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A^

Illustrated
*-

Anthology of
Love Poetry
Selected by

^
itWUlmHmsi

KATE FARRELL

FPT

$16.95
$21.95

in

Canada

ART&LOVE
An

Illustrated

Anthology

of Love Poetry
SELECTED

Kate

AND INTRODUCED BY

Farrell

Romantic

love, family love, platonic love, lost

love, ideal love, troubled love.

Throughout

the ages great poets have written about the

many
picted

sides of love
its

and great

power and beauty.

artists

have de-

Now love poetry

and treasures from The Metropolitan


of Art have been united in this elegant
anthology.

Andrew

The

Museum
new

results are inspired.

Marvell's "To His

Coy Mistress"

is

paired with the deliciously provocative paint-

The Stolen Kiss by Jean Honore Fragonard,


Maya Angelou's "Come, And Be My Baby"

ing

accompanies Romare Bearden's collage The


Block, and T. S. Eliot's tender "A Dedication
to

My Wife" appears alongside an ethereal

painting by Odilon Redon.

More than 150

poets are represented, including Carl Sandburg,

William Shakespeare, Lord Byron, Tu Fu,

140 color illustrations

09901645

ART & LOVE


An

Illustrated

Anthology of Love Poetry

ART & LOVE


An Illustrated Anthology of Love Poetry

Selected

and Introduced

fey

KATE FARRELL

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

New York

A Bulfinch Press Book / Littk, Brown and Company


Boston

Toronto

London

FRONT jacket:

Still Life:

Flowers and Fruit (detail).

Severin Roesen, German, active in America 1848-72.


Oil on canvas, between 1850 and 1855.

BACK jacket: The

This book owes much


intelligence of

of Special Publications.

who ably shepherded


Proposal.

Adolphe William Bouguereau, French, 1825-1905.


Oil on canvas, 1872.

to the patience,

Mary Beth Brewer, my


Thanks

enthusiasm, and
editor in the

also to Elizabeth

13:

Rubens, His Wife Helena Fourment, and Their

Son Peter Paul.

KF

the book through production.

For acknowledgments of the use of copyrighted material,


see page 162.

Compilation and introduction copyright

PAGE

Department
Stoneman,

Illustrations copyright

Museum of Art

1990 by

The

1990 by Kate Farrell

Metropolitan

All rights reserved

Peter Paul Rubens, Flemish, 1577-1640.


First Edition

Oil on wood, ca. 1639.

PAGE

29: In the

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

Meadow.

Pierre Auguste Renoir, French, 1841-1919.

Oil on canvas.

PAGE

45:

The Love

CATALOGING-IN-PUBLICATION DATA

& love

Art

an illustrated anthology of love poetry

and introduced by Kate

Farrell.

selected

1st ed.

Letter.
p.

Jean Honore Fragonard, French, 1732-1806.

cm.

ISBN 0-87099-576-6 (MMA). ISBN

Oil on canvas.

(Bulfinch Press

PAGE 67: Terrace at Sainte-Adresse.


Claude Monet, French, 1840-1926.

1.

II.

Oil on canvas.

Love poetry

2.

Title:

Art and

in art.

I.

Farrell, Kate.

York, N.Y.

III.

love.

PN6110.L6A66

PAGE 85: Sulking.


Edgar Degas, French, 1834-1917.

Love

Museumof Art (New

Metropolitan

0-8212-1771-2

distributor)

1990

90-31791

CIP

808.81'9354 dc20
PUBLISHED BY

Oil on canvas, ca. 1869-71.

PAGE

103:

Venus

The

Titian (Tiziano Vecellio), Italian (Venetian),


ca.

1488-1576.

123:

and Company

Bulfinch Press

an imprint and trademark of

is

Little,

(Inc.

Published simultaneously in Canada

Oil on canvas.

PAGE

Museum of Art and

Metropolitan

Bulfinch Press

at2d Adonis.

by Little,

Two Members

Brown

8c

Company (Canada) Limited

Prcxluced by the Department of Special Publications,

of the Gozzadini Family.

The

Metropolitan

Museum

of Art

Italian (Emilian), 15th century.

Tempera on

Designed by Peter Oldenburg


panel.

Photography by

PAGE

143: Nasturtiums

and

the "Dance,

Henri Matisse, French, 1869-1954.


Oil on canvas, 1912.

//.

The

Metropolitan

Museum of Art

Photograph Studio
Printed and bound in Italy by A. Mondadori, Verona

Second printing

Brown

FOR MY HUSBAND
Robert Blumborg

AND MY CHILDREN
Shane and Dan

Farrell

with love and gratitude

CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION

11

My-ness
czeslaw milosz

My-ness

My

No Name

Baby Has

Seventeen Months

Rocking

My Child
po

Children

Child

kim nam-jo

Yet

carl sandburg
gabriela mistral

chl'-i

Something Else Again

Is

14

None of Us Are As Young

14

Sonnet

16

You Playmates of Mine

Infancy

carlos drummond de andrade


pablo neruda

For Thee, Little Boy

virgil

rafael alberti

For Aitana

To

My

In

Memory

Sister

william wordsworth

My Mother

Patrick kavanagh

Cx'lebration for George Sarton

Energy

may sarton

Raymond carver

At the

19

Hearing That His Friend Was Coming Back


from the War wang chien

End of Spring

XXX

william Shakespeare

Sonnet
Bars

21

After Drinking All Night with a Friend,

Out

23

Boat

at

Poem

Dawn

See
robert bly

The lelephone

35

36

Who Can

We Co

Write
38

Robert frost

39

24
25

ToL.R-M

27

Poem

Elizabeth bishop

NOEL COWARD

41
41

FRANK OHARA

42

28

Autumn
Parting

30

century

to

33

36

NICOLAS guillen

in a

32

34

19

Oath of Friendship
1ST

rudyard kipling
po chu-i

20

Lhe North Coast

Oath of Friendship
anonymous, china,

30

rainer maria rilke

The Thousandth Man

Letter to N.Y.

of

30

16

22

charlotte bronte

auden

dante alighieri

the Best

Fiome-Sickness

h.

17

YEHUDA AMICHAI

Our Child

vv.

B.C.

Leaves

gary snyder

42

james schuyler

43

taniguchi buson

The Meeting of the Waters

43

thomas moore

44

Go, Lovely Rose


EDMUND WALLER

Song

anonymous, English

To His Love
I

Hid

My

john glare

Love

The Unknown
You

Who

If
I

edward thomas

Have Loved Hours

in the Fall
at

sara teasdale

Sea

goventry patmore

Kiss

pergy bysshe shelley

Love's Philosophy

The Garden

Come, And Be

Not

50

jacques prevert

Me

Let

O Blush

So!

My

Not

So!

john keats

maya ancjelou

Baby

Count

65

66

Ways

Sonnet XLIII, from the Portuguese


ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING

52

Madrigal

53

54
56
56

anonymous, English,

68

69

17th gentury

The Two Uses

Robert frangis

To Laura

petrargh

Eve Speaks

to

Adam

69
70

john milton

One Day Wrote Her Name


EDMUND SPENSER
I

ujxju the Strand

71

72

57

william shakespeare

Sonnet XVIII
Recipe for Happiness Khabarovsk or Anyplace

the

51

emily digkinson 52

andrew marvell

To His Coy Mistress

The

rainer maria rilke

william carlos williams

You Were Coming

47

49

Never Arrived

Love Song

O Blush

48

RUPERT BROOKE

Song

46

73

57

Where Does This Tenderness Come From?

lawrenge ferlinghetti

74

MARINA TSVETAYEVA

The

Passionate Shepherd to His Love

58
Song: To Celia

GHRISTOPHER MARLOWE

The Nymph's Reply to


SIR WALTER RALEGH
Gray Room

the Shepherd

Him

to

Me

Cloths of Heaven

Robert burns

Red, Red Rose

Juliet

HILAIRE BELLOG

63

Personal
Is It a

Girl

Column

Month

sir

john betjeman

basil bunting

john synge

63

me

77

tell

Very Valentine

this

Gertrude stein

somewhere have never


E.E.

76

77

GUMMINGS

The Olympic

76

Jonathan swift

your birthday comes to


E.E.

62

Birth-Day

75
75

61

owen barlield

plato

william butler yeats

WILLIAM BU LER YEATS


Sonnet

74

lord byron

A Drinking Song

Stella's

for the

ben jonson

Beauty

60

anna AKHMATOVA

He Wishes

in

Love Poem

Wallace stevens

Everything Promised

59

She Walks

travelled

78
78

GUMMINGS

64

Portrait of a

64

Variation

Lady

william garlos williams

federigo garcia lorca

80
81

Want

Breathe

to

james laughlin

For an Amorous Lady

Theodore roethke

paul eluard

Lady Love

The Confirmation

Softly

82

Mirabeau Bridge

101

guillaume apollinaire

102

82

KENNETH KOCH

To You

JOHN WHITE

81

83

edwin muir

He Still Looked in My Eyes

Yesterday

84

He

Yesterday

Looked

Still

in

My

Eyes

104

marina tsvetayeva

The Mess of Love


The Mess of Love

d. h.

Am No Good at Love

Can't Hold You and

86

noel coward

87

Can't Leave You

88

Street in

Gazing

at

antonio machado ruiz

89

mew

89

You So Tenderly

90

charlotte

Rooms
She's

Shadow

ALEXANDER PUSHKIN

My Woman catullus
When Love Fhes In walter de la mare
When Was One-and-Twenty a. e. housman
I

JOHN DONNE

Song

wearing the collar

The

90
90

charles bukowski

Souvenirs

anna swir

Chance

h. d.

kenneth rexroth

Loneliness

The More Loving One


3 Little

Only

Act on

Love

Knew
"

It

Is a

The

Swear

ire

Her Beauty
It

Tu fu

Was

108

anonymous,

109

Rejected Wife

anonymous, china

Do Not Look

for

Love That

109
1

Is a

Dream

10

1 1

CHRISTINA ROSSETTI

mary Ursula bethell

The Impulse
Walked

Past a

112

Robert frost
House Where

113
I

Lived

Once

14

YEHUDA AMICHAI

95

A Rant

97

97

The Night Has

frank o'hara

Spring Night in Shokoku-ji


a

114

gary snyder

Thousand l^es

116
1

16

FRANCIS WILLIAM BOURDILLON

When Will Thou Blow


ANONYMOUS, ENGLISH, 16tH CENTURY

Western Wind,

117

Would

PAUL GOODMAN
I

106

107

The Spring and the Fall


EDNA ST. VINCENT MILLAY

93

99

105

CHIPPEWA INDIAN

Response

98

james laughlin

the Truth,

Secret Feeding

ENGLISH

auden

ron padcett

Poems

Crystal Palace Market


"If

w. h.

in
I

94

(hilda doolittle)

anonymous,

the Air

Dudley randall

A Loon Thought

Parting

in

IRISH

91

92

up

Stars Stand

Alone

JUANA INES DELA CRUZ

The

john dryden

Farewell Ungrateful Traitor

lawrence

anonymous,

100

When

101

Joys

Rain

You Are Old

That Sting

c.

william butler yeats


s.

lewis

Margaret newlin

117
118

118

PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY

To

Sometimes with One


Past

One O'Clock

Lament

Love

walt whitman

vladimir mayakovsky

pindar

Love

120

Such Different Wants

120

For the

Listen, Will You Learn to

Me

Hear

from Afar

ROBERT browning

120

122

JULES SUPERVIELLE

Moment

138

Robert bly

138

pierre reverdy

The Double Bubble


The Old Words

kate farrell

of Infinity

david

139

wagoner

141

ROBERT creeley

Old Song

140

141

Unending Love

rabindranath tagore

Give All

Love

142

The Marriage of True Minds


Sonnet

To

CXVI

william shakespeare

124
124

My

Dear and Loving Husband


ANNE BRADSTREET

Give All

Conquer All the Earth


ANONYMOUS, ANCIENT INDIA

Although

126

jalal-ud-din rumi

Let's Live

Really

126

catullus

Live!

Anniversary on the Island

w.

s.

128

merwin

She Was

a Phantom of Delight
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

Dedication to

Now

My Wife

129

130

eliot

Now

the

White

Woman

jorge luis borges

Her Bath
WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS

Portrait of a

The Garret

Natural History
Fall of the

at

ezra pound

Love Recognized

Robert penn warren


e. b.

Evening Star

Men

147
148

What There

Is

148

Love Poem

Kathleen raine

In Love for

kenneth patchen

The Woman

in

white

kenneth patchen

What

carl sandburg

Robert herrick

Love Lives Beyond the


Lines

152

Wallace stevens

Sunshine

It Is

150

edwin muir

Long

132

134

146

WILLIAM BLAKE

131

132

144

lucretius

Answer to a Child's Question


SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE

Love

ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON

Amorous Anticipation

ralph waldo emerson

Love

Solo for Saturday Night Guitar

t. s.

Sleeps the Crimson Petal,

126

to

Darlingof God and

Song

juan ramon jimenez

the song of solomon

Song of Songs
Quatrain

So

125

Galante Garden:

to

125

Tomb

Would
JOHN KEATS

Late Fragment

156

157

Were

Stedfast as

Thou

Art

Raymond carver

Once More,

135

136

The World Was Warm and White When


I Was Born
delmore Schwartz

136

Love Tells Us

Round

Theodore roethke

Who We Are

donald

158

159

134

the

154

156

john glare

thomas hardy

Bright Star,

152

t.

159

160

sanders

161

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

162

CREDITS

16^

INDEX OF ARTISTS

70

INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES

171

INDEX OF FIRST LINES

174

TRANSLATORS

176

lO

INTRODUCTION

'A,

,t

a poet,

the touch of love, everyone becomes

wonderful

wrote Plato almost 2,400 years ago, sum-

ming up the natural

between love and

affinity

diversity.

old favorites

poetry and alluding to the power of both: Love

There

is

many

poetry from

times and places; light- and heavy-hearted poems;

and surprises; poems with

sorts

all

of moods, outlooks, and styles.

can turn ordinary people into poets, and poetry


can help people clarify

many

love's

mysteries.

The connection between

book of love poetry illustrated with works from


the splendid collections of

seum

The

of Art seems a perfect

Metropolitan

way

to

Mu-

show what

Raymond

great inspiration love, through the ages, has

been

to the arts. It

is

chance

to

show,

too,

how

poem and

work of

literal.

The

mysterious force that animates Henri Matisse's


Icarus resembles that

more often imaginative than

art is

Carver's

which flows through

poem "Energy.

"

Claude Mo-

net's misty, self-reflective Poplars accentuates

mood

eloquently poetry and the other arts reflect the

the

important part that love plays in our

Federico Garcia Lorca and James Laughlin that

lives.

of tender longing in the

appear alongside
In putting this book together,

and then found works of

first

illuminate

and

them

in

art that

many

seemed

picked poems that

and thought others would

looked at

chose the poems

pair a

from

to

some way. Given limited space

limitless possibilities,

liked

sides of love

like,

poems

that

and showed poetry's

At times,

17th-century
its

poem

match

Memisabu and

to

it

seemed

Anne

Bradstreet's

her husband, for example,

in a statue of the

his wife,

4,000 years ago.

fitting to

culture with a work of art

a very different one.

found

[11]

it.

poem from one

poems by

who

Egyptian

lived

more than

The poems
title

fell

of each section

introduces

it.

The

naturally into eight seetions.


is

taken from the

There are poems about

poem

that

familial love

of True Minds), and the final section contains

poems about

love as an idea

and

ideal {Give All

to Love).

(My-ness); friendship {Oath of Friendship); the

quest for romantic love {Go, Lovely Rose); and

poems

that praise the beloved's beauty, inner

outer {Let

Me

Count

the Ways).

The Mess of Love) and of


and parting {Yesterday He Still Looked in

speak of troubled love


lost love

My

and

Other poems

Eyes). Naturally,

brate the

many

of the

harmony of mature

love

poems

cele-

This collection

is

a small

bouquet gathered from

a vast, richly varied garden,

us

all.

The

arts challenge

one that belongs

and console

us,

lift

to

our

standards and deepen our thinking, enliven our

days and inspire our

lives.

hope

this

book

encourages further exploration of the garden.

{The Marriage
huite Farrell

My-ness

MY-NESS
"My parents, my husband, my brother, my
I am hstening in a cafeteria at breakfast.
The women's

voices rustle,

fulfill

delight in being here on earth

For one more moment, with them, here on earth,

To

1895.

celebrate our tiny, tiny my-ness.

MY BABY HAS NO NAME YET


My baby has
like a

Polisli, b.

no name

yet;

new-born chick or

my baby
CzESLAW MiLOSZ,

ca.

themselves

glance sidelong at their moving lips

And

Merritt Chase, American,

1849 1916. Oil on canvas,


sister.

In a ritual no doubt necessary.


I

For the Little One. William

not

is

named

puppy,

yet.

1911

What numberless texts I examined


at dawn and night and evening over again!
But not one character did

which

is

find

as lovely as the child.

Starry field of the sky,


or heap of pearls in the depth.

Where can

My baby
like

name be

the

has no

name

found,

I?

yet;

an unnamed bluebird or white Bowers

from the farthest land for the


I

how can

first,

have no name for this baby of ours.


Kim

Nam

The Abraham

jo, Korean,

b.

1927

Pixler Family. American,

Ink and watercolor on paper.

ca.

1815.


SEVENTEEN MONTHS

"Spoon"

for

handled,

This

girl

No for

child speaks Hve words.

no and no

no or

for yes, "no" for either

for

and

let

tools,

to

be

paraphernalia of

and convenience are spoons.

utility

the Government and the one force of majesty


and intelligence obeying the call of pity, hunger,

wheat or oats or corn or barley

or any food taken with a spoon.

"Go way"

instruments,

Mama is her only epithet and synonym for God and

yes.

'Teewee"

spoon or cup or anything


all

mama, mama, mama.

pain, cold, dark

as an edict to keep your distance

Carl Sandburg,

American, 1878-1967

her determinations operate.

ROCKING MY CHILD
rhe sea
is

its

millions of waves

rocking, divine,

hearing the loving seas,

Im

rocking

my

child.

The wandering wind


is

in the night

rocking the fields of wheat,

hearing the loving winds,


I

God
is

rocking

my

child.

the father his thousands of worlds

rocking without a sound.

Feeling his hand in the shadows,


I'm rocking

my

child.

Gabriela Mistral,

Chilean, 1889-1957

Midnight: Mother and Sleepy Child


Ja|xinesc,
(.

175^-1806. Wooclhloek print

iistoms of

Women

in the

Kitai;a\\a Litamaro,

in colors

Twelre Hours, 1790.

From

CHILDREN
My

nephew, who

is

six years old, is called

"Tortoise";

My daughter of three

One is beginning
The other can already

little

"Summer

to learn to joke

recite

and

poems and

At morning they play clinging about


At night they sleep pillowed against

Dress.

talk;

songs.

my feet;
my dress.

Why, children, did you reach the world so late.


Coming to me just when my years are spent?
Young things draw our feelings to them;
Old people

The
The
And

easily give their hearts.

sweetest vintage at
full

moon

so with

in the

men

last

turns sour;

end begins

to

wane.

the bonds of love and affection

Soon may change to a load of sorrow and care.


But all the world is bound by love's ties;

Why did

think that

alone should escape?

Po Chu-i, Chinese, 772-846

The Lacemaker

(detail).

Nicolaes Maes, Dutch

(1634-1693). Oil on canvas.

17.

'V

t^.^,:h,.

L.

'

'i^:,:^^^^^

K..

cr
:^

,^'

^f.k^.^'\

ZW^T
1

First Steps. Vinecnt \un Ciogh, Dutch, 185.^-1890. Oil on caiuus, 1S90.

P^L.


A CHILD IS SOMETHING ELSE
AGAIN

INFANCY
My father got on

A child is

something else again. Wakes up

in the afternoon

and

in

an instant he's

full

of words,
in

an instant he's humming,

an instant warm,

in

instant light, instant darkness.

his horse

and went

to the

field.

My mother stayed sitting and


My little brother slept.
A
I

small boy alone under the

sewing.

mango

trees,

read the story of Robinson Crusoe,

the long story that never comes to an end.

A child is Job.
bets on

They've already placed their

At noon, white with

him

but he doesn't
for pleasure.

know

He

it.

scratches his body

Nothing hurts

"Thank you when the Lord has given,


welcome when the Lord has
"

to say "You're

had

lullabies long ago in the slave-quarters

yet.

and never

They're training him to be a polite Job,


to say

light, a voice that

learned

"

forgot

called us for coffee.

Coffee blacker than the black old

woman

delicious coffee

taken away.

good coffee.

A child is vengeance.
A child is a missile into the coming generations.
I launched him: Lm still trembling.

My mother stayed
Shh

A child is

something else again: on

a rainy

spring day

glimpsing the Garden of Eden through the

kissing

him

and sewing

don't

wake the

boy.

She stopped the cradle when


had lit
and gave

Away

fence,

sitting

watching me:

a sigh

off there

my

how

mosquito

deep!

father

went riding

through the farm's endless wastes.

in his sleep,

hearing footsteps in the wet pine needles.

A child delivers

And

you from death.

was

Child, Garden, Rain, Fate.

Yehuda Amichai,

Israeli, b.

didn't

know

that

my

prettier than that of

story

Robinson Crusoe.

Carlos Drummond de Andrade,

1924

'9]

Brazilian,

b.

1902

OUR CHILD

Besides the wintry water

she and

Oh child,

do you know, do you know


where you come from?

From

a lake

with white and hungry sea

Hummingbird and

gulls.

Passionflowers

built

wearing away our lips


from kissing each other's souls,
throwing everything into the fire,
burning up our fife.

This

is

(detail)

Martin Johnson Headc, American, 1819-1904.


Oil on canvas.

a red bonfire

the

way you

arrived in the world.

But

in order to see

me

and

in order to see

you one day

she crossed over the seas

and

in order to

embrace

her small waist


I

walked the whole earth,

with wars and mountains,


with sand and spines.

This

is

the

way you

arrived in the world.

From so many places you come,


from the water and from the earth,
from the fire and from the snow,
from so

far

away you walk

toward the two of us,

from the terrible love


that has enchained us,

we want to know
what you are like, what you say
because you know more
so

about the world than


Like a great storm
the two of us shake

we

to us,

gave you.

the tree of

down

to

life

the most hidden

fibers of its roots

and you appear now,


singing in the leaves,

on the highest branch

we reached with

you.

Pablo Neruda,

Chilean, 1904-1973

FOR THEE, LITTLE BOY


From Eclogue

For thee, httle boy,

will the earth

pour forth

gifts

All untilled, gi\e thee gifts


First the

Then

wandering

Uncalled the goats

No longer

and foxglove

\\ ill

come home with

need the herds fear the

Thy cradle
The
The

ivy

colocasia and the laughing acanthus

itself will

their milk

lion

bloom with sweet flowers

serpent will die


ix)ison plant

\\ ill

wither

Assyrian herbs will spring up everywhere

And when thou art old enough


And of thy father s great deeds
Old enough

Then

will

heroes

understand the meaning of courage

will the plain

Grapes

Hard

to

to read of

grow yellow w ith

grow on brambles

old oaks drip honey.


\

Don Manuel

Osorio Manrique de Zuniga (1784-1792)

Francisco Goya, Spanish. 1-46- 1828. Oil on canvas.

ripe grain

IRGIL. Roman. -019 B.C.

[21

-i

^-

FOR AITANA
(9th of August, 1956)

Aitana,
to give

my

child. Springtime

bows

you fifteen small and delicate flowers.

You are

fashioned from

still

air,

and

all

your

things

tI5

:9'->"-v..

,i^''^\

still

seem charmed by

Aitana,

my

child,

how

a fragile light.

wish

could

make

the fairest winds blow forever for you,

and that

'^

^^'

could

comb more

lights

and

smooth out more roses


on your young wings of messenger breeze.
Aitana,
like air

<^'

my

child, since you are air

and are

and you soar off on the wind when

you wish,
happy, hushed and blind and alone in your

though

I'd

open new skies

bliss,

your wings,

to

don't forget that even the air can lose

its

leaves

in a flash,

the

air,

dear child Aitana, Aitana,

Rafael Alberti,

V^

Spring. Detail oF an cmbroiclcrc'd


ca.

h'-mmyr'

Spanish,

b.

my

child.

1902

han^inij.

rcnch,

i6H^. Silk, wool, and siKor threat) on canvas.

HOME-SICKNESS
Of College am
I

tired;

Far from the pompous

wish

Oh.

be at home,

to

tutor's voice,

and the hated

school-boy's groan.
I

wish that

That

slate
I

wish

and

had freedom

walk about

to

at will;

my Greek and

quill.

not suit me:

it's

cold and full of

snow;
So different from black Africa's warm, sunny,
genial glow.

I'm shivering in the day-time, and shivering

all

the night:
I'm called poor, startled, withered wretch, and

miserable wight!

And oh! miss my brother, miss his gentle smile


Which used so many long dark hours of sorrow to
I

beguile.

miss

my dearest

mother;

Aught half so mild

as she

now no

longer find

was, so careful and

kind.

Soap Bubbles. Thomas Couture, French, 1815-1879.


Oil on canvas.

father's,
all

my noble father's arms


me

wickedness, and keep

hear his voice no longer;

me in my misery:

see no

to

so

more

his eye

whom now shall

Charlotte Bronte, Enghsh,

my kitten, to hear my ape rejoice,


to my nightingale's or parrot's lovely voice.

And England does

my

from harms.

Smile on

to see

To listen

have not

safe

no more was troubled by

To guard me from

1816-1855

fly?

Edward

will

come with

you;

and,

pray,

Put on with speed your woodland dress;

And

bring no book: for this one day

We'll give to idleness.

No joyless
Our

forms shall regulate

living calendar:

We from

to-day,

my

The opening of the


Love,

now

From
From

heart to heart

the

first

mild day of March:

Each minute sweeter than

The

before,

redbreast sings from the

That stands beside our


is

is

stealing.

earth to man, from

It is

man

to earth:

the hour of feeling.

tall

larch

Some silent laws our heart will make.


Which they shall long obey:
We for the year to come may take
Our temper from to-day.

door.

And from
There

a universal birth.

One moment now may give us more


Than years of toiling reason:
Our minds shall drink at every pore
The spirit of the season.

TO MY SISTER
It is

Friend, will date


year.

the blessed power that rolls

About, below, above,

a blessing in the air,

Which seems a sense of joy to yield.


To the bare trees, and mountains bare.
And grass in the green field.

We'll frame the measure of our souls:

They

shall be

tuned

to love.

Then come, my Sister! come, pray.


With speed put on your woodland dress;
And bring no book: for this one day
I

My sister! ('tis a wish of mine)


Now that our morning meal is done,
Make haste, your morning task
Come forth and feel the sun.

resign;

We'll give to idleness.

William Wordsworth,

English, 1770-1850

The Flowering Orchard.


Vincent van Gogh, Dutch,
1853-1890. Oil on canvas,

li

Interior with Figure Sewing.

Edouard Vuillard, French,


1 868940. Oil on panel, 1896.
1

IN

MEMORY OF MY MOTHER

You

will

We will be choked with

have the road gate open, the front

The

door ajar

The

kettle boiling and a table set


By the window looking out at the sycamores

And your

Life too rich


All

nettles,

docks and thistles

am coming though send no word


who could tell
A man's thoughts my thoughts though I hid themThrough you I knew Woman and did not fear her
You

me coming up among the poplar trees.


You'll know my breathing and my walk
it

the

answering the prodigal's prayer.

loving heart lying in wait

will be a

summer evening on

will

know

For you were lover

For

And

the grief of things growing,

silence of dark-green air

those roads

Lonely with leaves of thought.

spell.

Patrick Kavanagh,
[25

Irish,

1904-1967

A CELEBRATION FOR
GEORGE SARTON
I

never saw

never saw

His

my
my

father old;

stride, staccato vital,

His talk struck from pure metal

Simple as gold, and all his learning


Only to light a passion's burning.
So, beaming like a lesser god.
He bounced upon the earth he trod.

And
At

people marveled on the street

this stout

man's impetuous

never saw my father passive;


He was electrically massive.
He never hurried, so he said.
And yet a fire burned in his head;
He worked as poets work, for love.
And gathered in a world alive.
I

father cold.

feet.

While black and white above

An

Arabic inscription flowed

nameof God.

Like singing: "In the

Loved donkeys, children, awkward ducks,

And when he died, he

Loved

His death was like a

to retell old

simple jokes;

Lived in a world of innocence

He went

Where

Still

loneliness could be intense;

his door

Spoke Mystery, the avatar

out

when

"

died so swift

final gift.

the ride was

full,

undiminished, bountiful;

Wrote letters until very late,


Found comfort in an orange cat
Rufus and George exchanged no word.
But while George worked his Rufus purred.
And neighbors looked up at his light.

The scholar and the gentle soul.


The passion and the life were whole.
And now death's wake is only praise,
As when a neighbor writes and says:
"I did not know your father, but

Warmed

His light was there.

"

by the scholar working

late.

May Sarton,

Portrait of a

Man, Probably Lucas van Uffele

(1583? 1637). Anthony van Dyck, Flemish, 1599 1641.


Oil on canvas.

27

miss the

American,

b.

light.

1912

ENERGY
my daughter's,
her best to tell me

Last night at

she did

what went wrong


between her mother and me.

near Blaine,

"Energy. You two's energy was

She looks

like

Moves the

drift of hair

to the filter in three

this visit
is

would be

down
draws,

to sleep.

To wake

thought

Wrong.
Those years

easy.

hard, brother.

spilling over into

her mother.

like

take a cigarette

just like her mother.

This

young.

like her.

from her forehead,

Can

my

sleep

light in the
to

when

to find a

cigarettes in the ashtray

pretend

wrong.

her mother

when her mother was


Laughs

"

all

try

thousand

and every

house burning.

can't

understand anything:

today ril be carried


three thousand miles away into
the loving arms of another

woman, not

her mother. No. She's caught


in the flywheel of a
I

turn off the

new

love.

last light

and close the door.


Moving toward whatever ancient thing
it is that works the chains
and pulls us

so relentlessly on.

Raymond Carver,

American, 1938 1988

Icarus. Henri Matisse, French, 1869-19^4- Poclioir from


Jazz, published by Tcriade, Paris, 1947.

Oath of
Friendship

OATH OF FRIENDSHIP

SONNET

Shangya!

Guido,

want

to

For ever and ever without break or decay.

When
And

the hills are

the rivers are

wish that you and Lapo and

Were carried off by magic


And put in a boat, which, every time there was wind.
Would sail on the ocean exactly where we wanted.

be your friend

all flat
all dry,

When it lightens and thunders in winter,


When it rains and snows in summer,
When Heaven and Earth mingle

Wouldn't be able

Not

We would want more and more to be together.

till

then will

Anonymous,

In this

And I wish

part from you.

China,

ist

way storms and other dangerous weather


to harm us
that, since

we

all

were of one mind,

And I wish that Vanna and Lagia too


And the girl whose name on the list is number

century B.C.

thirty

Were put

in the boat

by the magician too

And that we all did nothing but talk about love


And wish that they were just as glad to be there

NONE OF US ARE AS YOUNG

As

None of us are as young


as we were. So what?

believe the three of us

Dante Alighieri,

would

Italian,

be.

1265-1321

Friendship never ages.


W. H. Auden, American

(b. lin^jancl),

1907-1973

Fantastic Landscape. I'rancesco (Juardi,


171 2-1 793. Oil on canvas.

.^

Italian (Venetian)

YOU PLAYMATES OF MINE


You playmates of mine
the

in the scattered parks of

city,

small friends from a childhood of long ago:

how we found and

one another, hesitantly,

liked

and, like the lamb with the talking scroll,

When we were

spoke with our silence.

filled

with

joy
it

belonged

And how

it

to

no one:

dissolved

was simply

it

among all

there.

the adults

who

passed by

and

in the fears of the endless year.

Wheels

we

rolled past us,

stood and stared at the

carriages;

houses surrounded us,

solid but

untrue

and

none
of them ever

knew

What

us.

in that

world was

real?

Nothing. Only the

Boy Blowing

Their magnificent arches.

balls.

Not even the children


But sometimes one,
oh a vanishing one, stepped under the plummeting

Bubbles. Jean Baptiste Simeon Charclin,

Ircnch, 1699-1779. Oil on canvas.


ball.

(In

memoriam Egon von

Rilke)

Rainer Maria Rilke,

3^

Austrian, 1875-1926

THE THOUSANDTH MAN


One man

in a

thousand, Solomon says,

Will stick more close than a brother.

And
If

its

In season or out of season.

worth while seeking him half your days

you find him before the other.

Nine hundred and ninety-nine depend

On what

the world sees in you.

But the Thousandth

With

Man

will stand your friend

Tis neither promise nor prayer nor show

Nine hundred and ninety-nine of em go


By your looks, or your acts, or your glory.
But if he finds you and you find him,
rest of the

world don't matter;

For the Thousandth

With you

in

You can use

Man

will sink or

swim

any water.
his purse with

no more

talk

Than he uses yours for his spendings.


And laugh and meet in your daily walk
As though there had been no lendings.
Nine hundred and ninety-nine of them call
For silver and gold in their dealings;
But the Thousandth Man he's worth em all.
Because you can show him your feelings.

The

Studio. Winslow Homer, American, 1836-1910.

Oil on canvas, 1867.

Stand up and back

it

in all

men's sight

With that for your only reason!


Nine hundred and ninety-nine can't bide
The shame or mocking or laughter.
But the Thousandth Man will stand by your
To the gallows-foot and after!

the whole round world agin you.

Will settle the finding for ee.

The

His wrong's your wrong, and his right's your right.

RuDYARD Kipling,

English, 1865-1936

side

AT THE END OF SPRING


To

Yiian

The

Chen

(a.d. 8io)

flower of the pear-tree gathers and turns to

If the

fruit;

The

swallows' eggs have hatched into young birds.

When
What
It

It

the Seasons' changes thus confront the

me

to

watch the days and months

Without grieving that Youth

slips

World

is

but a long dream.

But ever since the day that

my

is

young or

friend left

side

And

fly

There is one wish I cannot quite destroy:


That from time to time we may chance to meet

away;

has lived an exile in the City of Chiang-ling,

again.

Po Chu-i, Chinese, 772-846

it^^^^
'v4t

^'

,^.vfS.i-

.,v^.,,^'S>,

<^,
r'^V

old.

my

mind

comfort can the Doctrine of Tao give?

will teach

Fleeting

does not matter whether one

-'-':-

^.

jK-/^:-'

HEARING THAT HIS FRIEND WAS


COMING BACK FROM THE WAR
In old days those

who went

to fight

In three years had one year's leave.

But

in this

They must
Wang

Hsi-chih Watching Geese. Ch

Chinese,

ca.

soldiers are never changed;

go on fighting

till

they die on the

battlefield.
icn Hsiian,

1235-after 1301. Handscroll in ink, color,

and gold on paper.

war the

thought of you, so weak and indolent,

Hopelessly trying to learn to march and

drill.

That a young man should ever come home again


Seemed about as likely as that the sky should fall.
Since I got the news that you were coming back.
Twice I have mounted to the high wall of your
home.

found your brother mending your horse's stall;


found your mother sewing your new clothes.

am

Yet

half afraid; perhaps

it is

not true;

never weary of watching for you on the road.

Each day I go out at the City Gate


With a flask of wine, lest you should come

Oh

that

thirsty.

could shrink the surface of the World,

So that suddenly

might find you standing

side!

Wang Chien,

Chinese, 756-835

at

my

"

SONNET XXX
When

BARS

to the sessions of

sweet silent thought,

summon up remembrance of things past,


I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought,
And with old woes new wail my dear time s
Then can I drown an eye (unus'd to flow)
For precious friends hid

And weep afresh love's long-since cancell'd woe,


And moan th' expense of many a vanish'd sight:
Then can grieve at grievances foregone,
And heavily from woe to woe tell o'er
The sad account of fore-bemoaned moan.
Which I new pay as if not paid before.
I

But

if

the while

think on thee (dear friend)

and sorrows end.

William Shakespeare,

love bars

and taverns

where people
waste:

in death's dateless night.

All losses are restor'd,

beside the sea,

English, 1564-1616

talk

and drink

just to drink and talk.

Where Joe Nobody comes

in

and asks

for

his drink straight,

and there are Joe Brawl and Joe Blade


and Joe Blow and even Simple Joe,
just plain old Joe.

There white waves


break in friendship;
a friendship of the people, without rhetoric,

wave of "hello! and 'how are you doing?


There it smells offish,
of mangrove, of rum, of salt
and of a sweaty shirt put in the sun to dry.
a

"

Look
(in

me

up, brother, and you'll find

Havana,

me

in Oporto,

in Jacmel, in

Shanghai)

with plain folk

who just

to

drink and talk

people the bars and taverns


beside the sea.

Nicolas Guillen, Cuban,

Dr. Emanuel Lasker and


His Brother. Frank Eugene,

b.

1902

The Smokers.
Adriaen Brouwer,

American, 1865- 1936.

Flemish, i6o6(?)-i638.

Platinum

Oil on wood, ca. 1636.

print, 1907.

-v*^>

^ys^^^imSi'-

AFTER DRINKING ALL NIGHT WITH A FRIEND, WE GO OUT IN A BOAT


AT DAWN TO SEE WHO CAN WRITE THE BEST POEM
These

pines, these

fall

This morning

oaks, these rocks,

This water dark and touched by wind


I am like you, you dark boat,
Drifting over water fed by cool springs.

sense

my

also, drifting in the

hands, and

Drifting, as

all

my

dawn wind,

shoes, and this ink

of this body drifts.

Above the clouds of the

flesh

and the stone.

Beneath the waters, since I was a boy,


I have dreamt of strange and dark treasures.

A few friendships,

Not of gold, or strange

A few oars weathered by the snow and the heat,


So we drift toward shore, over cold waters,
No longer caring if we drift or go straight.

Gift,

few dawns,

few glimpses

of grass,

stones, but the true


beneath the pale lakes of Minnesota.

Robert
3H

Bly, American,

b.

1926

Lake George. John

Frederick Kensett, American,

1816-1S72. Oil on canvas, 1869.

THE TELEPHONE
"When I was just
From here

as far as

could walk

today,

There was an hour


All

still

When
I

leaning

heard you

Don't say

my head

against a flower

talk.

didn

for

t,

heard you say

You spoke from that flower on the windowsill

Do you remember what


"First

tell

it

me what it was

was you said?"


you thought you heard.

"Having found the flower and driven a bee away,


I

leaned

And
I

my

head,

holding by the stalk,

listened

and

thought

What was it? Did


Or did you say

may have thought

as

said

"Well, so

call

Come'

Someone
"I

you

caught the word

me

by

my name?
'

heard

it

as

bowed.

much, but not

'

aloud.

came."

Mount
b.

Robert Frost, American, 1874-1963


39

Fuji

and Flowers. David Hockney,

1937. Acryhc on canvas, 1972.

British,

LETTER TO

TO L. R-M

N.Y.

For Louise Crane

There are certain


In your next letter

wish you'd say

where you are going and what you are doing;


how are the plays, and after the plays
what other pleasures you're pursuing:

Whose
Whose

taking cabs in the middle of the night,

hearts have

our land

unafraid

known a lot of pain.


many tears,

Who welcomed pity with disdain


the fast encroaching years

Humorously and undismayed.

save your soul

if to

where the road goes round and round the park


and the meter glares like a moral owl,
and the

ladies in

still

eyes have shed so

And view
driving as

and

Still living

trees look so

queer and green

There are certain

ladies in

our land.

Whose courage is too deeply bred


To merit unreflecting praise.

standing alone in big black caves

For them no easy, glib escape;

and suddenly you're in a different place


where everything seems to happen in waves,

No mystic

and most of the jokes you just can't catch,


like dirty words rubbed off a slate,

hopes confuse their days;

They can

identify the shape

Of what's

to

come, devoid of dread.

There are certain

ladies in

our land

and the songs are loud but somehow dim


and it gets so terribly late,

Who bring to Life the gift of gay

and coming out of the brownstone house

The past,

to the gray sidewalk, the

watered

one side of the buildings

rises

like a glistening field of

Wheat, not
if it's

wheat

with the sun

Is that

The

wheat.

for

is

safe

and sure.

they

know they can endure

rigours of another day.

Noel Coward,

none of your sowing,

I'd like to

sanity.

them,

Perhaps their only vanity

oats, dear. I'm afraid

it's

nevertheless

street,

Uncompromising

English, 1899-1973

know

what you are doing and where you are

going.

The
Elizabeth Bishop, American, 1911-1979

Lafayette. John Sloan, American,

Oil on canvas, 1927.

[41]

871- 1951

POEM

THE NORTH COAST

Here we are again together


buds burst over the trees

as the

hght

cries,

walking around

Those picnics covered with sand


No money made them more gay

their

pond

We passed over hills in

in yellow weather.

And walked

the night

along beaches by day.

Fresh clouds, and further

oh

do not care

to go!

Sage in the rain, or the sand

not beyond this circling friendship,

Spattered by new-falling rain.

damp new

That ocean was

air

and fluttering snow

remaining long enough

to

make

the leaves

But we did

it

too cold to

swim

again and again.

excessive in the quickness of their mild return,


not needing

more than earth and friends

Frank O'Hara,

to see the

winter

American, 1926-1966

42

so.

Gary Snyder,

American,

b.

1930

On the Beach at

Trouville. Eugene Boudin, French,

PARTING

1824-1898. Oil on wood, 1863.

For

me who go,
for you who

stay

two autumns.

AUTUMN LEAVES

Taniguchi Buson,

Japanese, 1716-1783

Mountains and mountains and mountains


rolling, rolling, rolling:
all

overgrown with

trees, trees, trees,

Cypresses. Vincent van Gogh, Dutch, 1853-1890.


Oil on canvas.

turning, turning, turning:

but in the

field

where we are

strolling, strolling, strolling,

the leaves on trees


are green, green, green.

"Soon,"

say,

"these leaves,

the ginkgo, the willow and the beech,


will all be

turning, turning, turning.

That smouldering red


is

swamp maple.

off there

'

Then we come to a fence


where one who has given
his life to poetry leans.

Next to him a sign proclaims,


ETERNAL HAPPINESS. Am I
dreaming about Frank again?
Frank among the leaves
all

turning, turning, turning.

James Schuyler, American,

b.

1925

THE MEETING OF THE WATERS


There is not in the wide world a valley so sweet
As that vale in whose bosom the bright waters
meet;

Oh! the

last rays

of feeling and

Ere the bloom of that valley

life

must depart,

shall fade

from

my

heart.

Yet

it

was not that Nature had shed o'er the scene

Her purest of crystal and brightest of green;


Twas not her soft magic of streamlet or hill,
Oh! no, it was something more exquisite still.

Twas

that friends, the belov'd of

my

bosom, were

near.

Who made every dear scene of enchantment more


dear,

And who

felt

how

the best charms of nature

improve,

When we see them

reflected from looks that

we

love.

The Oxbow. Ihomas

Sweet vale of Avoca! how calm could

Cole, American, 1801-1848.

In thy

Oil on canvas, 1836.

rest

bosom of shade, with the friends

love

best.

Where

the storms that

we

feel in this cold

world

should cease.

And our

hearts, like thy waters, be mingled in

peace.

Thomas Moore,

44

Irish,

1779-1852

Lovely

Rose


SONG
^-4.=!

Go, lovely rose


Tell her that wastes her time

and me,

That now she knows.

When resemble her to thee.


How sweet and fair she seems
I

to be.

Tell her that's young.

And shuns

to

have her graces spied,

That hadst thou sprung


In deserts where no men abide.
Thou must have uncommended
Small

is

died.

the worth

Ot beauty from the light


Bid her come forth.

retired:

Suffer herself to be desired.

And

not blush so to be admired.

Then die! that she


The common fate of all things
May read in thee;

How small
That are

so

rare

a part of time they share

wondrous sweet and

Edmund Waller,

fair!

English, 1606-1687

Allegorical Figure. Detail of an armoire. French


(Burgundian

Sch(X)l), late i6th century.

The Storm.

Walnut,

Pierre Auguste Cot, French,

1837-1883. Oil on canvas, 1880.

carved, painted, and gilded.

46

TO HIS LOVE
Come away, come, sweet love,
The golden morning breaks,

Ornament

All the earth, all the air

Haste then, sweet

Of love and

pleasure speaks.

Teach thine arms then

to

bliss.

Eyes were made for beauty's grace,


Viewing, rueing

love's long pain,

Procur'd by beauty's rude disdain.

Come away, come, sweet love.


The golden morning wastes.
While the sun from
His

fiery

Making

arrows

all

his sphere

casts:

the shadows

fly,

Playing, staying in the grove.

To

entertain the stealth of love,

Thither, sweet love,

let

us hie,

Flying, dying, in desire,

Wing'd with sweet hopes and heav'nly

Come away, come, sweet


Do not in vain adorn

love,

Beauty's grace that should rise

Like to the naked morn:


Lilies

And

on the

fair

nurse of pride.

love,

our wished

Anonymous, English

embrace,

And sweet rosy lips to kiss.


And mix our souls in mutual

is

Pleasure, measure, love's delight.

river's side,

Cyprian flowers new blown.

Desire no beauties but their own,

fire.

flight.

Landscape. Needlework upholstery on the back


American (Newport, Rhode Island), 1758.

chair.

of an easy

HID MY LOVE

hid

my

love

when young

till I

Couldn't bear the buzzing of a


I

hid

Till
I

my

love to

fly;

my despite

could not bear to look at

light:

dare not gaze upon her face

But left her memory in each place;


Where'er I saw a wild flower lie
I

kissed and bade

met her

my

love good-bye.

in the greenest dells,

Where dewdrops pearl the wood bluebells;


The lost breeze kissed her bright blue eye,
The bee kissed and went singing by,

A sunbeam found a passage there,


A gold chain round her neck so fair;
As secret as the wild bee's song
She lay there all the summer long.

hid

my

love in field

Till e'en the

and town

breeze would knock

me down;

The bees seemed singing ballads o'er.


The fly's bass turned a lion's roar;
And even silence found a tongue,
To haunt me all the summer long;
The riddle nature could not prove
Was nothing else but secret love.
John Clare,

English, 1793-1864

SONG
"Oh! Love," they

said, "is

King oF Kings,

And triumph is his crown.


Earth Fades in Hame before his wings,
And Sun and Moon l)ow down."
But

that,

knew, would never do;

And Heaven
So whenever
I

will not

is all

met

too high.

Queen,

said,

catch her eye.

"Oh! Love," they

said,

and "Love," they

said,

"The gift of Love is this;


A crown of thorns about thy head.

And

vinegar to thy kiss!"

But Tragedy
So whenever
I

And

not for me;

is

And Lm

content to be gay.
spied a Fragic Lady,

went another way.

so

never feared to see

You wander down the

Or come

On

ordinary

And what
was

that

Fx)ve

all

me

feet.

For what they'd never told

It

street.

across the fields to

me

of.

never knew;

the time,

my

love,

would be merely you.

The ProposaF
HuPEKT Bkooke,

Fn^iish, 1887-1915

Adolphe William Bouguereau, French,

1825-1905. Oil on canvas, 1872.

49

THE UNKNOWN
She

is

most

And when
The poets'

ladies

Look no more

But

On

fair,

they see her pass

Once proud

in the glass

or happy, soon

Far from his door.

after her.

Pygmalion and

a bleak moor
Running under the moon
She lures a poet,

Galatea. Jean Leon Gerome, French,

1824 1904. Oil on canvas,

ca.

1890.

Beside a train,

Because they saw her

Or

go,

failed to see her.

Travellers and watchers know


Another pain.

The simple lack


Of her is more to me
Than others' presence.
Whether life splendid be
Or utter black.
I

have not seen,

have no news of her;

can

tell

only

She is not here, but there


She might have been.
She is to be kissed
Only perhaps by me;
She may be seeking
Me and no other; she

May

not exist.

Edward Thomas,

English, 1878-1917

YOU WHO NEVER ARRIVED


You who never arrived
in

my

who were

arms, Beloved,

from the

lost

start,

don't even

know what songs

would please you.


to recognize

you

moment.

All the

images in

me

have given up trying

in the surging

wave of the next

immense

the

far-off, deeply-felt

landscape,

towers, and bridges, and un-

cities,

suspected turns in the path,

and those powerful lands that were once


pulsing with the
all rise

within

who

you,

life

me

to

of the gods

mean

forever elude me.

You, Beloved,

who are

the gardens

have ever gazed

longing.
in a

all

at,

An open window

country house

and you almost

stepped out, pensive, to meet me. Streets that

you had just walked

And sometimes,
were

my

still

down them and

in a shop, the mirrors

too-sudden image.

Who knows? perhaps

yesterday, separate, in the evening

Rainer Maria Rilke,

1840-1917. Watercolor, gouache, and pencil.

[51]

chanced upon,

dizzy with your presence and, startled, gave back

bird echoed through both of us

Origin of the Greek Vase. Auguste Rodin, French,

vanished.

Austrian, 1875-1926

the

same

LOVE SONG

YOU WERE COMING

IF

THE FALL

IN
I

lie

here thinking of you:


If

the stain of love


is

smears with saffron

If

the horned branches that lean

no

could see you in a year,

Until their time befalls.

light

only centuries delayed,

only a honey-thick stain

If

that drips from leaf to leaf

I'd

and limb

Subtracting

to

fly.

wind the months in balls.


And put them each in separate drawers,

heavily

is

I'd

against a smooth purple sky!

There

half a smile and half a spurn.

As housewives do

eats into the leaves,

in the fall,

brush the summer by

With

Yellow, yellow, yellow


it

you were coming

I'd

upon the world!

limb

Into

spoiling the colors

of the whole world

Van Diemen's

I'd toss it

the wine-red selvage of the west!

William Carlos Williams,

till

land.

If certain, when this life was out.


That yours and mine should be,

you far off there under

1883-1963

my hand,
my fingers dropped

count them on

And

yonder

like a rind.

taste eternity.

American,

But now,

all

Of time's

uncertain wing,

It

ignorant of the length

goads me, like the goblin bee.

That

will not state its sting.

Emily Dickinson, American, 1830-1886

Autumn

River. Wolf kahn, American,

Oil on canvas, 1979.

b.

1927.

HAVE LOVED HOURS AT SEA

have loved hours

The

at sea, gray cities,

fragile secret of a flower.

Music, the making of a poem

That gave me heaven


First stars above a

snowy

for

an hour;

hill,

Voices of people kindly and wise,

And

the great look of love, long hidden.

Found

at last in

meeting eyes.

Sara Teasdale, American, 1884 1933

Portrait of a

Man and

Woman at a Casement

Fra Filippo Lippi, Italian (Florentine), ca. 1406- 1469.

Tempera on wood.

TO HIS COY MISTRESS


Had we

but world enough, and time,

Deserts of vast eternity.

This coyness, Lady, were no crime.

Thy beauty

shall

We would sit down

iNor, in thy

marble

and think which way

To walk and pass our long love s day.


Thou by the Indian Ganges' side

no m.ore be found,

That long preserved

worms

Love you ten years before the Fkxxf,

And you

But none,

Of

find:

by the tide

H umber would complain.

Till the

should,

if

would

you please, refuse

conversion of the Jews.

My vegetable love
V^aster

should grow

than empires, and more slow;

An hundred

Sits

And

shall try

irginity.

And your quaint honour turn


And into ashes all my lust:
The grave s a fine and private

Shouldst rubies

sound

vault, shall

.My echoing song: then

to dust,

place,

think, do there embrace.

-Now therefore, while the youthful hue


like morning deu

on thy skin

while thy willing soul transpires

years should go to praise

At every

pcjre

Thine eyes and on thy forehead gaze;


Two hundred to adore each breast;

Now let

us

And now,

like

But

Rather

once our time devour

thirty

thousand

to the rest;

An age at least to every part,


And the last age should show

'I

your heart;

For, Lady, you deserve this state,

Nor would
But

at

lo\e at lower rate.

my

Time s winged
And vonder all

back

always hear

at

with instant

spcjrt

roll all

fires.

we may,

amorous birds

han languish

Let us

us while

in his

of prey,

slow-chapt pcnver.

our strength and

all

Our sweetness up into one ball.


And tear our pleasures with rough
Thorough the

iron gates of

strife

life:

chariot hurrying near;

Thus, though we cannot make our sun

before us

Stand

lie

still,

yet

AsuHEW

The

we

will

run.

.Makvell, English, 1621-1678

Stolen Kiss Jean Honore

1732-18'/) Oil on canvas.

[54I

make him

raj^onarcl,

rench,

LOVE'S PHILOSOPHY
The

fountains mingle with the river

And the rivers with the Ocean,


The winds of Heaven mix for ever
With
Nothing

sweet emotion;

in the

world

All things by a

In one spirit

with thine?

See the mountains

And

it

Heaven

kiss high

the waves clasp one another;

No sister-flower would
If

single;

meet and mingle,

Why not

And

is

law divine

disdained

its

be forgiven

brother;

the sunlight clasps the earth

And the moonbeams kiss the sea:


What is all this sweet work worth
If

thou kiss not me?

Percy Bysshe Shelley,

The Interrupted Sleep


1

English, 1792-1822

(detail). Franc^ois

Boucher, French,

703- 770. Oil on canvas, 1750.


1

THE KISS
"I

saw you take

his kiss!" " 'Tis true."

"O, modesty!

He

me

Twas

strictly kept:

I knew
He thought thought he thought

thought

asleep; at least
I

Coventry Patmore,

slept.

The Garden of the

English, 1823-1896

(detail).

56

Tuileries

on

Winter Afternoon,

Camille Pissarro, French, 1830-1903. Oil on canvas.

THE GARDEN
Of the

thousands and thousands of years

Time would take to prepare


They would not suffice
To entice
That small second of eternity

When you kissed me


When kissed you
I

One morning in

the light of winter

In Pare Montsouris in Paris


In Paris

On earth
Earth that

is

a star.

Jacques Prevert, French, 1900-1977

RECIPE FOR HAPPINESS

KHABAROVSK OR ANYPLACE
One

grand boulevard with trees

with one grand cafe in sun


with strong black coffee in very small cups

One not necessarily very beautiful


man or woman who loves you
One

fine

day

Lawrence Ferlinghetti,

American,

b.

1920

THE PASSIONATE SHEPHERD TO HIS LOVE


Come live with me and be my love,
And we will all the pleasures prove

A gown made of the finest wool


Which from our pretty lambs we

That valleys, groves, hills, and fields.


Woods, or steepy mountain yields.

Fair lined slippers for the cold,

With buckles

And we

will sit

upon the rocks,

Seeing the shepherds feed their

By shallow

rivers to

whose

flocks.

falls

of the purest gold;

belt of straw

With

And

and

coral clasps

if

pull;

ivy buds.

and amber studs:

these pleasures

may

thee move,

Melodious birds sing madrigals.

Come

And
And

The shepherds swains shall dance and


For thy delight each May morning:
If these delights thy mind may move.
Then live with me and be my love.

make thee beds

of roses

will

thousand fragrant posies,

A cap of flowers,

and

Embroidered

with leaves of myrtle;

all

a kirtle

live

with me, and be

my

Christopher Marlowe,

love.

sing

English, 1564-1593

Embroidered Cabinet. Box


right) decorated

(top on

with scenes representing

the five senses. English, ca. 1650-75.

White

satin,

with seed-pearls and coral.

THE NYMPH'S REPLY TO THE


SHEPHERD
world and love were young,

If all the

And

truth in every shepherd's tongue,

These

To

Time

me move

pretty pleasures might

live

with thee and be thy

love.

drives the flocks from field to fold

When

rivers rage

and rocks grow

cold.

And Philomel becometh dumb;


The rest complains of cares to come.
The flowers do fade, and wanton fields
To wayward winter reckoning yields;

A honey
Is

tongue, a heart of gall,

fancy's spring, but sorrow's

fall.

Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses.


Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies
Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten
In folly ripe, in reason rotten.

Thy
Thy

belt of straw

coral clasps

All these in

To come

and

ivy buds.

and amber studs.

me no means

to thee

But could youth

can move

and be thy
last

and

love.

love

still

breed.

Had joys no date nor age no need.


Then these delights my mind might move
To live with thee and be thy love.
Sir

59

Walter Ralegh,

English, ca. 1552-1618

GRAY ROOM
Although you
Except

sit in a

room that

gray,

Printed with the red branches of a red willow;

Move the leaf in the bowl


The leaf that has fallen from

Of the straw-paper,
And pick
At your pale white gown;
Or lift one of the green beads

Of your necklace,
To let it fall;
Or gaze at your green

is

Or, with one Hnger,

for the silver

Beside you

What
I

fan

the branches of the

forsythia
.

this?

is all

know how

furiously your heart

Wallace Stevens,

is

beating.

American, 1879-1955

Jallais Hill, Pontoise. Camille Pissarro, French,

1830 1903. Oil on canvas, 1867.

EVERYTHING PROMISED HIM

TOME
Everything promised him to me:
the fading

amber edge of the

sky,

and the sweet dreams of Christmas,

and the wind

at Easter,

loud with bells,

and the red shoots of the grapevine,


and waterfalls

and two

in the park,

large dragonflies

on the rusty iron fencepost.

And

could only believe

HE WISHES FOR THE


CLOTHS OF HEAVEN

would be mine
as I walked along the high slopes,
the path of burning stones.
that he

Anna Akhmatova,

Had

Russian, 1889-1966

the heavens' embroidered cloths,

Enwrought with golden and silver light,


The blue and the dim and the dark cloths

Of night and

light and the half-light,


would spread the cloths under your feet:
But I, being poor, have only my dreams;
I have spread my dreams under your feet;
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
I

Across the

Room

(detail).

Edmund

American, 1862-1938. Oil on canvas,

C. Tarbell,
ca.

William Butler Yeats,

1899.

61

Irish,

1865-1939

SONNET
How

shall

The wretch

work
to

that she

whom

may

not forget

her beauty most belongs?

Like an old fisherman,

I'll

knot a net

Patiently squatting, bending songs to songs.

Like an old fisherman.

Ml spread

Well must that heart go darting here and there

Meet

Lurk,

Of the

soft carp,

frolic,

Owen

escape the

lively,

that,

and beat

to despise

my

for

him and him,

circling snare.

double, dive, head out to sea

Ay, but not free, thou Lovely

constrain
last

and

Glittering in sunshine, grey in shadow, swim.

mesh

Well-stretched and wide, but strengthy to

From

this

And seeming

Barfield, English,

b.

One, not

free!

1898

flapping flesh

her heart, causing no pain.

The Rapids of Kajikazawa.

Katsushika Hokusai.

Japanese, 1760-1849. Woodblock print in colors from

The

Thirty-six Views of Fuji, 1823-29.

JULIET
How did the party go in
I

cannot

tell

you; Juliet

Portman Square?
was not there.

And how did Lady Caster's party go?


was next me and I do not know.

Juliet

HiLAiRE Belloc,

English, 1870-1953

THE OLYMPIC GIRL


The

sort of girl

Smiles

She stands

And

like to see

down from her

great height at me.

in strong, athletic pose

wrinkles her retrousse nose.

Is it distaste

makes her frown,

that

"

So furious and freckled, down

For you

On

And when the match is over,


Would flop beside you, hear you sigh;
And then, with what supreme caress,
You'ld tuck me up into my press.

an unhealthy

Or am
I

what she

worm

like

me?

much

care.

would I were
(Forgive me, shade of Rupert Brooke)

An

object

fit

Oh! would

to

So short in sleeve and strong in shorts.

were her racket press'd

And swished

to

do brilliant things.

Fair tigress of the tennis courts,

claim her look.

With hard excitement

will

likes to see?

do not know, though

eiOe 7evoL(XT]v

Little, alas, to

her breast

For

into the sunlit air

am

you

mean.

bald and old and green.

Sir John Betjeman, English, 1906-1984

Arm-high above her tousled hair.


And banged against the bounding ball
"Oh! Plung! my tauten'd strings would call,
"Oh! Plung! my darling, break my strings
"

Tennis at Newport. George Bellows, American,


Oil on canvas, 1919.

63

li

U-1925.

The Heart, South of Naples.


b.

Jim Dine, American,

PERSONAL COLUMN

1935. Oil on canvas, 1986.

...

As

to

my heart, that may as well be forgotten


Owner will dispose of same

or labelled:
to a

good home,

exchgd., h.&c.,

refs.

previous experience desired but not essential


or let on a short lease to suit convenience.

Basil Bunting, English, 1900-1985

IS IT

A MONTH
month

Is it a

since

and you

In the starlight of Glen

Dubh

Stretched beneath a hazel bough


Kissed from ear and throat to brow,

Since your fingers, neck, and chin

Made

the bars that fenced

me

in,

wreck
Near your bosom, brow, and neck
And stars grew wilder, growing wise,
Till Paradise

seemed but

In the splendour of your eyes!

Since the weasel wandered near

Whilst we kissed from ear

And

to ear

the wet and withered leaves

Blew about your cap and


Till the

moon sank

tired

sleeves.

through the ledge

Of the wet and windy hedge?


And we took the starry lane
Pair of Dancers. McK^eled by Joseph Nees, CJcrman

Back

to

Dublin town again.

(Ludwigsburj^), active 1754-1773. Hard-paste porcelain,

176063.

John Synge,

Irish,

1871-1909

O BLUSH NOT SO! O BLUSH NOT SO!


O blush not so! O blush not so!
Or

And

if

shall think

you knowing;

you smile, the blushing while,

Then maidenheads
There's a blush for

And

won

are going.

t,

and

a blush for shan't,

blush for having done

it;

There's a blush for thought, and a blush


for nought.

And a blush

for just

begun

it.

O sigh not so! O sigh not so!


For

it

sounds of Eve's sweet pippin;

By those loosen'd

And

hips,

you have tasted the pips.

fought in an amorous nipping.

Will you play once more, at nice cut-core.

For

it

only will last our youth out;

And we have

the prime of the kissing time.

We have not one sweet tooth out.


There's a sigh for yes, and a sigh for no,

And

a sigh for

can't bear

it!

O what can be done? Shall we stay or run?


O cut the sweet apple and share
it!

John Keats,

English, 1795-1821

65

COME, AND BE MY BABY


The highway

is full

Some prophets

of big cars

going nowhere fast

And folks is smoking anything that'll burn


Some people wrap their lives around a cocktail

is full

of every kind of blooming

And you sit wondering


What you're gonna do.

sit wondering
where you're going to turn

got

it.

got

it.

Come. And be my

baby.

baby.

Maya Angelou,
The Block. Romare

gonna end

horror

And you
I

is

But others say we've got a week or two

The paper

glass

Come. And be my

say the world

tomorrow

Bearden, American, 1914-1988. Cut

and pasted paper on Masonitc, three of

six panels, 1971.

American,

b.

1928

Let

Me Count the Ways

SONNET XLIII,
FROM THE PORTUGUESE
How do
I

me count

love thee? Let

My soul can

when

reach,

the ways.

and breadth and height

love thee to the depth

feeling out of sight

For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.


I

love thee to the level of everyday's

Most quiet need, by sun and

men

candle-light.

love thee freely, as

love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.

love thee with the passion put to use

In
I

my old griefs, and with my childhood

love thee with a love

With my

lost saints!

Smiles, tears, of all


I

strive for Right;

shall

seemed

my

s faith.

to lose

love thee with the breath,

life!

and,

if

God

choose,

but love thee better after death.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning,

English,

1806-1861

The Music
>-.tt-JIW5<>5S.'SfKSSl>^aB

Lesson. Modeled by Joseph Willcms.

English (Ohclsca). Soft paste poreelain, 1762-1765.

MADRIGAL
My Love in her attire doth
It

show her

wit,

doth so well become her;

For every season she hath dressings

fit,

For Winter, Spring, and Summer.

No beauty she doth miss


When all her robes are on:
But Beauty's

When all

self

she

is

her robes are gone.

Anonymous,

English, 17th century

THE TWO USES


The eye is

not more exquisitely designed

For seeing than

The same

lips

it is

for being loved.

curved

to

speak are curved to

kiss.

Even the workaday and practical arm


Becomes all love for love's sake to the lover.
If this is nature's thrift, love thrives

on

it.

Love never asks the body different

Or ever wants it less ambiguous.


The eye being lovelier for what it sees,
The arm for all it does, the lips for speaking.
Robert Francis, American,

b.

1901

The

Toilet of Venus. Francois Boucher, French,

1703-1770. Oil on canvas, 1751.

[69]

TO LAURA
I

saw the tracks of angels

Love, wisdom, valor, pity, pain,

in the earth,

The beauty of heaven walking by

itself

Made better harmony with weeping


Than any other likely to be heard in the

on the

world.

Joke or sorrow now,

it

And

Shadow, or smoke.

the air and the wind were so

filled

deep music
I

saw

a kind of rain that

And heard

world.

seems a dream

made

No single leaf moved on

the sun ashamed.

her, speaking sad words,

make

Petrarch,

mountains
Shift, the rivers stop.

70

Italian,

its still

1304-1374

branch.

with this

The Lake of Zug.

Joseph Mallord William Turner,

English, 1775-1851. Watercolor, gouache, and colored


chalk, 1843.

EVE SPEAKS TO ADAM


From Paradise Lost
With

thee conversing

All seasons

Sweet

is

forget

all

time,

all

please alike.

the breath of morn, her rising sweet,

With charm

When

and their change,

first

of earliest birds; pleasant the sun

on

this delightful land

His orient beams, on herb, tree,

he spreads

fruit,

and flower,

Glistring with dew; fragrant the fertile earth

After soft showers; and sweet the coming on

Of grateful
With

And

this

evening mild, then silent night

her solemn bird and this

fair

moon,

these the gems of heav'n, her starry train:

But neither breath of morn when she ascends

With charm

On

of earliest birds, nor rising sun

this delightful land,

nor herb,

fruit, flower,

Glistring with dew, nor fragrance after showers,

Nor grateful evening mild, nor silent night


With this her solemn bird, nor walk by moon,
Or glittering starlight without thee is sweet.
John Milton,

The Creation of Eve: "And She

Woman."

English, 1608-1674

black ink and watercolor.

,71

Shall

Be Called

William Blake, English, 1757- 1827. Pen and

ONE DAY WROTE HER NAME UPON THE STRAND


I

One day wrote


I

her

name upon

Again

wrote

But came the

it

Not

the strand,

But came the waves and washed

it

away:

and made my pains

his prey.

Vain man, said she, that dost in vain assay

A mortal
For

And

thing so to immortahze,

myself shall
eke

my name

(quod

To die

I) let

in dust,

baser things devise

but you shall

My verse your virtues

with a second hand,

tide,

so,

like to this decay,

be wiped out likewise.

And in

by fame:

the heavens write your glorious name:

Where, whenas Death

Our

live

rare shall eternize,

shall all the

love shall live,

Edmund Spenser,

and

world subdue,

later life

renew.

English, 1552/1553-1599

SONNET XVIII
compare thee to a summer's day?
more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
Shall

Thou

art

And summer's
Sometime

lease hath

all

too hot the eye of

too short a date:

heaven shines,

And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;


And every fair from fair sometime declines.
By chance, or nature's changing course untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade.

Nor
Nor

lose possession of that fair


shall

When

thou ow'st.

death brag thou wander'st in his shade,

in eternal lines to time

So long as
So long

men can

lives this,

thou grow'st.

breathe, or eyes can see.

and

this gives life to thee.

William Shakespeare,

English, 1564-1616

Fleur de Lis. Robert Lewis Reid, American, 1862-1929.


Oil on canvas, ca. 1895 1900.

The Beach
1

at Sainte-Adresse. Claude Monet, French,


840- 926. Oil on canvas, 1867.
1

.73

WHERE DOES THIS TENDERNESS


COME FROM?

SONG: TO CELIA

Where does

Drink

this tenderness

and
darker
than yours

These are not the

first

curls

lips

have stroked slowly

have known are

come from?

And
Or

And

(where does
so

and go out again

this tenderness

many eyes have

risen

come from?)

But might

and died out


I

no such song have

heard in the darkness of night before,

(where does

this tenderness

come

from?):

here, on the ribs of the singer.

Where does this tenderness come from?


And what shall do with it, young
I

sly singer, just

passing by?

Your lashes are

longer than

Marina TsvETAYEVA,

Venus and Adonis.

Detail of

a tapestry desij^ned by Pierre

de Seve the Younger (French,


ca.

1623-1695), Gobelins,

France.

W(j<)l, silk,

thread, 1686-92.

and

silver

anyone's.

Russian, 1892-1941

I'll

with mine;

not look for wine.

Doth ask

in front of these eyes of mine.


yet

with thine eyes,

only,

will pledge

thirst, that

and

me,

leave a kiss but in the cup.

The
as stars rise often

to

from the soul doth

rise,

a drink divine:

of Jove

nectar sup,

would not change

for thine.

sent thee, late, a rosy wreath.

Not so much honouring thee.


As giving it a hope, that there
It

could not withered be.

But thou thereon didst only breath,

And sent'st it back to me:


when it grows, and smells,

Since

Not

swear,

of itself, but thee.

Ben JoNSON,

English, ca. 1572-1637

SHE WALKS IN BEAUTY


She walks

in beauty, like the night

Of cloudless
And all

climes and starry skies;

that's best of

dark and bright

Meet in her aspect and her eyes:


Thus mellow'd to that tender light

Which heaven

One

to

gaudy day denies.

shade the more, one ray the

less.

Had half impaired the nameless grace


Which waves in every raven tress.
Or softly lightens o'er her face;
Where thoughts serenely sweet express
How pure, how dear their dwelling-place.

And on
So

The

that cheek,
soft, so

and

o'er that brow.

calm, yet eloquent.

smiles that win, the tints that glow,

But

tell

of days in goodness spent,

A mind at peace with all below,


A heart whose love is innocent!
Lord Byron,

English, 1788-1824

LOVE POEM
My child Star you gaze at the stars,
and
Elizabeth Farren (born about 1759, died 1829), Later

Countess of Derby. Sir Thomas Lawrence,


769- 830. Oil on canvas, 1790.
1

that

I
I

wish

were the firmament

might watch you with many eyes.

British,

Plato, Greek, 427-347

75

b.c.

A DRINKING SONG

A RED, RED ROSE

Wine comes in at the mouth


And love comes in at the eye:
That's all we shall know for truth
Before we grow old and die.
I lift the glass to my mouth,

O my Luve's like a red,

look at you, and

my

As
Irish,

Luve's like the melodic

That's sweetly play'd in tune.

sigh.

William Butler Yeats,

red rose.

That's newly sprung in June;

fair art thou,

So deep

1865-1939

And

will love thee

Till

Till

a'

bonie

am

still,

my

still,

While the sands


fare thee weel,

And
And

my

Dear,

Dear,

o' life

shall run.-

my only

come
it

Luve!

again,

my

Luve,

were ten thousand mile!

Robert Burns,

Dear,

fare thee weel, a while!

will

Tho

my

the rocks melt wi' the sun:

will love thee

And

lass.

I;

the seas gang dry.

a'

the seas gang dry,

And
1

my

in luve

Scottish,

1759-1796

Waitress at Duval's Restaurant. Pierre Auj^uste

Renoir, French, 1841-1919. Oil on canvas, ca. 1875.

Merry Company on

a Terrace

Dutch, 1626-1679. Oil on canvas,

Jan Steen,

(detail).

ca.

166870.

STELLA'S BIRTH-DAY
day

Stella this

(We

However,
Since

So

first

Made up
O, would

and years are doubled


saw thee at sixteen.

thy form declined;

so largely in thy mind.


it

please the gods to split

beauty, size, and years, and wit!

No age could
Of nymphs
With
With

And

How

be not troubled.

size

brightest virgin on the green;

little is

Thy

thirty-four,

Stella,

Although thy

The

is

shan't dispute a year or more:)

furnish out a pair

so graceful, wise,

and

fair;

half the lustre of your eyes.


half your wit, your years, and size.

then, before

should

it

grew

too late.

heg of gentle

fate,

(That either nymph might have her swain,)

To

YOUR BIRTHDAY COMES TO TELL


ME THIS

split

my worship too in

Jonathan Swift,

twain.

your birthday comes

each

English, 1667-1745

will be
E. E.

77.

me

this

luckiest of lucky days

i've loved, shall love,

and

to tell

and

my

do love you, was

birthday

is

cuMMiNGS, American, 1894-1962

Le Coeur. Henri

SOMEWHERE HAVE NEVER

Matisse, French, 1869- 1954. Pochoir

from Jazz, published by Teriade, Paris, 1947.

TRAVELLED
somewhere have never

travelled, gladly

beyond

any experience, your eyes have their silence:


in

your most

frail

gesture are things which

enclose me,
or

which cannot touch because they are


i

your slightest look easily will unclose

though

too near

me

have closed myself as fingers,

you open always petal by petal myself as Spring

opens
(touching

or

if

my
as

your wish be

life will

when

the

skilfully,

mysteriously) her

to close

me,

first

rose

and

shut very beautifully, suddenly,

the heart of this flower imagines

snow

carefully everywhere descending;

nothing which

we

are to perceive in this world

equals
the power of your intense fragility: whose texture

A VERY VALENTINE

compels

me

with the colour of its countries,

rendering death and forever with each breathing

Very fine

is

my valentine.

Very fine and very mine.

my valentine very mine and


Very fine is my valentine and mine, very
mine and mine is my valentine.

Very mine

is

Gertrude Stein,

(i

do not know what

it is

about you that closes

very fine.

and opens; only something

fine very

the voice of your eyes

is

in

me

understands

deeper than

all

roses)

nobody, not even the rain, has such small hands

American, 1874-1946

E. E.

[78]

cuMMiNGS, American, 1894-1962

The Garden

at Vaucresson.

Edouard Vuillard, French,


1 868940. Distemper on canvas,
1

1923 and 1937.

PORTRAIT OF A LADY
Your thighs are appletrees

whose blossoms touch the

Which

sky?

The

Your knees

are a southern breeze


a gust of snow.
sort of

a lady's

or

Agh! what

man was Fragonard?

as if that

answered

anything. Ah, yes

below

the knees, since the tune

it is

one of those white summer days,


the

sky

where Watteau hung


slipper.

drops that way,


sky.

tall

grass of your ankles

flickers

upon the shore

Which

shore?

the sand clings to

Which

my

Agh, petals maybe.

How

know?

should

Which

shore?

lips

shore?

said petals

Which

shore?

from an appletree.

William Carlos Williams,

American, 1883-1963

VARIATION
That

pool of the air

still

under the branch of an echo.

That

That

pool of the water

still

under

a frond of bright stars.

pool of your

still

under

Federico

mouth

a thicket of kisses.
CjArci'a

LoRCA, Spanish, 1899-1936

WANT TO BREATHE

you in I'm not talking about

perfume or even the sweet

o-

dour of your skin but of the


air itself

your

air

exhale

close

want

to share

inhaling what you

I'd like to

be that

two of us breathing

each other as one as that.


James Laughlin American,

Summer.

b.

1914

Frederick Carl Frieseke, American, 1874-1939.

Oil on canvas, 1914.

Poplars. Claude Monet, French, 1840-1926. Oil on canvas,


1891.

FOR AN AMOROUS LADY


"Most mammals like caresses, in the sense
in which we usually take the word,
whereas other creatures, even tame snakes,
"

prefer giving to receiving them.

From

The

Natural History Book

pensive gnu, the staid aardvark.

Accept caresses

LADY LOVE
She

And

is

my lids
my hair
colour of my eye
body of my hand

standing on

her hair

She has the


She has the

is

in

In

my

As

a stone against the sky

shade she

is

engulfed

in the dark;

The bear, equipped with paw and snout.


Would rather take than dish it out.
But snakes, both poisonous and garter,
In love are never known to barter;
The worm, though dank, is sensitive:

His noble nature bids him give.

She

will

never close her eyes

And she does not let me sleep


And her dreams in the bright day
Make the suns evaporate
And me laugh cry and laugh
Speak when have nothing to say
I

Paul Eluard. French. 1895-1952

But you,

my dearest,

have a soul

Encompassing fish, flesh, and fowl.


amorous arts we would pursue,
You can, with pleasure, bill or coo.
You are, in truth, one in a million,
At once mammalian and reptilian.

When

Theodore Roethke,

American, 1908-1963

Stepping Out. Hoy Lichtenstein. American, b. 1923.


Magna on canvas, 197S. Roy Lichtenstein.

Oil and

Lovers Under

TO YOU

(h. in

Lilies.

The Evelyn Sharp


I

walnut

love you as a sheriff searches for a

murder case unsolved for years


Because the murderer left it in the snow beside a window
Through which he saw her head, connecting with
Her shoulders by a neck, and laid a red
That

will solve a

Roof in her heart. For


For

this

we

this

Inside a bottle,

Kid searches for a goat;


In the wind,

The
I

we

live a

thousand years;

and we live because we love, we are not


thank goodness! I love you as a

love,

when

am

crazier than shirttails

you're near, a

wind that blows from

big blue sea, so shiny so deep and so unlike us;

think

white
Always,

am

bicycling across an Africa of green and

fields

to

When Fm

be near you, even in

my

heart

awake, which swims, and also

believe

that you
as the sidewalk which leads me
The place where again think of you, a new
Harmony of thoughts! I love you as the sunlight

Are trustworthy

to

leads the

Of a

prow

ship which sails

From Hartford to Miami, and I love you


when even before I am awake

Best at dawn,

Receives

me

in the questions

Kenneth Koch, American,

the sun

which you always


b.

pwse.

1925

[83]

Marc

Chagall, French

Russia;, 1887-19S5. Oil on canvas, 1922-25.


Collection.

THE CONFIRMATION
my love, is the right human
my mind had w aited for this long.

Yes, yours,
I

in

face.

Seeing the false and searching for the true.

Then found you as a traveller finds a place


Of welcome suddenly amid the wrong
\ alleys

and rocks and twisting roads. But you,

W hat shall
A

well of

call

w ater

you?

in a

fountain in a waste,

country dry.

Or anything

that s honest and good, an eye


That makes the whole world bright. Your open
heart.

Simple with giving, gives the primal deed.

The

first

good world, the blossom, the blowing

seed.

The

hearth, the steadfast land, the wandering

sea.

Not beautiful or
But

Edwin

Woman

with

Pink Rembrandt Harmensz van

Rijn.

Dutch, 1606-1669. Oil on canvas.

84

rare in every part.

like yourself, as they

were meant

.\1lir, Scottish,

1887-1959

to be.

The Mess of Love

Dubo, Dubon, Dubonnet


(b. in

Aiulre Keites/. American

THE MESS OF LOVE

Munjjarv), 1894-11)8^- (Jelalin silver print, 1934.

We've made
Sinee

a great

we made an

The moment

mess onove

ideal of

swear

to love a

woman, all my life


That moment begin
I

The moment

My

love dies

it.

woman,

to hate her.

even say to a woman;

down

a cold egg,

Love
If

it

is

like a

isn't love

it

Hower,

doesn't fade,

love you!

considerably.

The moment love is an understood


us, we are sure of it,
It's

a certain

it

it is

thing between

any more.

must Bower and

fade;

not a Bower,

Its either an artificial rag blossom, or an

immortelle, for the cemetery.

The moment
will fixes

Or

mind

the

on

interferes with love, or the

it.

the personality assumes

it

the ego takes possession of


It is

not love any more,

And we've made

it's

a great

as an attribute, or
it,

just a mess.

mess of love, mind-

perverted, will-perverted, ego-perverted love.


D. H.

Lawrence,

English, 1885-1930

AM NO GOOD AT LOVE

am no good

at love

My heart should be
I

kill

wise and free

the unfortunate golden goose

Whoever it may be
With over-articulate tenderness

And

too

much

am no good

batter

it

intensity.

at love

out of shape

my

Suspicion tears

at

And, gibbering

like

lie

mind

alone in the endless dark

Knowing
I

sleepless

an ape,

there's

am no good

no escape.

at love

When my easy

heart

yield

my mouth
Which should have stayed concealed;
And my jealousy turns a bed of bliss
Wild words come tumbling from

Into a battlefield.

am no good

betray

For

Is

at love

with

feel the

In the

And

it

little

sins

misery of the end

moment

that

it

begins

the bitterness of the last good-bye

the bitterness that wins.


Mezzetin. Jean

Noel Coward,

English, 1899-1973

Oil on canvas.

87:

.Antoinc VVatteau, French, 1684-1721.

CAN'T HOLD YOU AND


I CAN'T LEAVE YOU

can't hold you

and

can't leave you,

and sorting the reasons


I

find an intangible

one

and many tangible ones

to leave

to forgo you.

As you won't change, nor


Prudence. Andrea

della Robbia, Italian (Florentine),

1435-1525. Glazed terracotta

relief, ca.

shall give

my

let

me

armed

though the other half be ready

Then,
let it
let

if

our

Wall. Detail of a bedrcwm wall from the


Synistor at Boscoreale.
plaster.

Roman, 40-30

villa

of

P.

B.C. Fresco

Fannius

love,

to

to

abhor you,

adore you.

by loving flourish,

not in endless feuding perish;

us speak no more in jealousy and suspicion.

He offers
so

forgo you,

heart a defence against you,

so that half shall always be

1475.

you or hold you,

to love you,

know

mine

who would all receive


when it is your intention
be to make believe.

not part,

that

shall

on lime

JuANA In^s DeLa Cruz, Mexican, 1651-1695

THE STREET IN SHADOW


The

street in shadow. Tall houses hide

the dying sun; in balconies are echoes of light.

Do

you see in the

window

spell of the flowery

the pink oval of a familiar face?

The image behind

the distorting glass

looms or fades like an old daguerreotype.


In the street, only the patter of your step;

echoes of the sunset slowly burn out.

Agony! Pain hangs in

my

heart. Is

it

she?

cannot be. Walk on. In the blue, a

It

Antonio Machado Ruiz,

star.

Spanish, 1875-1939

ROOMS
I

remember rooms

that have had their part

down of the heart.


The room in Paris, the room at Geneva,
The little damp room with the seaweed smell,
And that ceaseless maddening sound of the tide
In the steady slowing

Rooms where
But there

is

for good or for

the room where

we

Though every morning we seem


might just as well seem

As we

shall

ill

(two)
to

things died.

lie

to sleep again

somewhere

in the other quieter,

dustier bed

Out

there in the sun

Charlotte Mew,

dead,

wake and

in the rain.

English, 1870-1928

SHE'S

MY WOMAN

GAZING AT YOU

SO TENDERLY
My woman
Drowning you in sparkling conversation,
Gay and witty, and her eyes

She

last

night she was using

all

her

What

says so.

woman

says to an eager

write on the wind, write on the rushing

waves.

skill

To give me secretly her little foot


Under the tablecloth for me to caress.
Alexander Pushkin,

wants no other lover

sweetheart

Absorbing you with their yearning.

But

says she

than me, not even Jupiter himself.

She's gazing at you so tenderly,

Catullus, Roman,

ca.

84-54 ^c.

Russian, 1799-1837

Lovers, Place
(b. in

d'ltalie. BrassaT (Gyula Halasz),

French

Transylvania), 1899-1984. Gelatin silver print,

ca. 1932; print ca. 1970.

The Fortune
1

Teller. Georges de La Tour, French,

593-1652. Oil on canvas.

WHEN LOVE FLIES IN


When
Make

Love Bies

make no

in.

sign;

Nor make no
If love

flit

Owl-soft his wings,

He

Sand-blind his eyes;

Without

Sigh,

But

if

seal

thou must,

him

Stifle

thine.

Walter de

tire

11

Thy
And

sign

out;

of thee
a doubt.

thy pangs;

heart resign;
live

without!

la Mare, English, 1873-1956

WHEN WAS ONE-AND-TWENTY


I

When
I

was one-and-twenty

heard a wise

man

say,

"Give crowns and pounds and guineas

But not your heart away;


Give pearls away and rubies

But keep your fancy


But

free.

was one-and-twenty,
No use to talk to me.

When I was one-and-twenty


I heard him say again,
"The heart out of the bosom

Was

never given in vain;

Tis paid with sighs a plenty

And sold for endless rue.


And am two-and-twenty,
And oh, 'tis true, 'tis true.
I

A. E.

HousMAN,

English, 18591936

SONG
Go and

catch a falling

star,

Get with child a mandrake root.


Tell me where all past years are,

Or who cleft
Teach me

Or

to

to

the Devil's foot.

hear mermaids singing,

keep off envy's stinging.

And find
What wind
Serves to advance an honest mind.

If

thou beest born to strange sights.

Things

invisible to see.

Ride ten thousand days and nights.


Till age snow white hairs on thee.
Thou, when thou return'st, wilt tell me
All strange wonders that befell thee,

Lives a

If

thou

And swear
Nowhere
woman true, and
find'st one, let

Such

me know,

a pilgrimage

Yet do not,

fair.

would not

were sweet;
go.

Ibulouse Lautrec, French, 1864-1901. Color lithograph,

Though at next door we might meet;


Though she were true when you met her,

1892.

And

The Englishman

at the

Moulin Rouge. Henri

de

last

till

you write your

letter,

Yet she

Will be
Kiesler and Wife. Will Barnet, American,

False, ere
b.

191

1.

come,

to two, or three.

Oil on

John Donne,

canvas, 1963-65.

92

English, 1572-1631

WEARING THE COLLAR


I

live

with a lady and four cats

and some days we

all

get

along.

some days
one of the

three.

some days
I

have trouble with

all

have trouble with

four of the

cats

cats.

other days

other days,

and the
I

have trouble with

lady:

two of the
ten eyes looking at
cats.

as if

was a

me

dog.

Charles Bukowski,

American,

b.

1920

PARTING

We suffer intensively,
as

Our love has been dying for years.


And now our parting
suddenly resurrects

Our

love rises

for the

in hell.

no fever.

it.

Moaning out of hatred

from the dead

uncanny
as a corpse

one suffers

Each of us runs

which came

to life in order to die

second time.

we pluck our wedding photograph from


And every night till dawn,
crying,

making

the

album

love,

breaking into cold sweat,

we
we
we

we make love,
we are parting,

Every night
every hour
every hour

we swear

to

each other faith

till

the grave.

talk to

each other,

talk to

each other,

talk to

each other,

for the first

and the

Anna Swir,

last

Polish,

time in

life.

1909-1984

The Dressing Room.


Pierre Bonnard. French,

1867-1947. Oil on
canvas, 1914.

Woman

with Chrysanthemums

(Madame

Paul Valpin^-on?).

Edgar Degas. French,


1834-1917. Oil on canvas, 1865.

CHANCE
wind

Chance says,
come here,

apart from you,

chance

wind,

can you bear

bird.

anything

to part?

sea,

further;

wave,

chance

sweetheart,

low places

dear,

we

and the high

chance

says,

says,

haven't loved

for almost a year,

can you bear

dire threat

this loneliness?

everywhere;

can't;

at

in sycamores,

fear

can't bear

says,

I'm here.

air;

don't you

hear

any

want me

more
H.D. (Hilda Doolittle)

start

American, 1886-1961

95

Office in a Small City. Lclward Hopper, American,

Stargazers. Ijigraving

1882-1967. Oil on canvas, 1953.

moralia, written by Christopher VVeigel (German).


in

[96]

Nuremberg,

ca. 1700.

troni lithiai mitunilis. sen dociimciita

Pubhshcc

THE MORE LOVING ONE

LONELINESS
To think

of you surcharged with

Looking up

at the stars,

know

Lonehness. To hear your voice

That, for

Over the recorder

But on earth indifference

"Lonehness.

So

full

"

The

of it, and

You away, so

say,

I,

word, the voice,

with

With

Lost in lonehness and pain.

they care,

should

we

like

flesh, in

Every instant of night

And day. O, my

times

love, the

We have forgotten love,

and

Sat lonely beside each other.

we

of leaves.

Of a flying bird, the new


Moon in the sunset, a poem,

all

the

Casual healing speech

Of your resonant, quiet voice.


The word freedom. The word
Kenneth Rexroth,

now

missed one terribly


all

damn,

see them, say

cannot,

all

day.

stars to disappear or die,

should learn to look at an empty sky

'^W

the black silence.

a person

think

at last.

Loneliness. Speak to me. Talk

A book,

W. H. AuDEN, American

Penitent, lost in the last

full

am

as

that do not give a

A lonely bed. Now my heart

Speak of a tree

cannot be.

And feel its total dark sublime.


Though this might take me a little

We have slept together in

To me. Break

burn

stars to

could not return?

Of stars

Have hidden behind children,

Turns towards you, awake

to hell.

the least

is

were

we

Admirer

Were

We have eaten together.


Lonely behind our plates,

quite well

Let the more loving one be me.

Thinking of you with every


Corpuscle of my

it

a passion for us

If equal affection

Black and unendurable.

can go

We have to dread from man or beast.


How

lost in it

all

peace.

American, 1905-1982

fb.

time.

England), 1907-1973

LITTLE POEMS
call

you on

the phone

&

we

chat, but

the

way

is

tele

missing from

phone

way
feel,

it

is

the

makes me

wishing

In literature and song


love

is

in the

4:50 and dark

often expressed

already? Everyone

imagery of

wants

to

be

weather. For example,

beautiful but

"Now that we are one


Clouds won't hide our sun.

and darker.

There'll be blue skies


etc.

"

few

are. 4:51

Ron Padgett,

American,

b.

1942

Partly cloudy

the rest of

and cool

you were here.

around

today, high

Telephone Booths.
Richard Estes, American,

fifty,

mostly

cloudy tonight and tomorrow.

b.

1936.

Acrylic on Masonite, 1967.

Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection,
Lugano, Switzerland.

CRYSTAL PALACE MARKET

House of Fire. James


American,

Saw

a girl in a food

store that looked like

me the shakes
my poor old heart

of things to eat every

thing to eat that a

in

person could desire

darling darling sings

but

the voice on the radio

hungry hungry hungry

darling

why

did

we

ever drift apart big

guess that

I'll

go

darling says the radio

why

did

we

ever part?

James Laughlin, American,

99

1933. Oil

on canvas, iq8i.

giant food market full

you gave

b.

b.

1914

Rosenquist,

'IF

On

ONLY I KNEW THE TRUTH, I SWEAR I WOULD ACT ON IT"

the tedious ferry crossing through

not knowing

the obscure night

if

toward the darkly lurid dock

at

Barclay Street

on the dark Hudson River pelted by the rain


the orange lightnings thick silently flickered

was

sick with ignorance

"If
I

only

was

if

my

wife had

wanted that
making a waste
I

knew

for spite,

the truth,

in confusion

left

and

me, not knowing

and wise

swear

too late, if at all?

would

act

on

it!

fright

the rain was pounding the water

and flashed
there was no thunderclap
I

was

the lightning was obscure

and fear

there

came no thunderclap

the boat did not seem to advance.

Paul Goodman, American,

1911 1972

A Storm.

Georgia O'Keeffe,

American, 1887-1986.
Pastel on paper, 1922.

Study for Sunday


Afternoon on the Island
of La Grande Jatte (detail)
Georges Seurat, French,
1859-1891. Oil on wood.

LOVE IS A SECRET FEEDING FIRE

SOFTLY

Love

Softly

Baby

Softly

I'll

is

a secret feeding fire that gives

all

creatures being,
Life to the dead, speech to the

man seeing.
And yet in me he contradicts

dumb, and

And even

to the

blind

It's

all

my

lips,

my

eyes,

my

life,

Softly

I'll

For a

soft

many

And

me in paths

uncouth

Where

all fair

untracked, ungone, and

places,

in despair

if

do,

I'll

realize

not such a good idea.

me

and from

ever flying

Leads

stop having a thing for you.

these his sacred

graces:

Sears up

I'll

try not to call again.

learn that

while

I'll

what

won't look at everything just through your eyes,


I'll

softly try not to see ya.

John White, American,


beauty curse. Curse love and

faces!

Anonymous, English
[

lOI

thought was true.

be asleep by ten.

b.

1958

The Bridge

at Villeneuve-la-

Garenne. Alfred
1

Sisley, British,

839- 899. Oil on canvas, 1872.


1

MIRABEAU BRIDGE
Under the Mirabeau Bridge there flows the Seine
Must I recall

Our loves

recall

how then

After each sorrow joy came back again

Let night come on bells end the day

The days

go by

me

still

Hands joined and face to


While underneath

The
Weary

face

stay

let's

stay just so

bridge of our arms shall go

Let night

come on
go by

me

bells
still

All love goes by

How slow life seems to me


How violent the hope of love can be
Let night

come on

The days

go by

The days

me

end the day

bells
still

stay

the weeks pass by beyond our ken

Neither time past

of endless looks the river's flow

The days

All love goes by as water to the sea

end the day


I

stay

Nor
Under

love

comes back again

the Mirabeau Bridge there flows the Seine

Let night

come on

The days

go by

me

bells
still

end the day


I

CuiLLAUME Apollinaire,

stay
Frciich, 1880-1918

Yesterday He Still Looked in

My Eyes

YESTERDAY HE STILL

LOOKED IN MY EYES
Yesterday he

still

my

looked in

A child-murderer,

eyes, yet

his looks are bent aside.

today

Yesterday

And

he sat here until the birds began, but


today

those larks are

all

And you are wise, you


am stunned.
lament of women in all times:

Stupid creature!
live

while

And
Love

woman

is

what was

it

water, blood

tears are
a

Why do

To

water,

and no mother:

we

love.

My

love,

what was

Yesterday he lay at

my

it

feet.

life fell

out like

My

know
I

It is

love,

what was

it I

there,

did to you?

know wherever

love holds

power

like a gardener.

almost like shaking a tree, in time

some

my

ripe apple

comes

love

whatever

Marina IsvETAYEVA,

104

me

can see now, I'm a lover no longer.

falling

for everything, for everything

a rusty kopeck.

break you.

he threw

to live in fire,

Death approaches soon

did to you?

He even

to

girl is their reply.

everything, don't argue with me!

And now

compared me with the Chinese empire! Then


suddenly he let his hands fall open, and

my

He wanted

My

cry stretches across the earth:

Why?

and then abandoned me on steppes of ice.


love, 1 know what you have done to me.

Along the white road they are taken away.

And one

ask the bed:

another

me

did to you?

it I

taught

then expect no justice or mercy from her.


Ships carry away the ones

kiss

am.

He

always washes in blood and tears.

a step-mother,

demand:

shall

suffer and live in penury?

His kisses stopped.

did to you?

is

what was

love,

ask this chair,

Now for the


My love,

yet even in Hell

My

ravens.

before some court

loathsome and timid

stand

it

down. So
me,

forgive

was

did to you.

Russian, 1892-1941

FAREWELL
UNGRATEFUL TRAITOR
Farewell ungrateful

The
1

Farewell

Letter. Jean Baptiste Camille Corot, French,

796-

875. Oil on wood.

traitor,

my perjured

swain,

Let never injured creature


Believe a

The

Surpasses

But

man

again.

pleasure of possessing

'tis

all

expressing,

too short a blessing.

And

love too long a pain.

Tis easy to deceive us


In pity of your pain,

But when we love you leave us

To rail at you in vain.


we have descried it,

Before

There

is

no

bliss beside

But she that once has

it,

tried

it

Will never love again.

The

passion you pretended

Was only

to obtain,

But when the charm

is

ended

The charmer you disdain.


Your love by ours we measure
Till we have lost our treasure,
But dying

is

When

a pleasure,
living is a pain.

John Dryden,

English, 1631-1700

THE STARS STAND UP IN THE AIR


The stars stand up in the air
The sun and the moon are gone,
The strand of its waters is bare.
And her sway is swept From the swan.
The cuekoo was
Hid

in the

How my
Tis

my

ealling

all

But sweeter than


Is
I

storin

is

fled
I

love

to

violin or lute

and she

wish that

And

all

my

left

me

behind.

music were mute.

beauty were blind.

more shapely than swan by the strand,


more radiant than grass after dew,
She's more fair than the stars where they standShe's

day,

branches above.

grief that

my

She's

away,

gave her

my

Tis

love!

my grief that
Anonymous,

Three things through love see


Sorrow and sin and death
And my mind reminding me
That this doom breathe with my breath.

her ever

knew!

Irish

The Coming Storm.

106

Martin Johnson Hcadc, American,

8 19- 1904. Oil on canvas, 1859.

SOUVENIRS
my

me

love has left

and

has gone from

me

with no keepsake nothing

not a glove handkerchief lock of hair picture

only in

the

memory

night the magic snowfall

first

the

warm

the

we

blue-walled room

looking out at

snow

listening to

music drinking the same cocktail

my hand searching my eyes


my hands touching her
me answering my lips

she pressing
the

first kiss

she close to

waking

at

morning eyes opening slowly

approaching her house trembling

room

kissing her entering the

waking

night writing a

all

poem

for

her

thinking of her planning her pleasure

remembering her
she cooking for
kissing

we
more

to

me

telling

with
our

remember

she denying
all

least liking

me

little

lives

and desire

eating with

me

kisses over the face

till

morning

better to forget

me

slashing

pain forgotten

if only

Dudley Randall,

my

love

she comes back to

American,

b.

me

1914

Old Souvenirs.

John Frederick Peto, American, 1854-1907.

Oil on canvas, ca. 1881-1901.

107.

ALONE IN HER BEAUTY


Who is

lovelier

than she?

Yet she lives alone in an

She

Which
.

me

tells

humbled now

is

When

empty

valley.

she eame from a good family


into the dust.

trouble arose in the

Her brothers and

close kin

Kuan

were

district,

killed.

What

use were their high offices,


Not even shielding their own lives?

The world

has but scorn for adversity;

Hope goes out, like the light of a candle.


Her husband, with a vagrant heart.
Seeks a new face like a new piece of jade;

And when morning-glories furl at night


And mandarin-ducks lie side by side,
All he can see is the smile of the new love,
While the

old love

weeps unheard.
in its mountain source.

The brook was pure

But away from the mountain


.

Waiting

for

its

waters darken.

her maid to come from

selling pearls

For straw to cover the roof again.

She picks

And

lets

few flowers, no longer

pine-needles

fall

And, forgetting her thin

She leans
Tv

in the

io

her hair.

tall

and the

cold,

bamboo.

Fu, Chinese, 712-770

Harunob Japanese,
Harunobu,
1768.

silk sleeve

sunset by a

Girl with Lantern

ca.

for

through her fingers.

on
1

Balcony

at

Night. Suzuki

725- 1770. Woodblock

print in eolors,

A LOON I THOUGHT IT WAS


A

loon

But

To

thought

was my

it

it

was,

love's

splashing oar.

Sault Ste. Marie he has departed,

My love has gone on before me,


Never again can

it

loon

But

it

thought

was my

see him.

was,

love's splashing oar.

Anonymous, Chippewa

Indian

Courtesan Holding a Fan. Kitagawa Utamaro,


Japanese, i753(?)-i8o6. Woodblock print in colors.

THE REJECTED WIFE


Entering the Hall, she meets the

new

wife;

Leaving the gate, she runs into former husband.

Words

stick;

does not manage to say anything.

Presses hands together; stands hesitating.


Agitates moon-like fan, sheds pearl-like tears.

Realizes she loves

him

as

Present pain never come

much
to

as ever,

an end.

Anonymous, China

io9_

THE SPRING AND THE FALL


In the spring oF the year, in the spring of the year,
I

walked the road beside

The
I

see

He

my dear.

were black where the bark was wet.

trees

them

yet, in the spring of the year.

me

a bough of the blossoming peach


That was out of the way and hard to reach.

broke

In the
I

The
I

fall

of the year, in the

walked the road beside

fall

of the year,

my dear.

rooks went up with a raucous

hear them

still,

He laughed at
And broke my

trill.

in the fall of the year.

all I

dared to praise,

heart, in

little

ways.

Year be springing or year be falling.

The

bark will drip and the birds be calling.

There's

much

that's fine to see

In the spring of a year, in the

Tis not love's going hurts

But that

it

Edna

Peach Blossoms

Villiers

le Bel. Childc

Hassam,

American, 1859-19^5. Oil on canvas.

10

went
St.

in little

and hear

fall

of a year.

my days.

ways.

Vincent Millay, American, 1892-1950

Mademoiselle Marie Dihau


(1843-1935). Edgar Degas, French,

18^41917. Oil on canvas.

DO NOT LOOK FOR LOVE THAT IS A DREAM

do not look
I

for love that is a

And, though young spring and summer pass away.

dream

only seek for courage to be

still;

To bear my grief with an unbending


And when I am aweary not to seem.
Let the round world

roll

on; let the sun beam;

Let the wind blow, and

let

the rivers

The everlasting sea, and on


The palms

will,

the

And autumn and cold winter come again,


And though my soul, being tired of its pain.
Pass from the ancient earth, and though my clay
Return to dust, my tongue shall not
complain;

fill

hill

No man

almost touch heaven, as children

shall

mock me

after this

Christina Rossetti,

deem.
[ill]

my day.

English, 1830-1894

RESPONSE
When you wrote your letter it was April,
And you were glad that it was spring weather,
And that the sun shone out in turn with showers
of rain.

write in waning

And am
I

Are

tied

May and it is autumn.


my chrysanthemums

glad that

up

fast to strong posts.

So that the south winds cannot beat them down.

am glad that they are tawny coloured.


And fiery in the low west evening light.
And am glad that one bush warbler
I

Still

sings in the honey-scented wattle

But oh, we have remembering hearts,

And we

say

"How

green

it

was

in

such and such

an April,"

And "Such and such an autumn was very golden,"


And "Everything is for a very short time."
Mary Ursula Bethell, New
The

Zealand, 1874-1945

Letter. Mary Cassatt, American, 1844-1926. Drypoint

and aquatint printed

in color,

1890-91.

In the Woods. Asher Brown Durand, American, 1796-1886.


Oil on canvas, 1855.

[112

THE IMPULSE
It

was

And

Sudden and

too lonely for her there,

And

The

too wild,

since there

were but two of them.

And no child.

And he

swift and light as that

ties gave.

learned of finalities

Besides the grave.

Robert Frost, American, 1874-1963

And work was


She was

And

little

in the house,

free.

followed where he furrowed

Or

She rested on

The
With

field,

felled tree.

a log

and tossed

fresh chips.

song only

to herself

On her lips.
And once she went to break
Of black alder.
She strayed

When
And

didn't

Or
She

bough

so far she scarcely heard

he called her

answer

didn't speak

return.

stood,

and then she ran and hid

In the fern.

He

never found her, though he looked

Everywhere,

And he asked at her mother's house


Was she there.

WALKED PAST A HOUSE


WHERE LIVED ONCE

A RANT

"What you wanted


I

walked past

man and

house where

woman

are

still

hved once:

together in the

said

took! Don't stand

told

you"

left

me

around

my bedroom making things cry

whispers there.

Many

"and what you

years have passed with the quiet

hum

of the staircase bulb going on

any more! I'm not going

and off and on again.

thrash the floor or throw any


apples!

The

keyholes are like

where

all

little

the blood seeped out.

And

To

let it rot!

wounds

hell

the monster in

any more!
I

want

to

stand once again as

began

to fall apart

was

did

my first love all night long


When we left at dawn, the house

in the

and since then the

doorway.

city

till

to

be

filled

in the
till

to

pictures

swung

all in

was crowded with

windows.

raced to the door.

with longing again

dark burn marks show on

want

The

Trinidad.

my

"Come back

skin.

You
I

too easily arrived at; most

oppressive.

the plants imagined us

the whole world.

want

my own bed
The silence

Well.

on the wall with boredom and

and

since then

with the radio,

I'm not going to be

inside,

people pale as death.

holding

to

Book of Life, to be written every


hand hurts.

footsteps.

single day

the writing

Israeli, b.

your

cried "for a minute!

new

shoes.

[114

the

"

Frank OHara,

1924

And

There were no
Wow! what a relief!

coffee pot's yours!

be written again

Yehuda Amichai,

left

"

American, 1926-1966

Thursday. John Moore. American,

b.

1941. Oil

on canvas, 1980.

A SPRING NIGHT IN SHOKOKU-JI

THE NIGHT HAS A

THOUSAND EYES
Eight years ago this

May

We walked under cherry blossoms


At night
All that
Is

in
I

an orchard in Oregon.

wanted then

And

the day but one;

With

the dying sun.

in the night

In a garden of the old capital


I

night has a thousand eyes,

Yet the light of the bright world dies

forgotten now, but you.

Here

The

feel the

trembling ghost of Yugao

I remember your cool body


Naked under a summer cotton

Gary Snyder,

American,

b.

The mind has a thousand eyes,


And the heart but one;
Yet the light of a whole

dress.
1930

life

dies

When love is done.


Francis William Bourdillon,

English,

1852-1921

Oriental Pleasure Garden. Paul Klee,


German, 1879-1940. Oil on cardboard,
1925.

Madame Joseph-Michel Ginoux


(Marie Julien, 1848-1911). Vincent van Gogh, Dutch,

L'Arlesienne:
1853-1890.

WESTERN WIND, WHEN


WILL THOU BLOW
Western wind, when

The
Christ,

if

And

small rain

my
I

in

love

will

thou blow

down can

were

in

rain?

my arms

my bed again!

Anonymous,

English, i6th century

WHEN YOU ARE OLD


When you are old and grey and full of sleep.
And nodding by the fire, take down this book.
And slowly read, and dream of the soft look
Your eyes had once, and of their shadows deep;

How many loved your moments of glad grace,


And

loved your beauty with love false or true.

But one

And

man

loved the pilgrim soul in you.

loved the sorrows of your changing face;

And bending down

beside the glowing bars,

how Love fled


And paced upon the mountains overhead
And hid his face amid a crowd of stars.
Murmur,

a little sadly,

William Butler Yeats,

Irish,

1865-1939

[117]

<^/r

JOYS THAT STING


Oh

doe not

die, says

All

women

so.

Women?
It is

But

How

Donne, /or

in a life

made

shall hate

sentence rings.

false the

desolate

the joys once shared that have the stings.

To take the old walks alone, or not at all.


To order one pint where ordered two.
To think of, and then not to make, the small
I

Time-honoured joke (senseless

to all

but you);

To laugh (oh, one 11 laugh), to talk upon


Themes that we talked upon when you were
there,

To make some poor pretence


Be kind

to one's old friends,

of going on,

and seem

to care,

While no one (O God) through the years will say


simplest, common word in just your way.

The

C. S. Lewis,

The Green

Blouse.

Oil on canvas, 191

I'icrrc

Hns^lish,

1898-1963

RAIN

Bonnard, French, 1867-1947.

9.

sad sort of rain.

Today, and
Spring Showers,

New

York,

Look

1900. Alfrtcl Stie^litz,

In

American. 1864-1946. I'hoto^raMirc.

iiH

inside, alone.

at the pictures

London and

Paris

took of you

and Spain.

What

good will

it

do

This dark gray mood

To
To

try to think

back

that sunlit blue?

Better to clean,

Bake bread,

And feed the fire.


So when our sons come home
From

school.

The house

will feel

warm.

Unclouded, serene.

No one must
Of me

that

see the ghost

wanders

Over the field and wood


Above this thin rain.
Filled with an ache

And

a crazy refrain.

Never again
Never again
We two at the farm
Or in London or Spain.
But under some other moon
Maybe?
Under some unknown sun,
Again, we two, we two might be
Always again?
Margaret Newlin,

American,

b.

1925

SOMETIMES WITH ONE I LOVE


Sometimes with one
for fear

But now
pay
(I

is

love

fill

myself with rage

effuse unreturn'd love.

think there

certain one

is

no unreturn'd

way

love, the

or another,

loved a certain person ardently and

my

love

was

not return'd.
Yet out of that

have written these songs.

Walt Whitman,

Woman

American, 1819-1892

Playing the Kithara. From the Villa of P. Fannius


Roman, 40-30 b.c. Fresco on Ume

Synistor at Boscoreale.
plaster.

PAST ONE O'CLOCK

Past one o'clock. You must have gone to bed.

TO

The Milky Way streams

Lm in
Music, when

soft voices die,

silver

through the night.

no hurry; with lightning telegrams

have no cause

to

wake

or trouble you.

Vibrates in the memory;

And,

Odours, when sweet

Love's boat has

smashed against the

Now you

are quits.

violets sicken,

Live within the sense they quicken.

to

Rose leaves, when the rose

Are heaped

And
Love

is

dead,

itself shall

when thou

art gone.

is

closed.

daily grind.

Why bother then

balance mutual sorrows, pains, and hurts.

Behold what quiet

settles

on the world.

in tribute

from the

stars.

In hours like these, one rises to address

The

slumber on.

Percy Bysshe Shelley,

and

Night wraps the sky

for the beloved's bed;

so thy thoughts,

as they say, the incident

ages, history,

and

all

creation.

Vladimir Mayakovsky,

English, 1792-1822

120

Russian, 1893-1930

LAMENT
The

stars

and waves

and the
call

rivers

you back.

Pindar, Greek,
ca.

522-443

B.C.

Waterfall. Lid of a
writing box. Japanese,
late

8th century.

Sprinkled design on lacquer.

LISTEN, WILL YOU LEARN


TO HEAR ME FROM AFAR
Listen, will you learn to hear
It's

me from

a question of inclining the heart

afar?

more than

the ear.
You'll find bridges in yourself

To

reach

all

the

way

to

and roads

me who

waits and stares.

What does it matter, the Atlantic's width.


The fields, woods, mountains between us two?
One by one they'll have to give up on that day
You turn your eyes

this way.

Jules Supervielle, French, 1884-1960

Landscape.

Detail from Virgin and ChiU. Joos van Cleve,

Flemish, active by 1507,

wood,

ca. 1525.

d.

1540/41.

Tempera and

oil

on

The Marriage of True Minds

SONNET CXVI
Let

me

not to the marriage of true minds

Admit impediments,

love

is

not love

Which ahers when it alteration finds,


Or bends with the remover to remove.

O no!

it is

That
It is

an ever-fixed mark,

looks on tempests

the star to every

Whose

worth's

and

wand

is

never shaken;

ring bark.

unknown, although

his height

be taken.
Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and

cheeks

Within
Love

his

bending

alters not

But bears

it

If this
I

sickle's

compass come.

with his brief hours and weeks,

out even to the edge of doom:


be error and upon

never writ, nor no

man

William Shakespeare,

Memisabu and His

Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (1743-1794) and His Wife


(Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, 1758-1836). Jacques Louis
David,

Dynasty

runch, 1748-1825. Oil on canvas.

124

5.

me

English, 1564-1616

Wife. Egyptian,

Painted limestone.

proved,

ever loved.

ca.

2360

b.c.

TO MY DEAR AND
LOVING HUSBAND
If ever

two were one, then surely we.

If ever

man were

If

loved by wife, then thee;

ever wife was happy in a man,

Compare with me, ye women, if you can.


I prize thy love more than whole mines of gold
Or all the riches that the East doth hold.

My love is

such that rivers cannot quench.

Nor ought but love from thee, give recompense.


Thy love is such I can no way repay.
The heavens reward thee manifold, I pray.
Then while we live, in love let's so persevere
That when we live no more, we may live ever.
Anne Bradstreet,
ca.

American Colonial,

1612-1672

ALTHOUGH CONQUER
ALL THE EARTH
I

Although
Yet for

me

conquer
there

is

In that city there

all

the earth,

only one

is

for

city.

me only one

house;

And in that house, one room only;


And in that room, a bed.
And one woman sleeps there,
The shiningjoy and jewel of all my kingdom.
Anonymous,

Ancient India

[125]

GALANTE GARDEN: I

SONG OF SONGS

Spring morning!

She came

to kiss

me

am my

lover's

and he desires me.

Come, my darling,

Just as a morning skylark

let

Soared up from the furrow singing,

and spend the night

"Spring morning!"

Let us wake early and go to the vineyards

us go out into the fields

and see
I

spoke

That

And
And

to

her of a white butterfly

saw

in the footpath;

me
"How

she gave
said,

if

her red

"My

is

open

in bloom.

love you?"

me!

eyelids

The Song of Solomon,

710-1:^

eyes are for you

And you

for

my

red lips!"

The spring heavens


Were blue with peace and oblivion

A morning
Sang

in blossom,

There I will give you my love.


The mandrakes will spray aroma
and over our door will be precious fruit,
new and old,
which I have saved for you, my darling.

love you!

lips for

was kissing her

is

grape bud

and the pomegranates

So many kisses she cherished

the vine

if

new

a rose
I

Don't you know that

On

the

in villages.

QUATRAIN

skylark

in the still sleeping

garden

What

is

this

day with two suns in the sky?

was light and crystal


In the newplowed furrow

with a great voice giving

Spring morning!

Here

Its voice

Day

Juan FUm6n Jimenez, Spanish, 1881-1958

unlike other days,

it is,

Jalal-ud-din Rumi,

126

it

to the planet.

enamored beings, your dayl


Persian, 1207-1273

i^iiiHi

so LET'S LIVE REALLY LIVE!


So

let's

live-really live! tor love

and

Now

loving,

honey! Guft of the grumpy old Imrruniphl-ers

what

s it worth? Is it even worth a penny?


Suns go under and bubble bright as ever
up but-smothered, our little light, the night
sudden plunge-and oblivion torever.

Kiss me! kiss

me

thousand times!

one

thousand again! Another hundred!

Don t stop yet. Add a thousand. And a hundred.


So. Then post, sitting pretty on our millions,
sums that none-we the least-make head or tail of.
Don let s know, even us. Or evil eyes might
t

glitter green,

A hundred!

over sueh a spell of kisses.

Catullus, Roman,

128

ca.

H4-54

b.c.

Bacchanalia. Pablo Picasso. Spanish. 1881-1973. Linoleum


cut, I9S9-

ANNIVERSARY ON THE ISLAND


The

long waves glide in through the afternoon

while

we wateh From

the island

from the eool shadow under the trees where the


long ridge
a fold in the skirt of the

runs

down

end

to the

day after day

mountain

of the

we wake

headland

to the island

the light rises through the drops on the leaves

and we remember
night after night
that onee

and

we

set

like birds

we toueh

where we

are

the dark island

out for

lie still at last

with the island in our arms

hearing the leaves and the breathing shore


there are no years any more

only the one mountain

and on

all

W.

Palm

sides the sea that brought us

S.

Merwin.

/\mcrican.

b.

1927

Tree, Nassau. Winslow Homer, American,

1836-1910. Watercolor on paper. 1898.

SHE WAS A PHANTOM OF DELIGHT


She was

Phantom of delight

saw her upon nearer view,

When first she gleamed upon my sight;


A lovely Apparition, sent

To be a moment's ornament;
Her eyes as stars of Twilight

And

Like Twilight's,

But

all

too,

things else about her

From May-time and

to startle,

drawn
Dawn;

the cheerful

dancing Shape, an Image

To haunt,

fair;

her dusky hair;

gay.

and way-lay.

Spirit, yet a

Woman

too!

Her household motions

light

and

free,

steps of virgin-liberty;

countenance in which did meet


Sweet records, promises as sweet;

Creature not too bright or good

For

human

nature

daily food;

For transient sorrows, simple wiles,


Praise, blame, love, kisses, tears,

And now
The very

and smiles.

see with eye serene

pulse of the machine;

A Being breathing thoughtful breath,


A Traveller between life and death;
The

reason firm, the temperate will.

Endurance, foresight, strength, and

A perfect Woman,

skill;

nobly planned.

To warn, to comfort, and command;


And yet a Spirit still, and bright
With something of angelic light.
William Wordsworth,

Young Woman with

English, 1770-1850

a Water Jug. Johannes Vcrmccr,


Dutch, 1632-1675. Oil on canvas.

A DEDICATION TO MY WIFE
To whom

I owe the leaping dehght


That quickens my senses in our wakingtime
And the rhythm that governs the repose of our

sleepingtime,

The

breathing in unison

Of lovers whose

Who think the

bodies smell of each other

same thoughts without need of

speech

And

babble the same speech without need of

meaning.

No peevish winter wind shall chill


No sullen tropic sun shall wither
The

roses in the rose-garden

which

is

ours and

ours only

But

this dedication is for others to read:

These are

private words addressed to you in

public.
T. S.

Eliot, American, 1888-1965

Flowers
1

in a

Chinese Vase. Odilon Redon, French,

840-1916. Oil on canvas, before 1906.

[131]

The

Lovers. Hishikawa Moronobu, Japanese,

1625-

ta.

1694. W(xxiblock print, sumi-e, from a set ot twelve sheets.

AMOROUS ANTICIPATION
Not the intimacy of your forehead

clear as a

celebration

nor the prize of your body,


tacit

nor the sequence of your

NOW SLEEPS THE CRIMSON


PETAL, NOW THE WHITE
sleeps the crimson petal,

now

the white;

Nor waves the cypress in the palace walk;


Nor winks the gold fin in the porphyry font.
The fire-fly wakens; waken thou with me.

Now droops
And

like a

showing

itself in

will be so mysterious a favor

watch your dream implied

in the vigil of

my

arms.

Miraculously virgin again through the absolving


virtue of sleep,

quiet and resplendent like a lucky choice of

memories,

the milk-white peacock like a ghost,

ghost she glimmers on to me.

life

words or silence

as to

Now

mysterious and

still

and childlike

you will give

me

those far reaches of your

life

that

you yourself do not have.

Now

lies

And all

the Earth

thy heart

all

lies

Danae

to the stars,

Cast into

open unto me.

Now
A

slides the silent

meteor on, and leaves

shining furrow, as thy thoughts in me.

and
as

will see

you for the

God must

first

time, perhaps

see you,

the fiction of Time destroyed,

Now

folds the lily

And

slips into the

So

my dearest, thou, and


my bosom and be lost in me.

all

her sweetness up,

bosom of the

Alfred, Lord Tennyson,

without

love,

without me.

lake:

fold thyself,

Into

stillness,

will perceive that ultimate strand of your being

Enj^lish,

Jorge Luis Borges,

slip

1H09-1892

Argentine, 1899-1986

The Bridal Chamber of Herse.


ca.

132]

1550. Tapestry: wool,

Flemish (Brussels),

silk, silver,

and

silver-gilt thread.

PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN AT HER BATH


it is

a satisfaction

a joy
to

have one of those

in the

laugh at her

an Inca
house

when she

the sun

takes a bath

The Bather.

she unclothes

Edgar Degas,

herself she

French, 1834-1917.

Venus

is

shivering at the well

glad of a fellow to

marvel

no

is

at

the birds and the flowers


look in

Pastel on paper,

William Carlos Williams,

ta. 1890.

American,

1883-1963

THE GARRET
Come,

us pity those

let

who are

better off than

we

are.

Come, my

friend,

and remember

that the rich have butlers and no friends,

And we
Come,

Dawn

have friends and no butlers.

let

us pity the married and the unmarried.

enters with

little

feet

like a gilded Pavlova,

And am
I

near

my desire.

Nor has life in it aught better


Than this hour of clear coolness,
the hour of waking together.

Ezra Pound, American, 1885-1972

Ice Floes. Claude Monet, French, 1840-1926. Oil on canvas, 1893.

LOVE RECOGNIZED
There are many things in the world and you
Are one of them. Many things keep happening
and
You are one of them, and the happening that
Is

you keeps falhng hke snow

On

Is throttled.

Has been,

The mayor

clearly, remiss,

and the

city

Was totally unprepared for such a crisis. Nor


Was
yes, why should this happen to me?
I

have always been a law-abiding citizen.

the landscape of not-you, hiding hideousness,

But you,

like

snow,

like love,

keep

falling.

until

The

streets

and the world of wrath are choked

How many

things have

And

it is

Covered

with snow.

become

silent? Traffic

not certain that the world will not be


in a glitter of crystalline whiteness.

Silence.

Robert Penn Warren,

American, 1905-ic

NATURAL HISTORY
(A

letter to Katharine,

Edward

The

oil

from the King

Hotel, Toronto)

spider, dropping

Unwinds

Painting. Joan Miro, Spanish, 1893- 1983. Tempera and


on canvas, 1927.

down from

twig,

a thread of her devising:

thin, premeditated rig

To use

in rising.

FALL OF THE EVENING STAR


And

all

the journey

down through

space,

In cool descent, and loyal-hearted.


She builds a ladder to the place
From which she started.

Thus

I,

web

to

you

Come

near

me

now.

Exaggerate the green blood in grass;

The music of leaves

returning.

E. B.

sun going down

a truth discerning.

Attach one silken strand

my

softly;

of sight.

Dear dying fall of wings as birds


Complain against the gathering dark

gone forth, as spiders do.

In spider's

For

Speak

Out

scraping space;

White, American, 1899-1985


Multiply the stillness by one sound;

By one

And

syllable of your

all

All that

Spider. WcxxJcut
trom Hortus

To

rest

that
is

is little is

name

with

soon giant.

rare grows in

common

my mouth on

As somewhere

beauty

your mouth

a stars falls

siDiiUitis.

Published

in

Strasbourg by

Johann
L.

And

the earth takes

Exactly as

we

it

softly, in

take each other

natural love
.

and go

Priiss,

ca. 1497.

Kenneth Patchen,

to sleep.

American, 1911-1972

LOVE
So, the year's

All

SUCH
DIFFERENT WANTS

done with!

(Lure me for ever!)


March begun with,

The
The

April's endeavour;

May-wreaths that bound me


June needs must sever;
Now snows fall round me,

Quenching June's fever


(Lore me for ever!)
Robert Browning,

board

on the

floats

river.

board wants nothing

but is pulled from beneath


on into deeper waters.

And

the elephant dwelling

on the mountain wants


a trumpet so its dying cry
English, 1812-1889

can be heard by the

stars.

The wakeful heron striding


through reeds at dawn wants
the god of sun and moon
to see his

long skinny neck.

You must say what you want.


I

want

and

to be the man
am who u ill loxe vou

when your

hair

Robert

white.

Ely,

American,

Boating.

is

Ixlouarcl

b.

1926

Manet, French,

i8^2-i88v Oil on canvas.

18-4.

FOR THE MOMENT


Life

is

simple and gay

The bright sun rings with a quiet sound


The sound of the bells has quieted down
This morning the

The
And

footlights of

the room

Just one

beam

light hits

my head

it all

are

lit

again

live in is finally bright

is

enough

Just one burst of laughter

My joy that shakes the house


Restrains those wanting to die

By the notes of its song


I

sing off-key

Ah

it's

funny

My mouth open

to every

breeze

Spews mad notes everywhere


That emerge I don't know how

To

fly

Listen
I

toward other ears

Lm

not crazy

laugh at the bottom of the stairs

Before the wide-open door


In the sunlight scattered

On

the wall

among green

And my arms
It's

today

vines

are held out toward you

love you

Pierre Reverdy, French, 1889-1960

The Swing.
Oil on canvas.

Hubert Robert, French, 1733-1808

THE DOUBLE BUBBLE


OF INFINITY
The
I

night before the day of our wedding

dreamed

that the universe had a party,

All the stars

were

invited,

Beneath sparkhngchandehers, the planets


rejoiced;

Landscape with

In

all its

beautiful, candle-lit galaxies,

Crowded with glass-clinking revellers,


The Cosmos was Laughing with
Lasting Love and Light.

Kate Farrell, American,

Stars. Henri

Edmond

b.

1946

Cross, French, iS'^G-igio. Watercolor on paper.

Fragmentary Head of a Queen.


^i^

Egyptian,
ji;yptian, ca. 1417-1379B.C
1417-1379 b

ynasty

18.

Yellow jasper.

Soho Bedroom.
British,

Bill

Brandt,

1904-1983.

CJelatin silver print. 1936.

OLD SONG
Takeoff your

And come
Soon

And
hard

sun be breaking

sea.

And all of our hairs


For aught we do

THE OLD WORDS


is

clothes, love,

me.

will the

Over yon

This

to

to say

For

all

all

be white, love,

our nights be one,

love.

we knew.

Simply, because the words

Have grown
Lips

and

Robert Creeley, American,

so old together:

eyes

and

tears.

Touch and fingers

And

love,

out of love's language,

Are hard and smooth as stones


Laid bare in a streambed,

Not

failing or fading

Like the halting speech of the body

Which will turn too suddenly


To ominous silence,
But

like

Slow

your

lips

to separate,

and mine
our fingers

Reluctant to come apart,

Our

eyes and their slow tears

Reviving like these words

Springing to

life

again

And again, taken to heart.


To touch, love, to begin.
David Wagoner, American,

b.

1926

b.

1926

UNENDING LOVE
I

seem to have loved you


numberless times,

In life after

My

life,

in

Whenever

numberless forms,

in age after age forever.

spellbound heart has made and re-made the

neeklaee of songs

That you take


your

as a gift,

wear round your neek

many forms

In life after

life,

in age after age forever.

hear old ehronieles of love,

age-old

its

pain.

in

Its

aneient tale of being apart or together,

As

on and on into the

stare

emerge
Clad in the

past, in the

end you

light of a pole-star piereing the

darkness of time:

You become an image of what

is

remembered

forever.

You and

have floated here on the stream that

brings from the fount

At the heart of time love of one

for another.

We have played alongside millions of lovers,


in the

shared

same

Shy sweetness of meeting, the same

distressful

tears of farewell

Old

love,

but in shapes that renew and renew

forever.

Today
end

The

it is

heaped

at

your

feet,

it

has found

its

in you.

love of

Universal

all

man's days both past and forever:

joy, universal

The memories of all

sorrow, universal

loves

merging with

life.

this

one

love of ours

And

the songs of every poet past and forever.

Habindranath Tacjore,

Indian, 1K61 1941

Courtly Lovers. Signed by Rcza-ye Abbasi, Iranian


(Safavid), Isfahan. Opaque watercoior, ink, and gold on
dated 10^9 A.M.

/a.

I).

i6;^o.

paper,

'%

:i

GIVE ALL TO LOVE


Give

Obey

Leave

all to love;

thy heart;

Yet,

Friends, kindred, days.


Estate, good fame.

Plans, credit, and the

Muse,

all for love;

hear me,

yet.

One word more thy heart behoved.


One pulse more of firm endeavor,

Nothing refuse.

Keep thee today.


Tomorrow, forever.
Free as an Arab

Tis a brave master;

Of thy

Let

it

Follow

it

Cling with

utterly,

life to

the maid;

But when the surprise.


First

dives into noon.

her bosom young.

Of a joy

Untold intent;

Free be she, fancy

But

Nor thou detain her vesture's hem.


Nor the palest rose she flung
From her summer diadem.

god.

Knows its own path


And the outlets of the

sky.

It

was never

It

requireth courage stout.

for the

mean;

apart from thee,

Though thou
As

free;

loved her as thyself.

a self of purer clay.

Souls above doubt.

Though her

Valor unbending.

Stealing grace from

It

will reward,

They shall return


More than they were,
And ever ascending.

1640. Pen and

colored washes.

vague shadow of surmise

Flits across

With wing unspent.


it is

Peter

Paul Rubens, Flemish, 1577-

Hope beyond hope:


High and more high
It

The Garden of Love.

beloved.

have scope:

parting dims the day.


all alive;

Heartily know,

When
The

half gods go.

gods arrive.

Ralph Waldo Emerson, American, 1803-1882

144]

brown ink and

DARLING OF GOD AND MEN


From On The Nature of Things
Darling of God and Men, beneath the ghding
stars

you

fill

rich earth

and buoyant sea with your

presence
for every living thing achieves its life
rises

through you,

and sees the sun. For you the sky

the tempest

still.

is

clear,

Deft earth scatters her gentle

flowers,

the level ocean laughs, the softened heavens glow

with generous light for you. In the

first

days of

spring

when

the untrammelled all-renewing southwind

blows
the birds exult in you and herald your coming.

Then

the shy cattle leap and

swim the brooks

for

love.

Everywhere, through

all

seas,

mountains and

waterfalls,
love caresses

Venus and the Lute Player.


Italian

Titian (Ti/iano Vecellioj,

Wiu'tian). ca. 1488- 1576. Oil on canvas.

to

all

hearts and kindles

all

creatures

overmastering lust and ordained renewals.

Therefore, since you alone control the

sum

of

things

and nothing without you comes forth into the


light

and nothing beautiful or glorious can be


without you. Alma Venus! trim

my

with your grace: and give peace

to write

and think.
Lucretius, Roman,

ca.

gg-^s

poetry

and read

SONG
Love and harmony combine,

And around our

souls intwine,

While thy branches mix with mine,

And our

roots together join.

Joys upon our branches

sit,

Chirping loud, and singing sweet;


Like gentle streams beneath our feet

Innocence and virtue meet.

Thou

the golden fruit dost bear,

am clad in flowers fair;


Thy sweet boughs perfume the
And the turtle buildeth there.
I

air,

There she sits and feeds her young.


Sweet I hear her mournful song;

And

thy lovely leaves among,

There

is

love:

hear his tongue.

There his charming nest doth lay,


There he sleeps the night away;
There he sports along the day.

And doth among our branches


William Blake,

play.

English, 1757-1827

Coverlet. Ann Walgrave Warner, American, made

Phebe Warner. Linen and

[i47_

cotton, ca. 1800.

for

WHAT THERE IS
ANSWER TO A CHILD'S QUESTION

In this

Do you

They hold me

ask what the birds say?

The Sparrow,

my green world
Flowers birds are hands

the

Dove,

The

Linnet and Thrush

say, "I love

In the winter they're silent

and

the wind

is

am

loved

all

day

love!"

All this pleases

so

me

strong;

What

it

says,

don't know, but

it

sings a loud

But green

leaves,

and blossoms, and sunny warm

weather,

And

singing,

But the Lark

The

green

That he

and loving
is

all

come back

so brimful of gladness

am

loved

all

day

Children grass are tears

love.

below him, the blue sky above.


and he sings; and for ever sings

fields

sings,

my

have

together.

and

he
"I love

am amused

to laugh from crying


Trees mountains are arms

song.

Love, and

my

cry

am

loved

all

day

Everything

Love loves me!"

Samuel Taylor Coleridge,

I
I

Pompous makes me laugh


I am amused often enough

English, 1772-1834

In this

My

beautiful green world

There's love
Peaceable Kingdom.

I-Alward Hicks,

1780-1X49. Oil on canvas,

ca.

all

day

Kenneth Patchen,

American,

1830.

American, 1911-1972

14H.

LOVE POEM
Yours

is

the face that the earth turns to me.

Continuous beyond

its

The mountain forms


With your

human

features he

that rest against the sky.

eyes, the reflecting rainbow, the sun's

light

Sees me; forest and flowers, bird and beast

Know and

hold

me

forever in the world's thought,

Creation's deep untroubled retrospect.

When

your hand touches mine, it is the earth


That takes me the deep grass,
And rocks and rivers; the green graves,

And

children

still

unborn, and ancestors,

down from hand

to hand from God.


Your love comes from the creation of the world.

In love passed

From

those paternal fingers, streaming through

the clouds

That break with


Here, where

light the surface of the sea.

trace your body with

my

hand,

Love's presence has no end;

For these, your arms that hold me, are the world's.

and oceans meet

In us, the continents, clouds

Our arbitrary

selves, extensive

Lost, in the heart's worship,

Kathleen Raine,

The Heart of the Andes.

with the night.

and the body

English,

b.

1908

Frederic lulvvin Church,

American, 1826-1900. Oil on canvas, 1859.

sleep.

IN

LOVE FOR LONG

I've

been

in love for long

With what

And

cannot

tell

song

will contrive a

It is

not anything.

And

yet

Its

That has no mould or shape,


From which there's no escape.

How can

It is

not even a name,

is all

cannot part from me;


yet as

still

As the established

What

Is

Tried or untried, the same.


It

burden and
I

it is

Flourishes sweet and wild;

its bliss.

In wrong, beyond wrong.

ever prove
I

All the world's

love?

hill.

day long.

This love a moment known

This happy happy love

constancy;

A breath,

And there it is content


And careless as a child.
And in imprisonment

is;

Being, being, being,

For the intangible

Yet

being

all

For what

sieged with crying sorrows,

I do not know
moment gone

Crushed beneath and above


Between todays and morrows;

And

That keeps its perfect laws


Between the tiger's paws

little

Held

in a

Is like

paradise

in the world's vice.

And

the happy doe

vindicates

its

Edwin Muir,

Improvisation

Number

Wassih Kandinsky,

27:

liussian,

cause.
Scottish,

18H7-1959

The Garden of Love.

1866- 1944. Oil on canvas,

1912.

THE WOMAN IN SUNSHINE


It is only that this warmth and movement
The warmth and movement of a woman.

any image

It is

not that there

Nor

the beginning nor end of a form:

is

are like

in the air

It is empty. But a woman in threadless gold


Burns us with brushings of her dress

And a dissociated abundance of being.


More

definite for

Because she

is

what she

is

disembodied.

Bearing the odors of the

summer

fields.

Confessing the taciturn and yet indifferent.


Invisibly clear, the only love.

Wallace Stevens,

American, 1879-1955

SOLO FOR SATURDAY


NIGHT GUITAR
Time

Man

was.

Time

Love was. Love


Yet

man

Nor

is.

Time

shall be.

invented time to be used.

is

is.

Love shall

Nor the smooth flow of new blossoms


Nor the drag of a heavy hungering for someone.
Love

be.

wears numbers one

to

or a

in a tight hold for keeps,

down and saying


now and here for always."

Fastening love
here

You don't do
Love

Nor

costs.
is

is

tall

light as a bubble, a blossom,

remembering bar of music

or a finger or a wisp of hair

this offhand, careless-like.

Love

leaving you lonely

or a sea

Who tells love numbers precisely ex-act-ly?

"It's

hammers

where phantom ships cross always


shadow always whispering
or a circle of spray and prisms
maybe a rainbow round your shoulder.
Heavy heavy is love to carry
and light as one rose petal,

twelve

And you look and read its face


And tell the time precisely ex-act-ly.
Yet who reads the face of love?
Holding love

a white horse you ride

or a rock in the moonlight for rest

love to be used like time.

A clock

is

or wheels and

never invented love

never forgotten.

not so easy

the shimmering of star dust

Carl Sandburg,

American, 1878-1967

Love and Innocence Clock,

[154

reiuli. ca.

1825. Cilt bron/e.

LOVE WHAT IT IS
Love

is

a circle that

LOVE LIVES BEYOND THE TOMB

doth restless move

Love

Robert Herrick,

lives

The tomb,

In the same sweet eternity of love.

English, 1591-1674

beyond

the earth, which fades like

dew

love the fond,

The

and the

faithful,

Love

true.

lies in sleep,

Ihe happiness of healthy dreams,


Eve's

dews may weep.

But love delightful seems.


Tis seen in flowers,

And

in the even's pearly

On
And

earth

dew

green hours,

in the heaven's eternal blue.

Tis heard in spring

When light and sunbeams, warm


On angel's wing
Bring love and music

And where

is

to the

and kind,

wind.

voice

So young, so beautiful, and sweet

As nature's choice.
spring and lovers meet?

Where

Love

The
1

Les Attitudes sont faciles et chastes. Maurice Denis,


French, 1870-1943. C^olor hthograph,

ca. 1899,

lives

beyond

tomb, the earth, the flowers, and dew.

love the fond.

The

faithful,

young, and true.

trom the

John Clare,

suite Amour.

156

linglish,

1793-1864

LINES
To

Movement

Show me

When

in

Mozart's E-Flat

Symphony

again the time

in the Junetide's

prime

We flew by meads and mountains northerly!


Yea, to such freshness, fairness, fulness, fineness,

freeness,

Love lures

Show me

When

life

on.

again the day

from the sandy bay

We looked together upon

the pestered sea!

Yea, to such surging, swaying, sighing, swelling,

shrinking.

Love lures

Show me

When

life

on.

again the hour

by the pinnacled tower

We eyed each other and feared futurity!


Yea, to such bodings, broodings, beatings,

blanchings, blessings.

Love lures

life

on.

Show me again just this:


The moment of that kiss
Away from the prancing folk,

by the

strawberry-tree!
Yea, to such rashness, ratheness, rareness,

ripeness, richness.

The Portico of a

Country Mansion. Hubert

Love lures

Robert,

French, 1733 1808. Oil on canvas.

life

on,

Thomas Hardy,
157

English, 1840-1928

BRIGHT STAR, WOULD I WERE


STEDFAST AS THOU ART
Bright star, would

Not

were

in lone splendor

And watching, with

stedfast as thou art

hung

alott the night.

eternal lids apart,

Like nature's patient, sleepless eremite,

1 he moving waters

at their priestlike task

Of pure ablution round earth s human


Or

gazing on the

new

Of snow upon

No
To

yet

C^Jtf**

still

Pillow'd

upon my

fair love's

ever

Still, still to

# *#

*1*

J^*

4.V>.<^m

#.^

^*

unchangeable,

stedfast,

Awake

And

the mountains and the moors;

still

feel for

its soft

swell

for ever in a

ripening breast.

and

fall,

sweet unrest,

hear her tender-taken breath,

so live ever

John Keats,

or else

swoon

to death.

English, 1795-1821

Dante and Beatrice with the Blessed


-)(f

^ ^

from Comedia deli Inferno,


->k

*^*^ ^ *^^*^
.^"^^^^j^^^^^t^

Canto 27 of

shores,

mask

soFt-fallen

Paradiso, by

del Purgatorio,

Dante

Souls. Wbudcut

^ del

Paradiso,

Alighieri. Venice: Published

by Giovambattista and Melchiorrc Sessa et Fratelli, 1578.

The

Fly. William Blake, f^nglish, 1757-1827. Hand-colored

relief etching,

heightened with gold, from Songs

and of Experience

I5H

1789-94 (printed

in 1825).

oj

Innocence

LATE FRAGMENT
And

did you get

what

vou wanted from this Hte, even so?


i

did.

And what did you want?


To call myselt beloved, to

feel

myself

beloved on the earth.

Raymond Carver,

American, 1938-1988

Akhenaton Holding an Olive Branch.


ca.

1373-1362

B.C.,

Dynasty

18.

Egyptian,

Painted limestone.

ONCE MORE, THE ROUND


What's greater, Pebble or Pond?

What can

My true

be

self

More!

Now

adore

With the
With the

known? The Unknown.


runs toward a Hill

More!

my

visible.

life

Bird, the abiding Leaf,

Fish, the questing Snail,

And the Eye altering all;


And dance with William Blake
I

For

love, for Love's sake;

And everything comes to One,


As we dance on, dance on, dance on.
Theodore Roethke,

American, 1908-1963

THE WORLD WAS WARM AND WHITE WHEN WAS BORN


I

How

The world was warm and white when

I was born:
Beyond the windowpane the world was white,

How

glaring whiteness in a leaded frame,

Yet

warm

as in the hearth

like a

summer

and heart of light.

like the

Patience,

my

summer

Until the future has

In midnight

And

paralysis, nevertheless

The world was warm and hope was


All things

be

would come,

would

known

would be enjoyed,
be mv own.

All things

then, only,

become the

when

all

truth!

never known
past

the love of truth at last

Becomes the truth of love, when both are one,


Then, then, then, Eden becomes Utopia and is

infinite

fulhlled, all things

of 1914, in

soul, the truth is

Although the whiteness was almond and was bone


s still

the years of youth have

passed!

surpassed:
fulHlled,

and come

For then the dream of know ledge and know ledge

to

knows
Motive and joy

at

once wherever

Uelmore Schwartz,
160

it

goes.

Amc'rican, 1913-1966

The

Visit to the Lying-in

Chamber

(detail).

Gabriel

Metsu, Dutch, 1629-1667. Oil on canvas, 1661.

LOVE TELLS US WHO WE ARE


Love Tells Us

Who

When

asked the

Music Tells Us

What We

We Are.
Answer "Who?"
No Love Answered
So I knew I
Had to Wait

Feel

But Cannot Say


Love Reveals

What We Know
But cannot See

was Nothing But

For Love

Before You

For

When You Gave me Your Hand


I took My Hand

We are No one

For Love Tells Us

Before Love

We Are So

When

missing clue looking

For a Person

A Star looking for


A sky
An "I am" waiting for
An I

Paradise
by 1417,

wood;

ca.

(detail).

d.

1482.

1445.

Giovanni

Who

asked the

Answer "Who?"
Love Answered
You.

Donald

T.

American,

Sanders,

b.

1944

di Paolo, Italian (Sienese), active

Tempera on canvas, transferred from

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Grateful acknowledgment

mission

is

made

to the Following for per-

net Press Limited. "Love Song," "Portrait of a Lady," and "Portrait

material listed below.

to print the copyrij^hted

Woman

of a

at

Her Bath" by William Carlos Williams from

Collected Poems, volumes

Ouen

"Sonnet" reprinted

Barficld

"The Spring and

Elizabeth Bamctt
Millay.

From

b\ permission of the author.

the Fall" by

Collected Poems. Harper

1951 by F^dna St. Vincent Millay

&

Edna

St.

Vincent

How. Copyright

and Norma Millav

Alberti,

He-

"The

Street in

Borges from Love Poems of Spain and Spanish America, trans-

"Lament" by Pindar, "Love Poem" by

and

Hui/,, translated

Mary Ursula

Want

Market" and

"1

lected Poems.

Copyright

to

Lorca from Ode

Bethell.

1986 by Charles

Bukowski. Heprinted from You

get so alone at times

sense with permission of Black

Sparrow Press.

it

just

B(K)ks. "C'rystal Palace

by James Faughlin from Se-

1986 by James Laughiin. Heprinted

Walt Whitman

to

Carlos Bauer. Copyright


Black Sparrow Press: "wearing the collar"

Breathe

by [X'rmission ot City Lights B(K)ks. "Variation

Lksula Bethell: "Hcsponse" reprinted by permission of the


late

1986 by Perry Higman.

Heprinted by permission of City Lights

Shadow" by Antonio \hichado

Trustees in the estate of the

Higman. Copyright

lated by Perry
Plato,

by Willis Bamstone. Heprinted by permission of the translator.


A-Iarv

"Our Child" by Pablo Neruda, "Hocking My Child" by


and "Amorous Anticipation" by Jorge Luis

Ciabriela Mistral,

printed by permission.
Willis Bamstone:

and IF Heprinted by permission of

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igii,.

Fllis.

Carcanet Press Limited.

permission ot

C'ity

by Federico (iarcia

Other Poems, translated bv

1988 by Carlos Bauer. Heprinted by

Lights Books.

makes
Collins Publishers: "Joys Lhat Sting

by C. S. Lewis from Poems.

Heprinted by permission of Collins Publishers, Fondon. "someRobert Bly: "After Drinking All Night
in a

Boat at

Hobert

Bly.

Dawn

to

See

Who

With

a Friend,

Wc (Jo Out

where

Poem" bv

comes

to tell

Wesleyan

I9liI962. Heprinted by permission of (irafton Books,

Cian Write the Best

Heprinted from Silence

in the

University Press, 1962, copyright

Snouy

Fields,

1962 by Hobert Bly. Re-

printed by permission of the author. "Such Different

have never travelled, gladly beyond" and "your birthday

me

this

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sion of William Collins Sons

cummings trom Complete Poems

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Wants
Constable Publishers-'ChMrvn," "Oath of

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riendshi|i

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Broadside Press: "Souvenirs

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Counterf)()em by ix-rmission ot Broadside Press, Detroit, Michigan.

Curtis Broun. Ltd.:

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The

Ltd.:

The

lelephone

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Poetry oj Robert frost, edited by lidward C!onnery

Lathem,

reprinted by permission ot the Lstate ot Hobert Frost, the

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etii

Ik'vin-iSilinr.

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Lindscape, translated bv Ciilbert Highet. Ik'printed bv permis-

from

Publishers:

Copvright

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print "In

Memory

of

My

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Collected Poems 1912-1944. Ik'printed b\ permission of C area-

162

to re-

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Douhleday. "Such Different

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In

Two

Wants" by Robert BIy from Loving A

Worlds. Copyright

1985 by Robert

printed by permission of Doubleday, a division of

Bly.

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Reprinted by permission of Farrar,


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from Elizabeth Bishop:

The Complete Poems, 1927-1979. Copyright 1979, 1983 by


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lishing

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Poems, 1927-1979 by Elizabeth Bishop. Copyright

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The

1959 by

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Stearns Eliot. Renewal copyright

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Kipling's Verse: Definitive Edition.

Published by

Elder Statesman by

poem

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Hays. Copyright
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plete Verse.

Com-

"My-ness" copyright

Press:

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on

From The Collected Poems. 1931-1987, first pubThe Ecco Press in 1988. Reprinted by permission.

It"

My

Wife" by

S. Eliot.

'Galante Garden: /"

1957 by Juan

Ramon

Jimenez. Renewal copy-

Moment" by

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Press:

Flammarion.

Only Knew the Truth,


Goodman from Collected
I

Swear

Would Act

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permission of Grey Fox Press.

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Thomas

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ica,

163

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tate of

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My

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Row, Publishers,

at

D. M. Thomas, from The Bronze

Everything Promised

Jane Kenyon:

1986 by Chana Bloch and Stephen Mitchell. Reprinted by

permission of Harper

The Viking

Roit\ Publishers, Inc.: "I

Bloch and Stephen Mitchell. English translation copyright

&

1985.

Tale.

Macniilkm, 1983).

he Es-

164

for the

B. \eats.

Wheless. "A

Cloths of Heaven," and

From Ihc Poems ofW.

by Richard

J.

linneran

(New

B.

York:

The

University of Massachusetts Press:

from Robert

"The Two Uses." Reprinted

Francis: Collected Poems.

in

i936 i976 (Amherst: Uni-

versity of Massachusetts Press, 1976), copyright

"1

Gcxxl at Love" and

"To L.R-M

"

Collected Verse. Reprinted by permission of

by Noel

Methuen

London.

Moyer

"DarHngof God and Men" from

Moyer

Little

Boy" by

Virgil,

New

Directions Publishing Cor|K)ration. "Love Song" and "Por-

trait

of a Lady" by William Carlos Williams from Collected Poems

1957 by James Laughlin. Reprinted by permission of

New

Directions Pub-

Reprinted by permission of

tions Publishing Corporation. "Portrait of a

Woman

New
at

Direc-

Her Bath"

by William Carlos Williams from Collected Poems Volume

Mt. Kisco, NY.

Bell Limited,

1909-1939. Copyright 1938 by

lishing Corporation.

Cht the Nature

of Things by Lucretius, translated by Basil Bunting. By permission of

Direc-

right

Volume

Bell Limited:

Thee,

New

translated by James Laughlin, from Virgil's Eclogue IV. Copy-

Am No

Coward from

by Gary Snyder from Back Country. Copyright

'

tions Publishing Corporation. "For

1938, 1966

by Robert Francis.

Methuen:

Shokoku-ji

1968 by (Jary Snyder. Reprinted by permission of

II

1939-1962. Copyright 1944 by William Carlos Williams. Re-

John Murray (Publishers)

"The Olympic

Ltd:

Girl" by Sir John

printed by permission of

New Directions Publishing Corporation.

Betjeman from Collected Poems. Reprinted by permission of John

Murray (Publishers)

Margaret Newlin: "Rain" by Margaret Newlin, Collected Poems

Ltd.

1963-1985, Ardis, 1986. Reprinted by permission of the author.

New

Directions:

"Le Pont Mirabeau " by Guillaume Apollinaire from

Selected Writings. Copyright

by permission of

New

"Chance" by H. D. from

1982 by

sion of

The

New

1971 by Roger Shattuck. Reprinted

John Frederick Nims: "So


loving.

Directions Publishing Corporation.

Directions Publishing Corporation. "Recipe for Hap-

Etuiless Life.

Copyright

Reprinted by permission of
ration.

"What There

Is"

North Point

really

live!

to Valery:

for love

Poems

and

in Transla-

Press:

"The North Coast" by Gary Snyder. Excerpted


The Rain: New Poems 1947-1985. Copyright

from: Left Out In

1973 by Lawrence Ferlinghetti.

New

live

by permission of the translator, John Frederick Nims.

Estate of Hilda Doolittle. Reprinted by permis-

piness in Khabarovsk or Anyplace" by Lawrence Ferlinghetti

from

let's

by Catullus from Sappho

published by Princeton University Press, 1980. Reprinted

tion,

Collected Poems 1912-1944. Copyright

."
.

1986 by Gary Snyder. Published by North Point Press and

Directions Publishing Corpo-

reprinted by permission. "To Laura" by Francis Petrarch. Ex-

and "Fall of the Evening Star" by Ken-

cerpted from: Songs and Sonnets from Laura's Lifetime. Trans-

neth Patchen from The Collected Poems of Kenneth Patchen.

lated by Nicholas Kilmer. Copyright

Copyright 1936, 1952 by Kenneth Patchen. Reprinted by per-

mer. Published by North Point Press and reprinted by permission.

mission of
ret" by

New

Directions Publishing Corporation.

ration.

"The GarW. W. Norton:

Ezra Pound from Personae. Copyright 1926 by Ezra Pound.

Reprinted by permission of

New

1956 by

Inc.

New

Directions Publishing Corporation, 1963 by Kenneth Rexroth.

Peter

New Directions Publishing Corpo


Was Warm and White When Was Born"

Reprinted by permission of
ration.

"The World

by Delmore Schwartz from Selected Poems:

Copyright
sion of

New

George Sarton

and Lois Brynes, by permission of W. W. Norton

"Loneliness" by Kenneth Rexroth from The Collected

"A Celebration for

is

reprinted

from Selected Poems of May Sarton, edited by Serena Sue Hilsinger

Directions Publishing Corpo-

Shorter Poems of Kenneth Rexroth. Copyright

1981 by Nicholas Kil-

Copyright

Owen

Peter

1978 by

Ltd: Publishers:

from Writings

Owen

&

Ix'ctures

May

ik

Company,

Sarton.

"A Very Valentine" by Ciertrude Stein


1911-1945. Reprinted by permission of

Ltd: Publishers.

Summer Knowledge.
Oxford University

1959 by Delmore Schwartz. Reprinted by permis-

Basil

Directions Publishing Corporation. "A Spring Night

Press:

"Personal

Column" by

Bunting 1978. Reprinted from

Basil Bunting.

Basil Bunting's Collected

Poems 1978) by permission of Oxford University Press. "In Love


(

165

for

Long" and "The Confirmation" by Edwin Muir. From The

Collected Poems of

Edwin Muir. Copyright

Granville-Smith, Administratrix of the Estate of Frank O'Hara.

i960 by Willa

Reprinted by permission of Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.

Muir. Reprinted by permission of Oxford University Press, Inc.

Never

Sonnets

Penguin Books: "My-ness" from The Collected Poems 1931-1987 by

Czeslaw Milosz (Penguin Books,

1988), copyright

'Unending Love

guin Books Ltd.

Czeslaw

Books, 1985), translation copyright

Who

"(You

"You Playmates of Mine"') from "The

"

Mitchell. Copyright

Rilke.

From The

Selected

and translated by Stephen

1982 by Stephen Mitchell. Reprinted by

Inc. "Autumn Leaves." From A


Few Days, by James Schuyler. Copyright 1985 by James
Schuyler. Reprinted by permission of Random House, Inc. "The

from Selected Poems by


William Radice, 1985,

11,8

Orpheus by Rainer Maria

Random House,

permission of

Rabindranath Tagore, translated by William Radice (Penguin

49.

to

and

Poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke, edited

Milosz Royalties, Inc., 1988. Reproduced by permission of Pen'

Arrived)""

p.

Woman

Reproduced by permission of Penguin Books Ltd.

In Sunshine." Copyright 1950 by Wallace Stevens. Re-

printed from The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens, by permis-

Peters Fraser

&

Dunlop "Juliet" by Hilaire Belloc from Sonnets and

Reprinted by permission of the Peters Fraser

Verse.

Group

sion of Alfred A.

& Dunlop

Ltd.

right 1919

Poetry Miscellany:

Knopf, Inc.

"Oath of Friendship

Translations from the Chinese, translated by

from

"

Arthur Waley. Copy-

and renewed 1947 by Arthur Waley. Reprinted by

permission of Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. "'Love Recognized." Copy-

"The Old Words " by David Wagoner reprinted

right

from Collected Poems 19S61976 courtesy of Poetry Miscellany.

1978 by Robert Penn Warren. Reprinted from

Now and

Then: Poems 1976-1978, by Robert Penn Warren, by permisLaurence Pollinger Ltd: "The Mess of Love" by D. H. Lawrence

Random House,

sion of

from The Complete Poems of D. H. Lawrence. Published by Viking Penguin, Inc. Reprinted by permission of Laurence Pollinger

Inc.

Riverrun Press: "Lady Love" by Paul Eluard.

Ltd and the Estate of Mrs. Frieda Lawrence Ravagli. "Past

of Paul Eluard, copyright

One O'clock

printed by permission of Riverrun Press.

..." by Vladimir

Mayakovsky from The Bedbug and

Selected Poetry. Reprinted by permission of

Ltd.

"The World

Selected Poems:

Was Born

by

Russell

Summer Knowledge. Re-

May

"

printed by permission of Laurence Pollinger Ltd.


Kathleen Raine: "Love

Poem

"

Selected

Poems

Laurence Pollinger

Was Warm and White When

Delmore Schwartz from

From

1988 by Riverrun Press, Inc. Re-

&

Volkening, Inc.:

"A Celebration For George Sarton" by

agents for the author. Copyright

reprinted by jjermission of the author.

&
May

Sarton. Reprinted by permission of Russell

Donald

Sanders:

"Love Tells

Us

1978 by

Who We

Volkening as
Sarton.

Are" by Donald

Sanders. Reprinted by permission of the author.

Random House: "Come, And Be My Baby from Oh Pray My Wings


Are Gonna Fit Me Well by Maya Angelou. Copyright 1975 by
Maya Angelou. Reprinted by permission of Random House, Inc.
"The More Loving One and "None of Us Are As Young. " Copyright 1957 by W. H. Auden. Reprinted from W. H. Auden:
Collected Poems, edited by Edward Mendelson, by permission of
Random House, Inc. "Anniversary on the Island from The Rain
in the Trees, by W. S. Merwin. Copyright 1988 by W. S.
"

The

"When Love

Society of Authors:

Flies In

'"

by Walter de

la

Mare. Reprinted by permission of The Literary Trustees of Wal-

"

ter

de

SUN:
Ron

la

""3

Mare and The

Society of Authors as their representative.

Poems" by Ron Padgett from Toujours iamour by

Little

Padgett. Copyright

1976 by

SUN.

Reprinted with the

"

Merwin. Reprinted by permission of Alfred A. Knopf,


Rant'

by Frank

OHara. From The

Inc.

1971 by

"Listen, Will You Learn to

Hear

Me

from

Afar" by Jules Supervielle from Selected Poems and Reflections on

"A
the Art of Poetry by Jules Supervielle translated by

Collected Poems of Frank

O'Hara, edited by Donald Allen. Copyright

SUN.

permission of

Copyright

Maureen

166

George Bogin.

1930 by Editions Gallimard. Translation copyright

1985 by George Bogin. Reprinted with the permission of SUN.

Threshold Books: "Quatrain" by Jalal

ucl

Rumi from Unseen

din

Rain. Reprinted by permission of Threshold Books,

600, Putney,

The

VT

RD

Viking Penguin Inc:

4 Box

and

05346.

University of California Press:

1983

The Complete Poems

F.

Warren Roberts. Copyright

1964, 1971 by Angelo Ravagli

rence Ravagli. All rights reserved. Reprinted by permission of

reprinted from Collected Poems of Robert Creeley, 19451975.


Press.

of Love" from

and C. M. Weekley, Executors of the Estate of Frieda Law-

"Old Song" by Robert Creeley

Pubhshed by the University of California

"The Mess

of D. H. Lawrence, collected and edited by Vivian de Sola Pinto

Viking Penguin, a division of Penguin Bcxjks USA, Inc. "She's

The

Gazing

Regents of the University of California.

at

You So Tenderly" from The Bronze Horseman by Alex-

ander Pushkin, translated by D. M. Thomas. Translation copy-

"My Baby Has No Name

University of Iowa Press:

Nam-jo. Reprinted from Contemporary' Korean


editor

Yet" by

Poetry,

Kim

right

Ko Won,

and translator by permission of the University of Iowa

Press. Copyright 1970 by the University of

USA,
A.

WangChien.

George Allen and Unwin (Publish-

ers) Ltd. 1946, 1961, 1983.

Reprinted by permission of the pub-

lisher,

Unwin Hyman

P.

Watt: "A Drinking Song,"

W.

B. \eats.

"He Wishes

"When You Are Old" from The

Reprinted by permission of A.

P.

for the

Cloths of

Collected Poems of

Watt Limited on

behalf of Michael B. Yeats and Macmillan London Ltd.

Unwin

Ltd. Copyright

Inc.

Heaven," and

Extracts taken from Chinese Poems, translated

by Arthur Waley, reprcxluced by kind permission of

Hyman

1982 by U. M. Thomas. All rights reserved. Reprinted

Iowa Press.

Unwin Hyman Limited: "At the End of Spring" by Po Chii-i and


"Hearing That His Friend Was Coming Back from the War"
by

by permission of Viking Penguin, a division of Penguin Books

John White: "Softly" reprinted by permission of the author.

Ltd.

167

CREDITS
Page 42: Bequest of Amelia

My-ness

B. Lazarus,

1906

07.88.4

Page

13: Gift

1981

Page

14:

Page

15:

of Mr. and Mrs. Charles


1981.238

Wrishtsman

Page 43: Rogers Fund, 1949 49. 30


Page 44: Gift of Mrs. Russell Sage, 1908

Gift of Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler


Garbiseh, 1966
66. 242. i

1917

Page

Amelia

B.

1190

Rogers Fund, 1922 JP 1278


Page 17: The Friedsam Collection. Bequest
of
Michael Friedsam, 1931
32.100.5
Page 18: Gift of George N. and Helen M.
Richard
1964
64.165.2
Page 20: Gift of Albert Weatherby, 1946 46.
17

21: The J ulesBache Collection, 1949


49.7.41
Page 22: Rogers Fund, 1946 46.43.
Page 23: Catharine h)rillard Wolfe C:ollection,

Page

BequestofCatharinel^)rillard Wolfe
87.15.22

1887

Page 24: The Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ittleson,


Jr
Purchase Fund, 1956 56.13
Page 25: Robert Lehman Collection, 1975
1975.1.225

Page 26: Bequest of Benjamin Altman 1913


14.40.619

Sam

Page45: Thejules Bache Collection, 1949


Page 46: Rogers Fund, 1925
25. 181

49.7.49

Page 47: Catharine Ix)rillard Wolfe Collection,


Bequest of Catharine l^jrillard Wolfe 1887
Page 48: Gift of Mrs.
50.228.3
Page 49: Gift of Mrs.

J.

Llliott L.

Kamen,

in

memory

ot her father,

Bernard R. Armour, 1960 60. 122


Page 50: Gift of Louis C. Raegner, 1927 27.200
Page 51: (;ift of Thomas F Ryan, 1913
13.164.2
Page 52: Purchase, Fhe Martin S. Ackerman
Foundation Gift, 1979
1979.184
Page 53: Marquand Collection, Gift of Henry (;.

Marquand, 1889 89.15.19


Page 55: Gift of Jessie Woolworth Donahue 1956

1951

51.112.4

51.30.2

Page 31: Gift of Julia A. Berwind, 1953


53.225.4
Page 32: Wentworth Fund, 1949 49.24
Page 33: Samuel D. Lee Fund, 1939
39. 14
Pages 34-35: Gift of The Dillon Fund, 1973

Page 62: Rogers Fund, 1922 JP 1327


Page 63: Bequest of Miss Adelaide Milton de
Gr(X)t (1876-1967), 1967
67.187.121
Page 64: Anonymous (Jilt, 1986 1986. 4{H

1973.120.6
Page 36: Alfred

Page 65: The Jack anti Belle Linsky C:ollection,


1982
1982.60.191-192
Page 66: (nft of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Shore

Page

Stieglit/ Collection, 1933

33.43.74

1 he Friedsam Clolleclion Bequest of


Michael Iriedsam, 1931
32.1(X).21
Page 38: Bequest of Maria DeWitt Jesup, from
37:

the collection of her husband, Morris


1914
15.30.61

Page 39: Purchase, Mrs. Arthur


Gift, 1972

K Jesup

1978

1978.61.4-6

Let

51.30.4

Page 73: CJeorge A. Hearn Fund, 1907 07.


140
Page 74: Gift of Julia A. Berwind, 1953
53.225.7
Page 75: Bequest of Edward S. Harkness,
1940
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Inslev Blair, 1950

Page 60: Bequest of Miss Adelaide Milton de


C;r(X)t (1876-1967), 1967
67.187 141
Page 61 Bequest of William Church Osborn

A. Lewisohn, 1951

Page 76: Bequest of Stephen C. Clark 1960

87.15.134

Page 56: Thejules Bache Collection, 1949 49.


746
Page 57: Gift of Katrin S. Victor, in loying memory
of Ernest (;. Victor, 1966
66.36
Pages 58-59: Rogers Fund, 1929 29.23.

Oath of Friendship

Page 70: Marquand Fund, 1959


59.120
Page 7
Rogers Fund, 1906 06. 1 322.
Page 72: Bequest of William Church Osborn
1951

56.100.1

Page 28: Gift of Lila Acheson Wallace 1983


1983.1009(8)

Page 29: Bequest of

20.155.9
08. 228

Go, Lovely Rose

Lazarus Fund, bv exchange

16:

Page68:Giftof Irwin Untermyer, 1964 64.101.519


Page 69: Bequest of William K. Vanderbilt 19'0

Me Count

The Ways

Page 77: Fletcher Fund, 1958


58.89
Page 78: Gift of Lila Acheson Wallace 1983
1983.1009(7)
Page 79: Wolfe Fund, Catharine h)rillard Wolfe
Collection, 1952
52.183
Page 80: (ieorge A. Hearn Fund, 1966 66. 171
Page8i: Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer,
1929,
H. O. Havemeyer Collection
29.100.110
Page 82: Purchase, Lila Acheson Wallace Gift,

Arthur Hoppotk Hearn Fund, Arthur Lejvva


Fund in honor of Jean Arp; and The Bernhill
Fund, Joseph H. Ha/en Foundation, Inc.,
Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation, Inc., Walter
Bareiss, Marie Bannon McHcnry, Louise
Smith
and Stephen t:. Swid (;ifts, 1980
1980.420
Page 83: rhe FAclvn Sharp t:ollection. New York.

C:ourtesv of rhe Ivvelyn Sharp t:ollection


Page 84: Bequest of Benjamin Altman, 1913
14.40.622

The Mess of Love


Page 85 Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer,
1929,
II. ().

Havemcver Collection

29.1(X).43

Page 86: Ford Motor C:ompany Collection, Gift


of
lord Motor Company and John C:. Waddell,
1987
1987. IKK).
Page 87: Munsey Fund, 1934
34. 138
Page 88: Purchase, Joseph Pulitzer Bequest

19^1

21.116
I

lavs Sulzberger

1972.128

Page4o:Giftoffriendsof John Sloan, 1928

28.18

Page 67: Purchased with special contributions and


purchase funds given or bequeathed bv friends
of the

Museum, 1967

67.241

168

Page 89: Rogers Fund, 1903 03. 14. 3


Page 90: Warner Communications Inc Purchase
Fund, 1980 1980.1023.5
1

Page 9 1 Rogers 1-und. 1960 60. iO


Page 92: Gift of Bessie Potter Vonnoh, 1941
:

66.66

Page 94: Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982


1984. 4.

Page 95: Bequest of Mrs. H. (). Havemeyer, 1929,


29.100.128
H. O. Havemeyer Gollect ion

1982 1982.60.47

The Marriage of
True Minds

42.26.1

Page 98: Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection, Lugano,


Switzerland
Page 99: Purchase, Arthur Hoppock Hearn Fund,
George A. Hearn Fund, and Lila Acheson
Wallace Gift, 1982
1982.90. la-c
Page 100; Anonymous Gift, 1981
Page

101:

Robert

Lehman

1981.35

Collection, 1975

1975. 207
Page 102: Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Henry
1964
64.287
1.

Ittleson, Jr.,

in

He

Still

Looked

My Eyes

Page 103: TheJulesBacheCollection, 1949 49.716


Page 105: Gift of Horace Havemeyer, 1929, H. O.

Havemeyer Collection

29. 160. 33

Erving Wolf Foundation and Mr.


and Mrs. Erving Wolf, 1975
1975.160

Page

106: Gift of

Page

1979.490.9

Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer,


1929, H. O. Havemeyer Collection
29. 100. 182
Page 112: Gift of Paul J. Sachs, 1916
16.2.9
Page 113: Gift in memory of Jonathan Sturges by
his children, 1895

Page

115:

Page

116:

95.13.1

George A. Hearn Fund, 1983


1983.170
The Berggrucn Klee Collection, 1984

1984.315.41

132: Harris

59. 16.

Brisbane Dick Fund, 1949

133:

134:

Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer,

1929, H. O.

Havemeyer Collection

29. 100. 190

Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer,


1929, H. O. Havemeyer Collection
29. 100. 108
Page 136: The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, The

Page

Give All

to

135:

44.7.37

137: Gift of Pierre Matisse, in

Pierre Loeb, 1984

memory of

1984.207

Page 138: Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer,


1929, H. O. Havemeyer Collection
29.100.115
Page 139: Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917
17.190.27

Page 140: Robert


1975.1.592

Lehman

Collection, 1975

169

50. 164

Love

Page 143: Bequest of ScoHeld Fhayer, 1982


1984.433.16
Page

145: Fletcher

Page

146:

Fund, 1958

Munsev Fund, 1936

58.96.

36.29

ol

Margaret E. Dows,

09.95

Page

153: Alfred Stieglitz Collection,

Page

155:

exchange, 1981

Page

1949

49. 70.

Purchase, Gift of Irwin Untermyer, by

156: Harris

1981. 50.a

Brisbane Dick Fund, 1941

41.19.3(4)
157:

Bequest of Lucy Work Hewitt, 1934

35.40.2

Page 158: Gift of Francis Leonard Cater, 1958


58.584
17.10.40.
Page 159: Rogers Fund, 1917
Gift of Norbert Schimmel, 1981
1981.449
Page 160: Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917
17.190.20

Bequest of George Blumenthal, 1941

Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 1944

m:

memory of

41.190.135

Page

Page

in

JP 3069
Page
Page

Fund, 1929 JP 1506


Page 109: Rogers Fund, 1922 JP 1367
Page no: Gift of Mrs. J. Augustus Barnard, 1979

89.15.21

Bequest of Mabel Choate,

her father, Joseph Hodges Choate, 1958

Page

Page 107: Bequest of Oliver Burr Jennings, 1968


68.205.3
108: Fletcher

131:

396. Ford

Collection, Gift ol

Page
10.228.6

Page 130: Marquand Collection, Gift of Henry G.

Marquand, 1889

1987.11(X).77
John C;. Waddell, 1987
Page 142: Francis M. Weld Fund, 1950

1909

1985.1079.3

Page 129: Amelia B. Lazarus Fund, 1910

Page

7.

Pages 150-151: Bequest

1977.10

Page 125: Rogers Fund, 1948 48.111


Page 127: Anonymous Gift in memory of Mr. and
1981.159
Mrs. A. B. Frank, 1981
Page 128: Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kramer,
1985

Yesterday

Gift, 1977

26.

Page 149: Gift of Fldgar William and Bernice


1970.283.1
Chrysler Garbisch, 1970

Purchase, Mr. and Mrs. Charles

124:

Wrightsman

S. Harkness Gift,
Motor Company
Ford Motor Company and

Purchase, Fldward

141:

Page 147; Gift of Catharine E. Cotheal, 1938


38.59

Page 123: Robert Lehman Collection, 1975


1975.1.95,96

Page

Page

1926

118: The Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ittleson, Jr.


Purchase Fund, 1963 63.64
58.5776
Page 119: Gift of J. B. Neumann, 1958
Page 120: Rogers Fund, 1903 03.14.5
Page 121: Bequest of Benjamin Altman, 1913
14.40.835b
Page 122: rhe Jack and Belle Linsky Collection,

5.3. 183
Page 96: George A. Hearn Fund, 1953
Page 97: Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, by exchange,

1942

Bequest of Sam A. Lewisohn, 1951

117:

51.112.3

Page

41.12.17

Page 93: Purchase, Roy R. and Mane S. Neuberger


Foundation, Inc. (JiftandGeorgeA. Hearn Fund,
1966

Page

Page

161:

Rogers Fund, 1906

06. 1046

INDEX OF ARTISTS
Jjarnet, Will

Gogh, Vincent van

93

Bearden, Romare

Goya, Francisco

66

Bellows, George

Bonnard, Pierre

94, 118

Boudin, Eugene

49

Hicks,

Edward

90

Homer, Winslow

Marc

112

Chase, William Mcrritt

Cot, Pierre Auguste

150

van Cleve

Kahn,

52

Andre

Klee, Paul

124

156

64

rank

116

Lichtenstein, Roy

82

Lippi, Fra Filippo

53

iVlaes, Nicolaes

98
36

Paolo

161

50

loi

102

40
77

91

75

119

Edmund

J.arbell,

Tiffany Studios

C.

60

127'

Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)

103, 146

Toulouse-Lautrec, Henri de

92

17

45, 55

80

^8

V-J tamaro

Matisse, Henri

28, 78, 143

Metsu, Gabriel

160

M(K)re, J(jhn

Kitagaua

Vermeer, Johannes

137

Monet, Claude

67, 72. 81

Vuillard,

Edouard

16.

109

130
2S, 75,

79

115

Moroiiohu, Hishikawa

VJerome, Jean Leon

Sloan, John

13, 14"^

Turner, Joseph Mallord William

26

Frieseke, Frederick Carl

99

Stieglitz, Alfred

113

1 ragonard, Jean Honore

di

51

Steen, Jan

J^a Tour, Georges de


Lawrence, Sir Thomas

Miro, Joan

Giovanni

38

86

Manet, Edouard

Rodin, Auguste

Sisley, Alfred

140

Durand, Asher Broun

Eugene,

139, 157

kjeurat, Georges
153

76

88

Robert, Hubert

Rubens, Peter Paul

Kensett, John Frederick


Kcrtcsz,

Dyke, Anthony \an

Wolf

29,

142

Robbia, Andrea della

122

Kandinsky, Wassily

85, 95, 111, 134

listes, Hichard

84

Reza-ye Abbasi

34

105

47

Edmond

Denis, Maurice

(X)s

23

-Lvavid, Jacques Louis

Dine, Jim

44

Corot, Jean Baptiste Camille

Degas, Edgar

32

15

Church, Frederic Edwin

Couture, Thomas

73

Rosenquist, James

Chardin, Jean Baptiste Simeon

Cross, Henri

62

83

Thomas

131

Rembrandt (Rembrandt FLirmensz. van


Rijnj

96

Hsiian, Ch'ien

Odilon

Renoir, Pierre Auguste

33, 129

Hopper, Edward
V^assatt, Mary

20, 106

39

Hokusai, Katsushika

37

k.ed<)n,

149

Hockney, David

Brouwer, Adriaen

Cole,

57, 61

Reid, Robert Lewis

Heade, Martin Johnson

141

R.

108

no

Hassam, Childe

42

Brassai (Gyula Halasz)

Chagall,

107

128

Pissarro, Camille

31

llarunobu, Suzuki

69

56,

Bouguereau, Adolphe William


Bill

Xeto, John Frederick

71, 159

Boucher, Francois

Brandt,

43, 117

Picasso, Pablo

Guardi, Francesco

63

Blake, William

18, 24,

21

132

Warner,

/\nii

Walgra\c

Watteau, Jean /\ntoine


Keelte, (Jeorui

Willems, Joseph

68

14-'

87

70

INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES


l\
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

Celebration for George Sarton

Child

Is

Something Else Again

Dedication to

My

Drinking Song

Loon

Blake, William

Robert

Spring Night

76
Shokoku-ji

in

Very Valentine

116

After Drinking All Night with a Friend,

We Go Out in a Boat at Dawn to


Who Can Write the Best Poem

Brooke, Rupert

Burns, Robert

76

Buson, Taniguchi

Dante 30
Her Beauty 108
Although Conquer All the Earth
Amichai, Yehuda
19, 114
Amorous Anticipation 132

125

Drummond

30,

Leaves

XJarfield,

109

Come, And Be

Bethell,

My

Coward, Noel
Creeley, Robert

148

Baby

41,

cummings,

De

112

63

126

Goodman, Paul
Gray Room 60

100

Guillen, Nicolas

36

e. e.

77,

la

88

from the

99

Dryden, John

35

23

A. E.

91

146

90

92

105

61

Was Coming Back

156

Home-Sickness

52

Doolittle, Hilda (H. D.)

War

Herrick, Robert

78

God and Men

Mare, Walter

157

Cloths of Heaven

Hearing That His Friend

Cruz, Juana Ines DeLa

Donne, John

Mary Ursula

Betjeman, Sir John

21

144

Lardy, Thomas
He Wishes for the

141

Dickinson, Emily

63

82

39, 113

Love

to

Housman,

62

105

69

H.

66

87

43

Owen

136

148

97

36

Belloc, Hilaire

34

102

34

61

57

An Amorous Lady
Moment 139

Give All

48, 156

J-v'arling of

Bars

22

VJalante Garden:

28, 159

Crystal Palace Market

At the End of Spring

Lawrence

For Aitana

Francis, Robert

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor

47, 69, loi, 117

ApoUinaire, Guillaume

Auden, W. H.

17,

Clare, John

English

Me

140

For Thee, Little Boy

95

125

30, 109

Anonymous, Irish 106


Answer to a Child's Question

Autumn

90, 128

Chance

Chippewa Indian

Kate

Frost, Robert

Raymond

to

For the

75

V^>arver,

71

Him

Ferlinghetti,

For

43

Catullus

Children

China

93

129

Ancient India

Adam

19

66

Anniversary on the Island

Anonymous,
Anonymous,
Anonymous,
Anonymous,

de

Byron, Lord

68

138

Bukowski, Charles

in

Angelou, Maya

Farrell,

Browning, Robert

Alone

to

Farewell Ungrateful Traitor

Browning, Elizabeth Barrett

Alighieri,

Eve Speaks

Tall of the Evening Star

38

61

144

28

Stedfast as

49

64

Andrade, Carlos

Were

See

22

131

82

Everything Promised

23

Bunting, Basil

Alberti, Rafael

116

125

Bronte, Charlotte

78

Akhmatova, Anna

Energy

132

Anne
Bright Star, Would
Thou Art 158

S.

Emerson, Ralph Waldo

38, 138

Bradstreet,

Eluard, Paul

Bourdillon, Francis William

109

114

Red, Red Rose

Jjiliot,

41

147

Borges, Jorge Luis

Was

It

Bishop, Elizabeth

Bly,

131

76

Thought

Rant

Wife

27
19

Am No Good

at

Love

Can't Hold You and

Do Not Look

Have Loved Hours

Dream

95

for

87

Can't Leave You

Love That

Is

1 1

at

Sea

53

88

My

Hid

Walked Past

Onec 114
Want to Breathe
If

Only

Love

Knew

Would Act on
If

Memory

Infancy

It

Is It a

Swear

52

What

Lucretius

Mother

Are

146

Madrigal

Marvell,

126

Mew,

Keats, John

Koch, Kenneth

Mo<jre,

Love

Lament

Late Fragment

81,

Lawrence, D. H.

NY.

Lewis, C.

S.

Lines

My-ness

159

Laughlin, James

Letter to

86

Love
Love

Portrait of a

Lady

Portrait of a

Woman

Pound, Ezra

134

80

None
Hear

Me

97

Yet

V^uatrain

14

XVain

38
Secret Feeding Fire

101

156

20

126

118

150

Randall, Dudley

Recipe

118

for

Now

the

59
107

Happiness Khabarovsk or

Anyplace

of

Response

57

112

Reverdy, Pierre

139

Rexroth, Kenneth

Blush Not So!

Oath of Friendship
Old Song 141

Once More,

134

90

Ralegh, Sir Walter

136

Us Are As Young 30
Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal,
White 132

81

Love Lives Beyond the Ibmh

from

Her Bath

57

Pushkin, Alexander

14

Newlin, Margaret

118

at

84, 152

Neruda, Pablo

[22

Is a

34

Prevert, Jacques

16

44

i Natural History

41

Lorca, Federico Garcia

17,

42

Raine, Kathleen

Listen, Will You Learn to

Afar

102

99

157

Loneliness

14

My Baby Has No Name


My Woman 90

82

121

75

Poem

71

Thomas

Muir, Edwin

Lady

Po Chij

Mistral, Gabriela

33

83

121

Plato

no

56

64

70

Pindar

89

Mirabeau Bridge

14

Hudyard

Kipling,

Petrarch

120

136, 148

Column

Personal

120

Vincent

St.

Milton, John

43

94
O'Clock ...

One

129

Milosz, Czeslaw

25

65, 158

Kim INam-Jo

S.

Edna

58

"54

Charlotte

Millay,

XVavanagh, Patrick

Andrew

Merwin, W.

98

Patmore, Coventry

Mayakovsky, Vladimir

63

Ron

Patchen, Kenneth

89

69

Marlowe, C'hristopher

Juliet

adgett,

Past

64

Jimenez, Juan Ramon


Jonson, Ben
74
118
Joys That Sting

42, 114

Parting (Swir)

1 Vlachado Ruiz. Antonio

Month

Hara, Frank

Parting (Buson)

56

25

19

20

O
161

156

It Is

L(we's Philosophy

72

Our Child

135

Who We

Wrote Her Name upon the

Strand

150

52

Love Tells Us

U)\v

100

"

in the Fall

One Day

75

Love Poem (Raine)


Love Song

152

My

of

Lived

81

the Truth,

Long

Love Recognized

You Were Coming

In Love for

In

Love Poem (Plato)

48

House Where

the

Blush Not So!

65

Rilke, Rainer

Rocking

30

My

Maria

Child

Roethke, I'heotlore

Round

[172

159

R(H)ms

89

97
32, 51

16

82, iS9

Rossetti, Christina

in

Swift, Jonathan

Rumi,

126

Swir,

ud-din

Jalal

Anna

Synge, John

Oandburg, Carl

16,

May

160

Seventeen Months

16

Shakespeare,

WiUiam

She Walks

Beauty

36, 73, 124

75
a Phantom of Delight

Shelley, Percy Bysshe

130

56, 120

She's Gazing at You So Tenderly

Snyder, Gary

So Let's Live
SoFtly

Really Live!

128

loi

Sometimes With One

Song (Blake)

120

92
126

Celia

30

Sonnet (Barfield)
Sonnet XVIII

62

73
36

Sonnet XLIII, from the Portuguese


Sonnet

CXVI

Souvenirs
Spenser,

124

107

Edmund

Stein, Gertrude
Stella's

Birth-Day

Stevens, Wallace

72

The Confirmation 84
The Double Bubble of Infinity 140
The Garden 57
The Garret 134
The Impulse 113
The Kiss 56
The Meeting of the Waters 44
The Mess of Love 86
The More Loving One 97
The Night Has a Thousand Eyes 116
The North Coast 42
The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd 59
The Old Words 141
The Olympic Girl 63
The Passionate Shepherd to His Love 58
The Rejected Wife 109
The Song of Solomon
26
The Spring and the Fall no
The Stars Stand Up in the Air 106
The Street in Shadow 89
The Telephone 39
The Thousandth Man 33
The Two Uses 69
The Unknown 50
The Woman in Sunshine 152
The World Was Warm and White When
Was Born 160

77
60, 152

122

68

125

Tu Fu

74, 104

108

>^ nending

Love

Variation
Virgil

142

81

21

Wagoner, David 141


Edmund 46

Waller,

Wang Chien

35

Warren, Robert Penn


wearing the

Western Wind,

135

93

collar

When

Will

Thou

n7

Blow

What There Is 148


When Was One-and-Twenty
I

When
When

Love Flies In

91

90

You Are Old


n7
Where Does This Tenderness Come

From?
White, E.

74
136

B.

White, John

loi

Whitman, Walt

120

Williams, William Carlos

Wordsworth, William

52, 80, 134

24, 130

78

Such Different Wants


Supervielle, Jules

Tsvetayeva, Marina

132

74

Sonnet (Dante)

XXX

78

147

Song of Songs

Sonnet

Love

49

Song (Donne)

To

154

have never travelled

Song (Brooke)

Song:

90

42, 116

Solo for Saturday Night Guitar

somewhere

142

53

Tennyson, Alfred, Lord

43

Schwartz, Delmore

in

Rabindranath

41

To My Dear and Loving Husband


To My Sister 24
To You 83
To
20

64

Teasdale, Sara

Schuyler, James

She Was

X agore,

161

27

70

ToL.RM

154

Sanders, Donald T.
Sarton,

To Laura

77

94

138

eats,

William Butler

Thomas, Edward 50
98
3 Little Poems
To His Coy Mistress 54

Yesterday

To His Love

your birthday comes to

47

[17^

He

Still

You Playmates of Mine


You

Who

61, 76,

Looked

in

My

n7
Eyes

32

Never Arrived
tell

51

me

this

77

104

INDEX OF FIRST LINES


l\
A
A

child

loon

something else again. Wakes up, iq

is

thought

it

Here we arc again

How
How
How

was, 109

sad sort of rain, 118

my

Aitana,

Although

conquer

Although you

And
...

Springtime bows, 22

child.

sit

to

Br, ght

my

in a r(x)m that is gray,

heart, that

star,

would

V-/hance

says,

Come,

us pity those

Come
Come

let

as well be Forgotten,

stedfast as thou art

64

158

95

who

are better oft than

me,

to

only,

we

are, 134

The

am no

call

For thee,

can't hold you

do not look

have loved hours

hid

lie

live

love bars

my

Go. lovely rose

l~lad

Had we

I,

48

52

remember rooms

saw the tracks of angels

my

saw you take

seem

walked past

to

father old, 27

the earth pour forth

have loved you


a

I,

in the earth,

Tis true,
in

"

70
56

numberless forms, 142

house where

lived once, 114

If

world and love were young, 59


ever two were one, then surely we, 125

If

you were coming

If all the

in the fall, 52

who went

to Hght,

3,^

In the spring of the year, in the spring of the year, 110

gifts, 21

my

green world, 148

Is

star, 92
wish that you and Lapo and

that have had their part, 89

his kiss!

46

catch a falling

till

in

5:5

never saw

In your next letter

with a lady and four cats, 93


and taverns, 36

144

CJuido,

dream

at sea, gray cities,

when young

In old days those

Go and

can't leave you, 88

43

all to love,

love

for love that is a

here thinking of you:

In this

VJive

and

Sparrow, the Dove, 148

traitor, 105

little boy, will

87

you on, 98

love you as a sheriff searches for a walnut, 83

Entering the Hall, she meets the new wife, 109


Everything promised him to me, 61

go,

not forget, 62

JZiight years ago this May, 116

me who

count the wavs, 68

may

and he desires me, 126

lover's

gocxl at love,

"I

For

me

that she

with thine eyes, 74

farewell ungrateful

work

the gliding stars, 146

God and Men, beneath

you ask what the birds say?

Drink

love thee? Let

shall

1 am my

60

away, come, sweet love, 47


live with me and be my love, 58

J_varling of

Do

may

were

do

the earth, 125

all

did you get what, 159

As

together, 42

did the party go in Portman Square?, 63

30

it

month

since

wish you'd

and you, 64

it is

a satisfaction, 134

It is

only that this

It is

the

was

the heavens' embroidered cloths, 61

It

but world enough, and time, 54

I've

174

first

say, 41

warmth and movement

mild day of March, 24

too lonely for her there, 113

been

in love for long, 152

are like, 152

J^ast night
Let

me

Life

IS

my

at

r^ast one o'clock. You must have gone to bed, 120

daughter's, near Blaine, 28

not to the marriage of true minds, 124

Oaw

simple and gay, 139

Listen, will you learn to hear

Looking up

the stars,

at

me

know

from

Shall

afar?, 122

Shang

quite well, 97

Love and harmony combine, 147


doth restless move, 156

Love

is

a circle that

Love

is

a secret feeding fire that gives all creatures being, 101

Love

lives

beyond, 156

Love Tells

Who,

L's

a girl in a food,

99

compare thee

to a

She

is

most

She

is

standing on

She was

Phantom

Music, when

So

soft voices die, 120

my

love has left

at

Love

me

went

somewhere

to the field, 19

Speak

has gone from me, 107

one of us are

as young,

X ake

Now

V^

sleeps the crimson petal,

blush not

O my

Luve

so!

s like

blush not

clear as a celebration, 132

now
so!,

a red, red rose,

the white, 132

65

76

Of College am tired; wish to be at home, 23


Of the thousands and thousands of years, 57
I

Oh

child,

Oh

doe not

On

do you know, do you know, 20


die, says

"Oh! Love," they

Donne, for

shall hate. 118

King of Kings, 49
the tedious ferry crossing through the obscure night, 100
said, "is

One day wrote her name ujx)n the strand,


One grand boulevard with trees, 57
One man in a thousand, Solomon says, 33
Our love has been dying for years, 94
I

for love

and

loving, 128

stop having a thing for you, loi


I

love

fill

myself with rage, 120

have never travelled, gladly beyond, 78

sun going down, 136

day

is

thirty-four,

77

off your clothes, love, 141

still

pool of the

air, 81

The board floats on the river, 138


The eye is not more exquisitely designed, 69
The flower of the pear-tree gathers and turns to fruit, 34
The fountains mingle with the river, 56
The highway is full of big cars, 66
The long waves glide in through the afternoon, 129
The night before the day of our wedding, 140
The night has a thousand eyes, 116
The pensive gnu, the staid aardvark, 82
The sea its millions of waves, 16
The sort of girl like to see, 63
The spider, dropping down from twig, 136
The stars and the rivers, 121
The stars stand up in the air, 106
The street in shadow. Tall houses hide, 89
The world was warm and white when was born, 160

30

Not the intimacy of your forehead

softly;

Stella this

17

That
>l

really live!

I'll

Spring morning!, 126

nephew, who is six years old, is called "Tortoise,"


"My parents, my husband, my brother, my sister," 14
My woman says she wants no other lover, 90

Baby

done with!, 138

Sometimes with one

the stars, 75

her attire doth show her wit, 69

in

let's live

Softly

yet, 14

father got on his horse and

My
My

7s

of delight, 130

again the time, 157

So, the year's

Star you gaze

82

lids,

in beauty, like the night,

Show me

child

my

She walks

IVlountains and mountains and mountains, 43


baby has no name

50

fair,

She's gazing at you so tenderly, 90

161

My
My
My

summer's day?, 73

30

ya!,

72

'75.

TRANSLATORS

There are certain ladies in our land, 41


There are many things in the world and you, 135
There is not in the wide world a valley so sweet, 44
These pines, these fall oaks, these rocks, 38
This

girl

This

is

Those

The name of the


title

name

to say, 141

Anna Akhmatova, "Everything Promised Mim


Rafael Albcrti, "For Aitana" Perrv Higman

picnics covered with sand, 42

Me

to

Jane kenvon and Vera Uunhai

Dante Ahghieri. "Sonnet Kenneth kcKh


Yehuda Amichai, "A Child Is SomethmK tise Again" and "I Walked Past a House
Where Lived Onte Chana Bloih and Stephen Milthell
Carlos Drummond de Andrade. Infancy
lilizabeth Bishop
Anonymous, China, Oath of Friendship" and "The Rejected Wife" Arthur Walcy
Anonymous, Chippewa Indian, "A Lixin Thought It Was Frances Densmore.
Anonymous, Irish, "The Stars Stand Up in the Air Thomas MacDonagh
Cuillaume Apollinairc, "Mirabeau Bridge Richard Wilbur
Jorge Luis Borges, "Amorous Anticipation Perry Higman
I

nder the Mirabeau Bridge there flows the Seine, 102

V.ery

my

fine is

Western

wind,

Taniguchi Buson, "Parting" Harold G. Henderson

when

"My Woman":
Frederick Nims

thou blow, 117

will

We've made

a great

What

day with two suns

this

"What you wanted

mess of

love,

"When

told you," 114

was

just as far as

Paul LIuard, "Lady Love

Love

flies in,

Nicolas CJuillen, "Bars

91

it

full

was

does this tenderness come from?, 74


lovelier

Wine comes

Petrarch, "To Laura

forget

Plato.

all

'
.

Willis Barnstone

George Reavev

Perry

Higman

Higman

Nicholas Kilmer

"Love Poem": Willis Barnstone

Jacques Prcvcrt. "The Garden": Harriet Zinnes


Alexander Pushkin. "Shes Gazing at You So Tenderly

mouth, 76

With thee conversing

Shadow

Pindar. "Lament": Willis Barnstone

than she?, 108

in at the

My Child"

Pablo Neruda, "Our Child" Perrv

April, 112

Who

in

One O'clock

Czeslaw Milosz, "My-ness": Czeslaw Miloszand Robert Hass


Gahriela Mistral. "R(Kking

of sleep, 117

Where
is

Thurman

Federico Garcia l^rca. "Variation" Carlos Bauer

the sessions of sweet silent thought, 36

letter

Judith

Arthur

Higman

Antonio Machado Ruiz, "The Street

you are old and grey and

War

90

you wrote your

the

John

Samuel Beckett

Perrv

Vladimir Mayakovsky. "Past

to

Really Live'"

Juan Ramon Jimenez. "CJalante Garden


H R Hays
Kim Nam JO, "My Baby Has No Name Vet" Ko Won

could walk, 39

was one-and-twenty,

Gilbert Highet. "So Let's Live

WangChien, "Hearing That His Friend Was Coming Back from


Walcy
PoChii-i, "Children" and "At the Fnd of Spring Arthur Walev
Juana Ines DeLa Cru/, "I Can Hold You and C ant Leave You

86

in the sky?, 126

What's greater. Pebble or Pond?, 159

When
When
When
When
When

valentine, 78

Catullus.

is

of the poet and the

child speaks five words, 16

hard

Time was. Time is. Time shall be, 154


To think of you surcharged with, 97
To whom owe the leaping delight, 131

translator follows the

of the poem.

Moment": Ron Padgett


"You Playmates of Mine" and "You

I)

Fhomas.

Pierre Reverdy, "For the

time, 71

Rainer Maria Rilkc.

Who

Never Arrived"

Stephen Mitchell

es, yours,

Yesterday he

my
still

love, is the right

looked in

my

human

face,

Jalal

eyes, yet, 104

you in I'm not talking about, 81

You playmates of mine

in the scattered

parks of the

who

never arrived,

You

will

have the road gate open, the front door

city,

me

this,

ajar,

2S

77

Your thighs are appletrees, 80


Yours

is

Rumi. "Quatrain

Ijive

Cieorge Bugin.

William Radicc

rhe Song of Solomon. ".Songol Songs ". Willis Barnstone.


Marina Tsvetayeva, "Where Docs This Tenderness Come From'" and "Yesterday
He Still L(ked in My Eyes": Elaine Fcinstein.
Tu Fu. "Alone in Her Beauty Witter Bynner
Virgil. "For Thee. Little Boy": James Laughlin

32

51

to tell

ud

Rabindranath lagore, "Linending

You

your birthday comes

dm

John Moyne and Coleman Barks


Jules Supervielle, "Listen. Will You Learn to Hear Me from Afar
Anna Swir, "Parting" C'/eslaw Milos/ and Leonard Nathan.

84

the face that the earth turns to me, 150

176

Dante

Alighieri, Elizabeth Bishop,

Coward, and Edna

St.

Noel

Vincent Millay.

illustrations are equally varied

The

and range from

a statue of an affectionate Egyptian couple

who

more than 4,000 years ago to the contemporary painting The Heart, South of Naples by
lived

Jim Dine. In addition


ture, there are prints

to paintings

and sculp-

and photographs, draw-

ings, frescoes, tapestries,

and objects

in gold

and porcelain.
This exquisite and intriguing anthology has
been edited by Kate Farrell, a poet and a
teacher at Columbia University. Her previous
collection of poetry. Talking to the Sun, edited
for the Museum with Kenneth Koch, was
acclaimed by the Times Literary Supplement
as "one of the most beautiful and evocative

anthologies ever compiled."

Jacket design by Peter Oldenburg

THE METROPOLITAN
MUSEUM OF ART
New

York

Book
Brown and Company

Bulfinch Press

Little,
Boston

Toronto

04-01127-6
PRINTED IN ITALY

London

At the touch of love,


everyone becomes a poet.
PLATO

,\

'.

'1'^

-sa^t^-'.^^^