduce friction and internal resistance to improve range. The VW transaxle, at least the one we are using, has a good deal of resistance in it. Living in an area with slightly rolling hills and an average speed limit of 45 mph, we have chosen to turn off

the regenerative braking feature as coasting has done more to improve our range. For mountainous or downtown driving, we would reconnect the regenerative braking feature to recoup energy through constant braking in more demanding conditions. Regenerative braking

Third, and Fourth gears to reduce friction and internal resistance to improve range. The VW transaxle,

does put energy back into the battery pack, but

has a far greater benefit

in reducing wear and tear on the brake pads. Onboard battery storage is designed per our individual customer, and ranges from 40 to 120 miles can be

Third, and Fourth gears to reduce friction and internal resistance to improve range. The VW transaxle,
achieved. Allowing for additional storage or a portable generator, a trailer can be built for longer

achieved. Allowing for additional storage or a portable generator, a trailer

can be built for longer trips and overnight storage. This customized buggy has been designed around a 45-mile battery pack and through opportunity charging, we have achieved more than 70 miles range on several occasions. A total vehicle weight of 1,585 pounds includes

a thick fiberglass body

and about 450 pounds of lithium batteries, motor, and other electrical components. Cost of operation is estimated to be less than four cents per mile. Green Cycle has developed a complete electric drive system to compete with big auto manufacturers, and can

be implemented into a predesigned vehicle in just a couple days. Our area of expertise lies within our EV ignition system using a

J1772 industry-standard plug, DOT-standard lighting circuit to work with gas or electric vehicles, custom analog gauges with data logging capabilities, and a lithium battery management system. Green Cycle also offers motors, controllers, lithium batteries, and other useful items to go with our proprietary product. Our E-drive system is designed to utilize the basic standard electrical connection hookups and can be installed into any custom

fiberglass-body specialty

car on the market. The only caveat is a preliminary buildup for sizing battery

boxes and doing electrical runs for maximum DIY

efficiency. We are

also developing additional electric-drive components to be released in 2016 which will likely simplify the buildup process and vehicle performance even more. What’s the bottom line? A good, basic electric drive system with a range from 40 to 150 miles varies from $13,000 to $30,000 and is usually dependent upon battery storage. High-performance DC electric drive systems may add about $3,000 to

$5,000, whereas, high- performance AC electric drive systems may range from $10,000 to $15,000 in additional cost. There are those car builders who are perfectly content with business as usual, and will continue to rely on older gasoline technology. But for those builders with the desire to go to the next level and aren’t sure what it is, EVs are a viable option. So let’s start thinking outside the chassis and see what opportunities are out there!

SOURCE:

Green Cycle Design Group

336/407-4322.

com

EnGauging Details

T raditional gauges are not much different than those

of electric vehicles. EVs still use speedometers and tachometers, but we have enhanced the amp and volt meters from old- school, 12-volt systems to work with large voltage battery packs. Our specially designed voltmeter works in percentage of pack instead of reading the actual voltage. Setting the nominal voltage to zero, we know that a positive (+)15 percent is fully charged and a negative (-)15 percent is fully depleted. This allows the gauge to be used across all pack sizes and battery chemistries. The Green Cycle amp meter is the only one of its kind, in that, we have a full three-inch diameter and reading up to 1500 amp

draw. Notice the geometric scaling where 0-100 is very wide. Since most driving takes place between 0-200 amp draw, you can monitor your amperage draw visually down to two to three amps and improve your range. Our fuel gauge works in ten percent increments and actually helps to reduce range anxiety. We know that the dune buggy can travel 4.5 miles per every ten percent. If we had the regenerative braking connected, the needle would move slightly up and down as you pulled energy out or put energy back in. Production vehicles display the number of miles left which tends to put more concern on the driver.

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Ruby R

Whatta Gem of a Car!

As Told by Al Shapiro

Photos by Steve Temple

oad Trip

READER’S RIDE
READER’S
RIDE
M y Speedster has met the replica Ruby1 challenge again. After returning to Flemington, Missouri from

M y Speedster

has met the

replica Ruby1

challenge again. After returning to Flemington, Missouri from the Import and Kit Nationals in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, I am convinced that the 3200-mile round trip was the highlight of my driving experience to date. It is unquestionably the most fun I’ve had in a car for some time. But there’s more to the story than just its roadworthiness, as this

particular car is significant

within the Speedster community, as I’ll explain. Built in 2005 by Intermeccanica, the car remains pristine. The miles accrued over the years have served as a testament to the quality and craftsmanship in every

car that Henry Reisner and his crew at Intermeccanica build. Ruby1 performed

flawlessly, and has

proven to be 100-percent reliable. I do not have any reservations at all about

going anywhere with this gem! I acquired the car in 2008, as a result of being in the right place at the right time. Jim Ward, the original owner of the car, had suffered from a very rare lung disorder that eventually took his life. The car was stored away in his garage for the next few years. At the point when his widow was able to “let the car go,” she approached Henry to broker it for her. I visited with Henry at

M y Speedster has met the replica Ruby1 challenge again. After returning to Flemington, Missouri from

his display at a previous Carlisle show, and in the course of our conversation, I asked, “What had ever happened to Jim Ward’s

car?” Ergo, being in the right place at the right time.

  • I was able to come to an agreement with the owners

widow, and the rest is history, as they say!

  • I am truly fortunate

his display at a previous Carlisle show, and in the course of our conversation, I asked,

to be the steward of this

magnificent automobile. I

consider myself the steward of this car because Jim Ward had an inspirational effect on everyone who knew him. He routinely included

input from members of the Speedster Owners Group into his build. Ruby1 is a compilation of all of the

ideas presented to Jim

during the brainstorming phase that ultimately became the completed project. It proved to be a collaboration and meaningful experience of inclusion, which gave special importance to the effects of coming together in the common goal of building the ultimate Speedster. The end result

of such an endeavor speaks for itself. In Henry Reisner’s words, “Ruby1 is the quintessential speedster.”

of such an endeavor speaks for itself. In Henry Reisner’s words, “Ruby1 is the quintessential speedster.” How so? It incorporates many features of an original 1956 Porsche 356 Carrera. A true-to-original approach was adopted during the process, and has had real

Porsche 356 owners take a second and third look at the car before they could determine its authenticity. Here’s an overview of some of its salient features:

142hp, 2110cc VW Type 1 from C.B. Performance with dual 44mm IDF Weber carbs; Intermeccanica/S&S

Headers and Magnaflow

mufflers. Special features:

custom-made air filter with K&N filter elements;

remote HD cooler; Ruby Red Glasurit urethane body color; curved top rollbar; 1956 NLA repro “beehive” taillights and front signal lights; Hella period-correct fog lights with vertical chromed grille; H-4 halogen headlights; period-correct bumper trim and guards; original-style rolled fender- edge treatment; Carrera louvered engine lid; Speedster bucket seats with body-color piping and dual- range heaters; and Lietz- style luggage rack; along with many, many other details, too numerous to include all of them here. I am carrying on the tradition that Jim started. I have not, and will not change any feature of

this car. It is impossible to improve on perfection. As to the condition of the car,http://www. intermeccanica.com 604/872-4747 " id="pdf-obj-126-2" src="pdf-obj-126-2.jpg">

this car. It is impossible to improve on perfection. As to the condition of the car, I feel it appropriate to maintain Ruby1’s integrity by keeping it as pristine as is possible. All of the effort has paid off, and it has been a labor of love for me. Jim is my co-pilot (in spirit, of

course), and I am sure that he looks down from his heavenly home and smiles with boundless joy. It’s not about the destination—it’s about the journey. And I’m ready to head out in Ruby1 at a moment’s notice!

SOURCE:

Intermeccanica Custom Coach Builders

604/872-4747

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FLASH
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lby American are registered trademarks and/or tradedress of Carroll Shelby and Carroll Shelby Licensing, Inc.

Wife’s Turn

Welcoming Another ERA Cobra Into the Family

READER’S RIDE
READER’S
RIDE

Slabside, and I loved it. It

was a perfect fit for me. We

did some online research and found a picture of an original up for sale and what I thought was the most beautiful car ever. So we decided to model it after

As Told by Marilyn Waters Photos by Steve Temple

M y husband built

a 1965 Cobra

427 replica

from ERA back in 2008 and I loved it. The speed, the heat, the vibration,

the smell—all of it. And I wanted to be a part of it, getting behind the wheel for more than a photo op. But when I asked him, “When can I drive it?” the answer was usually an emphatic , “No.” Except for once when he said, “I’d rather buy you your own than let you drive mine.” Sweeter words were never spoken!

At our first Carlisle

Import and Kit Car Show

in 2010, we saw ERA’s prototype of the 289

that car. (I believe it was CSX 2541.) It is rather understated, Mercedes Arctic White with

a red leather interior, like a perfect little British sports car but with a throaty little purr and one heck of a kick! The engine is a 289, stroked to 331 cubic inches by Danbury Competition

Engine, fitted

with Edelbrock heads, so it’s good for 409 horses. It’s backed by a Tremec TKO 600 trannie, and rolls on

6”x15” Dayton Wire Wheels with Firestone

Slabside, and I loved it. It was a perfect fit for me. We did some online

1” whitewalls. The mid- ‘80s Jag rearend has double adjustable dampers with Spax shocks. Finally out of the

1” whitewalls. The mid- ‘80s Jag rearend has double adjustable dampers with Spax shocks. Finally outp lica Automobiles http://www.erareplicas.com the gas pedal to the floor. " id="pdf-obj-132-4" src="pdf-obj-132-4.jpg">

passenger seat, and in the

heated driver’s seat, I love being able to drive on long cruises, playing cat and mouse with my husband in his car. The smile on my face gets wider as I press

SOURCE:

Era Replica Automobiles

the gas pedal to the floor.

READER’S RIDE? Email photos and text to: sctemple55@yahoo.com fastcraft.biz/ 330-758-2838 136 Subscribe to Car Builder today,www.kitcarclub.com Not a replica. Not a kit car. A continuation GT40. The GT40/R racecar – bolt-for-bolt virtually identical to the original – has been approved for historic racing in Bobby Rahal’s Legends of Motorsports. • Authentic GT40 ‘Continuation Model’ – licensed by Safir GT40 Spares • Eligible for both the Safir & (SAAC) registries • Virtually identical to original – parts are 85% interchangeable • Vintage race eligible – HSR and SVRA approved • GT40 ‘P’ Chassis number (MKI, MKII & Race body styles) Call a dealer today! 1-800-297-6253 Superformance LLC | 6 Autry Irvine CA, 92618 | 800.297.6253 | 949.900.1950 www.doveracing.net " id="pdf-obj-135-2" src="pdf-obj-135-2.jpg">
READER’S
READER’S
READER’S RIDE? Email photos and text to: sctemple55@yahoo.com fastcraft.biz/ 330-758-2838 136 Subscribe to Car Builder today,www.kitcarclub.com Not a replica. Not a kit car. A continuation GT40. The GT40/R racecar – bolt-for-bolt virtually identical to the original – has been approved for historic racing in Bobby Rahal’s Legends of Motorsports. • Authentic GT40 ‘Continuation Model’ – licensed by Safir GT40 Spares • Eligible for both the Safir & (SAAC) registries • Virtually identical to original – parts are 85% interchangeable • Vintage race eligible – HSR and SVRA approved • GT40 ‘P’ Chassis number (MKI, MKII & Race body styles) Call a dealer today! 1-800-297-6253 Superformance LLC | 6 Autry Irvine CA, 92618 | 800.297.6253 | 949.900.1950 www.doveracing.net " id="pdf-obj-135-6" src="pdf-obj-135-6.jpg">
RIDE? Email photos and text to:
RIDE?
Email photos
and text to:
sctemple55@yahoo.com
sctemple55@yahoo.com
fastcraft.biz/ 330-758-2838
fastcraft.biz/ 330-758-2838

136

Subscribe to Car Builder today, for Free www.kitcarclub.com

READER’S RIDE? Email photos and text to: sctemple55@yahoo.com fastcraft.biz/ 330-758-2838 136 Subscribe to Car Builder today,www.kitcarclub.com Not a replica. Not a kit car. A continuation GT40. The GT40/R racecar – bolt-for-bolt virtually identical to the original – has been approved for historic racing in Bobby Rahal’s Legends of Motorsports. • Authentic GT40 ‘Continuation Model’ – licensed by Safir GT40 Spares • Eligible for both the Safir & (SAAC) registries • Virtually identical to original – parts are 85% interchangeable • Vintage race eligible – HSR and SVRA approved • GT40 ‘P’ Chassis number (MKI, MKII & Race body styles) Call a dealer today! 1-800-297-6253 Superformance LLC | 6 Autry Irvine CA, 92618 | 800.297.6253 | 949.900.1950 www.doveracing.net " id="pdf-obj-135-23" src="pdf-obj-135-23.jpg">
Not a replica. Not a kit car. A continuation GT40. The GT40/R racecar – bolt-for-bolt virtually
Not a replica. Not a kit car. A continuation GT40.
The GT40/R racecar – bolt-for-bolt virtually identical to the original – has been approved for
historic racing in Bobby Rahal’s Legends of Motorsports.
• Authentic GT40 ‘Continuation Model’ – licensed by Safir GT40 Spares
• Eligible for both the Safir & (SAAC) registries
• Virtually identical to original – parts are 85% interchangeable
• Vintage race eligible – HSR and SVRA approved
• GT40 ‘P’ Chassis number (MKI, MKII & Race body styles)
Call a dealer today! 1-800-297-6253
Superformance LLC | 6 Autry Irvine CA, 92618 | 800.297.6253 | 949.900.1950
www.doveracing.net
www.doveracing.net
 

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Subscribe to Car Builder today, for Free <a href=www.kitcarclub.com Jim Inglese Weber Carburetion Since 1977 Ready-to-run systems for Ford and Chevy V8’s Cobra • GT40 • Daytona Coupe Corvette Grand Sport • Lola • McLaren www.JimInglese.com • S hop: 203-643-8054 • Mobile: 203-623-0659 www.cobraautomotive.com CELEBRATING 40 YEARS OF AUTOMOTIVE PASSION Join us in celebrating our 40th Anniversary! We have changed the way you shop for VW parts and accessories. With our new website, we make it easy to pursue your passion. The new site is content rich with user-friendly navigation and updated with the latest Tech Articles, Instructions, Diagrams, Videos and more! CLICK: www.mamotorworks.com OR CALL 866.309.5290 TODAY! Key code: 780 Effingham, IL 62401 Highway 17082 45, US N ©Mid America Motorworks, Inc. All rights reserved. is coming http://www.enigmacars.com " id="pdf-obj-137-8" src="pdf-obj-137-8.jpg">

Jim Inglese Weber Carburetion

Jim Inglese Weber Carburetion Since 1977 Ready-to-run systems for Ford and Chevy V8’s Cobra • GT40www.JimInglese.com • S hop: 203-643-8054 • Mobile: 203-623-0659 " id="pdf-obj-137-13" src="pdf-obj-137-13.jpg">

Since 1977

Jim Inglese Weber Carburetion Since 1977 Ready-to-run systems for Ford and Chevy V8’s Cobra • GT40www.JimInglese.com • S hop: 203-643-8054 • Mobile: 203-623-0659 " id="pdf-obj-137-19" src="pdf-obj-137-19.jpg">

Ready-to-run systems for Ford and Chevy V8’s

Cobra • GT40 • Daytona Coupe Corvette Grand Sport • Lola • McLaren

www.JimInglese.com • Shop: 203-643-8054 • Mobile: 203-623-0659

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CELEBRATING 40 YEARS OF AUTOMOTIVE PASSION
CELEBRATING 40 YEARS OF
AUTOMOTIVE PASSION
Join us in celebrating our 40th Anniversary! We have changed the way you shop for VWwww.mamotorworks.com OR CALL 866.309.5290 TODAY! Key code: 780 Effingham, IL 62401 Highway 17082 45, US N ©Mid America Motorworks, Inc. All rights reserved. " id="pdf-obj-137-33" src="pdf-obj-137-33.jpg">

Join us in celebrating our 40th Anniversary! We have changed the way you shop for VW parts and accessories. With our new website, we make it easy to pursue your passion. The new site is content rich with user-friendly navigation and updated with the latest Tech Articles, Instructions, Diagrams, Videos and more!

CLICK:

866.309.5290 TODAY! Key code: 780 Effingham, IL 62401 Highway 17082 45, US N
866.309.5290 TODAY!
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Effingham, IL 62401
Highway
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US
N

©Mid America Motorworks, Inc. All rights reserved.

is coming http://www.enigmacars.com
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159

Just the thing for a three-hour tour of Gilligan’s Island
Just the thing for a
three-hour tour of
Gilligan’s Island

Got a weird or funny photo to share? Please email it to sctemple55@yahoo.com and we’ll come up with a caption if you don’t have one ...