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Year 5/6 Britain since WW2: Weeks 4 - 5

Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening

Word/Sentence

Literacy Narrative: Plan 5 Dramatic Conventions


Independent group activities

Outcomes

Week 1 Tuesday

Week 1 Monday

This plan runs alongside Sessions 4 to 5a, Media World Theme, Britain since World War 2 Topic, but can also be taught independently. Chn look at a variety of prepared
scripts/broadcasts and discuss different types, focussing on news and animations. Chn write their own scripts, and then create a 60 second audio broadcast. You need access to
an interactive whiteboard to be able to watch several of the broadcasts via www.bbc.co.uk and to recording equipment.
Main focus: Relate a
Explain over next two weeks we shall be exploring
Easy/Medium
Hard
Children can:
broadcast to its script.
diff. types of TV and radio scripts, their features
What happens next to Dr Who In small groups chn discuss their
1. Identify
5/4, 6/4. Recognise
& presentation. Watch part of a TV drama, e.g.
and Martha? Take
favourite TV dramas and start to
dramatic
impact of theatrical
episode of Dr Who. Dr Who has been on our TV
some suggestions
write a script based on the
conventions in TV
effects in drama.
screens for many years see
from the group.
characters from that drama. Using
scripts & relate
5/3. Plan & manage a
http://www.bbc.co.uk/archive/changingwho/index.
Give chn outline of the TV script paper and guidance
these to the
group task over time.
shtml. What elements go into making drama, how
scene and scriptnotes (plan resources ) chn
broadcast.
5/9. Experiment with
do actors know what to say? List on w/b: Script,
writing paper (plan incorporate the features listed on
2. Incorporate
different narrative
Actors, Costumes, Cameras, Props, Recording,
resource). Ask the the w/b in the whole class for part of conventions for
forms to write a short
Scenery, Lighting. Look at simplified Dr. Who
chn to write
the lesson on their writing.
scripts in own
script. 6/9. Select words script (plan resource) and enlarge this. Get
Scene 2 of the
writing.
and language drawing on
confident chn acting out parts. How do they know
drama using the
3. Consider roles
their knowledge of
what to do? Highlight stage directions that show
script features
of those behind
literary features.
actors how to act or speak. What other features
discussed in intro.
the camera.
can we identify? Use notes ( plan resource) to
TD
guide discussion.
Plenary
Choose groups of volunteers to act out scripts. Can they follow stage
directions? Ask a volunteer to be a camera operator. Where might
they stand to achieve suggested shots? What about a sound engineer?
Main focus: Compare
Compare drama presented on TV and radio by listening to a clip
Easy/Medium/Hard
Children can:
radio and TV broadcasts. from The Archers on Radio 4 (again this programme has been
In groups, chn look at imaginary scripts from The
1. Compare
5/3. Understand diff ways
around for many years see
Archers and Emmerdale (plan resources ). Highlight the
different types
to take lead & support
http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/herefordandworcester/hi/people_an differences. Allow the group to choose one script to act of narrative
others.
d_places/arts_and_culture/newsid_8710000/8710717.stm) and
out. Discuss and allocate roles, e.g. actors, directors,
texts.
5/4. Perform a scripted
watching a short appropriate scene from Emmerdale on ITV
sound engineer, etc. Chn. could wear wellies and old
2. Contribute to
scene.
(began in 1972). Explain both are long running dramas set in rural
clothing to help them get into role and create some
group discussions
6/4. Devise a performance.
villages. On w/b draw table with column headings: Archers &
authenticity at this stage! TD as required
& take lead
Emmerdale. Using the list of elements used in making drama

Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users

Y5/6 BSWW2 N Plan 5 Weeks 4 5

Year 5/6 Britain since WW2: Weeks 4 - 5


Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening

Week 1 Wednesday

Main focus: Identify


features of good radio
comedy.
5/2, 6/2. Identify some
aspects of talk that vary
acc. to occasion.
5/4, 6/4. Recognise the
impact of theatrical
effects in drama.
5/8. Compare how
themes are presented in
different media.

Week 1 Thursday

5/7. Compare diff. types


of narrative texts and
identify structure.
6/7. Compare how writers
use different structures
to create coherence and
impact.

Main focus: Write a


short audio script.
5/9, 6/9. Experiment
with diff narrative
forms (e.g. drama) to
write their own scripts.
5/11. Adapt sentence
construction to diff
text-types and purpose.
6/10. Use varied
structures to shape and
organise text
coherently.

Word/Sentence

Literacy Narrative: Plan 5 Dramatic Conventions


Independent group activities

created in the previous session start a class discussion - list the


Plenary
features found in TV and radio (script, actors, and recording)
Pose the following question to the groups - Radio v. TV.
before starting to identify unique features, e.g. both dramas
Which media is best for drama and entertainment?
need to have a script but as we only hear a radio drama we dont
Allow time for discussion of the positives for each e.g.
need camera directions, lights or costumes. However sound
TV allows us to see expressions on faces while radio
effects are particularly important for radio. Watch a sequence
allows us to use our imagination more. Move between
of Emmerdale, this time with the screen covered listening to the groups encouraging all chn to contribute their ideas and
sound is it still clear what action is taking place? Repeat the
preferences. Ask each group to select a leader to
exercise with half of the class watching and the other half
present their ideas to class.
trying to describe what is happening from what they hear.
Listen to a radio broadcast Just a Minute on Radio 4
Easy
Medium/Hard
(go to http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/ select Comedy &
Listen to a few more radio
Listen to a few more radio
Quizzes). Discuss with chn whether this programme
comedy broadcasts on BBC
broadcasts on BBC website.
has a script. Why might it not? - Competitors have to
website. Use the Radio Sort
Discuss and note down what
speak spontaneously and make up their lines on the
sheet (plan resource) to
makes a good radio comedy.
spot . Tell chn that this is known as improvising. You
identify the features of radio
Which aspects of the broadcast
simply make up what to say as you go along! Do you
comedy. Tell the chn that this
did they find most or least
think any part of the show has a script? (Beginning
list will be useful when they
entertaining?
when presenter introduces show, speakers & list of
record their own comedy!
TD
topics.) Why does programme work on radio and not on
Plenary
TV? - It is all about verbal dexterity with no need for
Discuss features of good radio comedy? sound effects,
visual acting. Being able to see the competitors would
interesting voices etc. How does it differ from TV? - Radio fast
distract from listening carefully to words.
paced without pauses for scenery shots.
Discuss some comedies
Its really difficult to Easy/Medium
listened to yesterday. What
speak without
Chn work in pairs to write a short script for Just a Minute. Each
did chn enjoy? What features
repeating words. To
pair chooses a topic from sheet (plan resource). They then write a
did they identify? Return to
make it easier we are short script on that topic, to last approximately one minute,
Just a Minute, why is it one
going to write a short without repetition or deviation (they must stick to the subject!).
of the longest running of all
script. To avoid
Explain that the script needs to be bullet notes not the exact
radio comedies? What makes
repetition we will
words, to allow for improvising. Remind chn that as this is a
it enjoyable? (Spontaneity
have to use synonyms comedy they should try to make their script funny. They could
never knowing what people will
words which have
make up a funny incident, e.g. meet Girls Aloud pop group but get
say.) Print out intro and topic
same or similar
them mixed up with The Spice Girls. Give pairs a stop watch to
cards (plan resource). Ask
meaning, e.g.
time their speech. Take it in turns to say their part without
volunteer to be host and read
wet/damp. Pick topic
hesitating.
out intro script. Now ask
card. What words
TD Easy group

Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users

Outcomes
where
appropriate.
Yr 6 also
3. Use a range of
oral techniques
to present
arguments.

Children can:
1. Identify diff
types of talk
(scripted/nonscripted).
2. Compare
presentation of
comedy in
different media.
Year 6
3. Give opinions
about what they
hear.
Children can:
1. Write own
humorous
scripts.
2. Identify and
use synonyms in
their writing.
3. Understand
the purpose of a
thesaurus and
use effectively.
Year 6

Y5/6 BSWW2 N Plan 5 Weeks 4 5

Year 5/6 Britain since WW2: Weeks 4 - 5

Week 1 Friday

Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening

Literacy Narrative: Plan 5 Dramatic Conventions

Word/Sentence

5/6. Group and classify


words according to their
meanings, e.g. exploring
the use of synonyms.

volunteer to speak about topic


on card. Which do they think
is more difficult speaking with
or without a script? The rules
of the comedy are speaking
without hesitation, deviation
or repetition. What do these
all mean?

Main focus: Perform own


prepared scripts.
5/4. Perform a scripted
scene making use of
dramatic conventions.
6/4. Improvise using
drama strategies.
5/4. Use and recognise
the impact of theatrical
effects in drama.
5/7. Explore how writers
use language for
dramatic effects.
5/11. Adapt sentence
construction to diff
text types and purposes.
6/10. Use varied
structures to shape and
organise text.

Set up classroom as Just a


Minute recording studio. Cover
large table with tablecloth and
place 6 chairs around it. Explain
chn will perform own Just a
Minute scripts. Choose child or
adult to act as host; Nicholas
Parsons, and person to time
contestants with stopwatch, and
ring bell when minute is up. Class
take it in turns to be 4
contestants reading aloud their
scripts without hesitation,
repetition or deviation. Check
class remember meanings. Ask
chn what makes a script
humorous? (Telling jokes, word
play and puns, using funny
accents, inventing crazy
situations, coincidences.) On w/b
record possible jokes etc. for
some of the topics.

might we use in
script? Write on w/b.
Can we think of
alternatives? What
can help us? Revise
using a thesaurus.

Teach this
first:
Remind chn
scripts will be
read aloud. This
means style of
sentences
needs to be
short and
snappy so that
a fast pace can
be maintained
and interest of
audience kept.
Demo how to
cut out any
unnecessary
details by
editing sample
script.

Independent group activities


Plenary
Play another Just a Minute from the BBC archives. Can chn think
of any good subjects for topics? Ask volunteers to try speaking
for a minute on their topic. Does a minute seem like a long time?
What skills are needed? (Need to be able to use voice to describe
things that audience cannot see (mime doesnt work well!) use
funny accents and dynamics (loud and soft voice) to make speech
interesting and funny.) Can we make our own scripts funnier? Have
we included any jokes?
Easy/Medium
Hard
Allow chn extra time to practice
As per the easy/medium
reading their scripts and to add
group but allow the chn to
funny material. Imagine this is being
act out their Just a Minute,
performed on radio therefore voices
without a script at first. Tell
have to do all the work. Remind chn
them that this is called
to use dynamics (loud and soft),
improvising. Thinking on
funny accents, etc. They must not
your feet can be hard,
pause as this would be a hesitation
sometimes things can be
but they can slow down and speed up
funny other times they may
where necessary. They may want to
fall flat. Ask the chn to
add these directions in red pen to
record elements of their
their script. TD
improvised minute that
worked well as a script.
Plenary
Explain rules of game. As contestants read their scripts audience
must listen really carefully and challenge when they hear a
transgression either by ringing a bell or shouting out rule breaker.
If audience is correct swap to another contestant. Contestants get 1
point for speaking when bell rings, 1 for incorrect challenge and 1 for
correct challenge of another contestant. Audience judges which
script was the most effective. Have recording equipment available to
record performance.

Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users

Outcomes
4. Edit their
script to ensure
that it will be
well received by
the audience.

Children can:
1. Perform a
scripted scene
for radio media.
2. Use theatrical
effects to add
humour.
3. Include comic
lang. in their
scripts.
4. Adapt
sentences for
reading aloud.
Year 6
5. Improvise to
generate ideas
before recording
them as a script.

Y5/6 BSWW2 N Plan 5 Weeks 4 5

Year 5/6 Britain since WW2: Weeks 4 - 5

Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users

Literacy Narrative: Plan 5 Dramatic Conventions

Y5/6 BSWW2 N Plan 5 Weeks 4 5

Year 5/6 Britain since WW2: Weeks 4 - 5


Week 2 Monday

Objectives

Week 2 Tuesday

Main focus: Look at a


scripted news broadcast.
5/2, 6/2. Listen to
variation and identify
aspects of talk that vary
between formal & informal
occasions and contexts.
5/1. Tell a story using
notes designed to cue
techniques.
6/4. Devise a performance
considering how to adapt
the performance for a
specific audience.
Main focus: Revise
conventions of script
writing.
5/9. Experiment with
diff narrative forms
(e.g. scripts).
6/9. Use narrative
techniques to
engage/entertain.
5/8. Compare how
common theme is
presented in diff. media.
5/4, 6/4. Recognise
impact of dramatic
techniques.

Text/Speaking/Listening

Literacy Narrative: Plan 5 Dramatic Conventions


Independent group activities

Outcomes

Easy
Medium/Hard
Allow chn to select story
Create own short news story for
from BBC website, Your
local news station using report
charts: news story of the
sheet to select subject matter
week. Read thro story and
(plan resource). Ensure that these
then ask chn to rewrite it
chn make use of the stock
in their words as a short
phrases and the time connectives
script for a local news
to link the facts and details
station. TD
contained in the report.
Plenary
Create an imaginary newsroom with table with white tablecloth,
chair and microphone. Ask chn to act out being a
news reporter. They should read through their
scripts in the style of Newsround.
Easy/Medium/Hard
Watch One Minute Movies: Messy Monkey, Chuck McGee Reports,
Donkeys Day Out, A Stalker! Available from
http://www.bbc.co.uk/films/oneminutemovies/. Chn must decide
which type of script, 1, 2 or 3 would have been needed for each
movie and why (see plan resource for suggestions). Chn then choose
one movie to make and write the first few lines of the script in
the appropriate style. TD as required

Children can:
1. Identify
formal language
in news scripts.
2. Compare
news with more
informal radio
scripts.
3. Write own
news stories
using style.
Year 6
4. Use
connectives.

Word/Sentence

Print out cards on the News Report sheet ( plan resource).


Ask volunteers to read aloud each card. Do chn recognise
the type of programme they may have come from? These are
stock phrases used by news reporters. Watch video clip
from Newsround on http://news.bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews/. Do
you think the newsreader uses a script? How do we know?
He doesnt have notes in front of him; explain use of
autocue. Point out that before autocue, boards would have
been held up! Enlarge prepared news script ( plan resource).
Use guidance notes (plan resource) to lead discussion on
differences between this news script and the comedy radio
scripts looked at during week one. Highlight formal voice
used by news readers compared to the informal, almost
chatty style used in the radio comedy.
Remind chn they have looked at scripts for TV drama,
radio comedies and news reports. Tell chn that now they
will look at performances inspired by plays of Shakespeare.
Watch examples of 60 Second Shakespeare
www.bbc.co.uk/drama/shakespeare/60secondshakespeare/
. Revise conventions for script writing, e.g. Yes they are
all divided into scenes, name of speaker, new speaker new
line, etc. but the script is appropriate to the style and
media: 1. Basic dialogue; 2. Radio or audio; 3. TV or screen
play. Highlight the differences between each script type
using
http://www.bbc.co.uk/drama/shakespeare/60secondshake
speare/writing_scripts.shtml - 1. Gives actors their words
with very little instruction, 2. incl. sound effects, 3.
includes description of locations, characters motives,
sound, etc.

Plenary
Which movie did chn like the most? Why? They should give clear
reasons for their choice. Encourage them to think about different
techniques used, e.g. dialogue, stop-motion animation, mime, etc.

Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users

Children can:
1. Identify and
write different
types of script.
2. Compare how
a common
theme appears
in different
scripts.
3. Identify
theatrical
effects.

Y5/6 BSWW2 N Plan 5 Weeks 4 5

Year 5/6 Britain since WW2: Weeks 4 - 5


Objectives
Week 2 Wednesday

Main focus: Evaluate


movies.

5/3. Understand process of


decision-making.
5/4, 6/4. Reflect how drama
can explore complex issues.
5/8. Compare how themes
are presented in different
media.
6/4. Consider impact of
performance; identify ways
of conveying characters &
ideas.

Week 2 Thursday

Main focus: Plan a


dialogue script.
5/9. Vary the pace and
develop viewpoint
through portrayal of
action and selection of
detail.
5/10. Experiment with
the order of sections
to achieve different
effects.
6/10. Use varied
structures to shape &
organise text.
5/11, 6/11. Adapt
sentence construction
to different text
types and purposes
(e.g. scripts).
6/9. Use different
narrative techniques
to engage & entertain
the reader.

Text/Speaking/Listening

Literacy Narrative: Plan 5 Dramatic Conventions


Independent group activities

Outcomes

Easy/Medium
Hard
Allow chn to watch other
This group discuss the
animations on the website.
animations they have already
Using the Short Animation
watched before coming up with
Rating Sheet (plan resource)
ideas for categories in their own
children choose one film that
rating system. Chn can use
they liked best to rate from 1
printed copies of blank (plan
to 5 in a range of categories.
resource) as a template.
TD as required
Plenary
Chn present their recommendations. Can they justify their choice?
Have a class vote; which film do they think is the best? Ask the
chn to imagine that they are giving feedback to the creators.
Easy/Medium
Hard
Chn use Palingenesia
In pairs plan a basic dialogue in the
framework (plan
form of a voice over for Palingenesia.
resources ) to make notes Use timeline from intro. as basic
for a basic dialogue
structure for script. Allow chn to
script for the short film.
watch film, absorbing the images,
Tell chn that the dialogue listening to soundtrack. Voiceover
is a conversation between script takes form of a dialogue
the Earth and a human.
between two characters: Earth and
The film only lasts 3
Human. Remind chn of layout of basic
minutes so the dialogue
script new speaker, new line, etc.
needs to be kept short
This group could include basic
and to the point! Use
directions for the voice over artist
scene headings to plan
such as (angrily) for when Earth
script writing. TD
responds to Human being selfish.
Plenary Allow chn to share some dialogue between the Human and
the Earth. What works well? Take time to look at dialogue set out
correctly as a script. Read poem Important Notice by Philip
Waddell, p375 The Works 2. Mother Nature speaks to Human
Beings International about the damage being done to the Earth.
How might we be able to use parts of this poem to inspire our
script writing? Point out that a writer can be inspired by other
forms of writing. A story writer might use a poem as a starting
point for a story, while a poet might write a poem after reading a
story.

Children can:
1. Understand
how films are
rated.
2. Reflect how
drama can
explore
complex issues.
Year 6
3. Create own
criteria for a
review.

Word/Sentence

Watch animation films, Fetch and The Elephant In The


Room on
http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/filmnetwork/animation . What
features do they share? Both are short, less than 5 min
and animated. Similarities stop there! Fetch is based on a
simple scenario of a man throwing a stick for a dog. What
makes it funny? Whereas Fetch is brightly coloured The
Elephant ... used a limited subdued pallet of colours. Why?
Discuss content sadness of loss of loved one. Even very
complex issues can be addressed in short films. How do
judges decide which films to award prizes to? On w/b
start to note down criteria for rating short films, e.g.
funny (see plan resource for ideas).
On w/b write: 1. Basic dialogue, 2.
Radio or audio, 3. TV or screen
play. Can chn describe features
of each type of script? Write
ideas on w/b. Watch short
animation Palingenesia on BBC
website. This animation has no
words. Ask chn. to watch the
images carefully and listen to the
soundtrack. Explain film is a kind
of warning about what humans are
doing to the planet. Ask chn to
imagine they have to write a
script of a dialogue between the
Earth and a human. What might
the Earth say? What would its
view of all the smoke, factories,
guns, etc be? Collect ideas and
write on w/b. What might the
human response be? (I like to
travel and see the world I need
my car. Factories make food for
my family to eat, etc.) Start to
layout ideas as a basic dialogue
script.

Draw horizontal line on


w/b. This is a timeline
of Palingenesia. Chn
plot what happens in
film. Start with
beginning and end (same
scene is repeated as if
history repeats itself).
Divide line up into
sections, e.g. section on
war. Tell chn that these
sections can become
scenes in their script.
Give each section a
title like chapters then
collect ideas for
dialogue between Earth
and human. As the film
is short, dialogue needs
to be kept short and
pacy with short
sentences.
Demonstrate how to
edit dialogue to keep
pace flowing.

Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users

Children can:

1. Plan a basic
dialogue script in
sections
(scenes).
2. Adapt
sentences to fit
short film
format.
3. Use other
forms of writing
as inspiration.
Year 6
4. Give directions
to the actor to
suggest how lines
should be read.
5. Ensure that
their script
closely follows
the action on
screen.

Y5/6 BSWW2 N Plan 5 Weeks 4 5

Year 5/6 Britain since WW2: Weeks 4 - 5


Week 2 Friday

Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening

Main focus: Write own


dialogue script.
5/9. Write using different
narrative forms.
6/9. Use different
narrative techniques to
engage & entertain the
reader.
5/4, 6/4. Explore complex
issues by working in role.
5/9. Reflect independently
and critically on own writing
and edit and improve it.
5/11, 6/11. Punctuate
sentences accurately to
clarify meaning.

Literacy Narrative: Plan 5 Dramatic Conventions


Independent group activities

Word/Sentence

Enlarge images of the Earth (plan


resources ). How does it make us feel
to see the damage humans are creating
through pollution, etc. How do we think
Earth might respond? What kind of
voice might Earth use; angry, sad,
frustrated? Can we add these as stage
directions to our script? (Earth:
(Angrily) Stop the destruction before
its too late!) Tell chn that words that
say how something is done are adverbs.
Remind chn they must edit their
scripts to ensure they only last 3 min.
Demo how to cut words, without losing
the meaning.

Discuss adverbs
and how they
might be helpful to
the reader or
performer. On the
f/c make a list of
adverbs that
might be useful
for this task.
Which adverbs
would be best
suited to the
Earth which to the
Human.

Easy/Medium/Hard
Allow chn time to finish writing scripts. Explain that although
this is a basic dialogue script we will add stage directions for
how to speak, e.g. angrily, sadly, aggressively . This will help us
to make the performance more dramatic and effective. This
will turn the script into more of a screenplay. Allow chn time
to practise reading script aloud in pairs. Does it work when
spoken aloud? Try timing script? Does it last for 3 min? If it
is too long chn should edit out any unnecessary words. TD
Plenary (May need more time )
Divide class into two or three groups (additional adults might
be useful for this task ). In the groups, chn perform their
scripts in pairs as the film is playing on the computer. Are the
scripts effective? Have they made the film more enjoyable to
watch? Is the viewing experience improved by adding words?

Outcomes
Children can:
1. Write a
dialogue script.
2. Explore
complex issues
through their
script writing.
3. Edit and
improve own
work.
4. Use correct
punctuation for
script writing.

Scroll down for success criteria and book & website lists

Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users

Y5/6 BSWW2 N Plan 5 Weeks 4 5

Year 5/6 Britain since WW2: Weeks 4 - 5

Literacy Narrative: Plan 5 Dramatic Conventions

Success criteria for the plan these should be selected & adjusted to match the specific needs of the class being taught.
Easy
Medium
Hard
Relate TV scripts to matching
broadcasts
Consider roles of those behind the
camera
Contribute to group discussions and take
the lead where appropriate
Identify difference between scripted
and improvised
Perform a scripted scene for radio
media.
Begin to use theatrical effects to add
humour
Use some conventions for scripts in own
writing
Write own humorous scripts
Write own news stories matching their
style to the style of news bulletins
Begin to identify and use synonyms
Understand purpose of a thesaurus
Identify a common theme in different
scripts
Plan a basic dialogue script in sections
(scenes)
Adapt sentences to fit short film format
Use other forms of writing as inspiration
Edit and improve own work
Use correct punctuation for script
writing

Identify dramatic conventions in TV scripts


and relate these to the matching broadcast
Consider roles of those behind the camera
Contribute to group discussions and take the
lead where appropriate
Identify different types of talk on the radio,
i.e. scripted and non-scripted (improvised)
Perform a scripted scene for radio media
Use theatrical effects to add humour
Incorporate conventions for scripts in own
writing
Write own humorous scripts
Identify formal language in news scripts
Write own news stories using appropriate style
Identify and use synonyms in their writing
Understand purpose of a thesaurus, use
effectively
Compare how a common theme appears in
different scripts
Plan a basic dialogue script in sections (scenes)
Adapt sentences to fit short film format
Use other forms of writing as inspiration
Explore complex issues through their script
writing
Edit and improve own work
Use correct punctuation for script writing

Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users

Identify dramatic conventions in TV scripts and relate these to


the matching broadcast
Incorporate conventions for scripts in own writing
Consider roles of those behind the camera
Contribute to group discussions & take lead where appropriate
Use a range of oral techniques to present arguments
Identify different types of talk on the radio, i.e. scripted and
non-scripted (improvised)
Edit their script to ensure that it will be well received by the
audience
Write own humorous scripts
Identify and use synonyms in their writing
Understand the purpose of a thesaurus and use effectively
Perform a scripted scene for radio media
Use theatrical effects to add humour
Adapt sentences for reading aloud
Improvise to generate ideas before recording them as a script
Identify formal language in news scripts
Write own news stories using appropriate style
Identify and write different types of script using connectives
Compare how a common theme appears in different scripts
Give directions to the actor to suggest how lines should be
read
Ensure that their script closely follows the action on screen.
Explore complex issues through their script writing
Edit and improve own work
Use correct punctuation for script writing

Y5/6 BSWW2 N Plan 5 Weeks 4 5

Year 5/6 Britain since WW2: Weeks 4 - 5

Literacy Narrative: Plan 5 Dramatic Conventions

Books:
Poem - Important Notice by Philip Waddell (p373), The Works 2 Edited by Brian Moses and Pie Corbett, MacMillan. ISBN: 0330399020
Websites:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/comedy/show/p003cmwf - Some recordings of Just a Minute
http://news.bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews/hi/clips/default.stm - Newsround video clips or http://news.bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews/default.stm - most recent
clips
http://www.bbc.co.uk/drama/shakespeare/60secondshakespeare/ Video and audio clips of 60 Second Shakespeare short dramas based on
Shakespeares plays
http://www.bbc.co.uk/drama/shakespeare/60secondshakespeare/writing_scripts.shtml Samples of basic dialogue, audio/radio and
TV/screenplay scripts
http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/filmnetwork/animation Short animation films including Fetch, The Elephant in the Room and Palingenesia (scroll
through the pages at the bottom of this page)
Visual Resources:
Recorded clips Dr. Who
Recorded audio -The Archers, Radio 4
Recorded clips Emmerdale
The links to the websites and the contents of the web pages associated with such links specified on this list (hereafter collectively referred to as the Links) have been checked by Hamilton Trust and to the best
of Hamilton Trusts knowledge, are correct and accurate at the time of publication. Notwithstanding the foregoing or any other terms and conditions on the Hamilton Trust website, you acknowledge that Hamilton
Trust has no control over such Links and indeed, the owners of such Links may have removed such Links, changed such Links and/or contents associated with such Links. Therefore, it is your sole responsibility to
verify any of the Links which you wish you use. Hamilton Trust excludes all responsibility and liability for any loss or damage arising from the use of any Links.

Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users

Y5/6 BSWW2 N Plan 5 Weeks 4 5