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PYC2603/101/3/2016

Tutorial letter 101/3/2016


Adulthood and Maturity

PYC2603
Semesters 1 and 2
Department of Psychology

IMPORTANT INFORMATION:
This tutorial letter contains important information
about your module.

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................................................... 4

1.1

Tutorial matter .............................................................................................................................. 5

1.1.1

Inventory letter ............................................................................................................................. 5

1.1.2

The Study Guide .......................................................................................................................... 5

PURPOSE OF AND OUTCOMES FOR THE MODULE .............................................................. 5

2.1

Purpose........................................................................................................................................ 5

2.2

Outcomes..................................................................................................................................... 6

LECTURERS AND CONTACT DETAILS .................................................................................... 6

3.1

Lecturers ...................................................................................................................................... 6

3.2

Department .................................................................................................................................. 7

3.3

University ..................................................................................................................................... 8

MODULE-RELATED RESOURCES ............................................................................................ 9

4.1

Prescribed books ......................................................................................................................... 9

4.2

Recommended books .................................................................................................................. 9

4.3

Electronic Reserves (e-Reserves) ................................................................................................ 9

4.4

The Study Guide .......................................................................................................................... 9

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES FOR THE MODULE .............................................................10

5.1

Contact with fellow students ........................................................................................................10

5.1.1

Study groups ...............................................................................................................................10

5.1.2

myUnisa ......................................................................................................................................10

5.2

Tutorial classes ...........................................................................................................................10

5.3

Discussion classes ......................................................................................................................10

5.4

Repeat students ..........................................................................................................................10

MODULE-SPECIFIC STUDY PLAN ...........................................................................................10

MODULE PRACTICAL WORK AND WORK-INTEGRATED LEARNING ...................................10

ASSESSMENT ...........................................................................................................................11

8.1

Assessment plan .........................................................................................................................11

8.2

General assignment numbers .....................................................................................................11

8.2.1

Unique assignment numbers .......................................................................................................11

8.2.2

Due dates for assignments ..........................................................................................................12

8.3

Submission of assignments .........................................................................................................12

PYC2603/101
8.4

General remarks .........................................................................................................................12

8.5

Commentaries and feedback on assignments .............................................................................13

8.6

The assignments .........................................................................................................................13

8.6.1

General guidelines ......................................................................................................................14

8.6.2

Extension of time for submitting the assignments ........................................................................14

8.7

Assignments ...............................................................................................................................15

OTHER ASSESSMENT METHODS ...........................................................................................37

10

EXAMINATION ..........................................................................................................................37

10.1

Examination admission ...............................................................................................................37

10.2

Format of the examination paper .................................................................................................37

10.3

Preparation for the examination ..................................................................................................37

10.4

Examination period .....................................................................................................................37

10.5

Supplementary examination ........................................................................................................38

10.6

Previous examination papers ......................................................................................................38

11

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ........................................................................................38

Please note / important notes:


Formal tuition in this course will be conducted in English only. Where capacity exists, and upon
request, individual discussions will be conducted in any preferred South African language.
Formele onderrig in hierdie kursus word slegs in Engels aangebied. Waar die kapasiteit bestaan, en
op versoek, sal individuele besprekings met studente gevoer word in enige verkose Suid-Afrikaanse
taal.

1.

INTRODUCTION

Dear Student
We welcome you as a student of the Adulthood and Maturity module, particularly as a
person in his or her adult years of life. We trust you will find the subject and the tutorial
matter not only interesting and informative but that it will contribute towards your own
personal growth during adulthood. Our goals for this module are, amongst others, to make
you aware of the fact that psychological development is a life-long process and that the
focus of development during adulthood should be on the attainment of cognitive, social,
emotional and psychological maturity. Furthermore, we want to emphasise the development
of a mature way of thinking, responsible social and moral behavior, development of
emotional control, a realistic perception of life, meaningful interpersonal relationships and a
mature philosophy of life in this module. We trust that the knowledge you will gain will enrich
your personal relationships and be of great benefit to you in your life in general.
You will receive a number of tutorial letters during the semester. A tutorial letter is our way of
communicating with you about teaching, learning and assessment. All tutorial letters are
available on myUnisa. Regular access to myUnisa is therefore essential and will keep you
informed of all you need to know about your studies. These ICT tool makes it much easier to
communicate with the university, your lecturers, and with other students about their learning
and their challenges. In addition, you will need to have registered on myUnisa in order to
submit assignments online, access library resources, download your study material and so
forth. But the most important thing to remember is that myUnisa may give you additional
opportunities to participate in activities, tasks and discussions around your module topics,
your assignments, your marks and your examinations.
This tutorial letter (101/2016) contains information about the scheme of work, resources and
assignments for this module. We have also included general and administrative information
about this module. We urge you to read it carefully and to keep it at hand when working
through the study material, preparing for submission of assignments, preparing for the
examination and addressing enquiries to your lecturers. Also make sure that you obtain the
prescribed book for this module as soon as possible.
Right from the start we would like to point out that you must read all the tutorial letters you
receive during the semester immediately and carefully, as they always contain important and
sometimes, urgent information.
Please note that Adulthood and Maturity is a semester module. A module runs over four
months (12-15 weeks). Please make sure whether you are registered for Semester 1 or
for Semester 2. All the details regarding the assignments and examination for each
semester are provided further-on in this tutorial letter.
Best wishes for an enriching time of study.

Your lecturers for Adulthood and Maturity

PYC2603/101

1.1

TUTORIAL MATTER

The tutorial matter for this module consists of a study guide and tutorial letters.
1.1.1 Inventory letter
At the time of registration, you will receive an inventory letter that will tell you what you have
received in your study package and also show items that are still outstanding. Some of the
tutorial matter may not be available when you register. Tutorial matter that is not available
when you register will be posted to you as soon as possible, but is also available on
myUnisa.
The Department of Despatch should supply you with the following study material for this
module:

Study Guide
Tutorial Letter 101 - General information and assignments
Please note that your lecturers cannot provide you with missing study material.
You can access study guides and tutorial letters for all modules on myUnisa at
http://my.unisa.ac.za. All tutorial material is loaded onto this website as soon as it leaves
the department it will therefore be available on myUnisa long before you can possibly
receive it by post. We suggest that you check the site on a regular basis.
Later during the semester, you will also receive Tutorial Letters 201/2016 and 202/2016 and
any further correspondence which may become necessary. Tutorial letters will be
dispatched to you as soon as they are available or needed (for instance, for feedback on
assignments).
If you need to enquire about study material that you did not receive, please consult the
publication my Studies @ Unisa.
1.1.2 The Study Guide
The study guide leads you systematically through the prescribed book (chapters 1 to 7).
Follow the study guide carefully and complete all the questions and tasks to help you to
master the study material. The study guide also indicates clearly the sections of the
prescribed book that should be studied for the examination (i.e. all the sections indicated as
Study).

PURPOSE OF AND OUTCOMES FOR THE MODULE

2.1 Purpose
This module aims to:
1.
2.

introduce the learner to the study of adult development and maturity;


equip learners with knowledge in order to consider the characteristics of adult
behaviour and functioning and what it means to be a mature adult.
5

2.2 Outcomes
On the basis of reflections on what it means to be adult and mature, this module has a
number of envisaged outcomes, namely the achievement of:

an informed approach in counteracting developmental decline and in optimising


potential growth, particularly in terms of continued education and lifelong learning, plus
the commitment to reach higher levels of psychological maturity.
a highly responsible approach to the life tasks of a career, marriage and parenthood;
the leading of a healthy lifestyle; the commitment to community service, especially
during the years of retirement.
an informed commitment to the fostering of the development of others, both in helping
others to counteract decline and optimise their potential for growth and the
achievement of psychological maturity.
a developed sense of morality and a profound respect for the dignity and worth of the
individual person and in safeguarding the developmental rights of others, especially
those in need of upliftment and care.
the maintenance of social standards that ensures the welfare of, and opportunities for,
development for everyone.
a developed world conscience and worldview that seeks the good of humanity as a
whole.
the ability to identify the normal developmental characteristics of the adult and the
factors that influence the adults development and his or her level of life satisfaction.
the ability to identify the developmental needs of adults in various contexts.
the ability to plan and design interventions directed to addressing developmental lags
or problems which adults may be experiencing.
the ability to apply the acquired knowledge of adult development not only to everyday
life situations, but also in work and professional environments.

LECTURERS AND CONTACT DETAILS

3.1 Lecturers
By telephone or e-mail
For academic enquiries you may phone a particular lecturer or address the enquiries to his
or her e-mail address.

Lecturer

Telephone number

E-mail address

Prof I Ferns (Module leader)

012 4298210

fernsi@unisa.ac.za

Mr BR Palakatsela

012 4293778

palakbr@unisa.ac.za

Mrs VM Nekhavhambe

012 4298513

nekhavm@unisa.ac.za

You may contact your lecturers personally. They are available to assist you with any
academic enquiries that you may have. Lecturers may be contacted telephonically, by
e-mail, via myUnisa, by fax, via mail or personally when you visit the campus.

PYC2603/101

We like to meet our students, but it is essential to make an appointment beforehand. Also
note that lecturers are seldom available between middle December and early January. We
earnestly request that you sort out your academic problems before that time.
Lecturers are available on weekdays from 08:00 to 16:00 for telephonic academic enquiries.
Sometimes, however, lecturers have to attend meetings, conferences, etcetera. If you
experience difficulty reaching a particular lecturer at his/her office number, please contact
the second level Psychology module administrator (Ms Tidie Sekhaulela: 012 4298088 /
sekhapt@unisa.ac.za). If she is not available, phone the general number for the Department
of Psychology. The departmental telephone is staffed by administrative personnel who will
put you in contact with your lecturers.
Via myUnisa
If you want to contact a lecturer proceed as follows:
Using your browser go to the Unisa web page, which is located at the Internet address
http://www.unisa.ac.za.
On this web page, select the option myUnisa. If you are a first time user, you must now click
on the option Register as myUnisa user which will enable you to register online (this does
not cost anything). Type in your name, student number and a password (the password must
be at least 6 characters long).
By ordinary mail
Letters should be sent to:
The Module Leader (PYC2603)
Department of Psychology
PO Box 392
UNISA
0003
Please note: Letters to lecturers are not to be included with or inserted into
assignments.
3.2 Department
By telephone and e-mail
The following telephone numbers are provided for your convenience:
Contact person for general information about this module:
Contact person

Telephone number

E-mail address

Ms Tidie Sekhaulela

012 4298088

sekhapt@unisa.ac.za

(administrative officer)

By fax
Our departmental fax number is 012 4293414. When you send a fax, please remember to
clearly indicate the module code and name of a specific lecturer. Please note that no study
material can be faxed to students.
Physical address
Theo van Wijk Building, 5th Floor, Room 5-98, Main Campus, Muckleneuk Ridge, Pretoria.
3.3 University
By letter, telephone or e-mail
If you need to contact the University about matters not related to the content of this module,
please consult the publication my Studies @ Unisa which you received with your study
material. In this document you will find the contact details of various administrative
departments. If you did not receive this document and have access to the Internet, you can
find it on myUnisa under the Resources option. Remember to always have your student
number ready when making an enquiry.
Please ensure that you contact the correct section or department for each enquiry as
this will result in a speedy resolution of the enquiry.
The contact details are:
Postal address of Unisa:

University of South Africa


PO Box 392
UNISA
0003

Physical address of Unisa:

Telephone number
Online address:
Unisa website:

University of South Africa


Preller Street
Mucleneuk Ridge
Pretoria
City of Tshwane
012 429 3111
http://my.unisa.ac.za
http://www.unisa.ac.za

E-mail address:

study-info@unisa.ac.za

Fax number (RSA only):

012 4294150

Fax number (International):

+27 12 4294150

Examinations:

exams@unisa.ac.za

Aegrotat and special examinations:

aegrotats@unisa.ac.za

Via my Unisa

PYC2603/101

The following functions have been implemented in myUnisa (http://www.myunisa.ac.za):

you can contact your lecturers via e-mail.


you can join a discussion forum (e.g. to discuss your course with other students doing
the same course).
you can order books from the library, and search for books on the library database.
you can download study material placed on myUnisa.
you can check whether your assignments have been received and marked.
you can submit written as well as multiple-choice assignments via myUnisa.
you can look up your assignment or exam marks as soon as they are released.

To make use of myUnisa, you will need a computer with a modem and an Internet
connection, as well as a browser such as Netscape or Internet Explorer.

MODULE-RELATED RESOURCES

4.1 Prescribed books


The prescribed book for the module in Adulthood and Maturity is:
Louw, D., & Louw, A. (2009). Adult Development and Ageing. Bloemfontein: Psychology
Publications. (ISBN-13: 978-0-86886-755-7)
It is essential that you buy or order the prescribed book immediately. If you wait too long you
may have difficulty in obtaining it, and may be unable to keep up with the work program.
Please consult the list of official booksellers and their addresses in my Studies @ Unisa.
If you have any difficulty obtaining books from these booksellers, please contact the
Prescribed Book Section as soon as possible at telephone number 012 4294152 or e-mail
address vospresc@unisa.ac.za.

4.2 Recommended books


There are no recommended books for this module.
4.3 ELECTRONIC RESERVES (E-RESERVES)
There are no e-Reserves for this module.
4.4 The Study Guide
The study guide leads you by means of orientations, activities, practical exercises and selfreflective and enrichment tasks systematically through the relevant chapters in the
prescribed book. The information in your prescribed book that you should study for
the module Adulthood and Maturity is, therefore, indicated in the study guide.

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES FOR THE MODULE

For information on the various student support systems and services available at Unisa (e.g.
student counselling, tutorial classes, language support, peer help programmes) please
consult the publication my Studies @ Unisa that you received with your study material.
5.1 Contact with fellow students
5.1.1

Study groups

It is advisable to have contact with your fellow students. One way to do this is to form study
groups. The addresses of students in your area may be obtained from my Studies @ Unisa.
5.1.2

myUnisa

If you have access to a computer that is linked to the internet, you can quickly access
resources and information at the University. The myUnisa learning management system is
Unisas online campus that will help you to communicate with your lecturers, with other
students and with the administrative departments of Unisa all through the computer and
the internet.
Please consult the publication my Studies @ Unisa that you received with your study
material for more information on myUnisa.
5.2 Tutorial classes
Please contact our Regional Centers for more information on tutorial classes.
5.3 Discussion classes
No discussion classes will take place for this module.
5.4 Repeat students
It is expected from a repeating student to submit all assignments again. Students will not
obtain examination admission without the submission of assignments.

MODULE-SPECIFIC STUDY PLAN

Use your my Studies @ Unisa brochure for general time management and planning skills.
In order to meet all the deadlines within a limited time (a semester), we advise you to draw
up a study time-table as soon as possible. It should make provision for all your subjects, and
also for unforeseen circumstances such as illness and work pressure, to enable you to work
through the syllabus in good time.

MODULE PRACTICAL WORK AND WORK-INTEGRATED LEARNING

There are no practicals for this module.

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PYC2603/101

ASSESSMENT

8.1 Assessment plan


In this module the year mark counts 20% and the examination 80% of the final mark. Both
Assignments 01 and 02 counts equally towards the year mark. Please note that you should
obtain a sub-minimum of 40% in the examination for your year mark contribution to your
exam mark.
Our marking policy for multiple-choice questions for the assignments, as well as the exam
paper, is as follows: We may adjust the marks to accommodate the effect of blind guessing
or random guessing by subtracting a fraction of the marks for each incorrect answer. For
questions with four alternatives the maximum that we will reduce is one mark for four
incorrect answers (i.e. 0,25 marks for each wrong answer). For questions with three
alternatives the maximum that we will reduce is one mark for three incorrect answers (i.e.
0,33 marks for each wrong answer). If we find, however, that a specific exam paper was
difficult, we will reduce fewer marks for a wrong answer (e.g. only 0,25 or 0,12). We would
advise you to attempt to answer all questions, and to leave only those out that you really do
not know the answer of. Intelligent guessing, where you use your knowledge to eliminate
some of the alternatives before guessing the answer from the remaining alternatives, is
acceptable and even advisable. The chance of selecting the correct alternative with
intelligent guessing is much bigger than with blind guessing.
If you prefer not to respond to some questions rather than guessing the answer to these
questions, you may do so. No marks will be subtracted for omitted items. Bear in mind,
however, that it can be shown mathematically that intelligent guessing is always a good
strategy when you do not know the correct answer and is preferable to simply omitting an
item.
8.2 General assignment numbers
Assignments are numbered consecutively per module, starting from Assignment 01.
8.2.1 Unique assignment numbers
SEMESTER 1

SEMESTER 2

Assignment number

Unique number

Assignment number

Unique
number

Assignment 01

852368

Assignment 01

825060

Assignment 02

770685

Assignment 02

841098

11

8.2.2

Due dates for assignments

ASSIGNMENT NUMBER

DUE DATE:
SEMESTER 1

DUE DATE:
SEMESTER 2

Assignment 01

11 March 2016

19 August 2016

Assignment 02

08 April 2016

16 September 2016

8.3 Submission of assignments


Assignments are seen as part of the learning material for this module. When you do the
assignments, follow the study guide, consult the prescribed book, discuss the work with
fellow students or tutors or do research, you are actively engaged in learning.
For students attending tutorial sessions, tutors may also set additional tasks and provide
feedback.
Please note: Although students may work together when preparing assignments,
each student must do and submit his or her own assignment.
8.4 General remarks

PLEASE NOTE: Enquiries about assignments (e.g. whether or not the University has
received your assignment or the date on which assignments were returned to you) must be
addressed to the Assignment Section. You can send an e-mail to assign@unisa.ac.za. You
may also find information on myUnisa or consult the publication my Studies @ Unisa
regarding contact details.

You may submit the multiple-choice assignments for this module on mark-reading sheets
either electronically via myUnisa, at the regional offices or by post. Assignments may,
however, not be submitted by fax or e-mail.
If you prefer to submit the assignments in hard copy format it should be addressed to:
Assignments
PO Box 392
UNISA
0003
For detailed information and requirements as far as assignments are concerned, see my
Studies @ Unisa, which you received with your tutorial matter.
To submit an assignment via myUnisa:
Go to myUnisa.
Log in with your student number and password.
Select the module.
Click on assignments in the left-hand menu.
Click on the assignment number you want to submit.

Follow the instructions on the screen.


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PYC2603/101

8.5 Commentaries and feedback on assignments


You will automatically receive the correct answers for multiple-choice questions.
Commentaries and feedback on the two compulsory assignments will be sent to all students
registered for this module in follow-up tutorial letters, and not only to those who submitted
the assignments. The tutorial letter numbers will be 201/2016 and 202/2016.
As soon as you have received the commentaries, please check your answers. The
assignments and the commentaries on these assignments constitute an important part of
your learning and should help you to be better prepared for the next assignment and the
examination.
8.6 The assignments
There are two compulsory assignments in this module.
By submitting both Assignments 01 and 02 on time, you gain examination admission
(therefore, you do not have to pass the assignments to gain examination admission).

Your assignments should reach us by the closing dates NO EXTENSIONS are


granted.
Please note that there are NO further opportunities to gain examination admission.

Once your assignments have been marked, you will have an idea of your knowledge and
understanding of the study material. If you fail the assignments (receive less than 50%) this
should alert you to the fact that your knowledge and understanding of the study material of
this module is not up to standard and that you need to put extra effort into your preparation
for the examination.
Assignment 01
Assignment (COMPULSORY)
You will find this assignment on pages
15-20
You will find this assignment on pages
21-25

Closing
date
Semester one
11 March 2016
Semester two
19 August 2016

Extension
date
No extension

Unique
number
852368

No extension

825060

Assignment 02
Assignment (COMPULSORY)
You will find this assignment on pages
26-31

Closing
date
Semester one
08 April 2016

Extension
date
No extension

Unique
number
770685

You will find this assignment on pages


32-36

Semester two
16 September 2016

No extension

841098

13

8.6.1 General guidelines

Always keep a copy of your assignment answers, in case your assignment does not
reach the University. Please submit the original copy.

Please remember to number the assignments correctly (Assignment 01 or Assignment


02) and to give it the applicable unique number as above and as given on page 13 of
this tutorial letter.

Both assignments involve the use of a mark-reading sheet and you should read the
section INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE USE OF MARK-READING SHEETS in my
Studies @ Unisa. Those students who do not have access to a word processor must
complete their assignments on the mark-reading sheet provided with your study
material. Take note of the following important information:

Use only an HB pencil (not a pacer) and mark your answers clearly and distinctly.
Mark as follows [-]
If you mark a block incorrectly, make sure that the mark is erased properly.
Do not staple your mark reading sheet to any document.

You may submit your multiple choice and written assignments through the Internet by
using myUnisa instead of using a mark-reading sheet. Please adhere strictly to the
requirements applicable to the completion and submission of assignments in my
Studies @ Unisa.

One of the advantages that myUnisa offers is that your assignment is immediately
delivered to the Assignment Section at UNISA so that you do not have to agonise as to
whether your assignment has arrived safely, and you also no longer have to worry
about postal delays.

8.6.2 Extension of time for submitting the assignments


You will note that a closing date but NO EXTENSION DATE is given for each assignment.
(See previous page for summary of assignments for the two semesters.)
Do not phone us to ask for an extension. Note that assignments received after the
closing date will not be marked, and that you will forfeit your examination admission if
BOTH assignments do not reach us before or on the closing dates.

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PYC2603/101

8.7
Assignments
Please note that separate assignments are given for the different semesters. Kindly ensure
that you do and submit the relevant assignment and use the correct unique number.

ASSIGNMENT 01 FOR SEMESTER 1


(Compulsory multiple-choice assignment)
Please note: Although students may work together when preparing assignments, each
student must submit his or her own individual assignment.
Assignment 01 (for semester 1) consists of 15 multiple-choice questions covering chapters
one to four in the study guide for Adulthood and Maturity.
FIRST SEMESTER
Closing date: 11 March 2016
Unique assignment number: 852368
Question 01
Which of the following principles reflect the assumption of the life-span developmental
perspective?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Development is a life-long process and a combination of gains and losses.


Development is unidimensional and unidirectional.
Development is embedded in history and context.
Development shows plasticity and is multidisciplinary.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (d)


(b) & (c)
(a), (c) & (d)
All of the above

Question 02
Developmental influences resulting from biological, psychological and socio-cultural forces
and which are usually associated with chronological age, are referred to as ;
developmental influences resulting from events most people in a specific culture experiences
at the same time, are referred to as ; and developmental influences resulting from random
or rare events that may influence a specific individual, but are not experienced by most
people, are referred to as .
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

life-cycle forces; psychological forces; socio-cultural forces


normative age-graded influences; normative history-graded influences; non-normative
influences
normative history-graded influences; non-normative influences; normative age-graded
influences
non-normative influences; normative age-graded influences; normative history-graded
influences
15

Question 03
The viewpoint that the individuals behavior is determined by the complex interactions
between the persons genetics and his/her context, is referred to as the ; the viewpoint
that people develop to internally generated patterns of development, is referred to as the ;
the viewpoint that development results from biological or environmental forces upon which
the individual passively reacts, is referred to as the .
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

contextual perspective; mechanistic perspective; organismic perspective


organismic perspective; interactionist perspective; contextual perspective
universal perspective; psychological perspective; interactionist perspective
interactionist perspective ; organismic perspective ; mechanistic perspective

Question 04
The and research designs are particularly well-suited to determine the factors that
influence adult development; , and research designs are better suited to study agerelated developmental changes in adulthood.
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

experimental; correlational; longitudinal; cross-sectional; sequential


longitudinal; cross-sectional; experimental; correlational; case study
case study; sequential; cross-cultural; retrospective; structured
qualitative; structured; quantitative; cohort; hypothetical

Question 05
The programmed ageing theories propose the following viewpoints regarding the ageing
process:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

The length of life is genetically determined.


Ageing is programmed to start after the reproductive ability ends.
Molecular changes cause cells to age and lose their ability to divide and reproduce.
The loss of neurons in the brain causes ageing.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

All of the above


(a) & (d)
(b) & (c)
(a), (b) & (c)

Question 06
According to the cross-linking theory of ageing, certain interact and produce in such a
way that they make the body .
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

16

molecules; proteins; flexible


proteins; molecules; stiffer
molecules; nutrients; flexible
radicals; molecules; less functional

PYC2603/101

Question 07
In order to process information, the human cognitive system proceeds through the following
series of stages: the information is into the brain through the various sensory routes. It is
then and . The brain then uses the information immediately or stores it in .
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

stored; processed; entered; encodes; the frontal lobe


entered; encoded; analysed; memory
stored; coded; interpreted; the parietal lobes
encoded; interpreted; entered; the occipital lobes

Question 08
Primary memory refers to and working memory refers .
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

the passive retention of information; the active processing and manipulation of


information
the active processing of information; a persons knowledge about how the memory
system works
the strategies a person develop in order to remember; a persons ability to recognise
and recall information
ones memory about childhood experiences; ones memory about recent events

Question 09
Which of the following statements regarding age changes on implicit-explicit memory are
true?
(a)
(b)
(c)

(d)

Research on implicit memory indicates no to only a slight age-related decline and


findings on explicit memory show significant age related decline.
A reason for the difference in age-related decline in these two systems may be that
they are located in different regions in the brain that are differently affected by ageing.
Another reason for the difference may be that different processes are involved: implicit
memory tasks rely on automatic processes while explicit memory tasks require more
demanding and effortful processing.
Specific skills that are complex and require rapid response show some age-related
decline.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (c)


(b) & (d)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

17

Question 10
According to Paul Baltes (cited in Louw & Louw, 2009) the mechanics of intelligence while
the pragmatics of intelligence .
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

are similar to fluid intelligence; include culturally based factual and procedural
knowledge
include basic operations such as perceptual processing of sensory input; include skills
such as reading and writing, and comprehension of language
refer to the knowledge a person accumulated over his/her lifetime; refer to the ability to
solve problems for which there are no solutions derivable from formal education
could be equated to the hardware of the mind; could be equated to the software of the
mind

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (c)


(a), (b) & (d)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

Question 11
Research on expertise
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

suggests that younger adults outperform older adults on many information processing
tasks and therefore gain more expertise than older adults.
indicates that expert performance tends to be maintained as people age, with only
slight declines in the older age groups.
suggests that expertise is strongly associated with crystallised abilities.
identified a process called encapsulation to explain why adults attain increasing
expertise despite the decline in fluid abilities.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (d)


(b) & (c)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

Question 12
Which of the following statements are true regarding Piagets formal operational stage of
cognitive development?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

18

It is characterised by abstract and scientific deductive reasoning.


It is a way of generating abstract concepts and thinking about them in a very
systematic, step-by-step way.
Formal operational thought is governed by a logical structure that provides solutions to
problems that people have never seen and may never encounter.
Formal operational thought is aimed at resolving ambiguity: one and only one answer is
the goal.

PYC2603/101

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a)
(a), (b) & (c)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

Question 13
Which of the following statements are assumptions of Erik Eriksons psychosocial theory of
personality development?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

The earlier stages of personality development provide the foundation for the later
stages of development.
Each stage is characterised by a crisis during which the individual must attain certain
tasks or adjustments.
Each task has two opposing poles (positive versus negative) and the solution of each
crisis lies in choosing the positive pole.
The development from one stage to another requires a complex interaction of
biological, psychological and social forces.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (c)


(a), (b) & (d)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

Question 14
According to Robert Peck (cited in Louw & Louw, 2009), Eriksons theory did not adequately
address the physical, psychosocial and social changes during adulthood. He proposed the
following psychosocial crisis characteristics of late adulthood:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Ego differentiation versus work role preoccupation


Body transcendence versus body preoccupation
Wisdom versus physical power
Ego transcendence versus ego preoccupation

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a), (b) & (c)


(a), (b) & (d)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

19

Question 15
Findings from several cross-sectional and longitudinal studies suggested interindividual
personality changes, such as
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

extraversion declines after age 30.


conscientiousness and openness to experiences increase in young adulthood but
decline in later adulthood.
neuroticism increases with age.
cross-cultural differences were noted in the patterns of change.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (b)


(a), (b) & (c)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

END OF ASSIGNMENT 01 FOR SEMESTER 1

20

PYC2603/101

ASSIGNMENT 01 FOR SEMESTER 2


(Compulsory multiple-choice assignment)
Please note: Although students may work together when preparing assignments, each
student must submit his or her own individual assignment.
Assignment 01 (for semester 2) consists of 15 multiple-choice questions covering chapters
one to four in the study guide for Adulthood and Maturity.

SECOND SEMESTER
Closing date: 19 August 2016
Unique assignment number:

825060

Question 01
The degree in which a persons role in society meets the expectations and perceptions of
that society is referred to his/her ; the total ability of an individual to function effectively in
his/her environment refers to his/her ; the ability to adjust to the environment and to cope
with the associated challenges is known as the persons .
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

psychological age; biological age; social age


biological age; social age; functional age
cultural age; psychological age; chronological age
social age; functional age; psychological age

Question 02
The stability-change issue in development refers to ...; whilst the activity-passivity issue
relates to....
(1)
(2)

(3)
(4)

behaviour and genetics; quantitative differences in human development


the question whether people change or remain the same over time; the assumption
that people are the passive recipients of biological or environmental effects and that
people create their own environments in which they can function effectively
the relative contribution of genetics and the environment to development; the question
whether people change or remain the same over time
the question whether the environment contributes the most to development; the view
that people are actively involved in their development

Question 03
According to the perspective, human behavior results from biological or environmental
forces upon which the individual passively reacts. Development is seen as and in
nature.
(1) organismic; discontinuous; qualitative
(2) interactionist; multidirectional; multidimensional
(3) mechanistic; continuous; quantitative
(4) mechanistic; organismic; interactionist

21

Question 04
Bongani wants to determine whether the physical activity of elderly people is related to their
life satisfaction. She uses questionnaires to measure the activity level as well as the
satisfaction with life of a number of elderly people. Bongani uses a research design.
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

meta-analytical
case-study
correlational
experimental

Question 05
The genetic programming theory proposes that ageing is the result of
(a) the ageing of body cells in accordance with a master genetic program innate to every
specific species.
(b) a decrease in the ability of cells to divide; the cells deteriorate until the person dies.
(c) changes in the hypothalamus which cause changes in the hormones that eventually
bring about ageing in the organism.
(d) the shortening of telomeres with each cell division so that the telomeres eventually
become so short and contain so little telomeres that cell division cannot continue.
The correct answer is:
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (c)


(b) & (d)
(a), (b) & (d)
All of the above

Question 06
According to the free radical theory of ageing, free radicals
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

attack the structure of cell membranes.


damage the DNA of normal cells.
cause a decrease in cerebral metabolism.
cause the bodys genetic code to scramble.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

22

(c)
(a), (b) & (d)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

PYC2603/101

Question 7
Which of the following statements regarding older adults information processing abilities
is/are true?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Older adults become increasingly more disadvantaged with age.


Older adults do not become disadvantaged, their abilities only become slower.
Biological factors, ill health and poor level of education may be related to the decline in
processing speed.
With simple tasks, older adults reaction time is better than that of younger adults
because of their life experience.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a)
(d)
(b) & (c)
(a), (c) & (d)

Question 08
The memory span of a human consists of which refers to the temporary storage of
information or events perceived recently and memory which retains memory for a
relatively long period of time.
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

primary; secondary
retrospective; prospective
primary; working
short-term; long-term

Question 09
Which of the following statements are true regarding the possible problems in assessing
remote and autobiographical memories?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Remote and autobiographical memories are usually accurate because they reflect the
individual persons experience.
Remote events are more likely to have been frequently rehearsed and recounted.
Remote memories may be subject to unconscious distortion and embellishment.
Methodological flaws and confounding variables may affect the reliability of
autobiographical memories.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (d)


(b) & (c)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

23

Question 10
Which one of the following statements regarding the findings on age-related changes in
intelligence are true?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Abilities related to crystallised intelligence remain stable or rise until the 60s.
Abilities related to fluid intelligence begin to decline by early midlife.
Intellectual change is multidirectional: some abilities may increase while others may
decline.
The general curve seems to be: an increase until the middle age; a plateau is
experienced in middle age; a decline starts in old age.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (b)


(a) & (d)
(b) & (c)
All of the above

Question 11
A person who considers multiple contexts for problems and dilemmas, exhibits the
characteristic of wisdom while a person who obtains information, gives timely advice and
analyses the impact of a decision on immediate and future consequences, exhibits the
characteristic of wisdom.
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

life-span contextualism; factual knowledge


life-span contextualism; knowledge about strategies and procedures
relativism; uncertainty
factual knowledge; knowledge about strategies and procedures

Question 12
Which of the following statements regarding postformal thought is/are true?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Postformal thought is characterised by a recognition that the truth varies from situation
to situation and that solutions must be realistic to be reasonable.
It proposes that emotion and subjective factors usually play a role in thinking.
Postformal thought is a universal occurrence and is governed by biological maturational
processes.
It proposes that ambiguity and contradiction are the rule rather than the exception.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

24

(b) & (c)


(a), (b) & (d)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

PYC2603/101

Question 13
According to Erik Eriksons theory of personality development, the main challenge during
middle adulthood is to and the resolution of the crisis of generativity versus stagnation lies
in the synthesis of .
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

contribute to the younger generation through family or productive work; care


view ones life as satisfactory and worth living; reliability
commit to another in a loving relationship; love
develop a lasting, integrated sense of self; wisdom

Question 14
George Vaillant and his co-workers (cited in Louw & Louw, 2009) proposed an additional
stage between Eriksons sixth and seventh stage, which they call . During this stage,
adults focus on the establishment of a career and family life.
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

generativity and stagnation


ego transcendence versus ego preoccupation
career consolidation versus self-absorption
keeping the meaning versus rigidity

Question 15
Findings from longitudinal data from several studies on Costa and McGraes Five Factor
Model indicated
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

remarkable consistency in all five personality dimensions of the Five Factor Model.
that the mid-life period was a period of personality instability due to the midlife crisis.
personality stability especially after age 30.
personality showed differential stability.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (b)


(c) & (d)
(a), (c) & (d)
All of the above
END OF ASSIGNMENT 01 FOR SEMESTER 2

25

ASSIGNMENT 02 FOR SEMESTER 1


(Compulsory multiple-choice assignment)
Please note: Although students may work together when preparing assignments, each
student must submit his or her own individual assignment.
Assignment 02 (for semester 1) consists of 15 multiple-choice questions covering chapters
four to seven in the study guide for Adulthood and Maturity.

FIRST SEMESTER
Closing date: 08 April 2016
Unique assignment number: 770685
Question 01
The approaches to personality development in adulthood emphasise the perception or
interpretation of peoples experience. These approaches include models of and .
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

stage; crises; transitions


cognitive; the self-concept; identity
identity; cognition; the self-concept
trait; stability; change

Question 02
Which of the following statements regarding the possible selves is/are true?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Possible selves tend to remain stable and are measurable with psychological tests.
Possible selves motivate people to set and achieve goals to fulfil their hoped-for
possible selves and to avoid the feared possible selves.
Young adults seem to be less accepting of their ideal and future selves than of their
present and past selves.
Because older adults have a more realistic view of themselves, the differences
between ideal self and the present self, diminish with age.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

26

(d)
(a) & (b)
(c) & (d)
(a), (b) & (d)

PYC2603/101

Question 03
Research on the identity process theory indicated that .
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

identity assimilation and identity balance are higher in young adulthood, while
accommodation is higher in later adulthood
the ability to integrate age-related changes into ones identity and maintain a positive
view of oneself seems to be crucial for successful ageing
adults who use both identity balance and healthy identity assimilation seem to have
higher self-esteem than people who use identity accommodation
lack of identity assimilation and accommodation could lead to isolation and loneliness

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a)
(b) & (c)
(a), (c) & (d)
All of the above

Question 04
The social development of children and that of adults differ in the sense that
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

the social development of children takes place primarily within the context of the family
and that of adults in the context of significant others.
childrens social development is fairly predictable, while during adulthood the choices
regarding lifestyles become more divergent.
in childhood social contexts are limited, while during adulthood social contexts are
more extensive.
social and historical changes have to be incorporated increasingly by adults which may
not be the case during childhood.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (c)


(a), (b) & (d)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

Question 05
Which of the following statements regarding the convoy models of social networks are true?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Closer relationships are determined mostly by attachment, while more distant or casual
relationships are determined mostly by role requirements.
Role-guided relationships are usually more stable and include many types of support.
Closer relationships are usually limited in terms of the duration and nature of the
support provided.
Regardless of the loss of role-guided or causal relationships, older adults do not usually
feel a loss of social support and well-being.

27

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (d)


(b) & (c)
(a), (b) & (d)
All of the above

Question 06
People have children for various reasons. According to the functional perspective, people
have children . and according to the social perspective, people have children .
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

to satisfy their generative needs; because of a desire for immortality


as security for old age; as a source of self-fulfillment and the strengthening of their
identities
because children are viewed as extensions of self; as security for their old age
because of a desire for immortality; because parenthood signifies entry into adulthood

Question 07
Which of the following statements about adults friendship relationships are true?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

During young adulthood people typically have larger social networks but less intimate
acquaintances.
During middle adulthood friendship networks are often smaller in quantity but larger in
quality.
During older adulthood, the focus of friendship networks is on companionship and
support.
Friendship relationships are regarded of more importance by women than by men.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (b)


(b) & (c)
(a), (b) & (c)
All of the above

Question 08
During the period of the career cycle, workers are usually in the stage, where they
maximise their efficiency. They tend to obtain more autonomy, and tend to experience more
than during the earlier years.
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

28

early career; establishment; job burnout


mid-career; maintenance; job satisfaction
early career; maintenance; job satisfaction
mid-career; establishment; job burnout

PYC2603/101

Question 09
Which of the following statements regarding moral development in adulthood is/are true?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Factors that contribute to adults moral reasoning are amongst others their identity
development and their responsibility for the welfare of others.
Cognitive awareness of higher moral principles develops in adolescence, but people
only start committing themselves to those principles in adulthood.
Higher moral reasoning is attained by adults who experience a strong sense of
meaning and goal directedness.
Most adults reach the higher levels of moral reasoning because of their active
engagement in social and productive activities.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(b)
(a) & (b)
(c) & (d)
(a), (c) & (d)

Question 10
Which of the following components are included in a widely accepted definition of successful
ageing presented by Rowe and Kahn (cited in Louw & Louw, 2009):
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

financial freedom and independence.


active engagement in social and productive activities.
high mental and physical functioning.
freedom from disease and disease-related disability.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a)
(a), (b) & (c)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

Question 11
The activity theory regarding psychological well-being has been criticised for
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

not taking casual relationships between social activity and psychological well-being into
account.
not taking into account that perceptions of successful ageing are relative.
assuming that social activity leads to longevity and psychological independence.
assuming that a higher activity level leads to a better quality of life.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(b) & (c)


(a), (b) & (d)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

29

Question 12
Which of the following reflect the findings regarding life-satisfaction across the life-span?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Life satisfaction is a subjective experience and varies from person to person.


There is no difference in the level of life satisfaction between older and younger adults,
probably because of the stability of certain personality traits.
Life satisfaction peaks in early adulthood, reaches a minimum in middle adulthood and
peaks again in later adulthood.
Young adults often experience greater life satisfaction because they peak in cognitive,
physical and emotional functioning.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a)
(d)
(b) & (c)
(a), (b) & (c)

Question 13
Death anxiety is related to the fear of
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

failing to achieve important goals and the impact of death on those who may outlive the
person.
cowardice and humiliation.
non-being, the unknown and punishment.
physical suffering, isolation and loneliness..

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (b)


(c) & (d)
(a), (b) & (d)
All of the above

Question 14
According to Kbler-Ross, people who experience grief or who are dying
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

have to express even their most negative feelings in order to feel relief.
proceed through the five stages sequentially.
do not necessarily experience all five stages of grief and dying.
go through the stages of guilt, denial, numbness, depression and acceptance.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

30

(a) & (c)


(b) & (d)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

PYC2603/101

Question 15
Risk factors that may contribute to the development of complicated grief are
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

a highly dependent relationship with the deceased.


a sudden, unexpected or violent death.
a lack of support from family and friends.
personality characteristics such as lack of resilience and adjustability.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (c)


(b) & (d)
(a), (c) & (d)
All of the above
END OF ASSIGNMENT 02 FOR SEMESTER 1

31

ASSIGNMENT 02 FOR SEMESTER 2


(Compulsory multiple-choice assignment)
Please note: Although students may work together when preparing assignments, each
student must submit his or her own individual assignment.
Assignment 02 (for semester 2) consists of 15 multiple-choice questions covering chapters
four to seven in the study guide for Adulthood and Maturity.

SECOND SEMESTER
Closing date: 16 September 2016
Unique assignment number: 841098
Question 01
Which of the following statements are true about the self-concept and self-schemas?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Self-schemas play a role in how we define ourselves.


Self-schemas are working models around which behaviour is organised.
The self-concept consists of various areas or domains.
The self-concept is a fixed entity and is resistant to change.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (c)


(b) & (d)
(a), (b) & (c)
All of the above

Question 02
Which of the following statements regarding the physical self are true?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

As people age, the physical self becomes less important.


Age differences in the physical self reflect the needs and behaviours of the specific
stage of life.
Young adults hoped-for possible physical selves concern sexual and interpersonal
attractiveness.
Older adults hoped-for and feared possible physical selves concern issues such as
health, fitness, illness and declines in everyday competence.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

32

(a) &(b)
(a), (b) & (c)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

PYC2603/101

Question 03
When people accept the fact that they are ageing but do not become fatalistic or
preoccupied with any conditions or limitations they have already developed, but at the same
time do not live under the illusion that they will be young forever, they exhibit .
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

identity accommodation
identity assimilation
an identity threshold experience
identity balance

Question 04
Which of the following statements regarding intimacy and intimate adult relationships are
true?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Young adults may experience a conflict between the desire to be committed to


someone and to remain independent.
Young adults may experience a conflict between the desire to be committed to
someone and to retain their newly acquired personal identity.
Intimacy occurs in any relationship in which there is an emotional bond, such as
between family members and friends.
Intimacy implies the fusion of two identities and total commitment to the other person.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(b) & (d)


(a), (b) & (c)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

Question 05
Which of the following statements regarding attachment style in adult relationships are true?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Securely attached adults are less likely to abuse their spouses, engage in unsafe
sexual practices, to be depressed and to divorce.
Adults attachment style may affect their capacity for care-giving for their own children.
Adults attachment style has no influence on their achievement motivation at work, their
enjoyment of work or their socialising with co-workers.
Elderly people often tend to exhibit a dismissive-avoidant attachment style.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (c)


(b) & (d)
(a), (b) & (d)
All of the above

33

Question 06
Changes have occurred in the influence of grandparents on their grandchildren during the
last century because of
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

increased egalitarianism in relationships.


increase in divorce.
increased mobility of people.
increased financial independence of grandparents.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a)
(c) & (d)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

Question 07
Different friendship styles have been identified in adulthood. Adults who follow the style
usually maintain a psychological distance from others while adults who follow the style
clearly distinguish between close friends and casual acquaintances.
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

independent; discerning
discerning; gregarious
gregarious; independent
peripheral; reciprocal

Question 08
Retirement from work is one of the major life course transitions in late adult life. People who
adjust well to retirement often
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

have access to sufficient resources such as finances and health services after
retirement.
reached a peak in their career shortly before retirement.
prepared well in advance by following a healthy lifestyle and having a positive attitude
towards retirement.
did not experience self-fulfillment in their career.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

34

(a) & (c)


(b) & (d)
(a), (b) & (d)
All of the above

PYC2603/101

Question 09
Factors that may contribute to adults moral reasoning are:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

emotional stability and a low hostility level.


post-formal operational thinking.
identity development.
a strong sense of meaning and goal directedness.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (d)


(b) & (c)
(b), (c) & (d)
All of the above

Question 10
Which of the following components are better indicators of successful ageing than traditional
measures of wealth and wellness?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Optimism
Physical health
A positive outlook on life
Effective coping skills

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (b)


(c) & (d)
(a), (c) & (d)
All of the above

Question 11
Which of the following could be considered the better indicator of mental and physical health
and well-being of a person?
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

The persons reaction towards daily hassles.


Coping with the death of a significant other after a long sickbed.
Moving to a retirement home after some careful planning.
Acceptance of a situation where other people take decisions on your behalf.

Question 12
Some personality factors may play a role in peoples experience of loneliness. These are ...
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

irritability and negativity.


depression and anxiety.
locus of control and a lack of self-confidence.
submissiveness and suspiciousness.

35

(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(b) & (d)


(a), (b) & (c)
(a), (c) & (d)
All of the above

Question 13
Which of the following statements regarding the experience of death anxiety have been
found to be true?
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Women experience more death anxiety than men.


Middle-aged people experience more death anxiety than younger or older adults.
Older adults experience more death anxiety than middle-aged or younger adults.
People who are not religious and those who are deeply religious report no to very little
death anxiety.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a)
(b) & (d)
(a), (b) & (d)
(a), (c) & (d)

Question 14
Kbler-Rosss theory of the stages of dying has been criticised for
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

over-generalising the experience of death.


failing to take cultural differences into account.
failing to include hope.
failing to acknowledge the role of age and gender.

The correct answer is:


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(a) & (d)


(b) & (c)
(a), (b) & (c)
All of the above

Question 15
Chronic grief syndrome is defined as
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

high levels of grief and depressive symptoms for two to four months.
intense and unresolved grief for more than a year.
high levels of grief and depressive symptoms that usually decrease over time.
moderate but continuous levels of grief and depression.
END OF ASSIGNMENT 02 FOR SEMESTER 2

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PYC2603/101

OTHER ASSESSMENT METHODS

We will not use other assessment methods in this module.


10

EXAMINATION

For general information and requirements as far as examinations are concerned, see the
brochure my Studies @ Unisa which you received with your study material.
10.1

Examination admission

When submitting Assignments 01 and 02 on time, you gain examination admission (you do
not have to pass the assignments to gain examination admission).
Students who do not submit Assignment 01 and Assignment 02 will therefore not be
allowed to write the examination.
PLEASE NOTE THERE ARE NO FURTHER OPPORTUNITIES TO GAIN EXAMINATION
ADMISSION.

10.2

Format of the examination paper

The examination paper in PYC2603 is a two-hour paper.


The examination paper will consist of one section with 70 multiple choice questions covering
the whole syllabus as outlined in the study guide for PYC2603. These multiple choice
questions are to be marked on a mark-reading sheet that will be provided along with the
examination paper. Please ensure that you do not mark your answers on the examination
paper but directly on the mark-reading sheet. Your total mark for the paper, therefore, your
mark out of 70 will be converted to a mark out of 80% and the final 20% of your final mark for
this module will be contributed by your year mark.
10.3

Preparation for the examination

The questions in the examination paper are based on:

10.4

the sections which you have to study in the prescribed book, as indicated in the study
guide.
questions and tasks in the study guide.
the two multiple-choice assignments.
Examination period

This module is a semester module. This implies that you will write the examination in
May/June 2016, if you are enrolled for this module for the first semester and
October/November 2016 if you are enrolled for the module in the second semester. The
Examination Section will provide you with information regarding the examination in general,
examination venues, examination dates and fees.

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10.5

Supplementary examination

Students who fail the examination in May/June 2016 and who obtain 40% or more, or who
could not write because of medical reasons, have the opportunity to write the examination in
October/November 2016. Students who fail the examination in October/November 2016 and
who obtain 40% or more, or who could not write because of medical reasons, have the
opportunity to write the examination in May/June 2017.
10.6

Previous examination papers

Previous examination papers are available to students on myUnisa.

11

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

The my Studies @ Unisa brochure contains an A-Z guide of the most relevant study
information.

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