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The Delphos Herald


A DHI

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

www.delphosherald.com

City continues research


into automated meter
reading system
BY NANCY SPENCER
DHI Media Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS The city administration
presented a preliminary report on changing
the citys water meter reading to automated.
Safety Service Director Shane Coleman
outlined what the city has uncovered so far
in its investigation of the project.
There really doesnt seem to be a
downside to moving to monthly billing,
Coleman said.
He listed the benefits to citizens as:
Detailed history of usage upon
request;
Leak detection alerts;
Ability to monitor usage more closely;
Accurate and timely billing;
Better alignment with other bill
schedules; and
Ability to budget month-to-month.
Benefits to the city include:

See METER, page 13

BY NANCY SPENCER
DHI Media Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com

Nashville Crush

Fifty Amp Fuse

Considerable Windy with


Partly
cloudiness.
plenty of
cloudy
Highs in the sun. Highs
windy.
Delphos
& Area
low 30s and
in Communities
the mid
Highs i
lows in the
40s and
low 50
low 20s.
lows in the
lows in
mid 30s.
low 30

Sunrise: 7:19
AM

Sunrise: 7:17
AM

Sunrise: 7:16
AM

Sunrise: 7:14
AM

Sunrise
AM

Sunset: 6:22
PM

Sunset: 6:23
PM

Sunset: 6:24
PM

Sunset: 6:25
PM

Sunset:
PM

$1.00

2016 AMG | Parade

Reduced man-hours for meter reading;


Accurate records of consumption and
reduction of unaccounted-for water loss;
Meter tampering detection;
Leak detection;
Detailed usage history; and
Efficiencies in billing which will
allow for improved customer service.
With the automated system, a city
employee will drive around town each
month and when the meter reader gets near
a meter, information is transmitted to the
digital device in the vehicle or held by the
employee.
According to his research, Coleman said
the state-of-the-art readers have electronic
registers which verify the reading before it
is sent to the transmitting unit. Each automated reader in the home or small business
will have a unique number to ensure a
match.

Kiwanis set Fourth of July lineup

Shelby County Line

Cloudy and
Windy, snow
windy with
showers
periods of
possible.
Media
Publication
rain. Temps
Highsserving
in the
nearly
low 30s and
steady in
lows in the
the mid to
low 20s.
upper 30s.
Winds NE at
25 to 35
mph.
Chance of
rain 100%.
Rainfall may
reach one
Established in 1869
inch.

DELPHOS The
Kiwanis Club of Delphos
has released the entertainment lineup for the Fourth
of July celebration that
will be held July 2, 3 and
4 at Stadium Park.
Since the Fourth is on
a Monday, it only makes
sense to offer people
three days of family fun,
Kiwanis member Cindy
Metzger said.
Shelby County Line
will get things started on
July 2 and Delphos will
once again answer the
question of who has the
best-tasting pizza.
On July 3, Nashville
Crush will take the stage.
Plans are also in the works
for a kickball tournament,
corn hole and duck races.
The Up to the Challenge
Softball Tournament will
also be played.
On July 4, the day will
begin with the Optimist
Fishing Derby and Fire
Cracker Bike Ride as well
as City and Minor League
baseball tournaments.
The Kiwanis will serve
up their world-famous
chicken dinners, Basket
Bingo is on the slate in the
afternoon and the annual fireworks display will
start at 10 p.m.
Some tweaks have been
made for the upcoming
festival, including a larger social tent with higher
poles so all can view the
entertainment within.
We had some people tell us they couldnt
see anything in the social
tent from outside so we
are raising it up, Metzger
said. We are really putting
it all out again this year.
Metzger said the group
is finalizing the schedule
every day and more information will be available
soon.

An Amish crew works to tear down the Odenweller mill constructed in the 1870s and
purchased by the Odenweller family in 1896. (DHI Media/Nancy Spencer)

Odenweller mill coming down


BY NANCY KLINE
DHI Media Staff Writer
nkline@putnamsentinel.com

OTTOVILLE A building that has been on the Ottoville landscape for over 140 years
will soon disappear from the skyline.
The lemon yellow Odenweller Milling Co. building is being dismantled. The building has
been at this location since 1875 when it was built along the Miami-Erie Canal.
We will still have our day-to-day activities, said president Howard Odenweller. He said
to upgrade this building and equipment was not feasible. The Odenweller Milling Co. will
still handle grain and offer fertilizer and bag feed for sale.
The building is similar to an old barn on a farm, Odenweller said. Its just not built to
handle modern-day equipment.
Odenweller said they removed the inside equipment last week. This week they are dismantling the building.
They said it would take about 10 days, Odenweller said. We tried to see if anyone was
interested in the historical equipment but didnt have an success.
He said they are possibly looking to expand by putting in a bin.
See MILL, page 13

The 2016 Relay for Life of Delphos will be held at Stadium park on June 10. (DHI
Media/Nancy Spencer)

Relay moves to park this year


BY NANCY SPENCER
DHI Media Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS Big changes or coming for
this years Relay for Life in Delphos. Due to
extensive work to be done at Jefferson High
School, the event will be held at Stadium
Park on June 10.
As last year, the Relay will be held from
6 p.m. to midnight. The Hanser Pavilion will
serve as the Relay main stage.
The Survivor Reception and the silent
auction will be held in the shelterhouse and

other events will be held throughout the


park. New activities being talked about this
year are a kickball tournament and something centered around swimming as the
Delphos Municipal Swimming Pool will be
available for the event.
The core events will also be offered,
including the opening ceremonies, Survivor
Lap, Luminaria Lighting and Closing
Ceremonies.
This years goal is $54,000.
More information on the 2016 Relay
for Life will be published as it becomes
available.

Classifieds 12-13 | Entertainment 10 | For The Record 2 | Local-State 3-4 | Obituaries 2 | Sports 6-8 |
Tickets for the St. Johns girls vs Arlington
game at 6 p.m. Thursday in Ottawa Glandorf
will be sold from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. today
and 7:20 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday in the high
school office.
Doors will open at 5 p.m.
Tickets for the boys sectional tournament game against Miller City at Van Wert
High School will be sold from 7:30 a.m.

to 4 p.m. and 7-7:30 p.m. today; 7:20 a.m.


to 4 p.m. Thursday and 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Friday.
Adult tickets are $6 and students $4. All
tickets will be $6 at the gate.
St. Johns receives a percentage of all
pre-sale tickets sold.
Parking is $2 at both events.

Weather 2

Democracy
means
that anyone can grow up
to be president, and anyone who doesnt grow
up can be vice president.
Johnny Carson
comedian & television host
(1925 - 2005)

DHI MEDIA
2015 Published in Delphos, Ohio

Volume 145, No. 73

2 The Herald

For The Record


Wednesday, February 24, 2016

www.delphosherald.com

10 Years Ago 2006


Local insurance agency Odenweller,
Wulfhorst and Van Pelt at 103 N. Main St. has
changed ownership. Mike Odenweller and
Jack Wulfhorst announced Wednesday the sale
of the 81-year-old business to Odenwellers
son, Greg Odenweller of Delphos, and John
Sheeran of Middle Point. Mike Odenweller
and Wulfhorst purchased the Delphos business in 1982 from Bill Van Pelt. With the
current ownership transition, Odenweller will
stay on and Wulfhorst will remain available
as a consultant.
Fort Jennings dominated Perry 34-15 in
the middle two quarters Wednesday night and
finished with a 64-45 boys basketball victory
at the home of the Commodores. Seth Askins
topped the Musketeers (11-8) with 16 markers
while Derek Geise and Sean Weber tallied 13
each.
Wayne Gretzkys hand-picked club fell
way short at the Olympics, his aging corps
of veteran hockey players unable to match
up with speedier Europeans. The Americans
suffered the same fate, leaving Italy with
only one victory. It was a whole lot of underachievement by the two North American
teams who won gold and silver just four years
ago.
25 Years Ago 1991
The Sunrise-Sunset League of OCCL
met in the home of Carol Odenweller, with
Becky Wiechart as co-hostess. The group
decided to have the husbands party March
23 at the Delphos Recreation Center. It was
also decided to make a donation to both
schools for the post-prom activities. The
goodie raffle was brought by Deb Elwer and
won by Joyce Day.
Vantage Vocation Schools Cosmetology
Department winners of the recent Vocational
Industrial Clubs of America competition for
cosmetology are Monica Sanchez of Paulding,
who placed first; Missy Taylor of Antwerp,
second; and Stacy Will of Fort Jennings, third.
Sanchez will compete in the regional competition March 8 in Toledo.
Jeff Sever hit a bucket with 42 seconds left
in overtime, Jeff Wieging a free throw with
two seconds left, and Kurt Gunder intercepted the desperation pass by Bath as the Jays
captured a hard-fought 63-61 overtime win
over the host Wildcats as they honored their
seniors before the varsity contest. The Jays
open tournament play Tuesday at Van Wert.

50 Years Ago 1966


Delphos Jefferson High Schools Band will
play host to the Shawnee High School Band
next Tuesday, in the first of two exchange
concerts. The Shawnee Band will perform
for the first half of the program and the
Delphos Band will play during the second
half. The two bands will then present two
combined numbers. Shawnee Band will arrive
in Delphos Tuesday and after a rehearsal, will
accompany the Jefferson band members to
their respective homes for dinner.
Emily Rupert was hostess to the members of the Mary Martha Bible Class of the
Christian Union Church Tuesday evening in
her home on South Franklin Street. Martha
Meeker gave the opening prayer. Bessie Wells
was in charge of the lesson. Pauline Martin
gave the closing prayer. The next meeting will
be with Bernice Dunn.
Delphos Kiwanis Club met for its regular dinner meeting Tuesday evening at the
House of Vogts. Lloyd Smith, vocational
agriculture teacher at Jefferson High School
along with William Thompson presented,
the program. A Lima inter-club was present with Dr. Flickinger, president of Lima
Kiwanis, along with William Ault, Peter
Kough, Glen Wagner, Grove Nueman, Robert
Jones, Clayton Payne, Gene Wemmer, Henry
Richelle and Joe Baxter.
75 Years Ago 1941
The Lima Choral Society was very successful in the Central Ohio Eisteddfod held
in Columbus over the weekend. The male and
ladies choruses placed first in their respective
divisions. Mr. and Mrs. Guy Tilton, Margaret
Minnig, John Heitzman and Paul Harter Jr. of
Delphos are members of the Lima organization and competed in the Eisteddfod.
With St. Patricks Day in the offing, the
Irish of St. Johns parish under the enthusiastic guidance of the Rev. E. C. Herr, are arranging a program in celebration of the feast day of
the Irish saint. This year the Irish have decided
to present an amateur program in St. Johns
auditorium on Sunday evening, March 16. An
elimination contest will be held on March 5.
The Junior Society of Christian Service
of the Methodist Church met at the home of
Martha Ford, North Main Street, Saturday
afternoon. A part of the program was in observance of Washingtons birthday. Devotions
were given by Janet Thomas and Martha
Ford read a poem. In a contest, Janet Thomas
received the honors.

Eating right can improve quality of life


Legend states that on April
2, 1513, Spanish explorer
Juan Ponce de Len was the
first European to discover
modern-day Florida when
he traveled on a quest for
the mythical Fountain of
Youth. While modern science has proven that there is
no mystical fountain or body
of water that can reverse or
slow down the aging process,
there are many steps people
can take to age well and prolong their lives.
Eating the right foods is
one way to age well. According to Ralph Felder, M.D.,
Ph.D., coauthor of The Bonus Years Diet, reversing
the aging process internally
is more difficult than outward cosmetic changes. But
the right foods can go a long
way toward increasing both
life expectancy and quality of
life. Those who want to employ diet to increase their life
expectancy may want to start
adding more of the following
foods to their breakfast, lunch
and dinner plates.
Broccoli, grapes and salad: According to Health magazine, researchers have found
that compounds in these three
foods boast extra life-extending benefits.
Berries: In addition to
their abundance of antioxidants, berries have other
benefits. A 2012 study from
Harvard University found
that at least one serving of
blueberries or two servings of

Berries and whole grains are nutritious foods that can


help men and women live longer, healthier lives.

strawberries each week may


reduce the risk of cognitive
decline in older adults.
Fruits and vegetables:
Produce is good for the body
because its low in calories
and high in fiber, vitamins
and other nutrients. Numerous studies have indicated
that diets plentiful in fruits
and vegetables help people
maintain a healthy weight and
protect against cardiovascular
disease.
Whole grains: Whole
grains pack a lot of nutrition into a low-calorie food.
Whole grains help protect
against type 2 diabetes, and
researchers at the University of Texas Health Sciences
Center found study partici-

OSTING TAX OFFICE

TAX PREPARATION
Individual
Farm
Business
Home
Office
Pension Retirement
Investments

pants whose diets included


plenty of whole grains and
fruit cut their heart disease
risk by almost half compared
to those whose diets favored
meat and fatty foods.
Red wine: A glass a day
for women and no more than
two glasses daily for men
can be beneficial. Moderate
consumption of red wine has
been shown to slow age-related declines in cardiovascular
function, according to the
American Heart Association.
Fiber: Increase your fiber
intake for a longer life. Research from The American
Journal of Clinical Nutrition
finds that the more fiber you
include in your diet, the lower your risk of coronary heart
disease. The daily recommendation is 25 to 35 grams.
While there may be no
such thing as the fountain of
youth, a healthy diet can help
men and women prolong their
lives.

roger W. Davis
Dec. 5, 1941-Feb. 23, 2016
DELPHOS Roger W.
Davis, of Delphos, passed
away on Tuesday at Sarah
Jane Living Center.
He was born on Dec. 5,
1941, in Middle Point to
Charles E. Davis and Ruth
(Woods) Davis Edwards, who
preceded him in Death.
On March, 28, 1964, he
was united in marriage to
Francis Lynn Davis. She
preceded him in death on Oct.
31, 2010.
Survivors include three sons, Tony (Shirley) Davis of
Ottoville, Steve Beaver Davis of Toledo and Jeff (Dawn)
Davis of Fort Wayne; four sisters, Evelyn Swartz of Jonestown,
Donna Wermer of Van Wert, Mary (Tom) Odenweller of
Delphos and Doreen (Rick) Odaffer of Columbus; one sisterin-law, Mike Davis of Kentucky; and five grandchildren, Drew,
Justin, Ally, Fae and June.
He was also preceded in death by his brother, Bob Davis.
After over 40 years of service, Roger retired from Central
Soya as a purchasing agent. He was a member of Delphos St.
John the Evangelist Catholic Church, in the Army Reserve for
four years, volunteer fireman for many years, past member and
president of Jaycees, past member and Grand Knight of the
Knights of Columbus, and member of the Delphos VFW Post
3035. Roger was a very social man who liked to play cards,
golf, fish and attend his grandchildrens sporting events.
Mass of Christian burial will begin at 11 a.m. Friday at St.
John the Evangelist Catholic Church, the Rev. Daniel Johnson
officiating. Burial will follow at St. Johns Cemetery, where the
Delphos Veterans Council will conduct military graveside rites.
Friends may call from 2-8 p.m. Thursday at Harter and
Schier Funeral home, where a parish wake will begin at 7:30
p.m.
Memorial contributions can be made to the Alzheimers
Association.
To leave condolences, visit harterandschier.com.

Jane schweller
oct. 21, 1924-Feb. 19, 2016
OTTOVILLE Jane
Schweller, 91, of Ottoville
died at 3:45 p.m. Friday at St.
Ritas Medical Center, Lima.
She was born Oct. 21,
1924, in Stark County to
Ertus J. and Edith (Bogard)
Lewis, who preceded her in
death.
Jane married Carl B.
Bendele in 1948 and he died
Sept. 13, 1962. She then married Charles J. Schweller on
Sept. 28, 1963 and he died on
Aug. 14, 2007.
She is survived by seven
children, Ronald (Mary
Jean) Schweller of Fort
Jennings, Phyllis (Maury)
Quillen of Shingle Springs,
California, Dennis (Vicky)
Schweller of Union Mills,
Indiana, Paul (Sherry)
Schweller of Orofino, Idaho,
Mary (Dave) Lengerich of
Warsaw, Indiana, Jim (Bev)
Schweller of Ottoville and
Tina (Joe) Gallmeier of
Delphos; 17 grandchildren;
14 great-grandchildren; four
great-great-grandchildren;
and one son-in-law: Tommy
Thompson of Lawrenceburg,
Indiana.
She was also preceded in
death by a daughter, Linda
Thompson; two brothers:
Ralph and Richard Lewis; and
one sister, Viola Pritchard.
Jane was a homemak-

419-695-5006
1101 KRIEFT ST., DELPHOS
cpolaw@woh.rr.com

Weekdays 9-5;
Sat. by Appt.;
Closed Thurs.
and Sundays

TRUCKS,
TRAILERS
FARM MACHINERY
RAILINGS & METAL
GATES

er. She was a member of


Immaculate
Conception
Catholic Church, Ottoville,
and its former Altar Rosary
Society, as well as a member of the Catholic Knights
of Ohio. She enjoyed going
to her grandchildrens and
Ottoville sporting events and
working out at the Van Wert
YMCA.
Mass
of
Christian
Burial was held Tuesday
at Immaculate Conception
Catholic Church, Ottoville,
the Very Reverend Jerome
Schetter officiating. Burial
followed in the church cemetery.
Memorial donations may
be made to Immaculate
Conception Catholic Church
or to a charity of the donors
choice.
Condolences may be
expressed at www.lovefuneralhome.com.

DELPHOS The oversized load on a truck enroute to a


farm equipment business in Delphos did damage to several
traffic signals and a tree on its way through Delphos.
According to Delphos Police reports, a vehicle driven by
Ronald Brenneman, 74, of Delphos was traveling westbound
on East Fifth Street when the load on his truck damaged two
traffic signals and tore a limb from a tree on East Fifth Street.
A city worker saw the traffic light at Fort Jennings Road and
East Fifth Street get struck by Brennemans load and followed
the truck to HG Violet Equipment at 2103 N. Main St.
When the officer arrived at the business and spoke to
Brenneman, he said he didnt realize he had hit anything.
Police measured Brennemans load and found it to be within regulation.
No citations were issued.

GENERAL REPAIR - SPECIAL BUILT PRODUCTS

CARBON STEEL
STAINLESS
STEEL
ALUMINUM
Larry McClure
5745 Redd Rd.
Delphos

The
Delphos
Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
Wednesdays and Saturdays.
The Delphos Herald is delivered by carrier in Delphos for
$0.96 per week. Same day
delivery outside of Delphos is
done through the post office for
Allen, Van Wert and Putnam
Counties. Delivery outside of
these counties is $72 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DELPHOS HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833

CorreCtions

The Delphos Herald wants


to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the newsroom of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.

st. ritAs
A girl was born Feb. 19
to Tisha and Nathan Lee of
Delphos.

DHi Media staff reports

& Welding Inc.


Fabrication
419-339-0110

Nancy Spencer, editor


Ray Geary,
Chief Operating Officer
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Lori Goodwin Silette,
circulation manager

BIRTH

Oversized load damages


traffic signals, trees

Quality

FREE FEDERAL
& STATE E-FILING

The Delphos
Herald

OBITUARIES

FROM THE ARCHIVES

GRAINS

Wheat
Corn
Soybeans

$4.23
$3.87
$8.62

Local
Weather
Wed 38/31
2/24
Cloudy and windy with
periods of rain. Temps
nearly steady in the mid
to upper 30s. Winds NE
at 25 to 35 mph. Chance
of rain 100%. Rainfall
may reach one inch.

Thu 30/21
2/25
Windy, snow showers
possible. Highs in the low
30s and lows in the low
20s.

Fri

32/20

2/26
Considerable cloudiness.
Highs in the low 30s and
lows in the low 20s.

Sat

44/34

2/27
Windy with plenty of sun.
Highs in the mid 40s and
lows in the mid 30s.

Sun 52/30
2/28
Partly cloudy and windy.
Highs in the low 50s and
lows in the low 30s.
2016 AMG | Parade

For movie information, call

419.238.2100
or visit

vanwertcinemas.com
Van-Del drive-in closed for the season

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

The Herald 3

Local/State

Fate of Dollar
Street still up
in the air
BY STEVEN COBURN-GRIFFIS
DHI Media Editor
sgriffis@putnamsentinel.com

Run Your Ashes Off 5K raises nearly $3,000


St. Johns Athletic Booster president Don Odenweller, center, presents a check to Ralph Lause of St. Vincent
DePaul Society during halftime of the Jays last home game Friday as Father George Mahas and booster members
Julie Rode and Linda Schulte look on. The boosters donated $2,846 from the recent Run Your Ashes Off 5K.
Despite the wintry conditions for the race, the event continues to grow with a record 248 registered participants
this year. (DHI Media/Larry Heiing)

SENIORWISE

Marion Township
Trustees
Information submitted

By Ed Clark

OTTOVILLE While Ottoville Village Council appeared


to have resolved a dispute over Dollar Street during last
months meeting, the subject was once again on the table and
council members find themselves back at square one.
In January, Mayor Ron Miller advised council that Theresa
Von Sosson, the villages legal counsel, could find no reason
why the village shouldnt simply vacate the road.
So. We can vacate it, Mayor Ron Miller stated at the time.
My question to you guys is, is this what you want to do?
The response was immediate and unanimous. Expressing
the sentiment of the group as a whole, Councilor Darren Leis
said, I really think this is great news.
Miller expressed agreement, saying, That streets going to
be a problem child if we leave it as it is.
However, during Mondays meeting, Von Sosson conveyed
a message to council from Nathan Roberts, divisional president
with Celadon Trucking, which, along with Main Street Market,
is at odds over the short stretch of road.
Celadon would appreciate the Village of Ottoville keeping
Dollar Street open, Von Sosson read. The missive further
requested that the road remain open until an alternative access
to Celadons properties along Dollar Street can be devised.
Although communication between Celadon and village
representatives has proven sketchy at best, with weeks passing
without a response to queries put forward by the village, council conceded to the request.
Summing up councils intentions, Miller said, Before we
make any decisions on Dollar Street, well talk to them one
more time.
Council also heard and ultimately approved a resolution
acknowledging the Putnam County Solid Waste Management
Plan Update, in effect rubber-stamping a document that circulates every five years.
In response to Millers request for a vote on the update,
Councilor Joe Moreno shrugged both arms in the air and asked,
Which is?
Miller, conceding that the document supplied by the county
was slim on specifics, said, I thought theyd send us something a little broader, explaining what they did, but this is what
we got.
In other business, council:
approved a payment of $4,041.34 to J&M Excavating
for their work on the Progressive Drive water and storm line
project.
heard a brief presentation about a future Putnam Soil and
Water Conservation District even, currently scheduled for
August.
were informed that the Progressive Drive water and storm
line project is complete.
The next regular meeting of the Ottoville Village Council
is scheduled for 7 p.m. March 28 in the municipal building.

The Marion Township


Trustees met Monday evening
at the Marion Township office
with the following members
present: Joseph Youngpeter,
Jerry Gilden and Howard
Violet.
The purpose of the meeting
ifts of hought from the over
crowd...
was to pay bills and conduct
ongoing business. The minutes
of the previous meeting were
read and approved as read..
The Trustees then reviewed
the bills and gave approval for
15 checks totaling $7,465.39.
Bill Heidel from the Allen
County Land Bank was present to advise the trustees of
monies available for homes
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and Lucas of Indianapolis, Ken enjoy music from the 50s Ken said to remember God, get more information regardIndiana). Carol and Ken and 60s, country music in par- Family & Job, simple as that. ing it.
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1062-832-914
1062-832-914
419-238-2601
right out of high school (1958) Basketball Runner-Up for
working with New Delphos St. Johns watching their son
moc.eraclanipsdeer.www
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www.reedspinalcare.com
Manufacturing and had inten- Greg play.
tions for college but his father
School days memories:
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helping with the family busi- pull a name out of the hat his
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1062-832-914
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419-238-2601
Ken would drive school bus
My favorite president:
and perform custodian duties Carol did not identify a favormoc.eraclanipsdeer.www
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VisitmOur
(Delphos City Schools) total- ite president but noted Barbara
ing more than 50 years in all. Bush was her favorite first-laOver 200 Units on Display
Some of Carol and Kens dy saying shes out there for
Favorites.
her family and I want to
Tama Rd.
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change of all the seasons and (Ask not what your coun419-363-2230
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419-224-4656
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1062-832-914
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419-238-2601
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60

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Reed Chiropractic

Reed Chiropractic of Van Wert


Dr. Steven Reed, D.C.

419-238-2601

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Reed Chiropractic

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Reed Chiropractic

Showrooms!

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Reed Chiropractic

moc.eraclanipsdeer.www

moc.eraclanipsdeer.www
www.reedspinalcare.com

4 The Herald

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Local/State

CALENDAR OF EVENTS
TODAY
9 a.m. - noon Putnam County Museum is open, 202 E. Main
St., Kalida.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Delphos Museum of Postal History,
339 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301
Suthoff St.
Noon Rotary Club meets at The Grind.
6 p.m. Shepherds of Christ Associates meet in the St. Johns
Chapel.
7 p.m. Bingo at St. Johns Little Theatre.

Feb. 25
Susan Smith
Ashley Hawkins
Jared Meisler
Frank Rigdon

THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Delphos Museum of Postal History,
339 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301
Suthoff St.
3-7 p.m. The Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. Delphos Optimist Club, A&W Drive-In, 924 E.
Fifth St.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Delphos Museum of Postal History,
339 N. Main St., is open.
11 a.m.-4 p.m. Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301
Suthoff St.
SATURDAY
9-11 a.m. Delphos Project Recycle at Delphos Fuel and Wash.
9 a.m.-noon Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping.
St. Vincent dePaul Society, located at the east edge of the St.
Johns High School parking lot, is open.
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Delphos Museum of Postal History,
339 N. Main St., is open.
12:15 p.m. Testing of warning sirens by Delphos Fire and
Rescue.
1-3 p.m. The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
7 p.m. Bingo at St. Johns Little Theatre.

ring Your
World Home

Home in on the information


you need. Read your
newspaper.

Feb. 26
Shannon Jackson
Cherie Miller
Wayne Ledyard
Brian Laudick
Craig Good
John Mahan

Palte Most Improved Student

Andrew Palte has been named an Optimist Most Improved Student. Palte
attends St. Johns Schools and is the son of Sandy and Bill Palte. Optimists
and Delphos City Schools Superintendent Kevin Wolfe, left, and St. Johns
Elementary Principal Nathan Stant congratulate Palte. (Submitted photo)

CL of C meets Tuesday

PET CORNER

Information submitted

The Humane Society of Allen County has many pets


waiting for adoption. Each comes with a spay or neuter,
first shots and a heartworm test. Call 419-991-1775.

Keep up to date on the


worlds of foreign affairs,
local events, fashion,
sports, finance, and many
other subjects with your
newspaper. Youll also
find entertaining features,
like cartoons, columns,
puzzles, reviews, and lots
more.

DELPHOS The Delphos Catholic Ladies of Columbia


Council 40 will meet for the first time this year at 7 p.m. on
Tuesday at the Knights of Columbus hall.
Hostesses are Catherine Hammons and Raylene Fischer.
The last meeting was the Christmas dinner held at the hall
with dinner served by Cooking Country Classic. Games were
played and an optional gift exchange held.
A short meeting followed.

THRIFT SHOP VOLUNTEERS


Feb. 25-27

The Delphos Herald


419-695-0015
www.delphosherald.com

Tisha M. Fast
Agent

803 Fox Road


Van Wert, OH 45891
419-238-9441
tishafast.com
Providing Insurance and Financial Services

Feb. 27
Larry Miller
Drew Ulm
Beth Kemper
Quincy Brinkman
Gina Rekart
Gerald Bowling
Ashley Brown
Jennifer Gause

SATURDAY: Cindy Elwer,


Betty Beining, June Rode and
Martha Etzkorn.
THRIFT SHOP HOURS:
3-7 p.m. Thursday; 11 a.m.-4
p.m. Friday; and 9 a.m.-noon
Saturday.
To volunteer, contact
Volunteer Coordinator Barb
Haggard at the Thrift Shop at
419-692-2942 between 8 a.m.
and 4 p.m.

THURSDAY:
Sue
Vasquez, Marge Kaverman,
Eloise Shumaker,
Sharon
Wannemacher,
Doris
Brotherwood and Dorothy
The following pets are available for adoption through Hedrick.
The Van Wert Animal Protective League:
FRIDAY: Eloise Shumaker,
Cats
Sharon Wannemacher, Judy
Torti, F, fixed, shots, wormed, named Freckles
Kundert, Mary Lee Miller,
Torti Calico, F, fixed, shots, wormed, named Patches
www.edwardjones.com
Darlene Kemper and Kris Maas.
Kittens
Several mixed colors and ages; male and female
www.edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com
Dogs
Black Lab Mix; F, black and gray, fixed, named Buffy
For more information on these pets of if you are
in need of finding a home for your pet; please contact
Bobbie at 419-238-5447 weekdays. Donations and correspondence can be sent to PO Box 321; Van Wert OH
45891.
Rocky is a male senior
Billy is a male senior
domestic short hair.
Labrador mix.

Same focus on
Same
focus
on on .
Same
focus
Same . .
Same
Same
Same
Same
Same

your goals
Like us on
your
Facebook!
yourgoals
goals
philosophy.
philosophy
. Your
philosophy
.
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News Source.
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Control .the World,
butto
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Can
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Your Decisions
www.edwardjones.com

New location.

Financial Advisors Andy North and Corey Norton are


New
location.
location.
pleased
toNew
announce
that Edward Jones is now serving
Financial
Advisors
Andy
North
and
Corey
Norton
are are
Financial
Advisors
Andy
North
and
Corey
Norton
Sometimes
the
market
reacts
poorly
to world
events,
the investors of Delphos
from
another
convenient
pleased
toworking
announce
thatreacts
Edward
Jones
is for
now
serving
pleased
to announce
that Edward
Jones
is
now serving
but
just
because
the
market
doesnt
mean
you
location.
After
side-by-side
with
Andy
two
the
investors
of Delphos
from
another
convenient
theif
investors
of Edward
Delphos
from
another
convenient
years,
Corey
has
expanded
Jones'
presence
in
should.
Still,
current
events
are
making
you
feel
location.
After
working
side-by-side
with Andy
for two
location.
After
working
side-by-side
with
Andy
the
community
by
opening
a
new
office.
uncertain about your finances, you should schedule a for two
years,years,
CoreyCorey
has expanded
Edward
Jones'
presence
in
has expanded
Edward
Jones'
presence
in
personal financial review. That way, you can make
the community
by opening
a newaoffice.
the community
by opening
new office.

sure youre in control of where you want to go and


Please
by or call for an appointment
how youstop
get there.

with a financial advisor today.


Please
stopstop
by orby
call
Please
or for
callan
forappointment
an appointment
Call with
or visit
your
local
financial
advisor
a financial
advisor
today.
with
a financial
advisor
today. today.

Andy North

Corey Norton

Financial Advisor

00162769

Financial Advisor
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos,
OH 45833
Andy North
419-695-0660

Financial Advisor
.

Andy
Andy North
NorthNorth
Andy

221 Elida Rd
Delphos,
OH 45833
Corey
Norton
419-692-0346

Financial Advisor
.

Corey
Norton
Corey
Norton
Corey
Norton

1122 Elida Avenue


1122 Elida Avenue
Financial
Adviso
r Advisor
Financial
Advisor
Financial
Advisor
Financial
Advisor
Financial
Advisor
Delphos,
OH
45833
Delphos,
OHFinancial
45833
.
.
.
.
Elida
RoadAvenue
419-695-0660
1122
Elida
Avenue
1122
Elida
Avenue
1122221
Elida
Avenue
1122
Elida Avenue 419-695-0660
1122
Elida
Delphos,
45833
Delphos,
OHOH
45833
Delphos,
45833
Delphos,
OH OH
45833
Delphos,
OH 45833
Delphos,
OH
45833
419-695-0660
419-692-0346
419-695-0660
419-695-0660
419-695-0660
419-695-0660

800-335-7799

Member SIPC
ETY-1403A-A

From sports
stats & local
events to
business news,
The Delphos
Herald keeps
you in the local
loop.

The
Delphos
Herald

www.delphosherald.com
419-695-0015 ext. 122
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, OH 45833

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

National FFA Week ~ Feb. 20-27, 2016

ELIDA FFA
Neiderts
Mowers

Pitsenbarger
Supply, Inc.

Sales & Service

234 North Canal Street


Delphos, Ohio 45833
Bank with the people you know and trust

Proud to support Elida FFA


105 S. Greenlawn Ave.
Elida, OH 45807
419-331-8015

Elida Road
Tire Service
HOME OF THE
22 POINT
MAINTENTANCE
INSPECTION

419-331-1409

507 E. Kiracofe
(Rt. 309)
Elida, OH 45807
419-331-LAWN

Phone (419) 692-1010


Fax (419) 692-2091

Youll find it at
Carquest in Delphos

Authorized Dealer for Ariens,


Gravely, Exmark, Stihl

Wellman
Seeds, Inc.

23778 Delphos Jennings Rd.


Delphos, Ohio 45833
Phone (419) 695-9010

Delphos Animal
Hospital

Westside Lawn Care


& Property Management LLC
3150 Shenk Road
Elida, Ohio 45807
Bret Blymyer, Owner
bblymyer@yahoo.com
419-230-1493
419-339-7800

The Herald 5

Agronomic Products / Services

Fertilizer - Seed
Crop Protection Products

1825 E. Fifth Street


Delphos, Ohio 45833
11713A Spencerville-Delphos Rd.
419-692-9941
Delphos
Hous: Mon-Fri 8:30-5:30
419-695-1931
Sat. 8:30-2:30

DRIVE-THRU

Purina Feeds
Mulch
Pet Food
Compost
& Supplies
Topsoil
Lawn & Garden
River Rock
705 E. Main St. (S.R 309)
Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-6800

4-K Tire, Inc.

HEMKER
GRAIN,
INC.

Frank Reynolds, Owner


226 S. Pierce St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
419-692-2034
419-692-2082 Fax
419-302-4776 Cell
Email: frank@4ktire.com

Custom Application
Ag Chemicals
& Fertilizer
15970 Jonestown Road
Venedocia, Ohio 45894

Acutread

419-667-3055

Firestone

Steve Hemker
Home 419-692-4322
Mobile 419-235-1982

Bridgestone

Row 1: (L TO R) Luke Simmons, Cassidy Conn, Miranda Goodman, Oliver Fessler, Torey Carroll, Jacob Simmons, Keith Murphy,
Advisor Mr. Dennis Pohlman. Row 2: Isaac McAdams, Caleb Newland, Katelyn Groves, Tracey Long, Austin Kesler, Owen
Anderson, Kylie Archer, Logan Long and Felipe Villanueva. Row 3: Matt Barnett, Latayveyia Massey, Austin Bloom, Kaleab Bailey,
Lauren Kesler, Janay Sherard, Cristine Kirk, Kylie Bryan and Shelby Crider. Row 4: Tonesha Sibert, Brandon Kenny, Isaak Fridley,
Garrett Hall, Robert Gehr, Jakob Sexton, Christian Long and Hannah Fleishans.

Layman & Son

KILN DRY LUMBER,


HARDWOOD MULCH
LOGGING SERVICES,
COMMERCIAL & FARM LUMBER

SIEFKER SAWMILL
PH. 419-339-1956
Located on Rt. 309
Between Delphos & Elida
Hours: M-F 8-5, Sat. 8-12

5620 Gomer Road


Elida, Ohio 45807

ELIDA MACHINE &


TOOL, INC.

309 N. Greenlawn
Elida, Ohio 45807

Jennings-Gomer
Equity, Inc.

Phone: 419/339-1673
Fax: 419/339-2410

Columbus Grove, Ohio 45830


(419) 659-2676
Ft. Jennings, Ohio 45844
(419) 286-2444
Gomer, Ohio 45809
(419) 642-3191

419-331-5586

Residential Commercial

CARPET-VINYL-CERAMIC
FLOORTILE-ACOUSTICAL CEILINGS

www.tdinteriorsinc.com

We Take the DENT


out of Accident!

KENT KING, Owner


419-331-2041
4165 N. West St.
Lima, Ohio 45801 cell:419-303-4686
5425 N. Cable Rd.
419-225-8185
Lima, OH 45807
MARK CELLAR

Quality Welding &


Fabrication, LLC

Shop: (419) 225-6208


Fax: (419) 225-6205
ashley_miller@qualityweldingandfab.com

3720 Elida Rd.

Ph. 419-331-3633

(419) 331-8209
Fax (419) 331-1226

All Service. All Glass.


All Year Long.
4511 Elida Rd. 800-521-7059
Help us support

www.SuperiorFCU.com

Phone

(419) 223-9746
Lima

FRI., MARCH 25...12P-10P


SAT., MARCH 26...10A-10P
Allen Co. Fairgrounds, Lima

Kids Day Sat. 12P-2P


Simulators Adult Trikes Caricature Drawings
Face Painting Games & Prizes
Clownamania Bounce House

www.timssims.com

BLOOD DONOR
DAY
at Elida High School

WALK-INS WELCOME
March 17.....8am-1pm

Siding & Construction


Gomer, Ohio
419-642-5385

Williamson insurance
agency
Crop Insurance Specialists
101 E. Merrin Payne, Ohio 45880

Phone (419) 263-0168 888-399-5276


Fax (419) 263-0392
info@cropcoverage.com

Fine Cabinetry, LLC

4880 N. Cable Road


Elida, Ohio 45807

R. B.
OVERHOLT

2721 Elida Road, Lima, OH


419-331-6644

Bowmans

Old world
craftsmanship
for your home

KIM BRENNEMAN
Home: 419-339-3127
Mobile: 419-236-3347

Banquets
Catering
Carry-out

Where Quality Counts

Ashley Miller

Farm - Home - Auto Supplies

13833 St. Rt. 33, Lakeview, Ohio


419-568-4392
6008 St. Rt. 309, Elida, Ohio
419-339-7000

Kings Auto
CELLARS
AUTO BODY RepAiR seRvice

4330 East Rd., Elida, OH 45807

Mastersons
Stores, Inc.
Ace Hardware

5230 N. Grubb Rd., Elida, Ohio 45807

STAN BRENNEMAN
Home: 419-339-3457
Fax 419-339-7260
Mobile: 419-236-9759

SWICKRATHS, INC

JOB
CNC MILLING
HORIZONTAL
SHOP
& TURNING
BORING
BLANCHARD ESTABLISHED
MILLS
GRINDING
IN 1964
SPECIALTY
TURNING TO 40
TOOLS & DIES

3626 Allentown Rd., Lima, OH

Ph. (419) 331-4372

One of Ohios Finest Restaurants


3175 W. Elm St., Lima, OH 45805
(419) 991-3075
Auto Body Repair
ASC Certified

FAX 419-331-5886
email emtool@wcoil.com

General

BRENNCO INC.

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6 The Herald

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

www.delphosherald.com

Sports

Jays hold off Wildcats in D-IV


BY JIM METCALFE
DHI Media Sports Editor
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

VAN WERT Both


St. Johns and Kalida have
struggled with offensive consistency during the 2015-16
boys basketball season.
With that in mind, it meant
two things when the Blue
Jays and Wildcats met up in
Tuesdays second game of
the Division IV Van Wert
Sectional: this would likely
come down to being a defensive-minded affair, as well to
see which team could could
do just enough on the offensive end to win.
In the end, that came
down to the 7th-seeded Blue
Alex Berelsman of Fort Jennings drives into the lane and Gold (9-13) holding off
for a shot against Ottoville defense Tuesday night at the 5th-seeded Wildcats (13the Ottawa-Glandorf Division IV Sectional. (DHI Media/ 10) 46-42.
Charlie Warnimont)
We persevered. The
only negative we had was a
drought in the second half
but that has been an issue
all season; our shot selection
has been good all season but
its a matter of executing,
St. Johns head coach Aaron
Elwer said. The thing was,
we played right through it
defensively. We believed in
By Charlie Warnimont
DHI Media Sports Editor
news@delphosherald.com

Musketeers need
2 OTs to oust rival
Big Green boys

OTTAWA At the end of regulation, Fort Jennings used a


timeout to set up a final play. It didnt work.
When a similar situation presented itself near the end of the
second overtime, Musketeer coach Keith Utendorf decided not
to use a timeout. This time his kids found a way to score.
Senior guard Alex Berelsman hit a shot with time winding
down in the second overtime to give the Musketeers a 64-62
win over Ottoville in a Division IV sectional semifinal game at
Ottawa-Glandorf High School.
The win advances the Musketeers (6-17) to the sectional
finals Friday night against Crestview at 6:15 p.m. at OGHS.
Ottoville finishes the season at 3-20.
See MUSKETEERS, page 7

Information Submitted
Brunet tabbed MAC
boys POY
Senior Andy Brunet of
Coldwater earned Player
of the Year honors in the
Midwest Athletic Conference
for the 2015-16 boys basketball season.
Scott McEldowney of
league champion Versailles
(16-5, 8-1) was the Coach of
the Year.

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St. Johns junior Tim Kreeger tries to make a move in the


post against Kalidas Collin Nartker during Division IV
sectional action Tuesday night at Van Wert. (DHI Media/
John Parent)
offensive show as the Jays
got even hotter 7-of-10
while Kalida cooled down
slightly at 5-of-12. This time,
it was sophomore JV call-up
Connor Hulihan dropping in
a pair of triples and senior

Jesse Ditto (7 markers) adding four for the Jays, while


Trent Gerding (8 markers, 5
caroms) led Kalida with four.

(Fort Recovery); Deion Hoehne 12


(New Bremen); Jacob Stechschulte
12 (Minster); Nick Topp 11, Zach
Neuman 12 (New Knoxville);
Alex Wendel 11 (Versailles); Cole
Griesdorn 12 (Marion Local); Paul
Stammen 12, Evan Lefeld 12 (St.
Henry); Robby Saine 11 (St. Johns).
HONORABLE MENTION
Jack
Hemmelgarn
12
(Coldwater); Caleb Martin 11
(Fort Recovery); Kyle Homan 12
(Marion Local); Conner Tumbusch
12 (Minster); Ben Schwieterman 12
(New Bremen); Nathan Tinnerman
10 (New Knoxville); Clayton Agler
10 (Parkway); Ryan Luttmen 10,
Mitch Schwieterman 11 (St. Henry);
Austin Knapke 11 (Versailles).
FINAL STANDINGS: 1.
Versailles 8-1; 2. St. Henry 7-2; 3.
Coldwater 6-3/Fort Recovery 6-3;
5. Minster/Marion Local 5-4; 7.
New Bremen/New Knoxville 3-6; 9.
Delphos St. Johns 2-7; 10. Parkway
0-9.

============
Clement top PCL girls
cager
Columbus Groves Jade
Clement earned Putnam
County League girls basketball Player of the Year for the
2015-16 season.
Brian Schroeder of Grove
earned Coach of the Year.

See D-IV, page 7

All-League Basketball Selections

RAABE
11260 ELIDA RD. DELPHOS, OH

the game plan and kept playing with great effort; that can
be difficult when the balls
not going through the rim but
we did. We held them to one
shot most of the time, which
was another key for us.
The Jays advance to play
4th-seeded Miller City at
approximately 8 p.m. Friday.
Im not ready to throw in
the towel just yet on calling
it a coaching career, Kalida
mentor Richard Kortokrax
observed.
The first period was a little bit out of line with the
teams combining for 12-of21 shooting. St. Johns foulplagued freshman Jared
Wurst (12 counters; 5 boards)
got off to a hot start with
10 of the Jays 14 markers
before picking up his second
foul at 2.8 ticks and going
to the bench. On the other
end, senior Grant Unverferth
(10 points, 4 assists) led the
Maroon and White with five
and senior Brandon Verhoff
(9 counters, 5 rebounds)
added four. Unverferths foul
shot at 2.8 ticks gave Kalida
a 15-14 edge.
The
second
period
remained an unexpected

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Versailles was not ranked


in the final AP Poll in
Division III. It is Versailles
3rd MAC title and 2nd outright.

MAC
All-Conference
Selections
FIRST TEAM
NAME SCHOOL GRADE
Andy Brunet* 12, Aaron
Harlamert 12, Dylan Thobe 11
(Coldwater); Miciah Cox 11 (Fort
Recovery); Derek Albers 12, Tyler
Mescher 10 (Marion Local); Josh
Nixon 12 (Minster); Logan Leffel 12
(New Knoxville); Mitchell Stammen
12, Jesse Niekamp 12 (St. Henry);
Timothy Kreeger 11 (St. Johns);
Justin Ahrens 10 (Versailles).
Coach of the Year: Scott
McEldowney (Versailles).
SECOND TEAM
Brett
McEldowney
12
(Versailles); Darien Sheffer 12,
Chase Bruns 12, Brandon Schoen 12

Putnam County League AllLeague Selections


FIRST TEAM
PLAYERS SCHOOLS
Jade Clement Columbus Grove;
Paige Bellman Columbus Grove;
Kylie Osterhage Kalida; Cassie
Niese Miller City; Bridget Landin
Ottoville; Brooke Mangas Ottoville.
SECOND TEAM

See SELECTIONS, page 7

Another rite of spring and


this time, it isnt spring training
Another annual rite of spring OK, late
winter is the NFL Combine in Indianapolis.
That started Monday and involves all kinds
of evaluations of prospective draftees: Weight,
height, arm sleeve length (for all those offensive linemen to just push defenders away!),
40-yard dash time, how many reps they can do
on the bench press at 225 pounds, etc.
Then there are the attempts to get inside
each players noodle and see what makes
them tick, if they are a ticking time bomb or
level-headed or something in between.
With all the moolah involved in todays
National Football League with the salary
cap apparently heading above $153 million
for the 2016-17 season teams are taking
no chances
You dont get too many chances to make
mistakes in this day and age because there is
no patience anymore.
Maybe there cant be anymore but remember when teams could wait for a player to
come into his own.
Now, if they generally dont produce within a year or two, they are gone.
Then you have certain teams that will take
a chance on someone who is a proven ticking
time bomb anyway because they produce on
the field.
Sometimes, I think we have turned professional football into a lab experiment and dont
trust what we see and hear.
After all, many of these guys were productive players between the line they showed
they can play this game, even if they were a
step slow or lacked strength or some such
negative.
I find it almost impossible to think that in
this age of Bigger/Faster/Stronger, a player
who is eligible for the draft heck, any
player at a major college or below that wants
to get onto the field would NOT be busting
his behind to get bigger, stronger, faster.
The Combine might be OK for me because
they are tested in those areas that most players
need to improve most collegians need to
get stronger all over to make the jump to
the next level but it seems they do forget what
their own eyes did during fall Saturdays.
The Pro Day later on for most of these
guys at their respective colleges or at the
places many go to after the season to work
out is something different; these are not under
competitive situations but set up to make them
look as good as possible.
Anyone can run a rout with no one really
bothering them but try to run it with a cornerback beating you senseless; that would

Jim Metcalfe

Metcalfes
Musings
show me something.
Remember the circus that was Johnny
Manziels Pro Day a couple of years ago?
Maybe that was more of an indication of his
makeup than anything else.
Also going on is the lead-up to the
free-agency period, with teams making cuts
of some well-established stars.
For example, it appears Robert Griffith III
will be cut he and his $16 million deal
by the Washington Redskins by I think he will
end up somewhere else for a team he thinks he
can start for.
I dont think he has any thought of going
somewhere to be the automatic backup.
It could me that he might end up in
Cleveland assuming Johnny Football gets
the slash and not in Dallas because Romo
is the starter (for better or worse!).
I do believe he can still be a servicable pro
quarterback. Sometimes, you just need a new
start, a la Jim Plunkett and Rich Gannon years
ago in Oakland.
===========
As per my column last week, the Cincinnati
Reds attempted to trade outfielder Jay Bruce
to the Toronto Blue Jays in a 3-team deal the
Los Angeles Angels.
According to reports, they would have
received at least at least? ONE prospect!
Wow!
One prospect for a $12.5 million former
All-Star!
Thankfully, it looks like it wont go through
but one now wonders if this was a legitimate
offer, who in the Reds organization would
actually offer to make this trade.
Hopefully, if it gets resurrected, the pot will
be sweetened because I just cant believe they
would just give this guy away in essence,
thats what theyd be doing because hes
not that far removed from his hey day and is
still on the right side of 30.
He could still return to his old form and
help Joey Votto not walk 300 times.
Unfortunately, he likely will be gone
because they probably wont pick up his
option for 2017.

www.delphosherald.com

Local grapplers
earn District berths

Sports

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

The Herald 7

St. Johns senior Sydney Fischbach goes to the hoop against the defense of North Baltimore Saturday night at Bluffton
High School. (DHI Media/Jim Metcalfe)

Jays hold off Tigers in sectional

Evyn Pohlman of St. Johns battles Coldwaters Seth


Obringer during quarterfinal action of the D-III sectional
wrestling tournament held at L.C.C. Pohlman finished
third with a 3-0 decision over Grant Goecke of O-G to
qualify for districts in the 152-pound bracket. (DHI Media/
Larry Heiing)
BY LARRY HEIING
DHI Media Correspondent
news@delphosherald.com
LIMA With the regular season and conference tournaments behind them, wrestlers set their sights on a new goal:
Columbus.
The road to The Schott began this weekend with the Division
III sectional tournament held at Lima Central Catholics Msgr.
Edward C. Herr Gymnasium.
The top four placers in each weight bracket that survive the
2-day tournament will move onto the D-III District tournament
held at Hobart Arena in Troy next weekend.
With a total of 14 teams competing, only 56 tickets would
be punched for the right to move onto the next level.
Ottawa-Glandorf led the way for local teams with seven
wrestlers advancing followed by Wayne Trace (6) and Delphos
Jefferson (4). Delphos St. Johns, Columbus Grove and
Spencerville each had a pair survive.
Ada, Lincolnview and Parkway also advanced a grappler
to districts.
Jefferson had a pair of runner-ups with Andrew Foust and
Hunter Binkley.
Foust marched through the preliminaries, pinning Caleb
Baughman of Wayne Trace in the first round and notched a
major decision over Ottawa-Glandorfs Evan Ellerbrock in the
quarterfinals. The closest match of the tournament for Foust
was a 4-3 victory over Preston Brubaker from Columbus Grove
in the 113 pound semifinals. In the championship match, Foust
dropped a 6-3 decision to Kobe Cunningham of L.C.C.
Binkley also breezed through the opening rounds with a
pin of Parkways Noah Joseph and a 16-0 tech-fall victory
over Andrew Meyer of Coldwater. In the 170-pound sectional
championship bout, Binkley fell by a slim margin of 4-3 to
Tyler Ebbeskotte of O-G.
Also moving on for the Wildcats were Wyatt Place with a
5-0 decision over Cody Tebbe of Coldwater to finish third at
138 and Lane Bennett landed in fourth in the 182-pounders.
Returning State qualifier Brett Vonderwell finished in the
second spot for St. Johns at 160. Vonderwell who returned
to the mat last month after suffering a broken femur bone in
football pinned Jeffersons David Grant in the first round.
Vonderwell recorded his second pin in the quarterfinals over
Clayton Bollenbacher of Parkway and moved onto the finals
7-1 over Titan Danny Rosales. In the finals, Vonderwell met
Midwest Athletic Conference foe Grant Kaiser of Coldwater
and dropped a heart-breaking 2-1 decision.
Blue Jay Evyn Pohlman fought back from an opening-round
loss by pinning Spencervilles Peyton Ford and Caleb Schultz
of Wayne Trace in the consolation rounds. Pohlman placed
third in the 152-pound bracket with a 3-0 decision over Grant
Goecke in the finals.
Spencerville Bearcat Caleb Sutherland advanced to districts
with a second-place finish at 220 pounds. Sutherland wasted
little time in the opening rounds, scoring pins in 2:10 and 3:20.
In the finals, Coldwater strong man Zach Klosterman defeated
Sutherland 14-4.
Fellow Bearcat Cody Dickson placed third in the 145-pound
division with a pin of Logan Balbaugh in the finals with a time
of 2:23. Dickson suffered a close 9-8 loss to Luke Brown in the
semifinals but bounced back with a pin of Hunter Showalter in
the consolation round.
Columbus Grove will be represented next week in Troy by
Andrew Nichols and Preston Brubaker. Nichols lost to OttawaGlandorfs Daniel Beemer 9-3 in the finals of the 182-pound
class to finish runner-up. The Bulldog wrestler advanced to
the finals with an opening-round pin and defeated Parkways
Peyton Hamrick 6-3 in the semifinals. Brubaker opened the
competition with a pin before dropping the semifinal match to
Foust. Brubaker bounced back with another pin to advance to
the final round by fell 5-4 to Coldwaters Justin Sigler to place
fourth at 113 pounds.
See WRESTLERS, page 8

Selections
(Continued from page 6)
Lynea Diller Columbus Grove;
Allison Recker Kalida; Heather
Lammers Leipsic; Alicia Honigford
Ottoville; Alexa Maag PandoraGilboa.
Player of the Year: Jade Clement
Columbus Grove
Coach of the Year: Brian
Schroeder Columbus Grove
HONORABLE MENTION
Kyrah
Yinger
Columbus
Grove; Elizabeth Klear Miller
City; Macy McCluer Columbus
Grove; Tiffany Welty Miller City;
Amber Logan Continental; Nicole
Kramer Ottoville; Kylie Jettinghoff

Fort Jennings; Alexis Thorbahn


Ottoville; Brittany Kahle Kalida;
Lindsay Macke Pandora-Gilboa;
Joni Kaufman Kalida; Toria Hovest
Pandora-Gilboa; Brooke Gerdeman
Leipsic; Kierra Meyer Leipsic.
SCHOLASTIC AWARDS
TEAM
Mackenzie Wurth Columbus
Grove; Cassie Niese Miller City;
Jessie Young Fort Jennings; Elizabeth
Klear Miller City; Cathy Basinger
Kalida; Megan Niese Miller City;
Katelyn Siebeneck Kalida; Jenelle
Kuhlman Miller City; Katie Mickens
Leipsic; Serena Maag PandoraGilboa; Karissa Dorn PandoraGilboa.

BY JIM METCALFE
DHI Media Sports Editor
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

BLUFFTON North Baltimores


girls basketball team had broken a 7-year
tournament losing string when they beat
Fort Jennings Tuesday at the Bluffton
High School Division IV Sectional.
The third-seeded Lady Tigers tried to
add to that winning streak as they battled
seventh-seeded St. Johns in Saturday
nights second game.
The Lady Blue Jays stopped that idea
in a 57-47 dandy.
St. Johns (14-9) advance to tangle
with Leipsic in the 8 p.m. game Thursday
at the Ottawa-Glandorf District.
The Jays dominated the first two
periods in building a 23-10 halftime
edge and still led 38-26 heading into the
fourth.
Then they had to hold on for dear life
as the foul-plagued Tigers (21-3) they
committed 26 totals fouls, 20 the second
half made a game rally, getting within
49-47 before the Jays used 8-of-10 foul
shooting (15-of-18 in the fourth period;
25-of-31 for the game for 80.6%) in the

D-IV

(Continued from page 6)

After a span of two lead


changes and three tie the
last at 26-26 on a Hulihan trifecta, Dittos transition layin
at 1:56 gave the Jays the lead
for good at 28-26. Hulihans
bomb out of the left corner
at 1:15 accounted for a 31-26
halftime scoreboard.
The game reverted to
form in the second half as
the defenses took over and
the offenses combined for
3-of-19 shooting. The Jays
only fielder came from
junior Owen Rode, while
Unverferth and Verhoff had

Musketeers

final 1:02 to win comfortably.


The Jays were led by the inside duo
of seniors Lexie Hays (19 counters - 2
bombs, 9-of-10 at the line - 6 rebounds,
5 assists) and Sydney Fischbach (16
counters 8-of-8 at the line - 12
boards.
They outrebounded the taller Tigers
32-22 (12-8 offensive).
North Baltimore was topped by 11
each from senior Olivia Frost (4 blocks)
and freshman Alivia Light (both with 3
treys).
We showed tremendous patience
against their zone, with good ball movement. We had some good shots because
of it, St. Johns head coach Dan J.
Grothouse said. We hit the free throws
we had. We work on that every day but
it has been a struggle most of the year to
be consistent from there.
The teams traded early leads: Lights
drive at 6:26 was countered by a 3-ball
from St. Johns Madilynn Schulte, only
to see Frost answer with her own three
for a 5-3 edge at the 5-minute mark. The
Tigers did not score the rest of the stanza, turning it over six times (16 total)
and missing three shots and two foul

Kalidas two made shots. The


difference was the Jays were
4-of-6 at the line (11-of-18
total for 61.1%) to Kalidas
0-of-2 (4-of-9 for the game
for 44.4%). When senior
Ryan Hellman hit a pair from
the free-throw line at 41.4
ticks, the Jays led 37-30.
Two Wurst singles 13 ticks
into the fourth gave the Jays
their biggest lead of 9 before
the game tensed up. Kalida
began to try and apply more
pressure on the younger Jays
and rally. They forced four
turnovers and slowly cobbled
the deficit down to 41-40 on a
triple from the right corner by

(Continued from page 6)

After the Big Greens Nick Moorman


hit a 3-pointer to tie the game at
42-42 with 1:29 left in regulation, the
Musketeers decided to play for the final
shot calling a timeout with 14.9 seconds
left. Berelsman took a 3-pointer from the
right corner just before the buzzer that
was off the markm forcing overtime.
In the first overtime, Ft. Jennings
senior Drew Grone scored four quick
points for a 46-42 lead. Ottoville sophomore Nick Moorman answered back
with six straight points for a 48-46 lead
as the Big Green would not trail again
in the first extra session. Ottoville had
a 54-50 lead with 20 seconds left after
a free throw by Rudy Wenzlick before
Musketeer sophomore Brandon Wehri
drained a 3-pointer from the left corner
with 10.3 seconds left. After a Musketeer
timeout, Moorman was fouled on the
inbounds play and sank both free throws
for a 3-point Ottoville lead. With time
running out, the Musketeers again
looked for Wehri and he drained another
crucial 3-pointer from the top of the key
as time expired.
Brandon played a whale of a second half and both overtime periods,
Utendorf said. We got on him a little
bit in the locker room asking him what
happened the first half. It took him a

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See JAYS, page 8

Unverferth at 1:30. However,


the Jays hit just enough foul
shots 7-of-11 in the period
and 5-of-8 in the final 1:14 to
hold off the Wildcats.
St. Johns outshot Kalida
44.1 percent (15-of-34,
including 5-of-16 3-pointers) to 37.0 percent (17of-46, 4-of-16 rainbows)
and also won the battle off
the backboards 28-26 (5-7
offensive) as 6-8 junior Tim
Kreeger, held to six points
by the tough Kalida defense,
led St. Johns with eight and
Trent Siebeneck topped the
Wildcats with six.

Robby Saine 1-2-5, Tim Kreeger


1-4-6, Jared Wurst 4-2-12, Ryan
Hellman 2-2-6, Josh Warnecke
0-0-0, Owen Rode 2-0-4, Connor
Hulihan 2-0-6, Collin Will 0-0-0,
Jesse Ditto 3-1-7. Totals 10-5-11/1846.
KALIDA (42)
Drew Hovest 2-0-6, Grant
Unverferth 4-1-10, Brandon Verhoff
4-1-9, Noah Lambert 1-0-2, Trent
Gerding 3-2-8, Trevor Maag 0-00, Collin Nartker 1-0-3, Trent
Siebeneck 2-0-4 . Totals 13-4-4/942.
Score by Quarters:
St. Johns 14 17 6 9 - 46
Kalida 15 11 4 12 - 42
Three-point goals: St. Johns,
Wurst 2, Hulihan 2, Saine; Kalida,
Hovest 2, Unverferth, Nartker.

ST. JOHNS (46)

little while to get going, but once he got


going we had to find him and when we
did he did good things. This was one of
the better games that I have seen from a
sophomore.
Wehri continued to score in the second overtime as he hit six straight free
throws around a 3-pointer by Ottovilles
Wenzlick for a 62-59 Ft. Jennings lead.
After Wehris final free throws, sophomore Zane Martin tied the game with
1:32 left with a three point play.
Both teams then missed a shot and
after getting the defensive rebound,
the Musketeers decided to play for the
final shot. As the clock wound down,
Berelsman drove towards the basket,
pulled up and drained a short jumper to
give his team the lead. Ottoville did not
have a timeout left and time ran out on
their season.
I guess I should have been smarter the
first time and let them run at, Utendorf
said with a smile. I just figured I didnt
want to give them (Ottoville) a chance
to reset their defense and do something
different. Our kids kind of got confused
the first time in that situation. We wanted to play it out and see what happened
and whatever happened happened. Its
a credit to our kids, they executed. It
probably wasnt the
initial shot we were
thinking, but Alex

WOMEN WITH CANCER

shots. The Jays took the lead for good at


3:38 on a hoop-and-harm by Fischbach
and their patience against the 1-2-2 zone
of the Tigers paid off with an 11-5 lead
via a deuce by Hays at 38 seconds.
North Baltimore continued its
drought until the 5-03 mark of the second period when Light downed a triple.
By that time, St. Johns had a 16-8 edge
and they continued to build on that lead,
eventually taking a 23-10 halftime lead
on a Hays trifecta at 1:29.
The Jays then took advantage of
some serious Tiger foul trouble 11
fouls in the third period alone by
going to the line 10 times and hitting
eight. With several Tigers with three and
two with four, the Blue and Gold built a
38-23 edge on two Fischbach freebies at
8.1 ticks before Light buried a left-wing
triple at 1.1 ticks for a 38-26 Blue Jay
advantage.
The Tigers gained a sense of urgency
in the finale and steadily chipped away
at the deficit. They put the Jays at the
line 18 times and they hit 15 (Hays 7-of8, Fischbach 5-of-6 and Rachel Pohlman
(3-of-4).

made a great play to get a shot and it


went in.
This was a good game both ways.
Someone had to lose, Ottoville coach
Todd Turnwald said. Both teams played
well. It was a good basketball game. We
thought we did a good job defensively.
We held them to 3-of-15 from 3-point
range, but they hit two big, well-contested 3s late to tie the game. Our kids
played well.
Wehri led the Musketeers with a
game-high 26 points as 14 of his points
came at the free throw line. Connor
Stechschulte and Drew Grone both had
10 points. Berelsman had just the two
points.
Martin led the Big Green with 20
points and Moorman added 19.

***
Ottoville 12- 22- 62: Nick Moorman 5-819; Zane Martin 7-4-20; Eric Von Sossan 2-2-7;
Dustin Trenkamp 1-3-5; Andy Schimmoeller 1-47; Rudy Wenzlick 1-1-4.
Fort Jennings 20- 21- 64: Alex Berelsman
1-0-2; Brandon Wehri 5-14-26; Zack Finn 1-02; Luke Trentman 4-1-9; Aaron Neidert 1-0-2;
Connor Stechschulte 4-2-10; Drew Grone 3-4-10;
Ian Finn 1-0-2.
Ottoville 10 12 6 14 14 6 - 62
Fort Jennings 12 9 12 9 14 8 - 64
Three-point goals: Ottoville (Moorman 1,
Martin 2, Von Sossan 1, Schimmoeller 1, Wenzlick
1); Fort Jennings 3 (Wehri 2, Neidert 1).

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8 The Herald

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

www.delphosherald.com

Sports

Grove dispels Wildcat girls Lady Green erupts


versus Miller City

BY JIM METCALFE
DHI Media Sports Editor
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

BLUFFTON Jefferson
and Columbus Groves girls
basketball teams had already
played each other once in
2015-16.
That was way back on
Dec. 17, when the Lady
Bulldogs won 63-37.
The Lady Wildcats hoped
that Saturdays rematch in the
opening game of the Bluffton
University Division III
Sectional inside the Sommer
Center would be a revenge.
Poor shooting and 33
turnovers made that dream
a nightmare as the fourthranked Lady Bulldogs
grabbed a 60-24 rout.
Grove (21-2) advance to
tangle with Coldwater 6:15
p.m. Thursday at the Elida
District.
The Wildcats, who finished the season 12-12, shot
a polar 8-of-32 from the floor
1-of-11 downtown for
25 percent and compounded
that with the turnovers.
Turnovers just killed us.
We didnt play that bad on
defense but our offensive
execution didnt give us a
chance, Jefferson mentor
Dave Hoffman, coaching
his 750th game as the Lady
Wildcat coach. We were too
much in a rush against their
pressure and it led to them
getting easier shots against
our defense. We started out
OK but we couldnt keep it
up. They hit some outside
shots and that opened up the
inside for them because we
defended them pretty well for
a half.
Sophomore Sarah Miller
(6 boards) was the only
Wildcat in double digits with
10.

BY CHARLIE WARNIMONT
DHI Media Sports Editor
news@delphosherald.com

Jefferson sophomore Sarah Miller and senior Taylor Stroh battle Columbus Groves
Kyrah Yinger during first-period action Saturday night at Bluffton University. (DHI
Media/Jim Metcalfe)
The balanced Bulldogs
put three in twin figures with
Jade Clement canning 16,
Lynea Diller 14 (6 caroms)
and Kyrah Yinger (5 boards,
5 dimes) 10.
It took us a while to get
going; we had a typical first
tournament game jitters. As
those went away, we played
our typical balanced offense
and good defense, Grove
head man Brian Schroeder
said. What happened was
our pressure got the game
into the tempo we like.
Jefferson did a good job of
defending our big girls but
we hit some outside shots
and made a determined effort
to go inside the second half.
Jefferson, who defeated
Paulding Tuesday, stayed
close with the favored
Bulldogs most of the first
period. However, Groves
2-2-1 full-court pressure and
2-3 zone with the backing
of the 6-1 Diller and 5-11
Paige Bellman began to
force turnovers and helped

open up the offense. They led


from the start on an opening
bomb by Clement (8 points in
the period, 2 threes) and took
a 14-8 edge on a foul shot by
Diller at 40.4 ticks.
The pressure the Bulldogs
exerted took an even bigger toll on the Wildcats in
the second period, forcing 13
errors. Though the Bulldogs
shot 5-of-14, Jefferson could
only manage 2-of-6 shooting. Thus, Grove (who had
7 turnovers of their own in
the stanza and 19 total) and
its lead kept climbing and
reached 27-11 on a Clement
layin off a steal at 3:02 before
Jefferson got a pair of throws
from Devyn Carder (4 markers) at 2:26 and a steal-and-layin by senior Taylor Stroh (6
rebounds) at 1:38 to get within 27-15.
The teams traded baskets
Bellman (7:45) and Miller
(7:05) to commence the
third period but that would be
Jeffersons last points until a
foul shot by Mikayla Bennet

Enjoy the Best of


Both Worlds!!!

at 3:25. A Clement basket


began a 14-1 spurt to finish off the stanza and when
Yinger found herself all alone
under the rim for a layup
at 3.1 ticks it gave Grove a
43-18 edge.
The biggest lead of the
night came at 60-20 late in
the fourth on a 3-ball by
Groves Mackenzie Wurth
as the coaches went to the
deeper reserves with four
Jefferson seniors: Stroh,
Pimpas, Tori Black and
Bailey Gorman taking one
final bow as time wound
down.
Jefferson finished 7-of-9
at the foul line (77.8%); with
26 caroms (5 offensive); and
at 13 fouls.

JEFFERSON (24)
Taylor Stroh 1-0-2, Macy Wallace
1-0-2, Mackenzie Hammons 0-0-0,
Devyn Carder 1-2-4, Sarah Miller
4-2-10, Tori Black 0-0-0, Jessica
Pimpas 0-2-2, Bailey Gorman 0-0-0,
Alli McClurg 0-0-0, Mikayla Bennet
1-1-4, Michelle Rode 0-0-0. Totals
7-1-7/9-24.
COLUMBUS GROVE (60)
Macy McCluer 2-0-5, Kyrah
Yinger 5-0-10, Jade Clement 7-016, McKenzie Bame 0-0-0, Jenny
Ellerbrock 0-0-0, Brooke Hoffmn
0-0-0, Mackenzie Wurth 1-0-3, Rylee
Sybert 1-0-2, Grace Schroeder 0-22, Lauren Schroeder 0-0-0, Hallie
Malsam 1-2-4, Danielle Caudill
0-0-0, Lynea Diller 6-2-14, Paige
Bellman 2-0-4. Totals 21-4-6/9-60.
Score by Quarters:
Jefferson 8 7 3 6 - 24
Col. Grove 14 13 16 17 - 60
Three-point goals: Jefferson,
Bennet; Columbus Grove, Clement
2, McCluer, Wurth.

Jays
(Continued from page 7)

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On the other end, NB forced


five turnovers (15 overall) and
Frost netted eight (2 treys)
and Lacey Powell seven. Her
basket at 1:28 got the Tigers
within 49-47 before the Jays
final push at the charity stripe.
North Baltimore ended up
shooting 15-of-40 from the
field (9-of-22 beyond the arc)
for 37.5 percent and 8-of16 from the line (50%); and
grabbed 22 boards (8 offensive) as Light (5 assists) had
six and Katelyn Weinandy
four.
Our defense was magnificent; it was a great team
defensive effort. We let their
guards get away a couple of
times and they hit the shots
but not too often, Grothouse
added. For the most part,
we limited them to one shot
down the floor against a much
taller team. We boxed out very
well and got some of our own
second shots. Again, this was
a great team effort on both
ends.
St. Johns totaled 14-of-37
shooting (4-of-13 long range)
for 37.8 percent; secured 34
rebounds (12 offensive) as
Jessica Geise nabbed five; and
totaled 16 fouls.

NORTH BALTIMORE (47)


Cassidy Hiser 0-0-0, Alivia Light
3-2-11, Bailey Boyer 3-0-7, Kelcie
Bean 0-0-0, Lacey Trumbull 2-1-5,
Kiah Powell 1-5-7, Katelyn Weinandy
2-0-6, Emma Rister 0-0-0, Olivia
Frost 4-0-11. Totals 6-9-8/16-47.
ST. JOHNS (57)
Hayleigh Bacome 1-1-3, Taylor
Zuber 0-0-0, Madilynn Schulte 2-0-6,
Betty Vorst 0-0-0, Rachel Pohlman
0-6-6, Maddie Pohlman 0-0-0, Ellie
Csukker 0-0-0, Jessica Geise 3-1-7,
Lexi Hays 4-9-19, Sydney Fischbach
4-8-16. Totals 10-4-25/31-57.
Score by Quarters:
North Baltimore 5 5 16 21 - 47
St. Johns 11 12 15 19 - 57
Three-point
goals:
North
Baltimore, A. Light 3, Frost 3,
Weinandy 2, Boyer; St. Johns,
Schulte 2, Hays 2.

FINDLAY Saturday evenings Division IV sectional


final was just another night at the office for the Ottoville girls
basketball team.
Taking control of the tempo early, the Lady Green were
able to run their game plan offensively and defensively without
much trouble against Putnam County League foe Miller City.
And when the Big Green had another 30-plus point second
quarter in the sectional tournament, that was all they needed to
get past the Wildcats 82-43 at Findlay High School.
Ottoville (22-2) advances to the Division IV district semifinals Thursday night at Ottawa-Glandorf where they will face
Leipsic (15-9) at 8 p.m. The first game Thursday has Arlington
playing Delphos St. Johns.
Miller City saw its season end at 12-12.
We like to push the pace, Ottoville coach Dave Kleman
said. The first half we played 10-11-12 kids. We had a couple
of kids get a couple of fouls, but we are deep enough where the
kids coming off the bench do a pretty good job. Our JV team
was 21-1 this year, so they are more than capable of playing.
They go up against our starters every night and get beat on so
they should get better.
Before the Big Green really got going, the Wildcats had a
2-0 lead on a Cassie Niese drive to the basket. The Big Green
were up 6-5 after a Niese 3-point play before Ottoville went on
a 9-o run behind four points from Bridget Landin, a 3-pointer
by CJ Kemper and a Brooke Mangas basket for a 15-5 lead.
Ottoville had a 15-6 lead after one as the Wildcats Megan
Warnimont ended the first-quarter scoring with a free throw.
It was the second quarter where Ottoville made their stand,
outscoring the Wildcats 32-14, despite sitting three starters
and a sub because of two fouls each. The Big Green started the
quarter with an 8-2 run, then later in the quarter had runs of 7-0
and 9-0 to break the game open. Kemper and Mangas both had
seven points in the quarter for the Big Green as seven different
Big Green players scored in the quarter.
While the Ottoville offense was scoring points, the Big
Greens fullcourt pressure gave Miller City fits forcing 21
first-half Wildcat turnovers in building a 47-20 halftime lead.
Their defense tonight, by an opposing team against us as
long as Ive been coaching, was probably one of the best performances Ive ever seen, Wildcat coach Chris Rump said. I
told Dave that after the game. I told our girls that in the locker
room. When a team comes out and plays that well defensively
and they have three girls 5-11, 6-0, 6-1 and one or two more off
the bench, that is a luxury. To their credit, I thought they were
really good tonight. When a defense is that good you start to
press a little bit, get out of rhythm and we didnt run very good
offense the first half because of their press.
The Wildcats also faced their share of foul problems as four
players had at least two fouls each and one four. A total of 25
fouls were called the first half.
Ottoville continued to play their game in the third quarter,
outscoring the Wildcats 26-11. Four different players in the
quarter hit 3-pointers for the Big Green as eight players scored
points in the quarter.
What we do affects teams mentally, Kleman said. And
thats what we are trying to do when we play teams. We shot
the ball extremely well and when you do that it is quite enjoyable to watch and coach.
In the final quarter Miller City posted a 12-9 scoring advantage.
Kemper led three Ottoville players in double digits with 14
points, while Alicia Honigford had 12 and Bridget Landin 10.
Nicole Kramer, with three 3-pointers, Mangas and Thorbahn
all had nine points.
Cassie Niese led the Wildcats with 11 points. Megan Niese
and Megan Warnimont both had six points.

***
Miller City 16- 8-17 43: Cassie Niese 4-3-11; Paige Wenzinger 1-0-2;
Tiffany Welty 2-1-5; Amanda Simon 1-2-5; Megan Niese 2-0-6; Chrissy
Berger 2-0-4; Liz Klear 0-0-0; Jennelle Kuhlman 1-0-2; Chloe Lammers 0-0-0;
Megan Warnimont 2-2-6; Alisha Hoffman 0-0-0; Kylie Berner 0-0-0.
Ottoville 26- 22-26 82: CJ Kemper 5-3-14; Brynlee Hanneman 1-0-2;
Olivia Gamble 0-0-0; Madison Knodell 0-0-0; Bridget Landin 1-8-10; Nicole
Kramer 3-0-9; Haley Hoersten 1-0-2; Quinley Schlagbaum 0-0-0; Brooke
Mangas 1-7-9; Amber Miller 2-0-4; Kacey Knippen 3-0-8; Emily Landin
0-0-0; Alicia Honigford 4-3-12; Alexis Thorbahn 4-1-9; Abby Hilvers 1-0-3.
Miller City 6 14 11 12 - 43
Ottoville 15 32 26 9 - 82
Three-point goals: Miller City (Simon 1, M. Niese 2); Ottoville 8 (Kemper
1, Kramer 3, Knippen 2, Honigford 1, Hilvers 1).

Wrestlers

Wyatt Place of Jefferson defeated Collin Fischer of St.


Johns in the opening round. Place defeated Coldwaters
Cody Tebbe 5-0 in finals to place third at 138. (DHI Media/
Larry Heiing)
(Continued from page 7)
Along with Beemer
and Ebbeskotte for O-G,
Leon Palomo (120), Logan
Balbaugh (145), Grant
Goecke (152), Danny Rosales
(160) and Zane Brooks (220)
moved on for a chance to
compete at districts.
Lincolnviews
Luke
Bullinger placed third in the
106 featherweight bracket
and Adas Chase Sumner was
runner-up at 132.
Six local wrestlers placed
fifth at sectionals and will be

an alternate at districts: Caleb


Langhals and Enoch Jones
(Columbus Grove), Wyatt
Stabler and Hunter Showalter
(Wayne Trace), Spencer
Wannemacher (Jefferson) and
Justin Wieging (St. Johns).
Coldwater advanced 11
wrestlers out of sectionals and
ran away with the team title
with 224 points. Wayne Trace
placed a district second with
151 points. Ottawa-Glandorf
was fifth with 118, Jefferson
(7th), Columbus Grove (9th)
and St. Johns (10th).

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Next Generation

The Herald - 9

Students studying alternative energy sources


Information submitted
FORT JENNINGS For the past couple
of months, students in the Fort Jennings
Environmental Science class have been
studying alternative energy sources. They
have been researching and experimenting
with wind power, solar power, and hydrogen
fuel cell power. In the last couple of weeks
they have turned their attention to fuels produced from biomass. Two such fuels include
biodiesel and ethanol. The students have
been able to actually produce these fuels
in the lab collaborating with the chemistry
class at Fort Jennings to do so.
According to Environmental Science
teacher Jeff Jostpille, a lot of the equipment
needed to produce these labs was obtained
through a grant awarded last fall through
the Ohio Corn Marketing Program. Jostpille
was a participant last summer in a workshop
that the Program sponsored called Feeding
the World where topics such as ethanol
production, increasing corn yields, water
quality testing, and soil nutrient testing were

discussed and explained. As part of the program, participants were given the chance to
apply for a grant that would make use of the
knowledge and ideas from the workshop.
The $1,000 grant was then used to purchase
the supplies and equipment required for the
lab experiments.
Working with Chemistry teacher Heather
Harmon, the two classes combined their
knowledge of the topics to successfully create ethanol and biodiesel. Ethanol is a part of
gasoline in almost all the fuel at our filling
stations. It is less polluting when burned.
Approximately 40 percent of the corn crop
in the United States is used to produce ethanol. Modern ethanol production can produce
approximately 2.8 gallons of fuel ethanol
per bushel of corn. The ethanol production
process uses only the starch portion of the
corn, which is about 70 percent of the kernel. All the remaining nutrients: protein, fat,
minerals, and vitamins, are concentrated into
distillers grain, a valuable feed for livestock.
The Fort Jennings students prepared two
different setups for their experiment. One
Abby VonSossan, Connor Stechschulte and Quinton Neidert patiently wait on the distillation process.

The fermented corn mash that can be used as animal feed. (Submitted photos)

goes back to the next generation of soybean


plants who use it in photosynthesis to produce more oil. The Fort Jennings students
used virgin vegetable oil. When the alcohol,
methanol, is mixed with the catalyst, sodium
hydroxide, and vegetable oil is added, the oil
is broken down into the byproduct glycerin
and biodiesel.
The students then tested their biodiesel
for soap content. Unwashed biodiesel contains a certain amount of soap. The amount
depends on several factors, including the
the free fatty acid content of the original oil
and the amount of moisture present during
the production process. If too much soap
remains, the fuel cannot be used safely without the risk of engine damage or fuel filter
clogging.
Having the ability in a lab situation to
produce these kinds of real world applications is a great learning tool, Jostpille and
Harmon said. And being able to work together, in a crosscurricular way, was beneficial to
both classes of students.

used cracked corn while the other used corn


meal. In the process, different enzymes are
added to break down the starch into simple
sugars. Then yeast is added to take those
sugars and convert them to alcohol. The corn
mash is then filtered and the liquid is added
to the distiller. A very slow heating process
is applied and the ethanol evaporates to a gas
where it is forced into a cooling tube where
it condenses back to liquid and is captured
in a flask. This must happen at temperatures
between 173-212 degrees F. If the temperature gets above 212F, then water will evaporate and contaminate the ethanol.
The students found that the corn meal
produced more alcohol due to the larger
surface area available for the enzymes and
the yeast.
The two classes also worked on producing
Biodiesel. Typically, biodiesel is made from
soybeans or used oils such as fryer oil from
a restaurant. Biodiesel burns cleaner than
diesel made from fossil fuels and is renewable since the carbon produced in burning it

Farmer directs donation


to local 4-H club
Information submitted
OTTOVILLE The Ottoville Up To Date 4-H Club in
Putnam County has received a $2,500 donation from Americas
Farmers Grow Communities, sponsored by the Monsanto Fund
and directed by local farmer Josh Hemker of Putnam County.
The donation will help the 4-H club provide a permanent structure and equipment in the local community park for youth to play
Gaga Ball. Gaga Ball was made popular with local youth starting
at 4-H Camp Palmer and the local park fest.
For six years, Americas Farmers Grow Communities has
collaborated with farmers to donate over $22 million to more than
8,000 community organizations across rural America. Winning
farmers will direct donations to nonprofits to help fight rural
hunger, purchase life-saving fire and EMS equipment, support ag
youth leadership programs, buy much needed classroom resources,
and so much more.
Americas Farmers Grow Communities partners with farmers
to support local nonprofit causes that positively impact farming
communities across rural America. Grow Communities is one program in the Americas Farmers community outreach effort, sponsored by the Monsanto Fund. Other programs include Americas
The Jefferson Girls Vocal Ensemble, from left, senior Brandy White, sophomore Maggie Kimmet, junior Beth Williams, Farmers Grow Ag Leaders, which encourages rural youth to
sophomore Alyxis Carpenter, junior Alesha Harshman and freshman Victoria White. The group received a Superior remain in agriculture and provides $1,500 college scholarships
to high school and college students pursuing ag-related degrees
Rating at Solo and Ensemble Contest Feb. 6 in Celina. Students are under the direction of Mrs. Tammy Wirth. and Americas Farmers Grow Rural Education, which works with
(Submitted photos)
farmers to nominate rural school districts to compete for $10,000
and $25,000 math and science grants.
VisitAmericasFarmers.com to learn more.

Jefferson vocalists compete in Celina

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Delphos Jefferson Freshman Womens Ensemble, from left, Allison Hasting, Lauren Grothaus, Rachel Kroeger, Kylee
Gosset and Avery Godwin, received an Excellent Rating at Solo and Ensemble contest Feb. 6 in Celina.

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10 - The Herald

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, February 20, 2016

Crossword Puzzle

Good Vibrations

"FM Channels"

By Ed Clark

The music that moves us ...

AhhThose One Hit Wonders. In our sea of


music lies a designated harbor of songs, memorable songs, from artists you may not be familiar
with. A few one hit wonder-fuls from the 60s, 70s,
and 80s.
80s artist: The Romantics
I hear the secrets that you keep
When youre talking in your sleep
Talking In Your Sleep
Chart Peak #3 1984
Romantics lead singer Jimmy Marinos talks
about the song: That was the last song recorded
for the album In Heat. All we had was a backtrack,
the instrumental part of the song. And we realized
it was too good a track to leave unfinished. So
everybody put their heads together, and in a couple of days, we finished up the song melodically
and lyrically.
70s artist: Looking Glass
The sailors say Brandy, youre a fine girl
What a good wife you would be
Brandy (Youre a Fine Girl)
Chart Peak #1 1972
The members of the band Looking Glass
are all alumni of Rutgers University and were
a flashback feature in the 2009 Rutgers alumni
magazine. The No. 1 hit landed them on American
Bandstand. The band broke up a few years after
this smash hit yet the airplay of the song continues
today on countless oldies stations.

60s artist: Jeannie C Riley


The day my momma socked it to, the
Harper Valley PTA
The day my momma socked it to, the
Harper Valley PTA
Harper Valley PTA
Chart Peak #1 (both Pop & Country chart)
1968
Tom T Hall, this songs writer, has stated that
the inspiration for the song came from passing
by the Harpeth Valley Elementary School (still
educating students today) in Bellevue, Tennessee,
near where he then lived in Franklin. This would
be Country singer Jeannie Rileys only big hit and
a song that, hard as you may try, just wont go
away. Good Vibrations.
(Wikipedia, songfacts.com)

Across
1 Like some church
matters
5 Place
9 Will o'the ___
13 To boot
14 Hooded snake
16 Sound effect
17 F.D.R.'s Scottie
18 Cy Young, e.g.
19 Voice-mail sound
20 Highest British
military rank
23 Thwack
24 "Waterworld" girl
27 Beginning
homeowner's
arrangement
32 Blow your horn
33 Mountaineering
gear
34 Fine-grained wood
35 Boat propellers
36 Exodus
commemoration
37 Muscle quality
38 According to
39 Contemplative sort
40 Closed
41 Outdoor place to
get fresh vgetables
44 Buffalo
45 Melody
46 Bills
53 Not kosher
56 Like city folk
57 Slime
58 User-edited online
reference
59 "Metamorphosis"
hero
60 Peacock's pride
61 Airy
62 Nicholas II was the
last one
63 Boutique

13

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8
15

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28

32

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41

25

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35

10

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53

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61

Down
1 Slangy chuckle
2 Jai ___
3 Castaway's home
4 Fuel containers
5 Urchins
6 Corn Belt state
7 Way up the
mountain
8 Makes a mistake
9 Online journal
10 Diamonds
11 Every other
hurricane
12 ___ the question
15 Staunch supporter

WebDonuts

21
22
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
35
36
37
39
40

51

52

63

42 Breakfast bread
43 "Vikings" character
___ Lothbrok
47 "Shoot!"
48 Some servers
49 Discovery grp.
50 Talk show host
Trevor
51 Basso Pinza
52 Cry of pain
53 Low card
54 Cheat, slangily
55 Just make, with
"out"

Mr. Uncool
Some colonists
Graphic design
Ticket seller
"I lived ___": Tosca
Pigtail
Router hookup
Works
Ram's mate
"Papa Bear" of
football
Butterfingers
Extra
Fallon's in-house
band
Office message
Whole alternative

Sudoku

Sudoku Puzzle #3795-M

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www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Business

Epic Vapes joins Delphos


Area Chamber of Commerce

Epic Vapes has celebrated its Grand Opening of the newest store located at 109 E.
Second St., Delphos and joined the Delphos Area Chamber of Commerce. Similar to
its other locations, the Delphos store has been designed to include tasting bars where
patrons can test the wide array of premium e-liquids while socializing with other vapers. Epic Vapes also boasts a pharmaceutical-grade, clean mixing lab where all of the
e-liquids are mixed to ensure product quality and purity. Nate Geise, co-founder of Epic
Vapes, added, We use only the finest, FDA-approved ingredients and offer some of
the most innovative e-liquid flavor combinations on the market. We also offer a broad
selection of high quality personal vaporizer and accessories for both the novice and
experienced users at incredibly competitive prices. Since opening the first retail location in Fort Wayne, Indiana, in July 2014, Epic Vapes has grown their retail footprint
to Van Wert, Wapakoneta, St Marys and now Delphos. This expansion plan includes
additional stores to open in Napoleon and Findlay within the next two months. Participating in the ribbon-cutting are, from left, Chamber Board member Janet Metzger,
Epic Vapes Co-founder Nate Geise; Epic Vapes Manager Kirk Sneed, Co-founder Mike
Geise, Chamber Executive Director Tara Krendl and Chamber Board member Anita
Lindeman. (DHI Media/Nancy Spencer)

Six simple tips to help improve your credit


BY JOSH MILLER
Western & Southern Life
A credit card is a simple
fact of life for most adults.
Are you making airline reservations? Booking a hotel
room? Renting a car? Youll
probably need a credit card to
do so, even if you plan to use
cash to pay. Some employers
even use credit reports when
deciding whom to hire. If
your credit score isnt so great
(less than 600), youre probably paying higher interest on
many transactions. You may
potentially even incur higher auto and home insurance
rates. Are you ready to start
improving your credit score?
Here are some simple tips.
Tip #1: Pay the big debts
down first.
Are any of your credit
cards at or close to their maximum? Pay them down first.

Credit bureaus like to deduct


points from your score whenever your balance exceeds
50 percent of your available
credit limit. Better yet? Pick a
card with a high balance and
high interest to pay off first.
Tip #2: Pay your bills. On
time. Always.
Once youve demonstrated
your ability to pay on time for
a while, youll see your score
creep up.
Tip #3: Consider keeping
unused credit cards.
You didnt misread it. Is
your debt high? Dont start
canceling unused credit cards.
Doing so will only cause your
debt-to-credit ratio (see Tip
#1) to creep up in the short
term. Pay down your debt
first, and then cancel your
unused cards.
Tip #4: If your credit score
is less than 600, or if you have

no credit history, consider a


secured credit card.
These credit cards are tied
to a savings account that you
fund. The savings account is
actually security for the card,
so if your bill goes unpaid
the account can be tapped by
creditors to cover the debt.
Tip #5: Dont be in the
dark!
Regularly check your
credit report for free. Each
of the three credit bureaus
(Equifax, TransUnion and
Experian) are required to
provide you with one credit
report each year for free. Visit
AnnualCreditReport.com to
learn more.
Tip #6: Try to be patient.
Improving your credit takes time and patience.
Youve taken the first step so
youre heading in the right
direction!

Cutting your medical


bills via Smartphone

BY NATHANIEL
SILLIN
What if your next doctors
visit could happen by smartphone from anywhere in the
world? It could happen sooner than you think.
Its called telemedicine,
or telehealth: The use of
Internet-connected devices
to communicate information
about diseases, symptoms and
other health data. The Patient
Protection and Affordable
Care Act (ACA) is driving
innovators in healthcare and
technology to develop apps
and devices that offer greater access to healthcare products and services at a lower
cost. In fact, the global telehealth market is expected to
grow from $440.6 million in
2013 to $4.5 billion by 2018,
according to Colorado-based
research firm IHS.
How could this affect you?
Though apps that measure
everything from your daily
walk or run to your heart
rate are already available, an
incredible range of options
are coming. Here are some of
the current and future product
development trends in smartphone and wearable healthcare:
Physical activity and
vitals tracking. While many
major health systems and hospitals allow you to download
apps that let you schedule
appointments, see lab results
and even communicate
by email or text with your
doctor, such offerings have
no diagnostic value yet.
However, the U.S. Food and
Drug Administration recently
released policy statements on
what it calls mobile medical
apps that will actually allow
tracking of vital health data

for direct interpretation by


trained health professionals.
GPS Medicine. Lets say
you need to fill a prescription
and you want to know the
cheapest place to buy it within a 10-mile radius of your
office. Using technology similar to the restaurant, movie
and service-finding sites you
probably use now, developers
are considering similar models for medical supply and
service pricing data that could
save you money in real time.
Diagnosis by selfie. Who
knew taking a selfie could
help improve your health?
This new technology allows
patients to take a photo of
a non-life-threatening injury or rash using their cell
phones
(http://www.wsj.
com/articles/the-future-ofmedicine-is-in-your-smartphone-1420828632). Then,
an algorithm processes the
image, evaluates it and
texts back the diagnosis.
Developers are coming up
with sensors to collect symptom- and condition-related health data, which could
mean that in the future, physicians will have a lot more to
work with than a mere photo.
Virtual appointments.
Healthcare legislation is also
expected to spur use of handheld devices to create 24/7,
real-time communication
between patients and practitioners for the cost of a co-pay
or less. In a 2014 report,
consulting firm Deloitte said
that there would be 100 million health eVisits globally, potentially saving over $5
billion in costs compared to
those incurred by traditional
physician visits.
But before you start downloading this new technology,

A. Lisk, 5175 Peltier Road,


Delphos, $46,000.
Judith M. Sudhoff, Diane
K. Grothouse, John Grothouse,
Carla J. Bonifas, Steve
Bonifas, Kathy S. Dukes and
Linda Gerdeman to Darlene
A. Pohlman, Bloomlock Road,
Delphos, $726,400.
Sugar Creek Township
Bruce J. Dilley to Rodney
Brenneman, 5490 N. Wapak
Road, Lima, $116,000.
Putnam County
Christopher L. Recker TR,
Lots 5 and 6, Glandorf, to Cory
L. Buddelmeyer and Amber
Buddelmeyer.

Celina Carolyn Stammen Dammeyer has been


named to Western Southern Lifes Gold Medallion Club,
according to a news release. Dammeyer is a sales representative/financial advisor at Western Southerns Celina
office, lives in Celina, and coaches Varsity Volleyball at
Delphos St. Johns.
Gold Medallion membership is based on outstanding sales production, business persistence, meeting strict
ethical and production requirements and upholding the
heritage of conducting business with the highest level of
integrity, the release stated.
Western Southern Life was founded in 1888 and is
based in Cincinnati with more than 180 offices in 43 states.
Dammeyer plans to attend the Leader Sales Meeting in
Cancun, Mexico.

Wayne Suever, 2.592 acres

Dammeyer

See TRANSFERS page 13

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research the following:


Who made the app and
what do the developers really
know about my condition?
What about privacy?
Whats in the apps usage
agreement and how safe is
the payment, prescription or
medical data required to use
the app?
What does my primary care doctor or my insurer think about me using this
app? Could using it affect my
coverage in any way?
What does it really cost
to use the app and how might
it affect data charges on my
smartphone or tablet bill?
Bottom line: The ability
to manage your healthcare by
smartphone is a revolutionary
concept. But before you dive
in head first, learn as much as
you can about the technology and whether your current
health professionals and networks support it.
Nathaniel Sillin directs
Visas financial education programs. To follow
Practical Money Skills on
Twitter: www.twitter.com/
PracticalMoney.

Western Southern recognizes Dammeyer

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS

Allen County
Amanda Township
Richard D. Brorein to Patricia
L. Lee, 10680 Spencerville
Road, Spencerville, $140,500.
City of Delphos
Jenna L. and Adam Sanders
to Ryan P. Clark and Heather M.
Pohlman, 808 Fairlane Drive,
Delphos, $122,700.
Village of Elida
Herbert F. and Norma M.
Brunk to Joshua Thomas and
Marna Ann Wende, 113 W. Main
St., Elida, $35,000.
Marion Township
Mary Ann and Frederick C.
Lisk to Thomas F. and Renee

The Herald - 11

Pick up a copy of the NEW


Maple Magazine available at each stop

Wednesday, January 24, 2016

Classifieds
100 ANNOUNCEMENTS
105 Announcements
235 HELP WANTED
110 Card Of Thanks
115 Entertainment
120 CAREGIVERS:
In Memoriam
Lost And Found
A125
L
L
For You Home
130 Prayers
Care
is seeking quality
135 School/Instructions
c140
a r eHappy
g i v eAds
rs in the
145 Ride area.
Share STNA liDelphos

www.delphosherald.com

240 Healthcare
245
Manufacturing/Trade
235
HELP WANTED
250 Office/Clerical
255 Professional
260
RestaurantOPEN for a
POSITION
265
Retail
part
time or full time
270 Sales and Marketing
sales
representative.
275 Situation
Wanted
WillTransportation
train. Send resume
280

to Delphos Herald, 405


cense NOT required. 300
N. REAL
MainESTATE/RENTAL
St., Delphos,
200 EMPLOYMENT
305
Apartment/Duplex
Call
Ron
7am-9pm,
419OH
45833.
205 Business Opportunities 310 Commercial/Industrial
303-7762.
210 Childcare
315 Condos
215 Domestic
220 Elderly Home Care
225 Employment Services
230 Farm And Agriculture
235 General

320 House
325 Mobile Homes
330 Office Space
335 Room
340 Warehouse/Storage

Fair Marketing
Manager

The Van Wert County Agricultural Society is seeking


a Fair Marketing Manager to be responsible
for marketing the Fair and Fairgrounds to drive
increased sponsorship for the Fair and increased
rental income for the Fairgrounds. This position will
serve as the Face of the Fair to our customers and
the community. Candidates must have excellent
organizational, communication, teamwork and
supervisory skills. Resumes will be accepted until
March 5, 2016. Please forward your resume to:

The Van Wert County Agricultural


Society
1055 S. Washington St.
Van Wert, OH 45891

vwfair@bright.net

VAN WERT COUNTY HOSPITAL,


VAN WERT, OHIO

INFECTION PREVENTION
REGISTERED NURSE
Van Wert County Hospital is in search of
a full-time Infection Prevention RN to
join our Nursing leadership team.
The chosen candidate must have a
strong desire to continuously improve
the quality of care to our clients as
well as protection for our employees.
Is responsible for adhering to the CDC
guidelines as well as implementing
programs that will aid in the compliance
of the organization under the National
Patient Safety Goals, Joint Commission,
and NHSN regulations. Is highly involved
in program development and community
No health
experience
or medical skills necessary
fair events.

345 Vacations

520 Building Materials

www.delphosherald.com

Telling The Tri-Countys Story Since 1869

To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122

830 Boats/Motors/Equipment
LAWN, GARDEN,
835 665
Campers/Motor Homes
AND REMODEL 840 Classic
LANDSCAPING
530 Events
Cars
680 Snow Removal
595 Hay
360 Roommates Wanted
535 Farm Supplies and Equipment
845 Commercial
685 Travel
597 Storage Buildings
540
Feed/Grain
Spears
1BR APT., Nice, clean.
850 Motorcycles/Mopeds
690 Computer/Electric/Office
400 REAL ESTATE/FORHELP
SALE WANTED
545 Firewood/Fuel
LPN/RN600 SERVICES
855 Off-Road Vehicles
Electrical
Appliances, electric 695
heat,
Acreage
and Lots Lawn Care
New405
Home
Builder/
550 Flea Markets/Bazaars
860 Recreational Vehicles
700
Painting
605 Auction laundry room, No pets.
410 Commercial
Hiring for
Charge Nurse
555landscaping
Garage Sales
865 Rental and Leasing
705
Plumbing
610
Automotive
Remodeler
and Custom and mowing.
415 Condos
560 Home FurnishingsThe Hilty Home, a non-profit
W
A
T
E
R
I
N
C
L
U
D
E
D
.
870 Snowmobiles
710 Roofing/Gutters/Siding
615 Business Services
420
Farms
565
Horses,
Tack
and
Equipment
Specializing in
Cabinet
Builder seeking
Wages based on experi$450/month, plus depos875 Storage
715 Blacktop/Cement
620home
Childcare
425 Houses
570 Lawn and Gardenfaith-based retirement
ence.
it. 320 N. Jefferson. 720
419880 SUVs
Handyman
625 Construction
Trimming Topping Thinning
a full time
Work
430 employee.
Mobile Homes/
575 Livestock
and
child
care
center,
is
725 Elder GARAGES
Care
630 Entertainment
Stop out 577
andMiscellaneous
fill out an
852-0833.
SIDING ROOFING 885 Trailers Deadwooding
in Shop andManufactured
out in the field.Homes
635 Farm Services
searching for a passionate
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
580atMusical
435 Vacation Property application
21845Instruments
Old
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK 890 Trucks
895 Vans/Minivans
800 TRANSPORTATION
640 Financial
Will Train
experience
Since 1973
440but
Want
To Buy
SERVICE
HOUSE
FOR
L i n c o l n582 Pet
H i ginhMemoriam
way
individual
looking
to
make
899
Want
To Buy
805
Auto
645 Hauling 320
583 Pets and Supplies
preferred.
Hrs per Week.
FREE
ESTIMATES
Delphos or
call
419-69250045
MERCHANDISE
RENT
925
Legal
Notices
810
Auto
Parts
and
Accessories
650
Health/Beauty
a
difference
in
the
lives
of
585 Produce
505 on
Antiques
and Collectibles
Pay Based
Experience.
950 Seasonal
8855.
815 AutomobileFULLY
LoansINSURED
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
655 Home Repair/Remodeling
586 Sports and Recreation those we serve.
510 Appliances
953 Ernie
Free &Teman
Low Priced
820
Automobile
Shows/Events
588
Tickets
SEVERAL
MOBILE
660
Home
Service
419-230-4890
Paid Vacation,
Holiday
Pay,
515 Auctions
RETAIL 590
CLERK.
Coma FullTool and
MachineryWe currently have665
Aviations
Lawn, Garden,
Landscaping
Homes/House
for 825
rent.

POHLMAN
BUILDERS

Retirement and Health


Insurance. Must be motivated
and reliable. Looking for
someone that will grow with
the company.
Send resume to

p uter literate, 30-40


hours a week. $11-13.
Send replies to Box 142
c/o Delphos Herald, 405
N. Main St., Delphos,
OH 45833

Ted Verhoff
Builders & Cabinetry

19894 Rd S.
Fort Jennings OH 45844
or email to

Time, 3rd Shift opening and


Part-Time 1st and 2nd shift
openings for a professional
Licensed Practical Nurse or
Registered Nurse.
Apply using this web page,
or at mhcoliving.org under
Careers and then under
Hilty Home or come in
and apply at

Hilty Home

tvbuild@bright.net

Planning a
Garage Sale?
Check us out online:
Advertise here!
www.delphosherald.com
419-695-0015
00166335

304 Hilty Drive


Pandora, OH 45877

Become a CAREGiver

SM

The job that changes lives in your community.


No experience
or medical
skills necessary
No experience
or medical
skills necessary
Flexible
scheduling
Flexible scheduling
Training
provided
Training
provided
Very
rewarding
Very
rewarding

MISCELLANEOUS

583

PETS AND
SUPPLIES

AKC REGISTERED
Saint Bernard puppies.
$800 419-549-0856.

STORAGE
BUILDINGS

COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY

419-692-0032
Across from Arbys

or applyonline
at
or apply
online at www.HomeInstead.com/208/becomeacaregiver
www.HomeInstead.com/208/becomeacaregiver

Looking for a
house to buy
or rent?
Check the
classified
section of
The Delphos
Herald

POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS

670

MISCELLANEOUS

Residential
& Commercial
Agricultural Needs
All Concrete Work

Mark Pohlman

419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460

SAFE &
SOUND

DELPHOS

SELF-STORAGE
Security Fence
Pass Code Lighted Lot
Affordable 2 Locations
Why settle for less?

LAWN, GARDEN,
LANDSCAPING

419-692-6336

Mueller Tree
Service

Fabrication & Welding Inc.

665

Tree Trimming &


Removal
Window, Gutter &
Chimney Cleaning

419-203-8202

Quality
419-339-0110

GENERAL REPAIR
SPECIAL BUILT PRODUCTS

TRUCKS, TRAILERS
FARM MACHINERY
RAILINGS & METAL GATES
CARBON STEEL
STAINLESS STEEL
ALUMINUM

bjpmueller@gmail.com
Fully insured

Larry McClure

5745 Redd Rd., Delphos

953
L.L.C.

Trimming & Removal


Stump Grinding
24 Hour Service Fully Insured

KEVIN M. MOORE

(419) 235-8051

FREE AND LOW


PRICED MERCHANDISE

CHEST OF drawers, 5
drawers, good shape,
$50. Ph. 419-692-4861.
FOR SALE 2 porch
swings 1 with cushion.
$25.00 each. Call 419667-2852.

Each Home Instead Senior Care franchise office is independently owned and operated. 2015 Home Instead, Inc.

Each Home Instead Senior Care franchise office is independently owned and operated.
2015 Home Instead, Inc.

Each Home Instead Senior Care franchise office is independently owned and operated. 2015 Home Instead, Inc.

The Director of Nursing is responsible for management and


administration of all nursing services in the 61-bed Skilled Nursing
Facility and the 26 bed Assisted Living community that are on site.
Responsibilities include budget and labor management, planning
and development of nursing services, management of staff, and
the delivery of high quality nursing care that also meets the
needs and wants of the customer. Qualified candidates must hold
a current RN license, and at least two years of experience in a
management or DON role is preferred. This is a full-time position
with benefits, compensation commensurate with experience.
Please apply in person at 304 Hilty Drive, Pandora, or submit an
application online
at our website,
mhcoliving.org.
EOE.

577

outabout
more
this rewarding
CallCall
todaytoday
to findtooutfind
more
thisabout
rewarding
opportunity

or apply online
at www.HomeInstead.com/208/becomeacaregiver
submit
a resume/application to:

DIRECTOR OF NURSING

FOR SALE Beautiful


Mobile Home in Ulms
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long patio under very
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match. Well taken care
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SM

419.222.8109
Qualified candidates are encouraged to

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campus in Pandora, Ohio, is searching for a Director of Nursing.

430

MFG/MOBILE
HOMES FOR SALE

597

to three years of clinical experience in an

Fax: 419-238-9390
E-mail: hr@vanwerthospital.org

View homes online at


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inquire at 419-692-3951

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out more about this rewarding opportunity
acuteto
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Bachelors
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provided
required
or must be obtained by 2020.
maintain CPR certification. Previous
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rewarding
management experience preferred. Two

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TEMANS

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The job that changes lives in your community.

Human Resources
1250 S. Washington St.,
Van Wert, OH 45891

APARTMENT/ 670 Miscellaneous


HOME REPAIR

592 Want To Buy

Wanted
To Rent
525 Computer/Electric/Office
675 Pet Care
593 Good Thing
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235 350
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Van Wert County Hospital

HERALD

DELPHOS
THE

00067073

12 The Herald

Payroll Coordinator needed


FCC (Adams), an automotive parts manufacturer is expanding its
administration staff. Benefits include: competitive wage; insurance and
personal time package; opportunity for advancement.
This position requires:
Previous payroll experience
Accurate and timely record keeping abilities
Effective communication skills
Good trouble shooting and problem solving skills
Knowledge of FMLA, disability and benefits very helpful
If you are seeking a challenging and stable career you may apply in person or
via email to amy.poffenberger@e-fcca.com or send resume to:

00166627

WHIRLPOOL OTTAWA
PRODUCTION WORKERS
NEEDED

Kelly Services is partnering


with Whirlpool in Ottawa, OH
to fill production positions
immediately.
Job Requirements:

Must be available to work ANY shift


Manufacturing experience preferred

FCC (adams), llC


Attn: Human Resources
936 East Parr Road
Berne, IN 46711
FCC is an equal opportunity employer.

Immediate Opening
for a Full Time

Detail Technician
Duties include:
Buffing Polishing Interior Cleaning
We offer:
Medical Insurance 401k Comp. Wage
Experience preferred. Apply in person.

Looking for a
Career in the field
of Helping Others?
Join our Winning Team
at Van Wert Manor
Van Wert Manor is looking for
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Employees in the
Dietary Department
Laundry Department Personnel
Third Shift Nursing Assistants:
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Full time positions include health benefits,
vacation benefits, and 401K options.

If interested, applicants can apply in


person at

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160 Fox Road
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
or visit

vanwertmanor.com

Starting wage: $11.00 per hour

To Apply:
Call Kelly Services at:
(419) 523-1325

CHEVROLET BUICK

1725 East Fifth Street, Delphos


IN DELPHOS 419-692-3015 TOLL FREE 1-888-692-3015

EOE/m/f/vets/disability

Fab

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Meter

Horoscopes
ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
Excitement surrounds any get-together you are involved in this
week, Aries. This puts you in a good
mood for some time, and the positive energy can bring about change.
TAURUS Apr 21/May 21
Taurus, this week you may find
yourself in the right mood to organize your home or office. If hightech equipment will be part of the
project, enlist a friend to help out.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
Gemini, if youre feeling particularly amorous this week, schedule a
few date nights or even cuddle time
with someone special. A new person may come into your life as well.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
Plenty of projects around the house
need your attention this week, Cancer. Take advantage of some slower
days to devote time to repairs and
other tasks on your to-do list.
LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
Leo, important new information
may come your way this week. This
could be the catalyst for new professional ventures or even provide
new ways to network.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
Virgo, a job you have put a lot of
effort and time into is completed
successfully this week. You now
can enjoy the fruits of your labor
and the praise coming your way.

(Continued from page 1)

LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23


Communication
improvements
Installing the new meters and the cost of
with your romantic partner have
you feeling optimistic about the fu- the readers if $875,000, which will be paid for
ture, Libra. Dont make any defini- with a zero percent Ohio Public Works loan
tive plans, but start thinking ahead. and the city administration will also apply for
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Scorpio, an unexpected raise has
you spreading the wealth to others.
You tend to be good about sharing
your good fortune, and that is why
so many people look up to you.

SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21


A sense of adventure may find you
booking a vacation, Sagittarius.
Otherwise, you may be looking to
dive into an exciting new relationship. Be impulsive because you
deserve it.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
Capricorn, you may be drawn to
flashy colors and high energy this
week. Plan a fun and energetic date
or take in a movie with a lot of special effects.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Aquarius, youve adopted the attitude that life is an adventure and
youre ready to face any challenge
that comes your way with an open
mind. This may prove to be a busy
week.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
Do not be surprised if big changes lie in store for you, Pisces. You
may end up with a new job or begin
thinking about relocation.

Check our

up to $100,000 Local Government Innovation


Fund monies. Coleman said a fee of $1.35 per
water customer will pay for the new system.
Reading costs to the city per year would
drop from $9,000 using coupon booklets and
pencils to $2,196 with the automated system.
Coleman said he and Mayor Michael
Gallmeier had talked to six different companies that provide automated reading systems
and he and the mayor will visit several towns
in Ohio that are currently using an automated
system to gather more information.
Per ordinances passed in 2014, residents
will see a .7 percent increase in their water
and sewer rates beginning with the May
billing. The rate adjustment is based on the
Consumer Price Index, which increased .7
percent in 2015.
Coleman also reported bids were received
for the upgrades to the walking path
around the Delphos-Gillmor Reservoir. An
$18,000 donation from the Mueller-Scherger
Foundation sought by The Delphos Stadium
Club will provide the matching funds for the
$22,007 Natureworks Grant awarded to the
city earlier this year.
Coleman said the plan is to re-grade the
existing aggregate, add four inches of Ohio
Department of Transportation aggregate and
remove vegetation from the reservoir walkway.
Three bridges in Delphos will need atten-

Website

tion. Bridges over Flat Fork Creed on East


First, East Third and East Seventh streets have
been deemed deficient by the Allen County
Engineers Office. The city will seek 80/20
grants and monies from the Municipal Bridge
Program to help trim the citys 20 percent.
If we receive Municipal Bridge Program
funds, that could knock the citys match down
to 5 percent, Gallmeier said.
The First Street bridge is in the most need
of repair.
Theres no immediate danger to someone
driving over these bridges, Coleman added.
They just need to be kept up.
In other action, council passed on emergency a resolution requesting the State of
Ohio Parole Board deny parole to Robin C.
Bender, the man responsible of the murders
of Louis and Kenneth Youngpeter on July 17,
1974. The citys resolution states: Delphos
Council wishes to register its objection, in the
strongest terms possible, to any early release
of Mr. Bender to protect the safety and security of our community and its residents.
The resolution will be taken by a representative to the parole hearing on March 8.
Council also heard on first reading a resolution authorizing the mayor and/or safety service director to prepare and submit an application to participate in the Local Government
Innovation Fund in the amount of $100,000
for the radio read water meters.
Council passed on third reading an ordinance allowing the mayor and/or safety service director to purchase materials and commodities necessary for the operation of the
citys various departments.

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World in
PersPective

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The Herald 13

Mill

(Continued from page 1)

Odenweller is the fourth


generation to manage the
business, now in its third
century of operation.
The history of mill goes
back to the late 1800s when
a flour mill was built near
Lock 28 of the Miami-Erie
Canal in Ottoville, which ran
from Toledo to Cincinnati.
This canal made generating
power using a water wheel
both convenient and economical.
In an news article
Odenweller said only one
shipment of flour was
moved by boat.
When navigation on the
canal ceased in the early
1900s the mill was converted to electricity
In the early years, flour
from the mill was delivered
to local merchants by team
and wagon. Later trucks
were used.
In the mid-1940s the
company changed from
milling flour to manufacturing feed.
It was in 1990, when
the Odenweller took on the
Kent Feed line. In 1999 they
painted the old mill Kent
Feed yellow and gave it a
new Kent Feed red roof.
Local historian Millie
Ruen said they shipped on
the canal until a narrow
gauge railroad was built.
The railroad was used to
haul the grain until 1917
when the railroad was abandoned. Trucks were then
used to haul the grain.

Transfers
(Continued from Page 11)
Jennings Township, to Christopher C. Moenter.
Arnold W. Rosebrock TR and Mary Ann
Rosebrock TR, Lots 1019 and 1020, Leipsic, to Kurt
Warniment and Madison Warniment.
Karl U. Meyer TR and Brenda Meyer TR, 2.663
acres, 0.752 acre and 1.744 acres, Ottawa Township
to Karl U. Meyer and Brenda E. Meyer.
Ruth L. Schaublin, 1.0 acre, Riley Township, to
Barbara J. Lyga and Joan K. Reese.
John A. Verhoff and Abby L. Verhoff, .090 acre,
Palmer Township, to Nicholas J. Brink.
Louis O. Niese and Carla J. Niese, 2.046 acres,
Palmer Township, to Matthew J. Niese.
Alvin F. Schroeder TR and Dolores A. Schroeder
TR, Lots 437, 44, 129 and 1.181 acres, Columbus
Grove, to Good Home Properties LLC.
Joseph J. Ruen and Dorothy M. Ruen, 40.0 acres,
Jackson Township, to Joseph J. Ruen and Dorothy
M. Ruen.
John L. Kreinbrink, Jr. and Sarah J. Kreinbrink,
Lot 412, Glandorf, to Kevin R. Heckman and Beverly
J. Heckman.
Kimberly Steffen fka Kimberly Dawn Todd
and Adam Steffan, Lot 615, Continental, to Joy L
Dockery aka Joy L. Salyers.
Kevin P. Wagner and Susan K. Wagner, Lot
1, 6 and 7, Continental, to Joseph G. Glavich and
Courtney R. Olds.
James G. Morman, Barbara Morman, John
J. Morman and Mary Jane Morman, 2.50 acres,
Greensburg Township, to Daniel T. Kaufman and
Angela S. Kaufman.
Gerald Wurth TR, Steven P. Wurth TR, Robert P.
Wurth TR and Martha M. Wurth TR, 75.945 acres,
Greensburg Township, to David J. Kahle and Jane
A. Kahle.
Richard M. Wenzinger, Diane M. Maag, Sharon
A. Lammers, Brenda L. Vennekotter, Steven L.
McKibben, Irene A. Wenzinger, Gary J. Maag,
Donald Lammers, Clyde Vennekotter and Janis
McKibben, 1.058 acres, Monroe Township, to Kevin
P. Wagner and Susan K. Wagner.
Brian Lee Hunt and Kimberly A. Hunt, 2.0 acres,
Ottawa Township, to Scott E. Kempf and Emily M.
Kempf.
Janelle E. Leatherman, dec. Lots 1 and 2, Glandorf
and 33 acres and 5.410 acres, Ottawa, to Nicholas
Leatherman.
Van Wert County
Estate of Madge A. Wilson to Donald R. Wilson,
portion of section 25, Tully Township.
Julie K. Zaleski to Joseph T. Daniels, portion of
section 27, Union Township.
Estate of Betty J. Butler, estate of Betty Butler to
Marilyn Butler, lots 91-1, 93, Delphos subdivision
Estate of Harriet Jean Baer to Angela S.
Hasenkamp, inlot 1924, Van Wert.
Caleb D. Brinegar to Mary K. Humbert, portion
of section 31, Ridge Township (Pleasant Ridge subdivision lot 19).
Raymond M. Thomas, Angela M. Thomas,
Angela M. Breece to Benjamin T. Bowers, Lynsey A.
Bowers, inlot 656, Delphos.
Lowell K. Zelt, Gail A. Zelt to Lowell K. Zelt
Revocable Trust, portion of section 13, Willshire
Township.
Estate of Mildred Medford to Kenneth Medford
Family Living Trust, portion of section 10, Hoaglin
Township, portion of section 13, Jackson Township.
Kenneth Medford Family Living Trust to Kent
E. Eddy Revocable Living Trust, Pamela S. Eddy
Revocable Living Trust, portion of section 10,
Hoaglin Township.
Kenneth Medford Family Living Trust to Scott E.
Eddy, portion of section 13, Jackson Township.
Lewis M. Linton Living Trust, Elizabeth A. Linton
Irrevocable Family Trust to Michelle Tompkins,
Phillip Engel, Elizabeth E. Gray, portion of section 5,
Washington Township.
Carol A. Barnhart to James H. Barnhart Jr.,
Rhonda Davis, Joseph A. Barnhart, portion of section
25, Union Township.
Jill K. Wood to Matthew Joshua McMichael,
Brittany Nicole Myers, inlot 2001, Van Wert.
Reonna Karcher, Reonna Boley, Joseph Burk,
Sheriff Thomas M. Riggenbach to Wells Fargo Bank,
inlot 3372, Van Wert.
Clifford Germann, Teresa Germann, Teresa F.
Germann to Clifford Germann, Teresa Germann, inlot
123. Wren.
R. Scott Laing to Roger C. Eckart, Patricia L.
Eckart, inlot 183, Convoy.
Heather N. Thornell, Heather N. Hoover, Todd J.
Thornell to Rebecca J. Thomas, Joshua S. Johnson,
portion of inlot 1010, Van Wert.

14 The Herald

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

www.delphosherald.com

God, Flag and Country winners

The Delphos Eagles Aerie and Auxiliary hosted 14 young men and women for the annual
God, Flag and Country Oratory Contest Sunday afternoon. Eight 10-11-year-olds and six
12-13-year-olds from Delphos City Schools and St. Mary of the Assumption Schools in
Van Wert presented memorized, timed speeches on the contest titles topics. Winners in
the 10-11-year-olds are, from left, Elyse North, first place; Makya Miller, second place;
and Macy Poling, third place. All three are from Delphos City Schools (DHI Media/Nancy
Spencer)
What the Flag
Means to Me
By Elyse North
Age: 10-11
1st place
I will most importantly be
talking about what the flag
means to me, as well as what
it stands for.
The flag means to me
bravery. I think of all the
people who died protecting
America. Beginning with the
Revolutionary War up until current times, patriots have died
so that we may all live free.
We fought against the British
to become independent, then
we fought against ourselves in
the Civil War, we have fought
against Communism and now,
we are fighting terrorism. All
so our country and people will
remain free and live in our
democracy.
The flag is very important,
hopefully to everyone, because
it is one of the most important
symbols in American History.
The United States flag has a colorful history and has undergone
26 design changes since the
first flag in 1777, who knows
will it ever change again?
The first flag made was on
June 14, 1777 in Philadelphia.
The person who made it was
Betsy Ross, she made it during
the Revolutionary War. The flag
is supposed to represent liberty,
justice, and faith. Of course,
it does with full respect but to
me it means a little more than
that. To me it means freedom.
Freedom to choose for myself,
whether its who I can vote for,
where I can live or what religion I choose to follow.
The flag also reminds me of
every state and the difference
things that make them unique.
From Maine to California, t
here are so many differences
and yet we all are Americans,
under one flag.
This is what our American
flag means to me. I want everyone to stop and think what does
the flag mean to you.
God, Flag and Country
By MaKya Miller
Age: 10-11
2nd place
God, Flag and Country can
simply be explained by using
a four-leaf clover. These four
leaves are believed to represent
faith, hope, love and luck. In
this case, I feel it goes hand in
hand with a representation of
God, Flag and Country. With
God there is faith, with our
country we need hope. We
have love for our flag, and
with a little luck, we the people
can come together as one to
become the stem that holds it
all together.
The first leaf for me is
God. God is a powerful spirit
who died on the cross for us. I
believe that going to church and
spreading Gods word is what
helps the world go around. We
learn in religion that you should
do unto others as you would
want them to do unto you. This

is one simple thing that you can


do to create peace in the world
and make our stem stronger.
The next leaf for me is flag.
The flag is made up of 50
stars which stand for the 50
states. There are 13 red and
white stripes that stand for the
13 original colonies. They say
the red stripes stand for the
bloodshed of our soldiers who
fought and lost their lives for
our freedom. The white stripes
stand for equality and the blue
for brotherhood. To me, the
colors stand for blue skies,
campfires in the summer, and
white clouds. I love our flag
because I feel it brings color to
our country.
The third leaf is country.
Because we believe in God and
we raise our flags high, we are
able to bring hope to our country. We are able to travel and see
places like the Statue of Liberty
to the Golden Gate Bridge and
everything in between. We can
play in the sand or walk on the
beach. We can go swimming or
sit around the campfire because
we are free.
The last leaf is luck. As you
may know, a four leaf clover is
known for luck. It is very rare.
Our country is very rare too
because we are free while other
countries arent as lucky as
we are today. So whether you
believe in God, luck, or a little
bit of both, lets see if together
we can make our world shine.
Lets stand together to become
the stem of our four-leaf clover.
God, Flag, Country and Luck!
Four Chaplains
By Macy Poling
Age: 10-11
3rd place
Do you believe in God? I
hope everyone believes in God.
Are you willing to sacrifice
your life for the possibility that
a fellow man may survive? I
believe the answer to this question depends on the strength
of your relationship with God.
I want to tell you the story of
four men that their belief in
God was so strong they made
the ultimate sacrifice.
On a cold and windy
morning, as February 3, 1943
began nearly a thousand soldiers were traveling across the
Atlantic ocean on the USAT
Dorchester. These men were
going to Europe to sacrifice
their life to fight the Germans
during World War 2. Little did
they know how soon that sacrifice was going to begin. As 2
torpedoes hit the ship, the chaos
of the war immediately started.
However, this would also be
the final, great act of a small
group of men, known as the
Four Chaplains.
As t he USAT Dorchester
began to sink, the Four
Chaplains tried to bring calm
and control to the ship. With
young men confused and
scared, the four friends who
had previously met at Harvard
University, handed out life
jackets. When they ran out of

life jackets the Four Chaplains


removed theirs and gave them
away. One of the four men
even gave away his gloves to
someone just so they wouldnt
go back into the ship. The Four
Chaplains continued to help the
young men by directing them
safely to the lifeboats. The Four
Chaplains then linked their
arms together and prayed and
sang as they went down with
the ship. One survivor said,
It was the finest thing I have
seen or hope to see this side of
Heaven.
That night only 230 people survived, and four of
those among the dead were
Lieutenant George Fox,
Lieutenant Alexander Goode,
Lieutenant John Washington,
and Lieutenant Clark V. Poling.
These men were from different
religions, but they all worshiped
and loved the same God. It was
the love for God that determined the final actions the Four
Chaplains took that night. One
of Reverend Polings last quest
was his father, Reverend Daniel
Poling, to pray for him, not
for his safe return, but that he
would be strong and do his job
with courage. When these men
sacrificed their lives to save
others, God answered Clarks
prayer request. Through my
grandfathers family research,
Im proud to say that Reverend
Clark Poling is a distant relative
of mine, and I hope that when
I meet God our relationship is
as strong as Gods relationship
was with the Four Chaplains.
Indestructible
By Nicholas Curth
Age: 12-13
First place
Everyone knows that diving on a live hand grenade to
save your friends is the most
selfless, heroic act of valor that
any human being can perform.
It takes a special kind of person to come face-to-face with
their own destruction, trading
in the most precious thing a
human has to offer their
life so that others might live.
Im talking about Jacklyn H.
Lucas, who jumped on not one,
but two grenades, to save his
friends and lived.
Jack Lucas was born on
Valentines Day in 1928 in
North Carolina. Things were
going fine until December 7,
1941. While other kids his age
were goofing around, he convinced the public that he was
seventeen and hitched a ride
to the nearest Marine Corps
Recruiting Station. He forged
his moms signature on the
enlistment paperwork and was
shipped off to Parris Island for
US Marine Corps Boot Camp.
He made it through some
of the toughest training that the
US military has to offer, and
was made a Marine at age fourteen. He first was assigned to
manual labor training. He was
disappointed at this assignment
so he abandoned his station and
hitched a ride to Pearl Harbor.

Winners in the 12-13-year-olds are, from left, Nicholas Curth, first place; Catherine
Kopack, second place; and Rileigh Rahrig, third place. Kopack is from Van Wert. The
first-place winner in each age group will move on to the district competition held at 2 p.m.
March 20 at the Delphos Eagles.
After getting in trouble several
times, he snuck onto a military
transport ship to the front lines.
Of the 40,000 Marines who
attack the beach at Iwo Jima,
Private Jack Lucas was one
of the only infantrymen who
assaulted the beachhead without a weapon. He changed that
pretty quickly. He grabbed one
off the surf and charged into
battle. He ran and caught up
to a 4-man fire team. Just then,
Jack saw the grenade at his
feet and threw his body on it
instantly, yelling to the others
to get away. He saw another
one come within reach, grabbed
it, and stuffed it with the other.
A few seconds later, both
grenades went off, sending
hundreds of tiny nails, tacks,
and bullets into his body.
Shocked by what they just
saw, the four men fought even
more viciously and pushed the
Japanese back, capturing the
sector. When they went back to
take the tags off of their fallen
brother, they noticed that Jack
was not only still alive, but he
was still conscious.
After 21 surgeries, 250 pieces of shrapnel were removed
from every major organ in
his body. Just seven months
later, Jack Lucas personally
walked up to President Harry
S. Truman to receive a Medal
of Honor. That happened to
be just six days after his 17th
birthday. He was the youngest
Marine ever to earn the award.
I wish I had the chance to meet
that brave man. He truly was,
INDESTRUCTIBLE. I salute
you Jacklyn H. Lucas, and all
those who have served! Thank
you!
All Created Equal
By Catherine Kopack
Age: 12-13
2nd place
Have you ever been treated
unjustly just because of who
you are? Think about it. How
did it make you feel? There was
a time in Americas past that
people were discriminated for
just being themselves. There
was nothing they could change.
Those people were not only
African-Americans, they were
women.

The Womens Suffrage


Movement began in 1848. The
National Womens Suffrage
Association was formed in
1869. The womens main goal
was to gain the right to vote.
The 15th amendment, ratified
on February 3, 1870, prohibits the denial of the right to
vote based on race or color.
How come this didnt apply to
women? This question remains
unanswered.
As a Catholic, I believe
God is the almighty ruler of
Earth. God created everyone
in the likeness of His image.
Martin Luther King Jr. said
in his world renown I Have
a Dream speech, I have a
dream that one day this nation
will rise up and live out the
true meaning of its creed: We
holds these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created
equal. You have to treat everyone equally if you want that to
be done unto you.
In 1920, almost 50 years
later, the 19th Amendment was
added to the constitution, granting women the right to vote!
Fast forward almost 100 years,
we now have a woman running
for president! Women have
come a long way since they
were given the right to vote.
Justice was given to women
finally! The government chose
to be unbiased and give justice
to those who deserve it.
In conclusion, women gaining the right to vote is just one
example of when justice was
given to those who worked for
it. We have to know that we
dont have to change our beliefs
just because someone says differently, just like these women
did. Thank you.
Equality
By Rileigh Rahrig
Age: 12-13
3rd place
When you think of equality,
do you think of everyone having the same rights? Do you
think of everyone getting to
do the same things or getting
treated the same way? No matter what you think when you
hear the word equality, there
isnt enough of it in todays
society. Too often do we look

at each other and think mean


thoughts or say unnecessarily
cruel words. We no longer treat
each other with the dignity and
respect that is needed for a
better environment to live in.
I feel that we need to go back
to a time when we treated each
other as the equals that we are.
Picture this: today is the first
day at school for a girl who just
moved into the city. She walks
into the classroom wearing her
favorite sweater and jeans and
takes her seat. The other girls
in the class turn and whisper
to each other about the new
girl. Before they even made an
effort to talk to her, they judged
her based on her looks and the
way she dressed.
Many people in todays
society just look at people and
already have their minds made
up about whether or not they
will like that person. We often
treat each other poorly when
we should be treating each
other as equals. If those girls
wouldve talked to the new girl,
they wouldve found out that
they have the same interests.
She could have become friends
with them easily if they would
have just given her a chance.
Many times, we think
that we are better than others
because we have more money
or more things than them, when
really, this means nothing at all.
As Albert Einstein once said,
Before God we are all equally wise, and equally foolish.
When he said this, he implied
that we should treat each other
how we want to be treated, or
follow the Golden Rule. There
is really no reason to treat each
other badly in the first place; we
are all different humans who
make mistakes.
I feel that, in the long run,
treating each other with appreciation for one another will
result in a better America. We
will live in a happier place
where people know and care
for their neighbors again. God
created us all as equals; I think
it is the time we start treating
each other like it.

Trivia

Answers to last Saturdays questions:


The nickname of the psycho killer that FBI trainee Clarice Starling is pursuing in the
Oscar-winning chiller The Silence of the Lambs was Buffalo Bill.
Pallbearers at Ulysses S. Grants funeral included Union generals William Tecumseh
Sherman and Philip Sheridan and Confederate generals Simon Bolivar Buckner and
Joseph Johnson.
Todays questions:
What did P.L. Travers, the author of Mary Poppins, stipulate in her will about all future
film adaptations of her popular childrens series?
What Renaissance masterpiece depicting a miracle described in the Bible is the largest
painting in the Louvre museum in Paris?
Answers in Saturdays Herald.

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