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wahid

thalatha (th as in
bath)
khamsa

saba

tisa

ahada ashar

11

thalatha ashar

13

khamsa ashar

15

saba ashar

17

tisa ashar

19

wahed wa-ishrun

21

thalatha wa-ishrun

23

khamsa wa-ishrun

25

saba wa-ishrun

27

tisa wa-ishrun

29

wahid wa-thalathun

31

ithnan wa-arbaun

42

thalatha wa-khamsun

53

arba'a wa-sittun

64

khamsa wa-sabun

75

sitta wa-thamanun

86

sab'a wa-tisun

97

alf

1000

alfain

2000

Arabic Numbers

sifr

ithnan

arbaa

sitta

thamaniya (th in thin)

ashra

10

ithna ashar

12

arbaa ashar

14

sitta ashar

16

thamaniya ashar

18

ishrun

20

ithnane wa-ishrun

22

arbaa wa-ishrun

24

sitta wa-ishrun

26

thamaniya wa-ishrun

28

thalathun

30

arbaun

40

khamsun

50

sittun

60

sabun

70

thamanun

80

tisun

90

mi'a

100

mi'at alf

100000

Million

10000000

Forming numbers in Arabic is quite easy, from 13 to 19 you just place


a number before ten for example 13 = three ten, instead of thirteen in English, 17 is
seven ten in Arabic. From 21 to 99 you just need to reverse the numbers and add (wabetween the two numbers) 36 would be six wa- thirty instead of thirty six (sitta wathalathun), (wa means and).
0 is sifr in Arabic, from which the word cipher came. For 11 and 12 theyre irregular,
so just remember how to write them by now (11 = ehda ashar, 12 = ithna ashar).
So in general, numbers standing alone are easy to use, or say. The hard part is that
numbers 3 to 10 have a unique rule of agreement with nouns known as polarity: A
numeral in masculine gender should agree with a feminine referrer and vice versa
(thalathatu awlaad = three boys), boys are masculine plural, so the feminine form of

number 3 should be used (which is thalathatu, and not thalathu which is the masculine
form, the u at the end of numbers is used when a number is followed by another word
to make an easy jump to the next word) (thalathu banaat = three girls) banaat = girls,
which is feminine plural, therefore a masculine form of number 3 should be used
(thalathu). That may sound complicated but once you get used to it, it will not be as
hard as it seems now, besides most Arab natives make mistakes or simply dont care
about matching the gender and the number.

Arabic Ordinal Numbers:


Ordinal numbers in Arabic are almost like the cardinal numbers, with some
exceptions in the numbers from 1 to 10, and a slight difference in numbers from 11
and up.
Note that ordinal numbers in Arabic are somehow like adjectives, so they have to take
the masculine, or feminine form. Please check the adjectives page for more
information.
First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Sixth
Seventh
Eighth
Ninth
Tenth
Eleventh
Twelfth

Arabic Cardinal Numbers


Awwal
Thani
Thaleth
Rabe
Khaames
Sadis
Sabe
Thamen
Tase
acher
Hady achar
Thani achar

Oula
Thania
Thaletha
Rabea
Khaamesa
Sadisa
Sabea
Thamena
Tasea
achera
Hadiata achar
Thania achar