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Tyrone Li

82-6
10-19-07

The Effects of Different Exercises on Heart Beats per Minute

I. INTRODUCTION
This experiment used multiple exercises and found the heart rate for each
exercise. The purpose of this experiment is to find out which exercise increases
the heart rate the most.

II. VARIABLES
Experiment #1:
B. Experimental Variable: Exercise: Resting, Toe Raises, Bicep Curls, Squats,
Jumping Jacks
C. Dependent Variable: Heart Rate (bpm)
D. Controlled Variables: Same environment, similar test subjects (age)
E. Control Run: Resting exercise
Experiment #2:
F. Experimental Variable: Exercise: Judd's Dance, Push-ups
G. Dependent Variable: Heart Rate (bpm)
H. Controlled Variables: Same environment, similar test subjects (age)

III. HYPOTHESIS
Experiment #1:
If the jumping jacks were performed then the performer would have the highest
heart rate because jumping jacks are performed quickly and involves the whole
body.
Experiment #2:
If Judd's Dance was performed, then the performer would have the highest heart
rate because Judd's Dance is performed quickly and involves the whole body.
I.
IV. MATERIALS
7 x 7 space
Timer
Weights for bicep curls
J.
V. PROCEDURE
Experiment #1:
1. Time resting heart rate by sitting for one minute and counting heartbeats.
2. Perform exercise for one minute and record heart rate.
3. Repeat steps one through three for each exercise.
Experiment #2:
1. Perform exercise for 45 seconds then record heart rate for 15 seconds.
2. Repeat step one for ten minutes.
VI. RESULTS

Table #1: The Effect of the Exercise on the Average Heart Beats per Minute

Table #2: The Effect of the Exercise on the Average Heartbeats per Minute over
Time

Graph #1: The Effect of the Exercise on the Average Heart Beats per Minute
Graph #2: The Effect of the Exercise Performed over Time on the Average
Heartbeats per Minute
VII. CONCLUSION
A. ANALYSIS
The hypotheses set forth in this experiment were if the jumping jacks were
performed then the performer would have the highest heart rate because jumping jacks
are performed quickly and involves the whole body and if Judd's Dance was performed,
then the performer would have the highest heart rate because Judd's Dance is performed
quickly and involves the whole body. The first hypothesis was supported because
jumping jacks had the highest average heartbeats per minute. The second hypothesis was
also supported because Judd's dance had a higher heartbeats per minute rate than the
push-ups.
Graph 1 illustrates that the exercise that had the lowest heartbeat per minute rate
was the resting exercise. Then from then on to the highest is bicep curls, toe raises,
squats, and the highest was jumping jacks. This data supports my hypothesis because the
jumping jacks had a higher average heartbeat per minute rate. One way of explaining this
data is that exercises involving small parts of the body or even no parts of the body have
the least beats per minute such as the toe raises which use only the lower legs, the resting
exercise which incorporates no movement, and the bicep curls which only include the
upper half of the subject's upper body. Then the exercise that has a pretty high but not the
highest beats per minute is the squat which involves the whole lower body. The highest
beats per minute exercise which is the jumping jack uses the whole body while making
the subject move relatively quickly. Although the error bars overlapped, these results
were conclusive because the data from the squats and jumping jacks were significantly
higher than the other ones.
Graph 2 illustrates that Judd's dance had a significantly higher beats per minute
over time most likely because of the fact that it involved a lot of body movements. This
data supports my hypothesis because Judd's dance had a higher beats per minute rate over
time. One way of explaining this data is that Judd's dance incorporated the whole body
while the push-ups only used mainly the upper body. Another way of explaining this data
is that the subject performing Judd's dance performed it enthusiastically, causing his heart
rate to rise substantially. These results were conclusive because the experiment was very
precise and the error bars did not overlap at all.
As a result of these experiments, some questions that arose were if the subject
were not laughing when he performed the dance would the heartbeats per minute be
much lower? Another question was if each subject performed their exercise to the best of
their abilities, would the heartbeats per minute be higher? If these experiments were
repeated, more exercises would be added such as jumping squats and maybe some
exercises such as planks which uses core strength.

K. ASSUMPTIONS & ERRORS


It was assumed that each exercise was completed to the best of each subject's
abilities. It was also assumed that each subject did each exercise correctly.
One source of error was that many subject laughed uncontrollably. This could
have affected the experiment by either lowering their heartbeats per minute rate while
they were laughing or increased it. In order to eliminate this source of error the subjects
could perform the exercises in separate rooms where they would not be able to socialize
because socialization is the main thing that caused the subjects' laughter.
Another source of error was that sometimes each of Judd's dances were slightly
different each time. This could have affected the experiment by altering the performer's
heartbeats per minute rate slightly each time. In order to eliminate this source of error,
instructions on how to perform Jude's Dance correctly should be written out and given to
each performer.