You are on page 1of 5

Binswanger

Swiss
Met Freud in 1907 until Freud's death in 37

Existentialist ideas/terms used by the theorists
Dasein (term given to human beings by Heidegger)­ means "a being there"; in the 
thick of things, being there instead of being here (where we might belong, or feel more 
at home)
Throwness - we are thrown into a universe not of our choosing; "I" (conscious and 
free) is not separate from "that" (predetermined and physical)

Focus on authenticity ­­ there are clear "better" and "worse" ways of living life, and 
the more you are aware of your self, your social world, of your duty, of the inevitabilities 
of being human, the "better" you are. 

You are "worse off" if you are inauthentic, caught up in generalization (thinking of 
people as one big mass) and forfeiting freedom.

Life is not about pleasure or even happiness (though they're OK too) ­­ life is about 
doing your best to be your best.

Inauthenticity
Conventionality is the ignoring of one's freedom; living a life of shallowness.

(You can become too "busy" to notice your decisions; you can turn to authorities or 
peers or media for guidance)

Binswanger's Existential Analysis

Trying to understand client's "world view" or "world design":
How do you see the physical world?
The social world?
Your personal world?
Your relationship to time? (Are you in the past, in the future, living as a flash or living 
forever?)
What is your mode: singular (alone and self­reliant), dual, plural (membership in a larger 
body), or anonymous (quiet and secretive, in the background?) Does it change?

The goal is autonomy for the client: coming to the state of dasein: "being there".


­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­
Irvin Yalom
 four "ultimate concerns" of existential therapy:
death, freedom, isolation, and meaninglessness

DEATH
argues that freud denied the overwhelming power of death as a source
of anxiety, instead limiting his patients to more specific (and thus, more "curable") 
anxieties

also states that we believe ourselves to be special, that we are immortal while


others are not (denial); sometimes suicides are an active way to
maintain control over this

death can be assisted by first identifying one's cognitive style (field dependent or field­
independent, or "rescuer" vs "specialness") 

those who believe they are special can often overcome death anxiety by sharing 


their insecurities with others;  this will lead to greater stress in the short­term, but a 
sense of peace overall.

CASE HISTORY: Charles, successful executive, lost job and didn't know what to tell 


anyone but was finally honest and felt much more "alive" when he realized that others 
shared his concerns and could readily empathize (that he did not need to remain 
"special" and separate)

those who seek "rescue" can overcome death anxiety by noting their fear and 


realizing that they have put their lives on hold waiting for a rescuer ­­­ 

and then realizing that "existence cannot be postponed", that death is inevitable and so 
can be either heroic or miserable. You can either do everything or do nothing.

death anxiety is inversely proportional to life satisfaction.
one can also become desensitized to death if it is revealed to them over and over in 
small "doses"

FREEDOM / RESPONSIBILITY
all denial and redirection can be improved by assuming responsibility: not "he bothered 
me" but "I let him bother me"; not "I did it unconsciously" but "whose consciousness is 
it?"

­ responsibility can be attained with six steps:
­ learn how others see them
­ learn how their behavior makes others feel
­ learn how their behavior creates opinions in others
­ learn how others' opinions create their opinion of themselves

­ patients often have behaviors that fulfill their "prophecies"­­ a therapist can come at 
them from a different angle, one in which they don't fit the mold (ie. in a non­
transference) and address them as long as they occur in the "here and now"

CASE HISTORY: woman feels her children treat her terribly; Yalom became aware of 


the whining (childlike) quality of her voice that made her difficult to take seriously
­ when informed of this, by someone clearly not a child, she was able to instantly see it

CASE HISTORY: patient with terminal cancer who was overly sexual, "interviewed" 


women at a rape support group for explicit details, was rude and seemed unnaturally 
driven by sexual impulses (at the expense of all else);
­ it seemed the only human connection he made was with his children (daughter)
­ describes an encounter with a woman he really wanted but who walked away (and he 
felt terrible)
­ claims "if rape was legal, I'd do it ­­ once in a while" (Yalom seized on that hesitation)
­ he was forced by Yalom to confront "a world of rape" and made to understand that he 
was building a world he wouldn't want his daughter in
­ Yalom also makes him realize that the patient uses sex as a proof that he is still "OK", 
that he won't die and that there's nothing wrong with him
MEANINGLESSNESS can be assisted by the therapist being incredibly attuned to the 
patient; making it clear that there is meaning in what they say­­ they must "know" the 
patient, and meaning­producing activities of the patient

Frankl: "Can anyone blot out the happiness you've experienced? [...] can anyone blot 
out the joy you've created in others? Can anyone blot out what you've achieved and 
accomplished?"

"Cosmic" meaninglessness can be addressed when it is understood to be an 
experience, not a definitive perspective, and that it does not invalidate past "matterings"

CASE HISTORY: a patient at the age of 55 began to write poetry and found she was 
great at it; she comes to Yalom at 60, 
diagnosed with cancer 
feeling that her life has been a lie

he is able to reassure her that she did not feel this way before, when that life mattered; a 
deep state of doubt does not invalidate the meaningfulness of life prior.

she realizes that her poetry came from the experience she had had of living a full life.
­­­­­­­­­­­­­­

ISOLATION & LONELINESS are unavoidable, often brought on by experiences in 


which the familiar becomes unfamiliar (driving in fog, lost on a hike)­­ independent
of the actual threat is the fear that we are alone in the universe

hence the child's plea, "watch me", "look at me";


Lewis Carroll : "I exist only as long as I am thought about"

again, conformity helps alleviate these fears: being like everyone else means 


not being alone

mystical experiences of fusion (with nature, God, the universe) is also 


a way to avoid loneliness.

isolation fear can also manifest in refusing to talk to others,


refusing to get involved
(in this situation it is best to try hard to experience another's world thoroughly, rather 
than one's own)

"just because a relationship may not have a future reality, why strip it of its current 
reality?"

those who are likely to extend themselves continuously and in authentic fashion to 
others will, through the peopling of their inner world, experience a tempering of their 
eistential anxiety and be able to reach out to others in love rather than to grasp at them 
in need."