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TOLLESON UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT

COURSE:
GRADE 9 ENGLISH
UNIT:
QUARTER 3UNIT OVERVIEW
AUTHORS PURPOSE/POINT OF VIEW/RHETORICAL STRATEGIES/RESEARCH/ARGUMENT
WRITING
In Unit Three, Quarter Three students will assess how point of view or purpose shapes the
content and style of a text. Through the largely informational text focus of this unit,
students will have an opportunity to explore and analyze arguments in many different
forms, from environmental issues to advertising to political debates. Through the
examination of texts from many modalities (print, visual, audio, multi-media) students will
understand how rhetorical strategies persuade audiences, and will learn to critique texts
in various mediums for accuracy and validity. Students will include a focus on a study of
how language functions in different contexts, and the specific differences in word choice
and style for various audiences.
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of
the reasoning,
Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid
reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence (include all elements). Students will
conduct an extended formal academic research project. While the focus in Unit Two was
presenting findings to peers, in Unit Three students will focus on using technology to
convey their findings (final projects may include I-Movies, podcasts, websites,
PowerPoints, etc.)
RECOMMENDED TEXTS AND
RESOURCES
Literary Texts: Cultural Influence
on Community
The Seven Ages of Man,
Shakespeare (Poem)
The Road Not Taken, Frost (Poem)
Instructor choice
Animal Farm, Orwell
Of Mice and Men, Steinbeck
The House of the Scorpion, Farmer
Informational Texts
Fast Food Nation, Eric Schlosser
How Private is your Life?
(Optional teacher choice)
If You Pitch it They Will Eat
Dont Blame the Eater
Bowing to Pressure
National Geographic
Multi-Modal Resources
Super Size Me
Animal Farm (film clips)

KEY ASSESSMENTS
ELA Standards-Aligned District Benchmark Q3
Mid Unit Writing Performance Task
All students are required to produce a substantive writing
sample at mid-unit. This piece should be of a length that is
adequate to serve as a practice/scaffolding for the end of
unit Performance Task. The prompt provided to students
would be text-dependent and should align to the writing
standards in this unit.
Suggested prompts:
Using the literary text identify and analyze the ways in which
the author uses rhetorical strategies (e.g. diction, figurative
language, characterization, symbolism, etc.) to assert a
central message.

Analyze a speech for rhetorical devices and their purpose,


identify the authors purposeful manipulation of language,
the elements of argument within a speech and write an
analysis of a speech with in-text documentation.

End of Unit Writing Performance Task


In Unit Three students learned to identify and analyze the
ways in which authors use rhetorical strategies (e.g.
repetition, appeals to emotion, figurative and connotative
language) to influence, persuade, and even manipulate their
audiences. Focusing on one of the informational texts in this
unit (e.g. Fast Food Nation) state a claim asserting what the
authors primary purpose and intended audience might have
been for the piece. Support your claim by providing textual
evidence that illustrates rhetorical devices.

SKILLS AND CONCEPTS


RI/RL
1

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences
drawn from the text.

RI/RL
6

RI Determine an authors point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance
that point of view or purpose.
RL Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United
States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

RI 8

Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the
evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

W1

Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant
and sufficient evidence (include all elements).

W6

Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and update individual or shared writing
products taking advantage of technologys capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly
and dynamically.

W8

Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches
effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the
text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation
including footnotes and endnotes.

SL 3

Evaluate a speakers point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning
or exaggerated or distorted evidence.

L3

Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices
for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
A. Vary syntax for effect, consulting references (e.g., Tuftes Artful Sentences) for guidance as needed; apply an
understanding of syntax to the study of complex test when reading.

Note: the following standards denote overarching year-end mastery of foundational skills and are embedded in each unit.
RL.10: Read and comprehend grade level complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently
W.10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two)
for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
L.1, L2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking, and command of the conventions
of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

INSTRUCTIONAL SEQUENCE
Review the anchor standards identified in this unit at your grade level. Review the grade
above/below to ensure mastery of the cognitive progressions in the skills and concepts.
WEEKS 1-2: INTRODUCTION/LEARNING TARGETS/TEXTS
WHAT

WHY

HOW

Continue to support
classroom protocols
and culture

Learning occurs best


in a community
where norms and

Review key elements of proper research methods;


finding valid resources and how to utilize EBSCO when
researching a topic.

goals are established.


Identify the meaning of plagiarism and digital
citizenship
Identify overarching key terms within this unit; point of
view, purpose, content, style, argument, persuade,
rhetorical devices, etc.
Analyze the difference between argumentative and
persuasive writing.
Unit Overview,
introduction, and
historical/cultural
context

Real world context


and authentic life
applications are
important to learning.

Review the Argumentative Writing Rubric with students


and additional writing expectations related to
developing insightful ideas and content.
Have students write a baseline essay.
Review the trajectory of the unit, including the focus
standards that drive the content of the unit. Help
students understand the purpose of the unit of study.

Close reading of
unit texts

True understanding
often comes from
reading between the
lines.
Many texts require
skill and patience to
decode.

Continue close
reading and
analysis with text
dependent
questions

Use multi-modal resources to introduce first text


(teacher choice based on list)
Require students to identify audience, purpose, and
main idea of a variety of essays on a regular basis so
that this becomes an automatic summarizing technique

Academic discussions
about text should
primarily focus on the
text itself and the
authors intent.

Independent, pair, and small group exploration of textdependent questions

Good evidence for


any claim about an
authors message or
style derives from
text.

Demonstration of understanding through the


construction of TDQs

WHAT

WHY

HOW

Continue
introduction of
additional texts

It is important to
consider issues from
various points of view
and in differing
contexts

Use outside articles, videos, and study guides to


provide historical context for the literature

Use close reading template to create an analysis of the


literature under discussion and to document each
students analysis for later integration in later projects
and writing tasks
WEEKS 3-4: TEXT DEPENDENT INQUIRY/COLLABORATIVE EXPLORATION OF TEXTS

Integrate and
differentiate
informational and
literary works

Independent, pair, and small group exploration of textdependent questions


Strategies might include:
jigsaw(https://k20center.ou.edu/instructionalstrategies/jigsaw) , first word last word
(https://k20center.ou.edu/instructional-strategies/firstword-last-word), C.E.R.
(https://k20center.ou.edu/instructional-strategies/calim-

evidence-reasoning)
Additional Instructional Strategies https://k20center.ou.edu/instructional-strategies
Focus: Explore and
analyze arguments
in many different
forms.
Include a focus on a
study of how
language functions
in different
contexts, and the
specific differences
in word choice and
style for various
audiences.
Focus: Understand
how rhetorical
strategies persuade
audiences, and will
learn to critique
texts in various
mediums for
accuracy and
validity.

Meaningful
communication takes
place in a logical
sequence with
interconnected
elements.

Purdue Owl: Argumentative Resources


(https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/588/04)
Logic in Argumentative Writing:
(https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/659/1)
The Modes of Persuasion: Ethos, Pathos, and Logos
(http://pathosethoslogos.com)
The Three Types of Argument: Deductive, Inductive
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXW5mLE5Y2g)
and Abductive (https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=vflZuk-_Hz4)

The structure of
communication can
be as important as
the words in
determining
meaning.

Rhetorical devices list: (https://hhs-englishiv.wikispaces.com/file/view/Rhetorical+Devices.pdf)


Video Prezi: (https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=6WXbJyfkgxg)
Rhetorical strategies:
(http://www.miracosta.edu/home/dperales/newrhetorica
l%20strategies.htm)
Video Rhetorical strategies in Disney Songs:
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nkRC4DZF-_U)

Culminating and
increasingly
independent
analysis of theme,
main idea, and
language resources

Teachers must
gradually release
responsibility for
learning to the
students.

Mid-Unit writing
task

Mid-Unit Writing Task:


Analyze a speech for rhetorical devices and their
purpose, identify the authors purposeful manipulation
of language, the elements of argument within a speech
and write an analysis of a speech with in-text
documentation.

Analyzing a Speech for Rhetorical Devices:


(http://www.readwritethink.org/classroomresources/lesson-plans/analyzing-famous-speechesarguments-30526.html?tab=4#student-assessment)
WEEKS 5-6: INFERENCES AND CLAIMS/ORGANIZING EVIDENCE/TESTING IDEAS
WHAT

WHY

HOW

Move toward
completion of text
explorations

Participate in
academic discourse
and studentcentered
collaboration
processing texts

Constructing
meaning through the
integration of new
and old ideas
requires stamina and
perseverance.

Additional Text and Rhetorical Strategies:


http://www.isbe.net/common_core/pdf/ela-teach-stratread-text-6-12.pdf (pages 74+)

Proficiency in
academic language
provides access to
opportunity.

Group debates: (http://www.procon.org/debatetopics.php)

Provide students with examples of text where the


author attempts (or pretends to attempt) to maintain
objectivity and assess
whether an opinion or point of view can be ascertained
in some of these cases

Socratic Seminar:
(http://pms.pasco.k12.fl.us/wpcontent/uploads/pms/2014/08/Socratic-Seminar.pdf)
(https://www.paideia.org/socratic-questioning)

Elaborate on text
analyses and
gather evidence for
writing
performance task

Argument from
evidence creates
credibility and
reliability.

Elaboration strategies:
(http://www.readwritethink.org/professionaldevelopment/strategy-guides/iced-elaboration31096.html)
Writing Techniques:
(http://www.readwritethink.org/professionaldevelopment/strategy-guides/developing-evidencebased-arguments-31034.html)
Public Service Announcement:
(http://www.readwritethink.org/classroomresources/lesson-plans/mytube-changing-world-with1069.html)

Target and teach


specific skills in
need of
development based
on formative data
to date

Self-reflection
promotes academic
growth.

Argument Essay:
(https://www.kibin.com/essay-writingblog/argumentative-essay-outline)
(http://web.calstatela.edu/faculty/cendy/writing_tips.pdf
)
(https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/685/05)

WEEKS 7-9: DECONSTRUCT PERFORMANCE TASK/RUBRIC REVIEW/WRITING


PROCESS/PRESENTATIONS
WHAT
WHY
HOW
Unpack
performance
task/discussion
Rubric
annotation and
review

A clear vision of our


goals/targets
provides an organic
road map to
success.

Highlight key ideas of the rubric and discuss key elements:


(See attached rubric)
S:\Curriculum\English\AzMerit Argumentative Rubric.docx

Writing Process

The prescribed and


proven steps of the
writing process
support clear and
effective
communication

Prompt:
In Unit Three, students learned to identify and analyze the
ways in which authors use rhetorical strategies (e.g.
repetition, appeals to emotion, figurative and connotative
language) to influence, persuade, and even manipulate
their audiences. Focusing on one of the informational texts
in this unit (e.g. Fast Food Nation) state a claim asserting
what the authors primary purpose and intended audience
might have been for the piece. Support your claim by
providing textual evidence that illustrates rhetorical
devices.

Galileo
StandardsAligned End-ofUnit Assessment

The end of unit


assessment allows
reflection on
student and
teacher progress
toward established
goals and to shape
and form
instruction

Galileo Directions:
S:\Curriculum 2017\11th Grade\Resources\Galileo Cheat
Sheet pub .pdf

Presentation and
peer review of
final writing
performance
tasks

Education does not


happen in isolation.
The sharing and
celebration of ideas
demonstrates and
validates growth.

After peer response has taken place, use the AzMerit


rubric to provide feedback on student work. You may
change the values of the different
categories/requirements to better suit the learning
goals for your classroom.

Appendix
Progression of Standards
W.9-10.1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or
texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence (include all
elements).
A. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or
opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear
relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
B. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while
pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that
anticipates the audiences knowledge level and concerns.
C. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create
cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons,
between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
D. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to
the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
E. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the
argument presented.