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ISSN 2347-1921

Incompressibility and Existence of Navier- Stokes Equations


Kawaljit Singh
kawaljitsinghw@gmail.com
ABSTRACT
In this paper, we represents incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, i.e. fluid is incompressible in the domain .
Navier-Stokes equations have wide applications in fluid mechanics, air and sea navigation. Mathematicians have not
proven yet these equations. In this paper we describe incompressibility and existence of these equations in the domain
2

(n=2), Navier-Stokes problem is now included in the Millenium problems of Clay mathematics Institute.

Keywords; Newtons second law of motion; incompressibility; viscosity; molecular dynamics.

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Journal: Journal of Advances in Mathematics


Vol 1, No1
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INTRODUCTION
In this paper, we study the motion of fluid membrane and Incompressibilty of fluid, and existence of Navier-Stokess three
impotant equations. Navier-Stokes equations are the most important and famous equations for turbulent flow of fluid or
wind from a century. The Proof of Navier-Stokes equations is most challenging for all Mathematician from all around the
world.
Navier-Stokes equations were originally derived in the 1840s on the basis of conservation laws and first- order
approximations. But if one assumes sufficient randomness in microscopic molecular in processes in fluid they can also be
derived from molecular dynamics, as done in the early 1900s.
The major difficulty in obtaining a time-accurate solution for an incompressible flow arises from the fact that the continuity
equation does not contain the time-derivative explicitly. The constraint of mass conservation is achieved by an implicit
coupling between the continuity equation and the pressure in the momentum equations. One can use an explicit time
advancement scheme which obtains the pressure at the current time-step such that the continuity equation at the next step
is satisfied. However, for fully implicit or semi implicit schemes, the aforementioned difficulty prevents the use of the
conventional Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) scheme to advance in time as is the case for compressible flows.
For very low Reynolds numbers and simple geometries, it is often possible to find explicit formulas for solutions to the
Navier-Stokes equations. But even in the regime of flow where regular arrays of eddies are produced, analytical methods
have never yielded complete explicit solutions. In this regime, however, numerical approximations are fairly easy to find.
Since about the 1960s computers have been powerful enough to allow computations at least nominally to be extended to
considerably higher Reynolds numbers. And it has become increasingly common to see numerical results given far into the
turbulent regime - leading sometimes to the assumption that turbulence has somehow been derived from the NavierStokes equations. But just what such numerical results actually have to do with detailed solutions to the Navier-Stokes
equations is not clear. Our understanding of them remians minimal.The challenge is to make substantial progress towards
a mathematical theory which will unlock hidden secrets in Navier-Stokes equations.

Mathematical Approach of Navier-Stokes Equations


The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations describe the motion of a fluid in (n=2,3). These equations can be solved for an
n

unknown velocity vector

, 1 i n
u x, t ui x, t

and pressure

P x, t defined for position x and

t 0

time

ui
u
P
uk i ui
f i x, t
t k 1 xk
xi
n

div u

i 1

ui
0
xi

with intial conditions

where n

....(1)

x n , t 0

.....(2)

u x,0 u 0 x , x R n

.....(3)

Equation (1) is just Newtons second law of motion f = ma for a fluid element subject to the external
force f fi x, t , 1

x n and to the forces arising from pressure and friction. Equation (2) just says the

incompressibility of fluid . W here

fi x, t are the components of a given externally applied force ( for e.g. gravity) ,
n

is +ve coefficient of viscosity and

i 1

2
0
is a Laplacian operator in the space variables. u x is a given,
2
xi

C divergence-free vector field on n . Equation (1), (2), (3) are Euler equations with equal to zero.

Incompressibility and Existence


Cosider a fluid membrane. Let PQRS shape of an element an element of the membrane at any time t. Let PQRS be
projections of PQRS on xy-plane. We wish to obtain position change

u x, y, t

at any point

x, y at any time t>0.

First we cosider the following assumptions:


(a) The mass of the fluid membrane per unitvarea is constant

(say)

(b) The whole motion takes place in a direction perpendicular to xy- plane.

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(c) The surface tension T per unit length developed by fluid membrane molecules is same at all points. We consider
T does not change during the motion.
(d) The position change of

u x, y, t

is small as compared to the size of the membrane. All angles of inclination

are small.

Fig 1.1
If we consider motion of the element PQRS , The forces

T y on its opposite edges QR of length y act at angles

and to the horizontal.


These have vertical components

T y sin T y sin

T y sin sin
Since

and

are so small so that

sin tan , sin tan

T y tan tan
u
u
T y

x x x x x
Where

u
tan
x x x

So similarly the forces

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T x

is the slope and

u
tan is also slope.
x x

act on the edges PQ and SR of length

x have a vertical component


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u
u
T x

y y y y y
Area of the portion PQRS is

u
2
t

x y and mass is x y . Again the acceleration of the fluid membrane in vertical

direction is

. Using Newtons laws of motion P = mf the equation of the portion PQRS is

u
u
2u
u
u
T y
T x
x y 2
y y y y y
t
x x x x x
Dividing both sides by

x y , we have

u
u
u
u

T y
- T x
2
x x x x x
y y y y y u

x
y
T 2t
As

y 0 and y 0 , then equation

.(4)

(4) gives the result

2u 2u 2u

2 x 2 y T 2t
From equation (3) the intial condition

....(5)

u x,0 u 0 x ,

u
2u
0 2 0
t
t

Then Eq.(5) becomes

2u 2u

0
2 x 2 y

2u 0

This result shows that Eq.(2) is incompressible i.e. the incompressibility of fluid in two dimensional ( )
2

There fore Navier-Stokes equations exits. Equations (1), (2), (3) are Euler equations with equal to zero.
.REFERENCES

[1] O.Ladyzhensaka,The Mathematical Theory of Viscous Incompressible Flow (2ndedition) Gordan and
Breach, New York,1969.
[2] Charles L. Fefferman, Millennium problem description of Navier-stokes equations, Clay Mathematics
Institute.
[3] L.Caffarelli, R. Kohn, and L.Nirenberg, Partial regularity of suitable weak solutions of the Navier-stokes
equations, Pure and Applied Math.35 (1982), 771-831.
[4] F.H.Lin, a new proof of the Caffareel-Kohn-Nirenberg theorem, Pure and Applied Math. 51
(1998), 241-257
[5] P. Constantin, Some open problems and research directions in the Mathematical study of fluids
dynamics, Mathematics Unlimited-2001, Springer Verlag, Berlin, 2001, 353-360.

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[6] J.Leray, Sur le movement d liquid visquex emplissesent lespce, Acta math. 63 (1934), 193-248. [7]
V. Schefffer, An inviscid flow with compact support in spacetime, J. Geom Analysis 3 (1993), 343401.
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