Physics 15b Assignment #12 By Monday May 2, read Chapter 10 of Purcell.

Usually, I absolutely don’t want you to focus on formulas, and I don’t mind if Purcell makes you think about what the relevant formulas are rather than highlighting them for easy use. But in this chapter, I think that he has overdone it a bit, and I thought it might be useful if I collected some of the relations that you should be looking to ~ understand in this chapter. Here they are: The polarization density P satisfies

~ ~ bound = r P
The susceptibility e is defined by The dielectric constant is From this it follows that

(1) (2) (3) (4)

~ ~ P = e E

= 1 + 4  e
~ P=

4

1~ E

Q&A questions to be answered on the Physics 15b website before 11pm on Monday, May 2: 12QA-1. In problem 10.14 in Purcell, what are the capacitances of the middle and lower capacitors in the figure, respectively?

A : 2(1 + ) C0 and B:

2 C and 1+ 0

+1 C 2 0 +1 C 2 0 2(1 + )
C0

C : 2(1 + ) C0 and D:

2 C and C 1+ 0 2(1 + ) 0

E : None of the above pairs.
12QA-2. A conducting sphere with radius r1 carries a charge Q, It sits inside a spherical shell of dielectric matrial with dielectric constant , inner radius r2 and outer radius r3 , as shown in the

1

illustration. What is the total quantity of bound charge on the inner surface of the dielectric shell?

A: B: C: D:

( 

1) Q 4 1 1 1
Q Q Q  

4

E : None of the above.
......................................................................... ................ .......... .......... ........ .. ....... ....... .. ...... ...... ...... .... . ..... ..... ..... ... .... .... ................................................................. .... .. ........ ....... . ... .... ...... ...... ... .... .. ... ...... .. ... ..... ..... ... .. ... .... .. ... .. . .... ... ... ... .. ... . ................................. ... ... .. .. .......... ...... . .... . .. . ..... ... .. .. .... .. .. ... ... . ... .. .. .. ... .. .. .. . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . r1 ... r2 .... r3 .... . . . .. . . .. . . . . .. . . .. . . ... . .. .. .. . .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. .... . ... .. .. ..... conductor ....... .. ... ... ....... .. .. ... ... ... ....................................... . ... ... .. .. .... ... ... .. .. .... ... .. ... ..... ... .. ...... ..... ... .. .... ....... vacuum .... ...... ... ........ .... ... ....... .. ............... .. .... .................................................... ... ..... .... ...... ... ...... ..... ...... ...... ....... .... ........ ....... dielectric ............. ........ .......... .................... ..........................................................

In addition, there are some survey questions and feedback questions.

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Problems due at the beginning of class on Thursday, May 5 — 12.1. Consider a cube with side a centered at the origin with its edges oriented parallel to the coordinate axes. Suppose that the three faces with x = a=2, y = a=2 and z = a=2 respectively carry a uniform surface charge density  while the other three faces carry a uniform surface charge density  . 12.1.a. 12.1.b. 12.2. Find the dipole moment. If a charge Q sits at (b; 0; 0) for b  a, find the force and torque on the cube. Do problem 10.13 in Purcell. By considering how the introduction of a dielectric changes the energy stored in a capacitor, show that the correct expression for the energy density in a dielectric must be E 2 =8 . Then compare the energy stored in the electric field with that stored in the magnetic field in the wave studied in Section 10.15. 12.3. Do problem 10.24 in Purcell.

A block of glass, refractive index n = , fills the space y > 0, its surface being the xz plane. A plane wave traveling in the positive y direction through the empty space y < 0 is incident upon this surface. The electric field in this wave is z Ei sin(ky !t). ^ There is a wave inside the glass block, described exactly by Eq. 68. There is also a reflected wave in the space y < 0, traveling away from the glass in the negative y direction. Its electric field is z Er sin(ky + !t). Of course, each wave has its magnetic ^ field, of amplitude, respectively, Bi , B0 , and Br . The total magnetic field must be continuous at y = 0, and the total electric field, being parallel to the surface, must be continuous also. Show that this requirement, and the relation of B0 to E0 given in Eq. 70, suffice to determine the ratio of Er to Ei . When a light wave is incident normally at an air-glass interface, what fraction of the energy is reflected if the index n is 1:6? 12.4.. Consider a parallel plate capacitor with plate separation s and area A, filled with dielectric with a small susceptibility, e  1. Because e is small, the (average) electric field inside the capacitor can be computed directly in a simple iterative procedure. Orient the plates perpendicular to the z axis and call the charge on the top and bottom plates plates Q.

p

~ 12.4.a. Call E0 the electric field that would exist between the plates if there there were no dielectric. Show that (this is review!!!)

4Q ~ E0 = z ^ A
~ Now the electric field E0 produces a polarization in the dielectric

(12-4.1)

4e Q ~ ~ P 1 = e E 0 = z ^ A
3

(12-4.2)

This in turn produces bound charges on surfaces of the dielectric next to the plates. Find them, ~ and then compute the contribution E1 of these charges to the field between the plates. Now iterate! ~ ~ ~ The field E1 produces a polarization P2 which produces charges that cause a field E3 that produces ~3 .... and so on. Find En for arbitrary n. ~ a polarization P

~ ~ 12.4.b. Now solve the problem exactly for E as a function of e and show that the En you ~ around e = 0, so that calculated in part a is the (n + 1)st term in the Taylor expansion of E
X ~ ~ E ( e ) = E n

1

n=0

(12-4.3)

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