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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015 I VOLUME 34 I NUMBER 40

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KEEPING TECH OUT


OF CHINATOWN
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Vol. 34 | No. 40
october 22-28, 2015

Edi torial

Editors Jeremy Lybarger, Chris Roberts


art dirEctor Audrey Fukuman
staff WritErs

Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez, Julia Carrie Wong


arts & culturE Editor Peter Lawrence Kane
Music Editor Matt Saincome
contributors Rae Alexandra, Michael Barba,

Sherilyn Connelly, Jonathan Curiel, Irene Hsiao,


Brad Japhe, Eddie Jorgensen, Anita Katz, Jonathan
Kiefer, Siouxsie Q, Dan Savage, Katy St. Clair, Katie
Tandy, Silke Tudor, Chris Zaldua

p.33

art

contributing artist and PhotograPhEr

Mike Koozmin, Fred Noland

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dirEctor of MarkEting
and crEativE sErvicEs Cheryl Fletcher
sEnior dEsignErs Bill Evans, Doran Shelley
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The LasT empress


Chinatown takes a stand
against the tech invasion.
By Julia Carrie Wong
PAGe 8

Marcio Rivera
advErt ising

chiEf rEvEnuE officEr Jay Curran


advErtising dirEctor Dave Saltman
bu si nEss

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5 Letters
6 sucka Free city
8 News
Chem Tales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
10 cover story
18 the caLeNdar
Event Listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
28 arts & cuLture
The Whore Next Door . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Film Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Film Showtimes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Kill Your Television . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
33 eat
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Distillations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
39 Music
Some Thoughts
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Hear This . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

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SHIT TALK

Writers on the storm: For every citi-

zen of San Francisco who reads this


well-written and informative article (Shit
Storm, Julia Carrie Wong, 10/15/15),
please take the time to write Mayor Lee
and your supervisor urging them to take
the necessary steps to (1) properly compensate all of the victims of the citys
sewer and storm drain system failure for
their documented losses, and (2) fix this
problem. The entire city benefits from the
use of the storm and sewer system, but its
a very small section of the city that suffers
when the system fails. Mark Epstein

DISS-ENGAGED

Better late than Lee: I didnt see this

guy do a darn thing of substance to


dump Ed Lee earlier this year or earlier in
Ed Lees term (The Man Who Cursed
the Mayor, Chris Roberts, 10/15/15).
Where was this brilliant, oh-so-smart
POC street prophet in 2011? Was he actively helping one of the other candidates? No, because people like him think
elections are for nerds and dont care.
Now that he can boost his struggling
hip plop career with an Ed Lee diss, hes
active when its useless. This is why
the Mission is evicting your ass, dude.

Equipto Unequipped

sfweekly.com

If we dont take you out, the earthquake will. Thats a fucking promise.
zakku

JANES AFFLICTION

PROMISES, PROMISES

not elected to the state senate (State


Senate Race Gets Interesting With Candidacy of Jane Kim, Jeremy Lybarger,
The Snitch, 10/14/15). She is presently
the representative for S.F.s Tenderloin,
South of Market, and Mid-Market areas
just look at one of those districts and
ask yourself if this woman deserves to be
in government. I wish shed go back to
wherever she came from because she has
ruined this city! Douglas

see Im not the only Bay Area native getting sick of these out-of-town fucks coming into our city with no regard for the
communities or cultures that have been
here long before they arrived (Fatal Police Shooting At 8th and Market, Julia
Carrie Wong, The Snitch, 10/15/15).
They want to destroy it, so its time for us
real Bay Areans to destroy them back. We
wont make this city pleasant for you. We
wont take it lying down anymore. We
want our city back. If we dont take you
out, the earthquake will. Thats a fucking
promise. Zakku

See Jane Run: I pray this woman is

CIVIL (SERVICE) WAR

Missing the point, part one: San


Fran is full of armed thugs (Argument
That Began Aboard Muni Bus Leaves
Victims With Life-Threatening Injuries,
Jeremy Lybarger, The Snitch, 10/16/15).
Meth, heroin, and crack heads are everywhere. The buses are about as safe as war
zones. This is the price people pay for decades-old Affirmative Action policies
where people get civil service jobs because of their sexual orientation, color of
their skin, or gender. Whens the last
time our Dear Readers saw a heterosexual European-American male working a
civil service job? Roch

Missing the point, part two: Glad to

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Sugarwolf

Janet Jackson at Bill Graham Civic Auditorium.

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mOnTh22-28,
XX-XX,2015
2015 || 51

NEWS

SUCKA FREE CITY

Mo Money, Mo
Witnesses?

Ed and Julie, Besties

The city hopes bigger payouts


will entice murder witnesses
to come forward.
Supervisor London Breed is

Mayor Ed Lee is spending an awful lot of time with Supervisor Julie Christensen.
By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez
Together they played ping-pong

in the park, gawked at lion dancers, hid


under desks with schoolkids, and posed
with the twirling beauties of North Beachs
Festa Coloniale Italiana.
Such is the montage of joint public
appearances by Mayor Ed Lee and Supervisor Julie Christensen over the past
few months. Christensen, a mayoral
apppointee, faces an election challenge
next month from former Supervisor
Aaron Peskin.
And Lee is using every opportunity
to remind the public of his choice for
the office.
A review of Lees official city schedule
shows at least 11 mayoral events in
Chinatown and North Beach with Christensen since April.
By contrast, the other 10 members
of the Board of Supervisors may have
forgotten what Lee looks like. The mayor
has had five events with Board President
London Breed, one with Malia Cohen,
one with Scott Wiener and no announcements of exclusive events with
the other seven supervisors.
Winning Chinatown is key for
Christensen, who has potentially
alienated voters there through several
verbal gaffes (calling tenants there
lower-class instead of low-income;
referring to the Stockton Street tunnel
as a wormhole). This may be why Lee,
hugely popular in the Chinese community, appears attached to Christensens
hip.
Christensen is also receiving plenty
of free social media exposure on city

time. Lee chronicled her cameo at his


annual ping-pong tournament via his
official Twitter feed.
Playing a friendly match with @SupeChristensen at #ChinatownPingPong
tournament. I can tell shes been practicing! Lee (or his press people) tweeted.
Meanwhile, a ribbon-cutting ceremony at Joe DiMaggio Playground netted
Christensen posts on the Twitter and
Facebook accounts of the Recreation
and Park Department, the Department
of Public Works, and the SF Public Library.
Thats a lot of free face-time.
Political campaigning is forbidden
on city time and on the city dime, but
its entirely legal to make public appearances and
meet with
constituents.
But while Lees
public relationship campaign
with Christensen
may not violate
the letter of ethics
laws, it sure does look
odd.
There seems to
be a lot of various
ribbon cuttings, program launches, and
that sort of thing
in the last couple
months in Chinatown, especially
with the mayor,
said Jim Ross, a campaign
consultant who is working for a
labor-backed independent expenditure

committee that supports Peskin.


Its not them campaigning, Ross
said, but its doing things with an official city veneer.
In a statement, a Lee spokeswoman
said Christensens exemplary record
justified such attention. Christensen
herself says that a close relationship
with the mayor is to be expected.
If I lose, a candidate who vowed to
make a mayors life a living hell [may
win], and youre surprised hed spend
time with his appointee? Christensen
told us. The fact of the matter is, I try
to use that perk judiciously. But there
are times when the weight of the mayors help is valuable.
Especially

San Francisco values, said Mayor


Ed Lee, who has vowed to remove
the citys 6,800 homeless from the
street before the Super Bowl. Our
residents want to help, and we are
providing easy ways for them to do
that.
Darcel Jackson, a formerly homeless ironworker who this year spent
six months in a shelter, calls 311s
new feature a snitch app and the
latest tool in City Halls campaign to
crack down on the homeless.
311 started out as a way to report
potholes and graffiti, then somebody
got the bright idea to tell on people,
Jackson says. The citys homeless
policies are ineffective because they
dont include the homeless.
The City Administrators office

confirmed that homeless people


werent consulted during the planning of the new 311 feature, although
representatives from the Department
of Public Health, the Department of
Human Services, the Homeless Outreach Team, and the mayors office
spoke on their behalf.
Jackson sees this as another example of the bureaucratic groupthink
that has bloated San Franciscos
annual homeless services budget to
$167 million, but made little headway
in solving chronic homelessness.
Thats why Jackson has developed
an alternative app, See|Me, which
connects homeless people to information about shelters, soup kitchens,
legal and medical services, and job
counseling.

Street Seen
Frustrated by the citys 311
snitch app, a formerly
homeless man created an
alternative.
San Franciscans have a new

option for helping the homeless. This


month, the mobile app for 311, the city
services clearinghouse, introduced a
feature that lets citizens report homeless people who need non-emergency
medical treatment or who require intervention because of aggressive behavior.
As a bonus, users can upload photos of
the homeless person in question.
Walking past someone suffering
on the streets does not reflect our

6 |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

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haunted by the quadruple homicide


that rocked her district in January,
when four young men riding in a stolen
car were gunned down in a drive-by at
Page and Laguna streets. Police chalked
up the murders to turf warfare between rival gangs, but without surveillance footage or witnesses, the
investigative trail has gone cold.
Breed hopes money can speed
justice along. She wants the city to
reward witnesses whose tips lead to
an arrest and conviction of an unsolved homicide thats at least a year
old with up to $250,000.
So many black boys and men I
know have been killed, their children
have been killed, Breed says. The
reward idea grew out of my frustration, and out of the mothers of
victims who want justice.
Although Breed says its unlikely
the city will dip into the fund often, it
sends a message that rewards arent
ad hoc, and that everyone deserves
justice.
Over the past six years, the city
has averaged about 50 homicides per
year. According to FBI data, police
made arrests in 60 percent of those
cases.
As to whether a big payday will
entice witnesses in the remaining 40
percent of cases, Breed says, These
are poor communities, and I know
theres a culture of non-snitching.
Anyone who comes forward has to
be prepared to start a new life somewhere else.
Thats a tall order, but if this
legislation takes killers off the street,
then thats what well do, Breed
says. JL

Fred Noland

ARTS & CULTURE

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MUSIC

I had homeless people give me


feedback about everything, Jackson
says, including where to place download stations where technicians will
help users install and navigate the
app.
Jackson spent $200 out of pocket
to launch the free app hefty capital
for a man who earns $62 per month.
He raised another $1,000 at the apps
Oct. 13 unveiling at The Hall on Market Street but says hes starting to
worry that we wont be able to raise
the money to keep this going after all
the work we put into it.
So far, tech companies havent
shown much interest in partnering
with Jackson. Neither have city supervisors, none of whom attended
the apps unveiling.

For just a fraction of the citys


homeless budget, this app could be
funded every year, Jackson says.
Despite the cold shoulder from
techies and politicos, Jackson
is persevering. He hopes to get
support from Sam Dodge, the
citys new homeless czar. (Jackson
says he tried for four months to
schedule an appointment with
Bevan Dufty, Dodges recently
resigned predecessor, but never got
a response.) And he plans to launch
an Oakland version of See|Me in
February.
I want this to pop up in cities
across the country, Jackson says.
If we can make it work here, we can
make it work anywhere in the world.

Jeremy Lybarger

SFWEEKLY.COM

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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 7

news

gentrification

The Last Empress


Chinatown takes a stand against the tech invasion.
By Julia Carrie Wong
Chong Imports is having a

going out of business sale. Banners in


the two-story emporium of Chinese jewelry, art, tchotchkes, and souvenirs
promise 75 percent discounts. A computer-printed sign posted next to framed
Chinese silk needlework warns, Last
Chance For Dying Artworks!!!
Sales clerks cant say when the longtime Chinatown business will close
its doors, but they know the end is
coming soon.
The building is for sale, a saleswoman confides.
The building is 838 Grant Avenue,
an imposing, six-story concrete block
of Hong Kong brutalism that looms
over Portsmouth Square in the heart
of Chinatown. Officially called the
China Trade Center, its better known
by the name of its most famous former
tenant: the Empress of China restaurant, which closed last New Years Eve
after 48 years in business.
Upstairs from Chong Imports,
tenants are similarly on edge and
out of the loop. The poorly lit third
and fourth floors host more than
a dozen professional offices: travel
agents, accountants, insurance
agents, a dentist.
Harvey Louie, a Farmers Insurance agent who has worked out of
Suite 414 for 35 years, can only
shrug when asked about his
future in the building. Go
ask the owners, he suggests.
(Attempts to reach members of the Chong family,
who own the building
via three corporations,
were unsuccessful.)
Calvin Louie, an
accountant with offices on the third floor,
isnt that worried. He
figures that even if the
building sells tomorrow, it will take at least
two years for the new
owners to get the permits to renovate.
After that, he says,
who knows?
The fate of 838 Grant
Avenue has been uncertain for
nearly a year. The decidedly oldschool Empress of China, which occupied the 5th and 6th floors, served
its final Peking Duck on December
31, 2014, after the Chongs decided to
put the property on the market.
The restaurant a San Francisco
institution popular for banquets,

8 |

October 22-28, 2015

proms, and weddings chose not to


operate on a month-to-month lease,
but most of the rest of the tenants
remain in limbo, chasing rumors of
potential sales.
The rumor mill kicked up a notch
last week. On August 30, the lawyer
representing the current owners of
838 Grant submitted a request for a
Letter of Determination regarding
the buildings zoning to the San Francisco Planning Department.
Something of a bureaucratic formality according to Planning spokeswoman Gina Simi, a letter of determination does not involve any decisions
by the department but is simply a written response that explains to a landowner what are and are not the permitted uses for a particular property the
request is being interpreted by some in
Chinatown as a signal that after a year
on the market, a sale is imminent.
The letter sounded an alarm. Last
Tuesday, members of various Chinatown community organizations including the
Chinatown Community Development
Corporation
(CCDC), the Chinatown Progressive Association
(CPA), and the

LETTERS

Chinatown Chamber of Commerce, as


well as Supervisors David Campos and
Norman Yee (who grew up in Chinatown) held a press conference outside the iconic building to announce
the formation of a new coalition.
It may be too late to save the Empress, but the group vowed to prevent
the building from being converted
to that working-class neighborhood
scourge: offices for tech workers.
No tech offices in Chinatown a
banner read.
If tech offices invade Chinatown
buildings, there is no way our community-serving merchants can compete
with them on rent, Chinese Chamber
President Eddie Au said in a statement.
We will be driven out of Chinatown.
The specter of a tech company
moving in was first raised last year,
when marketing materials for the
building portrayed the Empresss banquet hall transformed into an open
floor plan office.
Theyre showing all these computer
systems and techies working in a place
that has been important to thousands
of families in Chinatown, says Gordon
Chin, the former executive director of
Gordon Chin holds an enlargement
of marketing materials
for 838 Grant.

CCDC. We cannot afford to have this


building turn into a technology center.
It will raise rents for everybody.
Rising rents and an influx of affluent new residents They all ride
bikes, Chin jokes of the newcomers he
terms hipsters are an increasing
concern for the neighborhood, which
has seen the average rent of single
room occupancy units rise from $610
in 2013 to $970 this summer, according to a rent survey by CCDC.
SROs have long provided the poor
and working class with gateway
housing and housing of last resort,
says Shaw San Liu of CPA, but the tech
boom across the city has seen SROs
converted into tech dorms that are
rented at much higher rates.
We see the Empress as very symbolic, Liu says. Its been marketed
as a tech office of some kind, which is
very disturbing, given the trends weve
seen in Chinatown.
Brett Gladstone, the lawyer representing the Chong family, said by
phone that the Planning request simply seeks to clarify the planning code
as it relates to the building.
The Chongs are looking forward to
some discussions with the community, he added.
But thats little comfort to the coalition, which is preparing for battle.
Last week, the Chronicle
reported a rumor, still
unsubstantiated, that
the building is already
in contract to an
offshore investment
group looking to do a
tech co-working space.
If a tech company
gets it, were going
to fight, says Chin.
We think we have the
zoning on our side. It
clearly prioritizes community services.

The fine distinction


between zoning for professional services and
general offices is familiar
ground for another Chinatown newcomer that
was previously and
perhaps unfairly seen
as the harbinger of a tech
invasion of Chinatown.
When 1920C, a
coworking space on
the second floor of 950
Grant, opened its doors
one block from the Empress last spring, it was

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welcomed to the neighborhood with a


blistering CCDC press conference and
formal challenge: 1920C is in a building
zoned for professional offices, not administrative offices.
At the time, Planning Commissioner and CCDC deputy director Cindy
Wu specifically invoked the Empress
as a reason not to let anything techlike wiggle into the neighborhoods
restrictive zoning.
The precedent this could set for the
Empress is part of the reason we need
to be so vigilant, she told the Chronicle
in April. That model, if it takes off,
will be devastating. There is no way
that mom-and-pop retailers can compete with tech.
But the founders of 1920C dont
even want to be mentioned in the
same sentence as the Empress.
On a recent afternoon, a handful
of young professionals worked at
desks in 1920C while Wilma Pang,
the self-proclaimed wild card in the
District 3 Supervisor race, and Richard Ow, a retired postal worker and
member of the citys Aging and Adult
Services Commission, hung out in the
community/art gallery half of 1920Cs
spacious quarters.
Ow, who is 85 years old, is a fan of
1920C.
Once in awhile I get stuck on my
cell phone, and Jenny helps me, he
says of Jenny Chan, one of the coworking spaces co-founders. Ow led a
counter-protest in support of 1920C
last spring. CCDC thinks they own
Chinatown, he says.
Chan, who was born in Hong Kong,
says that she volunteered with CCDC
when she was growing up and is insulted by the groups protest of her
venture.
Were a small business, not a corporation at all, she says. Were not
some old white dude. Were not a tech
company by any means. Im actually
really offended when people tie us in
with that issue.
As for the Empress, Chan compares
the shared offices of professionals on
838 Grants third and fourth floors with
what shes trying to offer. Those Chinatown accountants who share office
space thats coworking, she says.
In fact, depending on which way the
Empress goes, her open space might
be a future home of Chinatowns past.
Thanks to the uncertainty of their
leases, she says, some of the 838 Grant
tenants have actually stopped by to
inquire about renting desks.
JWong@SFWeekly.com

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NEWS

A FEDERAL JUDGE WROTE THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OUT OF CANNABIS.

Its On
For years, the biggest risk in the

To the Courts recollection, he


added, the Government has yet to
allege or even suggest that MAMM
was at any time operating in violation
of state law.
Lets say that again: the federal
Justice Department can no longer interfere with a marijuana operation as
long as it complies with state law.
And state law, thanks to Gov. Jerry
Brown and the Legislature, which
passed a package of bills outlining
statewide regulations and expressly
allowed for-profit commercial cannabis activity has just become stricter and clearer than ever.
The budget amendment, authored
by California Reps. Dana Rohrabacher
(R-Huntington Beach) and Sam Farr
(D-Carmel), is set to expire at the end
of the current federal budget next
year, but is almost sure to be

CHEM
TALES

BY
CHRIS ROBERTS

QTY: 52

cannabis industry and the one scaring away the biggest investors was
the federal Justice Department.
As U.S. attorneys and DEA agents
have demonstrated, medical marijuana operations can follow state law to
the letter only to lose everything when
federal law enforcement decides to
get involved. This is what shut down
a third of San Franciscos licensed
and permitted medical marijuana
dispensaries during the 2011-2012
crackdown.
That risk appears to be over now.
On Monday, a federal judge ruled that
recent actions in Congress bar the
Justice Department from interfering
with a state-legal marijuana enterprise
a stunning rebuke for federal drug
cops, and a game-changing victory for
legal weed.
The ruling came in the case of the
Marin Alliance for Medical Marijuana, a modest (by todays standards)
outfit that sold cannabis in the town
of Fairfax with a permit created by
the towns police chief from 1997
to 2012.
The dispensary attracted the feds
attention early, but managed to stay
in business for another decade after a

2002 injunction, until U.S. Attorney


Melinda Haag filed a forfeiture action
against the dispensarys landlord and
forced operator Lynette Shaw to close
her doors. Help for Shaw came from
Congress. Earlier this year, federal
lawmakers de-funded Justice Department efforts taken against medical
marijuana operations that comply
with state law.
That sounds good after all, if
there is no money for police, theres
no way police can function but
skeptics were cautious. The Controlled
Substances Act still stood, and cannabis is still illegal, so how did this
change anything?
The answer came from U.S. District
Judge Charles R. Breyer brother of
Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer
who ruled that while the 2002 injunction against Shaw still stands, the
federal government
cannot enforce it.
The plain reading of [Congresss
action] forbids the
Department of Justice
from enforcing this
injunction against
MAMM to the extent
that MAMM operates
in compliance with
California law, Breyer
wrote.

renewed unless, of course, Congress


goes further and decides to remove
cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act.
In the meantime, the message is
clear: if you thought the Green Rush
was wild now, its about to get wilder.
As for Shaw? Despite a reported $3
million tax bill due to the IRS, shes
looking for investors and seeking
to reopen MAMM. Some of the San
Francisco operators closed during the
crackdown may not be far behind.

Sean Parker Circulates


Legalization Language
Monday was a big day for cannabis. On
the heels of the MAMM decision came
the victory of Justin Trudeaus Liberal
Party in Canada, which has vowed to legalize recreational marijuana.
Drug reform advocates celebrated,
and used the opportunity to push forward on legalizing in California as well.
Legalization has been in a bit of a
nether region, with no big
money backers signaling
support for any of the
proposed legalization measures floating around. (It
will take as much as $20
million to run and win a
statewide ballot measure
in November 2016, with
$3 million or more needed
at the onset to run a petition drive.)
The biggest pro-legalization money out there

is in Silicon Valley billionaire Sean


Parkers bank account. Parker has
been mum so far, but his political and
fundraising team has begun circulating
proposed language to reform advocacy
groups.
What does it say? Until Parker declares it public, its a big secret.
Weve seen it, but were in a weird
situation, said Mason Tvert, a spokesman for the Marijuana Policy Project,
the main force behind Colorados successful legalization bid in 2012.
Parkers team has circulated the language under a strict embargo, which
means, We cant really comment on
it, Tvert said.
Parkers language, which could be
public this week or next, was supposedly hashed out in cooperation with
Justin Hartfield, the Orange County
CEO of Weedmaps, who parked $1
million in a political action committee
earlier this year.
Parkers team did not respond to
a request for comment left through
his assistant. But word is that forces within the industry are already
unhappy about being left out of the
drafting process.
That could be why instead of leading the marijuana crusade, Lt. Gov.
Gavin Newsom a friend of Parker
and legalizations most vocal pitchman to date chose last week to
sponsor another, easier initiative: gun
control.
CRoberts@SFWeekly.com

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|OCTOBER
MONTH22-28,
XX-XX,2015
2015 || 91

Life
on the
Streets
Hear San Franciscos
homeless population,
in their own words.
By SF Weekly Staff
San Franciscans are experts

in homelessness.
We step over homeless people, over
their belongings, over their shit just
to get to work. We know exactly why
people are on the streets, we tell each
other. Theyre mentally ill. Theyre addicted to drugs. They made bad choices.
But unless we have been outside
ourselves, we have no idea.
Officially, there are 6,800 homeless
people in San Francisco. That figure
doesnt include people sleeping in cars,
motel rooms, or on friends couches. It
also misses some of the 2,100 homeless children in San Francisco public
schools whose concern for schoolwork competes with the worry about
whether they will have a shelter bed
that night.
Homelessness in San Francisco has
proven to be remarkably stubborn.
There has been little change in the
statistics over the past decade, despite
the steady flow of press releases from
City Hall about the latest innovation
supportive housing for veterans,
the Navigation Center, a new app
meant to assuage one of American
capitalisms most intractable social ills.
Much has been written about how
to solve the problem of homelessness. Mayor Ed Lees dictum that
the homeless will have to go by the
Super Bowl has injected anxiety into
the lives of people on the street and
urgency into the task of finding that
elusive solution.
For once, we wanted to let this
problem be what it is people
and we wanted to let some of those
people do the talking.
What follows are testaments to
living on the streets of one of the richest and most expensive cities in the
world. We do not offer any solutions,
opinions, or expert critiques. Given
the choice of talking or listening, we
decided to listen.
In this issue, we give space to people society has failed, and hope you
will listen to them too, and see them
for what they are.
People. People who, at some time,
perhaps not too long ago, were just
like you: safe inside.

10 |

October 22-28,2015

LETTERS

Anne Marie

Age: 47
Hometown: North Carolina
Homeless four months
Location: Highway 101 underpass
Ive been homeless almost five
months. We were living on 68 6th Street.
Its called the Shree Ganeshai Hotel.
The manger there is a thief. Hes a liar.
He had everybody that we cared about
86ed. He came in our room after wed
been there four months, and wed been
paying him not only on time, wed been
paying him a day early. And then we
missed one weeks rent, and he came in
our room and took everything we owned
and threw it in huge garbage bags and
threw it down three flights of stairs.
We found this little box. We were
living in that box until we got this tent
about two weeks ago. Its just a little
box. We walked up on it. It was there;
it was empty; it had hardwood floors. I
think we gave a guy $80 for it.
I pee in a bucket and I go to the bathroom at McDonalds. [My boyfriend]
goes to CalTrain. Where do we shower?
We dont. I washed my hair here yesterday. It took a lot of water. We use
too much water as Americans. I wake
up now and my face is swollen. And my

George

Age: 53
Hometown: Maine
Homeless 18 years
Location: Civic Center
I came here from Maine. I was in
the navy and went to school a couple
times. Mostly I did warehouse work. A
glass factory had a garage door division,
so I worked there putting together kits
with door panels and remote controls.
After about four years, a new company
bought it and shut down the garage
door division. So then I cleaned carpets
for a while. And then I started moving
people did that for 15 years. It was a
decent living. I got paid under the table
and did side jobs. On a good weekend I
made $600 or $800 profit. Id come out
to San Francisco a couple times a year
on vacation, get a motel, spend money,
and have a good time.
When I became homeless, I didnt
have a clue how long itd last. Its been
18 years now. Maine was rough because
in the summer theres mosquitoes and
blackflies. In the winter, theres blizzards and ice storms. I stayed in shelters
or crashed on friends couches. One day
I thought, If Im gonna be homeless, Ill
go out to California. So in 96 I took a
Greyhound across the country. I stayed
around 2nd and Market, 1st and Market. They used to have these bridges in
SoMa that Id stay under. I didnt have
any enemies there, so I must have had
at least one friend.
When you first start out on the street
you think its a temporary thing, but as
the years go by and you carry more stuff,
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eyes are swollen. It feels like the warranty ran out on me and my body.
I got here in 89. January 13th. I
didnt want to wake up one day and
be 50 years old and still be wondering,
you know. I came out here and became
a stripper. There was lots of money.
Then I got involved in the counterculture, and I havent done anything. Ive
sold drugs, and Ive stripped. Never
been a prostitute. Now I hear they
do sucking and fucking in strip clubs.
They werent allowed to do that back
then. The guy that was the manager
had a heart attack and died, and his
girlfriend became the manager of the
girls. She started getting rid of everybodys weekend hours. So I told her she
was a power hungry bitch and asked
if shed ever read Animal Farm. She
didnt know anything about Animal
Farm, but she knew what bitch meant,
and I was the first one on the list to be
fired after that. So that was the end of
my stripping career. After that I became
a drug dealer. So thats about it. Thats
what Ive done. I always managed to
have money.
This city was embarrassingly easy to
be in for a while. Now its...everything
has changed.
The lady at HOT Team was really
honest with me. She said if I want a place
to live, I need to find a vacant building.

Because if we dont do it for ourselves,


whos going to do it for us?
A while ago, there was a big warehouse on Jessie Alley, and this guy
James opened it up. It was so big I got
lost. We had water and electricity. We
had everything. We had so much space
everybody had their own room. When
we finally got thrown out of there two
or three months later, forty-some people walked out. And the cops were like,

thats why no one has been in Civic Center. He housed like forty-some people.
We got to do that again. To get people
off the street. Theres way more chance
of James getting people off the street
than there is of Ed Lee. Ed Lee doesnt
know these people, and he doesnt care
about these people. And James does.
Well find a place, and well disappear for
a little while, and you guys wont see us,
and that will be a good thing.

and you get older, you start to break


down. I tried to keep my bedding as
clean as possible. Usually someone stole
it or DPW took it. Sometimes Id get up
in the morning and go to get a coffee and
take a leak right around the corner, and
when Id come back all my shit would be
gone. I just carry a bedroll or a backpack
now. Maybe rolling luggage if I find it.
Early on I learned the BART system.
Id get on a train and ride all day, sleep
on the train. Or Id walk underground
through the stations. Id make extra
money by helping people buy their
ticket. I checked the machine slots for
money. To tell you the truth, its not
hard if you figure out a system. Theres
a guy down there in BART, a friend of
mine, who partners up with somebody
and plays guitar, but his partner keeps
dying on him. Me, I run a whole routine
here with my sign: Im fun for the whole
family, I say. Or: Im cheap, but Im
worth it. Sometimes I sell SF Weekly. I
tell people straight up, I got free newspapers for a dollar. You just pay shipping
and handling.
Im in a veterans home that Swords
to Plowshares got me in. Been indoors
for four months now. I got a decent
room with its own toilet, shower, sink,
microwave. But I still come out here
to kick back in the sun, not expecting
much. Im just killing the day until its
time for me to lay down again. Look,
Im homeless. Im in public all the time.
People are going to come and go. Youre
okay with me if you havent stomped
me in my sleep or set me on fire. Even
if you wanted to do something like that
you kept going, and thats a redeeming
quality in my eyes.
>> p12

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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 11

Life on the Streets


Kermit

Age: 60
Hometown: Richmond, California
Homeless 20 years
Location: Mason and Ellis streets
I grew up in Richmond, California.
My father just got my mother pregnant
and ran off. I didnt really know my
dad but he was from the Fillmore, San
Francisco. You ever hear of the Fillmore?
Thats where my daddy is from. But after
he got my mother pregnant he just, you
know, kinda left.
Ive been living on the streets a little
over 20 years. Because where I was living
I used to live in north Richmond, California was like everyone was selling
dope, pimping, robbing banks, and I just
decided I didnt want to die. Because if
I stayed out there too long it was going
to happen. Ive never used drugs in my
life, but I used to hang around dope dealers and you could get killed just being
around the wrong people. Well, theyre
not the wrong people. But you can get
killed just being around that. You have
to choose where you hang out at. You
can be around the wrong crowd, maybe
youre not into what theyre doing
pimping, robbing banks, selling cocaine
or heroin but you have to choose

your life and look in your heart. If your


friends are doing something that doesnt
mean it agrees with you because you gotta find yourself. You have to look in your
heart and see what agrees with you.
I didnt want to get killed. I had already been stabbed. I was talking to this
mans woman. I asked her if I could eat
her pussy and he got mad at me. He had
a hook knife, you ever seen one of those?
Its curved. I went to the hospital and
the doctor had to sew my insides back
in because he hooked me. He pulled my
insides out. They had to sew em back in,
because I asked his girl if I could eat her
pussy and he didnt like it [laughs].
I knew him. I knew him. I knew him.
He was a pimp, and I asked one of his
girls if I could eat they pussy and he got
mad and he damn near killed me. But
you know what? Im 60 years old right
now and Im happy. You know why? Because I could have been dead a long time
ago. It was 1977 when I got stabbed.
I drink whiskey all night, I let prostitutes pee in my mouth, and then I
just get up and panhandle and start all
over again. In life, you have to have a
routine.
Im happy. I dont have a lot of
money. I aint got no big ol car and all
that but Im happy with my life. I could
have been dead a long time ago but only

through the grace of God Im here. I aint


mad at nobody. Some things in life you
bring on yourself by acting crazy. You out
there getting drunk and acting a fool. I
learned the hard way. Im 60 years old,
and I aint gonna lie to you: when I was
20 I was a fool. I was a wild motherfucker. I used to eat pussy and get drunk all

night, take off all my clothes and ride my


bicycle naked!
Twenty years ago I used to make
$200 every Saturday on a hard night!
You ever heard of North Beach? That
was my spot. I was the king of Broadway.
I made so much money! Nobody could
touch me. Now, everything has changed.

Theres just not too many people out.


People used to come out and go to the
strip club and the bars. North Beach
used to be the area to be, but everything
has slowed down. Now Im lucky if I
made damn near three dollars!
Dont ever judge me because Im
homeless, because you dont know me.
I could be the best person you ever met
in your life. Just because I sleep on the
sidewalk and you sleep in some big
mansion or whatever we are all people.
There is no such thing as color. What
color is God? What color is love? We are
all people. I dont go to church though,
you know why? Because church is in
your heart. God is in your heart. Im in
church right now! If you believe in God
you in church all the time. A building is
not church. People say, Do you go to
church? Im in church all the time!
I never had children of my own. But
I have my mom and brother and uncles
in Richmond. But my uncles hustle,
travel the world to make money. I see
them every now and then, but me, I
kind of like I stick to myself. I sleep on
the sidewalk. Im independent. I dont
like help. People mean good but I like to
live my life. As long as Im not bothering you let me live my life and you live
your life. I get drunk every night and let
prostitutes pee in my mouth.

to see my dad before he died. We dont


see eye to eye the only thing he ever
taught me was how to work. But its
hard to work when you cant get someone to hire you.
I usually skate around to get to
the highest part of the mountain, like
Twin Peaks, where nobody else is. I get
an hour or two of sleep. Then I come
down here to get something to eat.
Then I go back up on the mountain.

The worst part of being outside is


that everyone is a hater. Unless youre
under 24, theres no place to take showers. A lot of [service] places discriminate
against people. Oh, youre too old, you
dont deserve to eat. You dont deserve
a jacket. You dont deserve a blanket.
All of these places on Haight Street that
give shit away, you have to be a youth.
And all the other places, if youre older,
you gotta be a heroin addict. Somebody
stole my blanket I cant even get
a blanket. Youre supposed to be able
to ask a police officer or a firefighter,
theyre supposed to have emergency
blankets at least. You ask them and they
just laugh at you. Its like theyre waiting
for you to get sick and die.
Im out here hoping for a fruit
donation or a burrito donation. Im
lucky if I get one or two meals in a day.
I dont think Ive ever seen more than
$30, and thats from being out here
from 5 in the morning until about 1
oclock in the morning.
Im lucky if I get a shower once a
month or once every other month.
I have to break down and spend the
$100 or whatever the hotel wants.
If they had more places to shower,
that would cut down on some of the
drama right there. You think some of
these kids are on crazy drugs some
of them are just freaked out because
theyre traveling and they just want to
get a shower and they cant.
But whos going to listen to me? Im
just some guy from Ohio who lives on
a skateboard.
>> p14

Lurch

Age: 35
Hometown: Toledo, Ohio
Homeless 13 years
Location: Church Street, Castro
I got the name back in high school.
There was a group of kids, we all had
nicknames from the Addams Family.
We had Fester, we had Thing, we had
Morticia. One day we were hanging out
listening to some music and someone
said Lurch. It just kind of stuck.
Ive been in California for 13 years.
Ive skated pretty much up and down
the whole coast on my skateboard. Im
trying to stay in shape, to get that job
that dont exist.
Toledo, Ohio, is like Detroit. Its
actually a lot worse. People are cutthroat and hateful. You couldnt even
get from the house to the corner store
without having four or five different
people trying to rob you. I think they
call Toledo, Ohio, the whore capital,
the biggest prostitution place in America. I dont want to be a part of all that.
Im a peaceful person.
I had a house. I used to do construction. Ive been to cooking school, but I
did that just to make my mom happy. I
went there to show her that I could do
things other than roofing and drywall.
I know how to do furnaces and central
air conditioning, too. I was certified
in Ohio, but when I came here, nope.
I had to go through all that schooling

12 |

October 22-28,2015

again. Its hard enough to find someplace to take a shower, let alone go
through that schooling again.
I got a couple of half sisters somewhere. I aint talked to them in like
eight years. I cant afford to get a
phone to have some kind of Facebook
to even try to send them a message to
let them know that Im still alive.
I feel like Im in prison here. My
whole life Ive never been allowed to get

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a drivers license. I was caught with a


pellet gun when I was 9. That suspended my ability to get a license until I was
18. Then when I was 17 I was caught
driving without a license a few times.
I lived with my mom off and on for
a long time. She was sick with cancer.
She died Feb. 10, 2001. Then I went
on to Florida for a few years. Found
some temporary work but it wasnt
much. Then it was back to Ohio. I got

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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 13

Life on the Streets

Tommy

Age: 53
Hometown: South Bend, IndianaHomeless off and on 26
years

Doreen

Age: 46
Hometown: Illinois
Homeless four months
Location: Rainbow Grocery,
Tommy: Were married. We met

on a corner.

Doreen: Hyde and Golden Gate.


T: I was just rolling by on my wheel-

chair and I saw her standing there. And


I asked her, because I smoke a lot of
weed, I asked her if she wanted to party.

Erin

Age: 21
Hometown: California
Homeless 11 months
Location: Civic Center
Im from a little town in Marin called
Novato. Its not as high class there as
people would think. I was a military
brat. My father was in the Coast Guard,
so we moved around a lot. When we
came back here, like three years ago, I
found this man, we found each other
actually, and we thought we were
soulmates. Nothing could ever tear us
apart. We decided to move to New York
together, which is where he was from. I
lived there for a year and half, doing my
thing, enjoying life. I partied a lot but
I worked a lot, too. I lost a lot of jobs. I
worked at this sports bar on Long Island
for about six months. I was a hostess.
They had like 55 TVs there. And two
bars. It was the second or third busiest
restaurant on Long Island. It was nice.
But me and the guy broke up, which

14 |

October 22-28,2015

was hard. It was like this part of me was


suddenly gone, and I kind of lost myself
for a while. I went out to Seattle to get
clean. I had a really good job at Red
Lobster that paid $10 an hour just for
opening and closing doors, and greeting
people when they came in. It was a good
time. I had my shit together then.
At the same time, I had just got out
of that relationship, which lasted three
years, and I couldnt get a grasp on taking care of myself. It was like part of me
disappeared and I kept looking for it. I
went back to my immature ways. I felt a
sense of freedom, and I wanted to party.
Ever since November 2014 Ive been
homeless off and on. Couch surfing. Ive
been in San Francisco about a month.
The weather couldnt be better here.
Definitely better than Seattle. Being
homeless in the rain isnt much fun. But
the wind and fog here can sure mess up
your day.
I havent made any friends yet. I
found a roadside buddy, but I keep
losing him. Hes like my boyfriend I
dont even know what to call him. Im

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very socially awkward. Its hard for me


to talk to people. I rely on my buddy to
make money. We panhandle or find little
knickknacks on the street to bargain
with. Like, Hey, can I trade this bag of
food I found for your soaps and razors?
Ive never been so grateful for those
times in my life when I had a roof over
my head or food in my stomach or a
family who loved me and never gave up
on me. But I got to the point where me
and my family just didnt see eye to eye.
Were different. They dont understand
why Im out here or why I live the way I
do. So I distance myself from them. At
the same time, I try to stay in touch. But
its hard because my bag got stolen and
I dont have a cell phone right now. They
know Im here though. I have this feeling inside where I know theyre sending
their thoughts and prayers. And thats a
good feeling, but it makes me sad, too.
Throughout my experiences Ive
grown a lot stronger. Ive found out
what my strengths and weaknesses are.
Mainly my weaknesses. I couldnt be
more thankful though.

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She said yes. And Im a chef or I used


to be so I started fixing her a lot of
meals. And here she is right now.
We used to stay at the Harlan
Hotel. Thats at Geary and Larkin. We
were there for five or six years and
then we got into a little problem with
each other. The hotel tricked her into
signing a restraining order against me
and they put her in another hotel. But
then she couldnt pay her rent, and so
she had to go homeless.
D: I was a caregiver. I was paying
rent. But all my clients were in the
[first] hotel. I was 86ed. And they
knew that, so when they kicked me
out, that was all of my income.
T: I have a room. But I sleep out
here with her. My place is full of bed
bugs. I havent slept there in like two
months.
We stay up on Van Ness between
Geary and OFarrell. We just run up on
it one night, and the police dont bother us. We sleep in a doorway.
D: Theres a partial roof so the wind
dont get us.
T: We usually try to get to bed
before 11 p.m. That way we get up, we
have to get up by 7 a.m. because were
in a doorway. The stores open and we
have to move along.
Were trying to get affordable
housing. Were on a list, so we can get
inside and be together.
Every day we go to St. Anthonys
and Glide to get something to eat. We
sell Street Sheets out here, its like our
survival thing.
Street Sheets, like today, weve
been out here since 9:30 this morning
[it was 4 p.m. at that time]. She only
made $13. And I made $10. Six and a
half hours.
D: Some days its a little more.
Some days, its even less than that.
T: I panhandle all the time. She cant
do it. Panhandling, people think its
easy. Its not easy. Ive been Tazed, Ive
been spit on. People have even tried to
grab me and wrestle me to the ground.

And Im in a wheelchair! But I can handle it. If someone does that to her, Ill
just go berserk. So its best if I do it.
Here at Rainbow, all the workers
know us. They dont bother us as long as
we dont go on the property. They even
let me charge up my chair sometimes.
I got a night spot if this spot dont
work out. I can go to Mason and
Geary, or Sutter and Powell, at that
Walgreens. Theres more people there,
and it all depends what youre asking
for. And you have to mean what youre
asking for. If youre hungry for food,
you ask for a meal. I have to be sincere
in how Im asking.
I tell them, I dont drink or do
drugs. Im just out here trying to get
something to eat like everyone else.
And sometimes they laugh. And thats
not funny. And I gotta hold back.
We even give other panhandlers
some money when we have it. If we
give extra food, we pass it onto them.
D: Its like a union, sort of. Everyone looks out for each other.
Ive been homeless before. I was
homeless in Illinois. I lost my job and
I was on unemployment. I asked my
landlord if I could get extra time, but
the unemployment check came the
week after my rent was due. So I had to
go outside.
Now, its harder. Its harder when
youve been inside before.
T: And when you get older.
I got a son here. I dont really do
shelters. I dont ask him for much
because his life is his life. But we do
go over there to take showers. Hes on
Turk Street. I got two sons, they live in
the same building. Three sons, actually.
I dont really ask them for anything.
When they were younger, I didnt really ask them for anything. Ive always
been a loner-type person.
My familys poor. They dont got
much. The thing of it is, Im not going
to lean on them. Even if they wanted to
help me I wouldnt let them. They dont
really have the money to help me. >> p16
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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015


9/18/15 10:11 AM

| 15

Life on the Streets


Richard

Age: 77
Hometown: Shawnee, Oklahoma
Homeless four days
Location: 16th and Mission

NOW

Ive been living on the street for four


days. Im getting kind of used to it. Man,
theres people all over this town. A lot of
them you gotta sleep with one eye open
because theyll come and rob you. Theyll
come and rob you right now.
I had a room, but I cant afford it now.
Right over there in one those dinky hotels. Its $80 a night. I said, Are you kidding? I didnt know it but I couldve gone
to Travelodge and got a room for the
same price. Its a whole lot nicer. This girl
I was trying to see, she came in my room
with her boyfriend, and they robbed me.
Right up there in that damn room. Now
I dont have ID so I cant cash my check.
I gotta go way over to the Social Security
office to see if I can get my Social Security
card and to the VA hospital to get my ID.
Im Native American from Oklahoma, so I get an oil and gas royalty check.
It aint very much but it helps me. I get
one every two weeks. I get a Social Security check on the 1st and a VA check on
the 1st. But if I get this $177, if I get my
ID, I can live on it.
I was born and raised in a town called
Shawnee, east of Oklahoma City, almost
the center of the state. I was in Vietnam
for four years. Im not proud of it. Im
not bragging about it. Its just a fact. Im
no hero or nothing. But it was my job,
my duty. So I went. When I came back,
I went back to Oklahoma. Aint nothing
there. My parents passed away. I inher-

NG!
I
Y
PLA

Age: 52
Hometown: Great Falls, Montana
Homeless less than two years
Location: Castro

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OCTOBER 22-28,
OctOber
22-28,2015
2015

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NEWS

I had a brother and three sisters. But


I dont see em. I just dont get along with
them. Theyre from Oklahoma and set in
their ways. Im not going to lie to you I
go and have a beer every now and then.
My family runs me off. But thats alright.
Thats their life. Im glad theyre living
like that. They go to powwows and put
up a tent all that stuff. And the same
things happening there. All the young
kids down by the pond, by the lake, smoking crack, screwing around. It aint right.
It takes $4000 to move into a room
around here. I dont have that kind of
money. Ill probably get on a train and
go to Oklahoma and buy me a van and
just live in that.

Mike

Spirited, affectionate,
and nearly irresistible.

16 |

ited a three bedroom big house, twelve


miles out in the country. What am I
going to do? Talk to the coyotes and the
possums and squirrels and birds?
I been travelling all over ever since I
got out of the military. I been married
and got divorced. My wife was screwing
somebody else and I just left. We got
a daughter, and I aint seen her since
she was three years old. I had enough. I
just walked out. I left. Then I ended up
in San Francisco. Ive been all over the
United States. Long Island, Key West,
San Diego. All the way to Anchorage,
Alaska. San Francisco is a friendly place,
but some of these people, theyre not
friends. Especially at nighttime.

COVER
COVER STORY
STORY

Im without employment, and just


staying on the streets right now. Its
been awhile, about two years, since I
was working at a pizza place down near
Mission, in the SoMa area.
I moved here from Montana. Great
Falls, Mont., about eight years ago. It
was really hard. Hard times in Montana, so I figured Id come here. Im
looking for gainful employment and
housing. Id probably stay here, yeah.
I spent the night downtown. Outside, but in a corner area.
People have been pretty nice so far.
[The cops] tell you sometimes to stand
up. I can earn about $40 you can
survive on it. People are respectful for
the most part, yeah. A lot of people
who walk by you ignore you, but youll
always have a percentage wholl always
acknowledge you or help you out. It
keeps you alive.

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Life on the Streets


William

Age: 31
Hometown: Seattle
Location: Powell and Ellis
streets
Homeless 1 year
Me and my dog moved here to San
Francisco last year in November. By
choice. Were homeless. I hold the sign
as a way to survive instead of having to
lose my freedom. My dogs name is Bear.
I took a Greyhound down here. I
sleep wherever I can thats, you know,
out of the way so nobody can find me. I
find a nice little spot.
I grew up in Seattle. San Francisco
reminds me of Seattle. I grew up, you
know, in the urban community, street
life and whatnot. Truthfully, my mother
was an addict and my father was an
army knucklehead. But at the same
time, they were separate, and my father
went to do his own thing and I just got
slung around because my mother had
addiction and whatnot. Ive been living
on the street for a year. The last time I
had a place was in Seattle.
Its crazy because as you see the
different faces walk by and the difficult
looks and so forth, there are some that
have, like, a look of disappointment, like
theyre disappointed in me. Some have a
look like you could tell they would rather
I be doing something else. To me, thats
like saying youd rather I would be doing
something illegal like, Holding a sign?
Psh, you better go be selling dope or
steal something or whatever. Its like,
Yeah, no.

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But some people actually understand, point blank. There are some folks
who stop to help because people want to
help people who actually need help, not
people who are just going to take their
money and ... People walking by, they
dont know that I dont do drugs, that I
actually have goals and ambitions, that
just because Im in my situation I didnt
forget how to take care of myself.
I moved here not knowing anybody,
no friends, no family, with intentions of
starting over. Starting from level zero.
Thats how it is. I came here, and I dont
have nobody that I can be like, Hey,
brother, let me stay at your house. So at
the end of the day, its just me and Bear
with nowhere to go.
Im a city boy, and theres resources
here, among other things. Though I am
homeless, theres tons of resources for

us. They got the church that feeds. They


have EMC South that allows you to take
a shower and wash your clothes. And
they got a bunch of programs and stuff
that are low-income rated or homeless
rated, like I got to BAVC, Bay Area Video
College, so I got my tripod here and my
school video camera is in my backpack
for shooting videos. I shoot music videos, mostly, but also whatever catches
the eye or whatnot, you know, just trying to put something together. Basically,
Im getting to hone my skills and do
something with my time other than just
wandering around.
The school is in the Potrero area.
Thats like something I do when I dont
feel like being embarrassed and sitting
here. I go sit there at school and edit for
a while, then once school closes I come
back here and stand for a little while.

Ill do that. Ill pay the rent, up to $300


a month I can afford. Itll be all right. I
gotta keep things positive.
I would definitely love a shower and
some clean socks.
There should be more help for us,
you know what I mean? Theres a lot of
kids out there. And theres a difference
between homeless and travelers.
Its been a rough day, for the most

part. I just got here half an hour ago. Im


trying to make like 15, 20 more bucks. On
a good day, I can earn maybe $50. Maybe.
When I had my dog, it was about $150,
I tried getting him the other day, but
they wouldnt let me rescue him because
I didnt have California ID. Buses, trains,
he was always there for me. A good dog,
man. I had him cremated, too. I paid
$200. I have most of the ashes, still.

Chris

Age: 35
Hometown: Northampton,
Massachusetts
Homeless six months
Location: Castro
Im trying to figure out how to get
my checks sent to me. I get like $300
every two weeks, but sometimes they
mail the check and it takes a week by
Western Union to get my money.
Im from Northampton, Mass. I lived
there a long time. I broke up with my
ex-wife and lost a lot of shit over it. A
lot of shit, dude. So, like, I dont know.
I asked God for forgiveness, and I just
went walking, riding buses, started
hitchhiking. I just needed a break for a
while. It was fucking annoying. Now I
got a couple things I gotta get done back
home. I got kids [ages 10, 15, and 21],
ex-wives, shit I gotta fix. Its been longer
than six months.
Ive been living in [Golden Gate]
Park a week, basically walked the entire
101 from Redding, Mt. Shasta. Im
trying to get housed for a little while,
trying to save $600. And were trying to
get a van. If I can find a room to rent,
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OCTOBER
OcTObER 22-28,
22-28,2015
2015

| 17

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Fri 10/23 | Event

Gate Park, S.F. $25-$50;415-3798000orcalacademy.org. Silke Tudor

WHERE THE WILD


THINGS ARE

Sat 10/24 | Wrestling

When we were young, packs of


unsupervised children roamed the city
streets like motherless beasts on
Halloween. We got bus transfers and
gathered so many pounds of Fun-Size
Milky Ways, and we had to stuff sacks in
the bushes for future retrieval. These
days, most kids are relegated to highly
supervised trick-or-treat parties held in
schoolyards and churchyards in
Southern California, theyre actually
held in parking lots where vetted hosts
arrange their cars with trunks full of
candy making our banshee heart
wail. If trick-or-treating must be
sequestered and scrutinized, we pray a

SuperNatural Halloween Party

will always be held within the darkened


halls of the natural history museum,
because even we can imagine the thrill
of trick-or-treating between live shark
tanks and taxidermied lions. For the
smaller kids, theres face painting
(which never gets old) and magic shows,
and prizes for the best guess on the
weight of thegiantpumpkin before it is
carved up into a fiendish face. Proceeds
benefit the Academys education
programs.
SuperNatural Halloween starts at5
p.m.at California Academy of Sciences,
55 Music Concourse Dr. in Golden

18 |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

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OFF THE TOP ROPE


In the 1990s, we had Incredibly Strange
Wrestling with El Homo Loco and the
Poontangler riling up beer-swilling miscreants in SoMa. These days, Hoodslam carries the torch for underground
wrestling in a warehouse in West Oakland. Like ISW, Hoodslam makes no
qualms about the nature of the fight:
This absurdist display of belligerence,
hostility, and violence is more performance art than bloodshed (though there
are plenty of bruises). Unlike ISW, Hoodslam eschews Mexican masks in favor of
all-American heroes like the Stoner
Brothers, the twin tag team who started
it all, and Broseph Joe Brody, the dude
who covers himself in Axe body spray
and forces the house band to play Nickelback during his entrance. (Everyone
hates the Bro.) Other recurring characters includeBat Manuel the Dark Noche,
Ultra Girl Brittany Wonder title
holder of Hoodslams coveted Golden
Fannypack andDrugz Bunny, a
coked-up rabbit in a zoot suit. A couple
rules: If you have kids, leave em home. If
you hate Jack Daniels, dont get close to
the ring. And if you want to fight, theres
always next month Hoodslam will
train you if youre fucking awesome.
Hoodslam starts at 8 p.m. atOak-

land Metro Operahouse, 630 Third St.,


Oakland. $20;510-763-1146orbirdswillfall.com. Silke Tudor

Sun 10/25 | Conversations

LIBRARY SCIENCE,
LIBRARY HUMANITIES
Hugh Leeman likes to paint, and hes
damn good one of San Franciscos
more notable artists. But Leeman is also
a damn good interviewer who draws out
other artists (and thinkers) and gives
them room to talk. Thats the idea behind The Lives of the Creators,
Leemans free public series where he invites creative figures to talk, tell stories,
and if its appropriate do live performances. The series next incarnation,
Sunday, Oct. 25, 2-4:30 p.m., is at the
main San Francisco Public Library, and
features painter Brett Armory; oceanographer Phil McGillivary; Fernando Briosos, whose nonprofit work supports the
Philippines indigenous people; and
pharmaceuticals researchers Mark and
Lara Menning. Each speaker, says Leeman, is changing the world for the better.
The Lives of the Creators, is
Sunday, Oct. 25, 2-4:30 p.m., Latino/
Hispanic Meeting Room, San Francisco
Public Library, 100 Larkin. Free; registration at thelivesofthecreators.com.

Jonathan Curiel

sfweekly.com

the calendar listings


Calendar listings are offered as a free service
to SF Weekly readers and are subject to space
restrictions. To have a listing added, email
Calendar@sfweekly.com, fax (777-1839), or
mail (835 Market St., Suite 550, S.F., CA 94103).
Deadline is noon Tuesday for the following
weeks issue. Listings rotate regularly, as space
allows. All phone numbers are area code 415
unless otherwise noted. Our complete listings of
local events searchable by keyword, date, and
genre are available online.

Art - GAlleries
1AM Gallery. Momento Mori: A new collection of
works by stencil artists C215 and Logan Hicks.
Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-6:30 p.m. Continues
through Oct. 29. Free. 523-8282. 1amgallery.com/.
1000 Howard, San Francisco, 861-5089, 1amsf.com.
a.Muse Gallery. Soul Season: Bamboo Sculpture, Collage, and Prints by Charles H. Stinson: In the exhibit
Soul Season, San Francisco artist Charles H. Stinson
uses his art in contemplation of cyclical patterns
of life and nature. From seemingly wild bamboo
sculptural forms to playful yet dark intaglio prints
and collages, Stinson acts as gardener, shaping

and ordering his highly evocative forms to create


a mesmerizing exhibit which encourages active,
though meditative, participation from the viewer.
The works invite one to sense the subtle space and
breath within and between manifested objects--to
slow down a moment in this age of immediacy and
instantaneous access, says Stinson. Through Nov.
15, 6-9:30 p.m. Free. 279-6281. lorishantzis@mac.
com. www.yourmusegallery.com. 614 Alabama, San
Francisco, 279-6281, yourmusegallery.com.
Andrea Schwartz Gallery. John Belingheri: Andrea
Schwartz gallery presents the seventh solo exhibition with John Belingheri. Mondays-Fridays, 9
a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Nov. 13. Free. 4952090. asgallery.com. 545 Fourth St., San Francisco,
495-2090, asgallery.com.
Arc Gallery & Studios. Art for the House: Silent art
auction featuring contemporary work by local
artists including artists from Hospitality Houses
Community Arts Program. All proceeds benefit
Hospitality House, the Coalition on Homelessness,
and individual artists. Thu., Oct. 22, 6-10 p.m. Free.
749-2118. hospitalityhouse.org/annual-art-auction/
art-for-the-house-2015/. 1246 Folsom, San Francisco,
298-7969, arc-sf.com.
California Historical Society Museum. Field of
Vision: Landscapes from the Imagination: Much
as the completion of the Panama Canal in 1915
was a twentieth-century engineering triumph
over geographical obstacles, the Panama-Pacific
International Exposition (PPIE) was a demonstration
of human and cultural resilience in response to the

THURSDAY

devastation of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake


and fires. The fantastical city of the PPIE was born
from the shadow of this disaster, a message to
the world celebrating the combined powers of
technology, industrialization, cultural determinism,
and globalization. In her installation, Elise Baldwin
juxtaposes panoramic landscape photographs
of San Francisco after the 1906 earthquake with
panoramics of the PPIE. Overlaying photographic
panoramas from different years, maps, and other
documents from the era, she underscores the surreal
phoenix-like rebuilding of the city and construction
of the fairgrounds. Tuesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
Continues through Nov. 22. $5, Free for children and
members. 357-1848. www.californiahistoricalsociety.
org/. 678 Mission, San Francisco, 357-1848, californiahistoricalsociety.org.
Catharine Clark Gallery. Sandow Birk: Imaginary
Monuments: A series of large-scale drawings on
paper. Sandow Birk is a Los Angeles artist known for
his creative output around social issues. Starting Oct.
24. Thursdays, 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Tuesdays, Wednesdays,
Fridays, Saturdays, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Continues through
Dec. 23. Free. cclarkgallery.com/. 248 Utah, San
Francisco, 399-1439, cclarkgallery.com.
Crown Point Press. Concinnitas: The Art of the
Equation: A portfolio of ten aquatints by Michael

Atiyah, Enrico Bombieri, Stephen Smale, Murray


Gell-Mann, David Mumford, Steven Weinberg, Simon
Donaldson, Richard Karp, Peter Lax, and Freeman
Dyson. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Mondays,
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Oct. 27. Free. 9746273. info@crownpoint.com. www.crownpoint.com/.
Tomma Abts: Tomma Abts created four new etchings
for his second project with Crown Point Press.
Being familiar with the technical possibilities of the
etching medium, Abts used shaped plates and split
plates to create his new work. Tuesdays-Saturdays,
10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Mondays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues
through Oct. 27. Free. 974-6273. info@crownpoint.
com. www.crownpoint.com/. 20 Hawthorne, San
Francisco, 974-6273, crownpoint.com.
David Brower Center. Edward Burtynsky: Water: The
exhibit features Burtynskys latest: Water, which
took him to the Deepwater Horizon spill, Rajasthan,
Salton Sea, Netherlands, and the Yellow River Dam
in China. The exhibit opens with a talk by Burtynsky.
Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-5
p.m. Continues through Feb. 4. Free. 510-809-0900.
browercenter.org. 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, 510809-0900, browercenter.org.
Ever Gold Gallery. Carolyn Salas: Ever Gold Gallery
presents a solo exhibition of new work by New
York based artist Carolyn Salas. Salass recent work

utilizes materials and finishes in visually deceptive


ways; snaking tubes with the look of solid lead
are actually a lightweight casting material, and
large apparently Styrofoam forms are heavy, resin
casts of the referent material. Sat., Oct. 24, 6-9
p.m. Free. 796-3676. evergoldgallery@gmail.com.
evergoldgallery.com/. 441 OFarrell, San Francisco,
796-3676, evergoldgallery.com.
FFDG. On Silent Haunches: Group painting show
featuring Nicholas Bohac, Michelle Fleck, Emily
Proud, and Jenny Sharaf. Wednesdays-Saturdays.
2277 Mission, San Francisco, 500-2166, ffdg.net.
Fifty24SF Gallery. Devolution: Group show featuring
Benjamin Constantine, Tina Lugo, Smithe, and
Lauren YS. Wednesdays-Sundays. 252 Fillmore, San
Francisco, 252-9144, fifty24sf.com.
Fouladi Projects. At Mount Meru New paintings
by Laine Justice: The main gallery displays Laine
Justices new body of work, At Mount Meru.
Tuesdays-Saturdays, 6-8 p.m. Continues through
Oct. 30. Free. 621-2535. www.fouladiprojects.
com. 1803 Market, San Francisco, 621-2535, fouladiprojects.com.
Gallery Wendi Norris. Chris Fraser: Animated: Oakland-based artist Chris Fraser will exhibit new
work in his first solo exhibition through October
31. Tuesdays, Thursdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

10/22

Film

FREEZE FRAME

We didnt get it at first. Those blanket requests to share the last song we played,
the last book we read, the last photo in our phone. But one local interactive artist brought it into focus: That unedited bit of information, however mundane,
is informal and intimate, like answering the door with bedhead. Over the last
two years, filmmaker Ivan Cash has been traveling around, asking strangers to
share the last photo on their phones. These collections are like the digital-age
equivalent of thrift store family albums, only a little more ridiculous. But
theyre sweet, too, perhaps because Cash really wants to live in a world where
more people talk with strangers. And hes not alone. Since posting the Last
Photo Project which has received more than a million views people in
Slovenia, Brazil, Korea, the Netherlands, Germany, and France have compiled
stories and pictures from strangers in their own hometown.Tonight, we follow
Cash from London to Detroit, in eight montages spanning 45 minutes, followed by a Q&A during which, of course, well ask Cash to tell a story about the
last picture on his own phone.
Last Photo startsat7 p.m.at Roxie Theater, 3117 16thSt., S.F.
$10;415-863-1087orroxie.com. Silke Tudor
Other wOrthy events this week

varla
Jean
Merman

Music

SFJAZZ Collective: The Music


of Michael Jackson, the all-star

ensemble that beautifully reinterpreted Stevie Wonder gives the King


of Pop the royal treatment at 7:30
p.m. through Oct. 25 at SFJAZZ Center, 201 Franklin St., S.F. $25-$65;
866-920-5299 or sfjazz.org.

sfweekly.com

Rex Bonomelli

Comedy
Big Black Hole, starring Jeffery
Roberson as Varla Jean Merman in a
cabaret-style space odyssey, starts at
7:30 p.m. at Oasis, 298 11th St., S.F.
$25-$35; 415-795-3180 or sfoasis.com.

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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 19

Continues through Oct. 31. Free. 346-7812. www.


gallerywendinorris.com. 161 Jessie, San Francisco,
346-7812, gallerywendinorris.com.
George Lawson Gallery. Brandon Shimmel: Five
paintings: SF51, recent CCA MFA graduate Brandon
Shimmel presents a group of five paintings in the
middle gallery. Shimmel is interested in the trappings
and seductive science of consumer marketing and
retail display. He uses materials associated with
window dressing--polished aluminum, colored
plexiglass, pearlescent colors and Trompe-Loeil
surfaces--to project the picture plane beyond the
window frame, and by implication, to comment on
the manner in which the object of desire is leveraged
in consumer culture. Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays,
Saturdays, 11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Continues through
Nov. 14. Free. 703-4400. info@georgelawsongallery.
com. www.GeorgeLawsonGallery.com. 315 Potrero,
San Francisco, 703-4400, georgelawsongallery.com.
Gregory Lind Gallery. Karla Wozniak: The Valley
Electric: Wozniaks recent paintings are inspired
by the landscape surrounding Knoxville. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Continues through
Oct. 24. Free. info@gregorylindgallery.com. www.
gregorylindgallery.com. 49 Geary, San Francisco,
296-9661, gregorylindgallery.com.
Intersection for the Arts. The Intersection Archive
Show: Artist and curator Lexa Walsh digs below the
surface to create a multi-layered installation that
explores Intersections history warts and all. Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Nov.
22. Free. 626-2787. theintersection.org. 925 Mission,
San Francisco, 626-2787, theintersection.org.
Kuhl Frames + Art. Bianca Kolonusz-Partee: Serendipity: Industrial landscapes and constructed
drawings made from repurposed commercial
packaging. Tuesdays-Saturdays. Continues through
Oct. 24. 1645 Telegraph, Oakland, 510-625-0123,
kuhlframes.com.
Landis Photography. Landis Photography: Final Event:
Barbara Landis will hold one final event before
closing her Landis Photography art studio after 34
years. Sat., Oct. 24, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun., Oct. 25, 11

a.m.-6 p.m. Free. 668-4486. www.barbara-landis.


com. 689 37th Ave., San Francisco.
Lesher Center for the Arts. The Art of the Brick:
Bedford Gallery hosts The Art of the Brick, an
exhibit featuring large-scale sculptures constructed
out of LEGO bricks by New York artist Nathan
Sawaya. The Gallery will be closed October 2-3, and
November 11, 26-27. Tuesdays-Sundays, 12-5 p.m.
Continues through Dec. 20. Free-$5. 925-295-1417.
bedfordgallery.org. 1601 Civic, Walnut Creek, 925943-7469, lesherartscenter.org.
The Midway. Ed Hardy: Visionary Subversive: Exhibition
of original art by Ed Hardy presented by Varnish Fine
Art. Artist Reception Thursday Oct. 29th, 7-11pm.
Mondays-Fridays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Thu., Oct. 29, 7-11
p.m. Continues through Nov. 2. Free. 433-4400. q@
varnishfineart.com. www.varnishfineart.com. 900
Marin, San Francisco, themidwaysf.com.
Modern Eden. Verdant: Featuring: Kari-Lise Alexander, Lauren Marx, Kindra Nikole, Lori Nelson,
JeanPaul Mallozzi, Miranda Meeks, Lioba Brckner,
Crystal Barbre, Jana Brike, Leilani Bustamante,
Lacey Bryant, Sheri DeBow, Catherine Moore, Michael Campbell, Nicomi Nix Turner, Steve Ferrera,
Helen Bayly, Phillip Hua, Bradley Platz, Caitlin
Hackett, Stephanie Pui-Mun Law, Susanne Apgar,
Hannah Yata, Jaclyn Alderete, JoKa, Syd Bee,
Michael Ramstead, Zoe Keller, Kurtis Rykovich, Anja
Altenburg Laursen, John Walker, Jillian Dickson,
Tracy Lewis, Happy D., and Stephanie Jucker. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Thu., Nov. 5, 6-9 p.m.;
Fri., Nov. 6, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Continues through Nov. 7.
Free. 956-3303. moderneden.com. 801 Greenwich,
San Francisco, 956-3303, moderneden.com.
PHOTO Fine Art Gallery. California! National Juried
Exhibition: The Best of Show Award of $500 will
be announced during the opening reception on
Thursday, Oct.15, from 6-8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through Nov. 14. Free.
510-858-7352. info@photogalleryoakland.com.
photogalleryoakland.com. 473 25th Street, Oakland,
www.photogalleryoakland.com/.
University of San Francisco (USF). Just Passing

THURSDAY

10/22

Dance

IN A WORD

The work of local poet JaneHirshfieldhas been described asbare stage


sets.Spare and careful, but containing a deep seat of emotional insight, her
lines are often anchored in quiet observations of the domestic body.Your
Story Was This, Lissa Fain Dances new work (based on several of her poems)
premieres as a coda to Litquake, in which dancers parade before the audience
at shows end. The performance installation, resting on the startling beauty
ofMatthew Antakysset design, reworks the spatial borders between audience
and performers, allowing a multitude of viewpoints. The poems include It Was
Like This: You Were Happy, an unpretentious reflection on lifes end like
abaker at the momenthe sees the bread is finished abetted,no doubt, by
Hirshfields long years of study at the San Francisco Zen Center (she was ordained as a lay person after graduating among the first women at Princeton).
Read aloud,this piece is notably hypnotic. Planted in repetition withinDan
Wools cool electronic score, wrapped within the troupes sinuous limbs, against
Antakys sheer edifice, we can only imagine the impact of its words.
Your Story Was Thisbegins at8 p.m.and continues through Oct. 25 at
ODC Theater, 3153 17thSt., S.F. $25-$30;415-863-6606orodcdance.org.

Through: Sculptures & Installations: Kalmanovitz Hall


rooftop sculpture terrace exhibit featuring largescale works by Llewelynn Fletcher, Sasha Petrenko,
Austin Thomas, and May Wilson. Mondays-Fridays, 9
a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 11. 2130 Fulton,
San Francisco, 422-5555, usfca.edu.

CABARET & DRAG


Big Black Hole: Starring Jeffery Roberson as Varla
Jean Merman in a cabaret-style space odyssey. Thu.,
Oct. 22, 7:30 p.m., $25-$35. Oasis, 298 11th St., San
Francisco, 985-4442, sfoasis.com.
Dragalicious Brunch: Featuring drag performances
and bottomless mimosas. Sundays, 12:15, 1:30 &
2:45 p.m., no cover. Balancoire, 2565 Mission, San
Francisco, 920-0577, balancoiresf.com.
The Dream Queens Revue: Bi-monthly drag show with
Collette LeGrande and guests. Fourth and Second
Wednesday of every month, 9:30 p.m., free, dreamqueensrevue.com. Aunt Charlies Lounge, 133 Turk,
San Francisco, 441-2922, auntcharlieslounge.com.
The GlamaZone: With Pollo Del Mar and guests.
Sundays, 8:30 p.m., $3. The Cafe, 2369 Market, San
Francisco, 621-4434, cafesf.com.
The Ladies of San Francisco: The Finest Old School
Drag: With hostess Miss Galilea and DJ Jack Rojo.
Fridays, 10:15 & 11:30 p.m., $5. OMG, 43 Sixth St., San
Francisco, 896-6374, clubomgsf.com.
Mahogany Mondays: With Honey Mahogany and guests.
Mondays, 9 p.m., free. Midnight Sun, 4067 18th St.,
San Francisco, 861-4186, midnightsunsf.com.
Meow Mix: A weekly cabaret show hosted by Ferosha
Titties, with rotating co-hosts and DJs. Tuesdays, 11
p.m., $3-$5. The Stud, 399 Ninth St., San Francisco,
863-6623, studsf.com.
The Midnight Show: With Alexis Miranda. Fridays,
Saturdays, midnight. Divas, 1081 Post, San Francisco,

474-3482, divassf.com.
Piano Bar 101: Open mic cabaret with Joe Collins
Wicht, Trauma Flintstones piano-playing alter ego.
Mondays, 9 p.m., free. Martunis, 4 Valencia, San
Francisco, 241-0205.
Showtime in the Mission: Weekly drag show hosted
by Galilea and including a five-course meal. Fridays,
7 p.m., $60. Balancoire, 2565 Mission, San Francisco,
920-0577, balancoiresf.com.
Some Thing: Art drag night with craft table. Fridays,
$5. The Stud, 399 Ninth St., San Francisco, 8636623, studsf.com.
Sundays a Drag: Brunch & drag revue with Donna
Sachet. Sundays, 11 a.m. & 1:30 p.m., $39.95. Harry
Dentons Starlight Room, 450 Powell, San Francisco,
395-8595, starlightroomsf.com.

COMEDY
Andy Haynes: 18 and over. Two drink minimum. Oct.
28-30, 8 p.m.; Fri., Oct. 30, 10 p.m.; Sat., Oct. 31, 8
p.m., $16.50-$22.50, www.punchlinecomedyclub.
com/. Punch Line, 444 Battery, San Francisco, 3977573, punchlinecomedyclub.com.
Attractive Camp: Monthly comedy party featuring lots
of pretty people with perfect teeth. Fourth Sunday
of every month, 8 p.m., $10, facebook.com/AttractiveCamp. Lost Weekend Video, 1034 Valencia, San
Francisco, 643-3373, www.lostweekendvideo.com.
Best of San Francisco Stand-Up Comedy: 18+ local
comedy showcase. Fridays, 8 p.m., $15, bestofsfstandup.com. The Variety Preview Room (The Hobart
Building), 582 Market, San Francisco, 781-3893,
varietync.org/screening-room.
Big Wednesday: Hosted by Jeremy Wheat. Last
Wednesday of every month, 7 p.m., $8. Make-Out
Room, 3225 22nd St., San Francisco, 647-2888,
makeoutroom.com.

FRIDAY

10/23

Talk

WAR ON WALLS

In 2010,Iraqi American artist Wafaa Bilal, an associate arts professor at New York Universitys Tisch School of the Arts,received 105,000 tattoos, one dot for every fatality associated with Operation Iraqi Freedom. During the same year, New Yorkborn artist Mariam Ghani hired Afghani-Americans who had worked as translators for the U.S. military to review, on video,
reports about conditions in U.S. military prisons back in Afghanistan. Resistance art has been a part of our global cultural
landscape for as long as there have been powers to resist. But, to view it, listen to it, and consider it in real time, and without
the mollifying balm of a faded past, is a challenging endeavor. As the artistic response by Muslims, South Asians, and Arab
Americans continues to grow, from hip-hop to fine art, in the face of an unending War on Terror,Ronak K. Kapadia cultural theorist and assistant professor of Gender and Womens Studies offers to serve as guide. Friday, he shares examples,
context, and opinion from his upcoming bookShadow Atlas: US Global Counterinsurgencies and the Sensorial Life of Empire.
Ronak K.Kapadia speaks at4:30 p.m.at San Francisco Art Institute, 800 Chestnut St., S.F. Free;415-7717020orsfai.edu. Silke Tudor

OTHER WORTHY EVENTS THIS WEEK

Silke Tudor

Lake Ozarks Square


Dance Team

Untitled
Roz Joseph

OTHER WORTHY EVENTS THIS WEEK

Movie

Art

Music

Extraordinary Tales, a 3D

Reigning Queens: The Lost Photos of Roz Joseph, an exhibit of photographs taken during the 1970s of the
Imperial Court to celebrate its 50th anniversary, opens at 7 p.m. and continues
through Feb. 1 at GLBT History Museum, 4127 18th St., S.F. Free; 415-6211107 or glbthistory.org.

animated anthology of five


masterworks by Edgar Allan Poe,
narrated by Sir Christopher Lee, Bela
Lugosi, Julian Sands, and Guillermo
del Toro, starts at 3:30 and 8:40 p.m.
at Presidio Theatre, 2340 Chestnut
St., S.F. $12; 415-776-2388 or
lntsf.com/presidio-theatre.html.

Nino de Pura, one of Spains preeminent flamenco guitarists, leads his


troupe in a tribute to the late Paco de
Luca at 7:30 p.m. at Herbst Theatre,
401 Van Ness Ave., S.F. $35-$55; 415242-4500 or omniconcerts.com.

20 |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

LETTERS

news

COVER STORY

Bobby Slayton: 18 and over. Two drink minimum. Thu.,


Oct. 22, 8 p.m.; Fri., Oct. 23, 8 & 10 p.m.; Sat., Oct.
24, 9:30 p.m., $20-$25, www.punchlinecomedyclub.
com/. Punch Line, 444 Battery, San Francisco, 3977573, punchlinecomedyclub.com.
Brainwash Weekend Comedy Showcase: Because
when it comes to doing laundry, laughter makes
your clothes whites whiter and colors brighter.
Thats just science, duh. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.,
free. Brainwash Cafe & Laundromat, 1122 Folsom, San
Francisco, 861-3663, brainwash.com.
Cheaper Than Therapy: Jon Allen, Eloisa Bravo, and
Scott Simpson offer comedians (and audiences)
a chance to unburden their minds at this regular
night of stand-up. Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m., $10,
cttcomedy.com. Shelton Theater, 533 Sutter, San
Francisco, 882-9100, sheltontheater.org.
Classy Pants: Long-form improv comedy by Daniel
Burt and Chrysteena Lairamore. Fourth Wednesday
of every month, 9 p.m., $10-$20, facebook.com/
ClassyPants. PianoFight, 144 Taylor, San Francisco,
816-3691, pianofight.com.
Comedy @ The Comet Club: Your free weekly chance
to laugh in the Marina (instead of at it). Wednesdays,
8:30 p.m., free, facebook.com/sufficientcomedy.
Comet Club, 3111 Fillmore, San Francisco, 567-5589.
Comedy Machine: A one-night, three-round comedy
tournament featuring eight comedians all competing
to be chosen as the champion. Unlike any other
comedy show in the Bay Area, we give the power
to the audience to choose who they want to see
continue. Comedians literally live and die by the fans.
Hosted weekly by comedian Will Cole. Wednesdays,
8:30-10 p.m., $7 adv., $10, https://www.facebook.
com/sfcomedymachine. The Purple Onion at Kells,
530 Jackson St., San Francisco.
Comedy Night: Open mic hosted by Tony Sparks. Thursdays, 7 p.m., free. Brainwash Cafe & Laundromat, 1122

the calendar

Arts & Culture

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music

Miller County Museum and Historical Society

Event
Feral Friday Urban Square Dance,
a bookstore dance party with an experienced caller and live music by KC and
the Moonshine Band, at 7:30 p.m. at Alley Cat Books, 3036 24th St., S.F. Free;
415-824-1761 or alleycatbookshop.com.

sfweekly.com

Folsom, San Francisco, 861-3663, brainwash.com.


Comedy Noir: Hosted by Valerie Branch. Fridays, 8 p.m.
Balancoire, 2565 Mission, San Francisco, 920-0577,
balancoiresf.com.
Cup o Comedy: Stand-up comedy with Danny Dechi and
guests. Second and Fourth Thursday of every month,
7 p.m., free, dannydechi.com. Emmas Coffeehouse,
5549 Geary, San Francisco, 933-6632.
Cynic Cave: Hosted by George Chen and Kevin OShea.
Saturdays, 8 p.m., cyniccave.com. Lost Weekend
Video, 1034 Valencia, San Francisco, 643-3373, www.
lostweekendvideo.com.
Dash: Late-night improv comedy romps by the UnScripted Theater Company. Saturdays, 10 p.m.,
$10. Un-Scripted Theater, 533 Sutter, San Francisco,
un-scripted.com.
Docs Comedy Open Mic: Comedy returns to the
North Beach space formerly occupied by landmark
nightclub The Purple Onion and this weekly open
mic means that you, too, can share the same stage
where Lenny Bruce once stood. Mondays, 7 p.m.,
free. Docs Lab, 124 Columbus, San Francisco, 6496191, docslabsf.com.
Dont Watch This Show LIVE: Monthly sketch comedy
program. Fourth Wednesday of every month, 8
p.m., $15, dwtslive.com. PianoFight, 144 Taylor, San
Francisco, 816-3691, pianofight.com.
Dueling Pianos at Johnny Foleys: Merry musical
sing-alongs. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 9 p.m., free,
duelingpianosatfoleys.com. Johnny Foleys Irish
House, 243 OFarrell St., San Francisco, 954-0777,
johnnyfoleys.com.
Harveys Funny Tuesdays: Hosted by Ronn Vigh.
Tuesdays, 9 p.m., free. Harveys, 500 Castro, San
Francisco, 431-4278, harveyssf.com.
#HellaHustle Showcase: Weekly comedy presented
by True Hustle Entertainment. Wednesdays, 7 p.m.,
truehustleentertainment.com. Brainwash Cafe &
Laundromat, 1122 Folsom, San Francisco, 861-3663,
brainwash.com.
Hysteria: Comedy Open Mic for Women & Queers:
Hosted by Irene Tu and Jessica Sele, with all genders welcome (but misogyny most definitely not).
Mondays, 6 p.m. Oasis, 298 11th St., San Francisco,
985-4442, sfoasis.com.
Joking, Not Slurred: A free comedy showcase
Every other Monday, 5 p.m.-midnight, Free,
650-787-2432, https://www.facebook.com/
events/1640699289539010/. Oddjob, 1337 Mission,
San Francisco, oddjobsf.com.
Joking, Not Slurred: Every other Monday, 7 p.m.,
free. Oddjob, 1337 Mission, San Francisco, 555-1337,
oddjobsf.com.
The Layover Comedy Night: Tuesdays, 8 p.m., free.
The Layover, 1517 Franklin, Oakland, 510-834-1517,
oaklandlayover.com.
Melt the Mic: Free comedy night produced by Griffin
Daley. Mondays, 8 p.m., free, griffindaley.com.
Melt!, 700 Columbus, San Francisco, 392-9290,
melt-cafe.com.
The Mission Position: Weekly stand-up comedy
showcase hosted by Matt Lieb, Kate Willett, Jessica
Sele, Richard Toomer, and Torio Van Grol. Thursdays,
8 p.m., $10, missionpositionlive.com. Lost Weekend
Video, 1034 Valencia, San Francisco, 643-3373, www.
lostweekendvideo.com.
Moe Greene: Comedy open mic hosted by Michael
Brandon. Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. The Basement, 222
Hyde, San Francisco, 742-7222, thebasementsf.com.
Night Moves: Midnight comedy madness with hosts
Josef Anolin and Joey Devine. Saturdays, 11:59 p.m.,
$5. PianoFight, 144 Taylor, San Francisco, 816-3691,
pianofight.com.
Nightlife on Mars: Free weekly comedy night with
Nightlife on Mars (hosted by Ryan Cronin) plus
guests. Thursdays, 8:30 p.m., free, nightlifeonmars.
com. Murphys Pub, 217 Kearny St., San Francisco,
693-9588.
No, Youre Drunk: The Drinking Game Comedy Show:
With hosts Justin Gomes and Andrew Moore. Fourth
Friday of every month, 10:30 p.m., $10. PianoFight,
144 Taylor, San Francisco, 816-3691, pianofight.com.
OMFG: Weekly comedy open mic. Tuesdays, 7 p.m.,
free. OMG, 43 Sixth St., San Francisco, 896-6374,
clubomgsf.com.
Pamtastics Comedy Clubhouse: Weekly comedy
podcast with host Pam Benjamin and a live audience.

sfweekly.com

Fridays, 8 p.m., free, facebook.com/PamtasticsComedyClubhouse. Mutiny Radio, 2781 21st St., San
Francisco, mutinyradio.fm.
The Purple Onion at Kells: Comedy Machine: Weekly
single-elimination comedy tournament. Wednesdays,
8:30 p.m., $15, purpleonionatkells.com. Kells Irish
Restaurant & Bar, 530 Jackson, San Francisco,
955-1916, kellsirish.com.
Rajeevs Big Night Out: Comedy n rock n roll with
host Rajeev Dhar. Fourth Saturday of every month,
9 p.m., $10. Amnesia, 853 Valencia, San Francisco,
970-0012, amnesiathebar.com.
Rock n Roll Comedy Jam: Featuring music by Medicine
Bug and comedy by Affirmative Action Heroes, plus
guests. Thursdays, 8 p.m., $5-$20, facebook.com/
medicinebug. Milk Bar, 1840 Haight, San Francisco,
387-6455, milksf.com.
Secret Improv Society: Underground improvisational
theater. Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m., $17-$20, improvsociety.com. Shelton Theater, 533 Sutter, San
Francisco, 882-9100, sheltontheater.org.
The Setup: A night of comedy in the TL on the DL.
Fourth Saturday of every month, 8 p.m., free,
facebook.com/TheSetupSF. The Basement, 222
Hyde, San Francisco, 742-7222, thebasementsf.com.
SF Comedy Showcase: Weekly roundup of local
laughmakers. Sundays, 8 p.m., $12.50. Punch Line,
444 Battery, San Francisco, 397-7573, punchlinecomedyclub.com.
SF Tonight!: Suffering from bad news burnout? Let
Endgames Improv turn headlines into punchlines at
this interactive and spontaneous comedy show. Saturdays, 10:30 p.m., $5, endgamesimprov.com. Stage
Werx, 446 Valencia, San Francisco, stagewerx.org.
Shit Talk: A Comedy Show: Hosted by Yuri Kagan.
Fourth Wednesday of every month, 7 p.m., $5. Oasis,
298 11th St., San Francisco, 985-4442, sfoasis.com.
Spaghetti Monologues: New Works by Women in
Kiddie Pools full of Spaghetti: One night only.
Women swimming in irreverence of deities, homages
to the past, transport gone wrong, complications of
love and lust, relatable predicaments and sauce lots of sauce. w/ Edna Mira Raia, Amelia Van Brunt,
and Christina Linksey in co-production with Little
Boxes Theater. including an opening invocation by
Aaron Simunovich, live Music by Karen Penley. Tue.,
Oct. 27, 7:30-10 p.m., $20-$50, 734-0162, https://
littleboxestheater.wordpress.com/. Little Boxes
Theater, 1661 Tennessee, San Francisco, https://
littleboxestheater.wordpress.com.
Storking Comedy: Weekly stand-up routines followed
by bonus interview segments. Thursdays, 6:30
p.m., free, facebook.com/SylvanProductions. Stork
Club, 2330 Telegraph, Oakland, 510-444-6174,
storkcluboakland.com.
Sunday Funnies: Stand-up comedy with Danny Dechi
and guests. Last Sunday of every month, 5 p.m., free,
dannydechi.com. Kawikas Ocean Beach Deli, 734 La
Playa, San Francisco, 221-2031, oceanbeachdeli.com.
Troubled: With Rajeev Dhar and friends. Tuesdays,
6:30-9 p.m., free, troubledcomedy.tumblr.com.
Amnesia, 853 Valencia, San Francisco, 970-0012,
amnesiathebar.com.
Tuesday Night Comedy Funnies: Tuesdays, 8 p.m., $17$27. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton,
Mill Valley, 383-9600, 142throckmortontheatre.com.
Wanda Sykes: Fri., Oct. 23, 8 p.m., $45-$91 advance.
The Masonic, 1111 California, San Francisco, 877-5988497, sfmasonic.com.
Where the Funny Things Are: Comedy open mic
hosted by Christian Reyes. Thursdays, 7 p.m. The
Basement, 222 Hyde, San Francisco, 742-7222,
thebasementsf.com.
Your Fucked Up Relationship: Endgames Improv
makes fun of your romantic foibles for free at this
long-running weekly comedy catharsis. Fridays,
10:30 p.m., free with RSVP, endgamesimprov.
com. Stage Werx, 446 Valencia, San Francisco,
stagewerx.org.

AARDVARK

WANTS BOOKS!

Buyer on duty 7 days 11am - 10pm


and we sell books too...

227 Church Street @ Market

415-552-6733

Dance Performances
The Anata Project: The Anata Project presents two
world premieres, By My Side and HomeBody in the
companys exciting fifth home season. Oct. 23-24, 8
p.m., $15 for students, $20, https://www.facebook.

LETTERS

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COVER STORY

the calendar

Arts & Culture

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music

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 21

SATURDAY

10/24

Dance

STAR LIGHT, STAR BRIGHT

Autumnal moons hang low in the sky, peering over the earths horizon, heavy,
intimate, bursting with secrets. Little wonder this season is so rich with traditions that favor the night.Arcane: A Tale of All Hallows Eve, a new fulllength story ballet by Charles Anderson, the artistic director and principal
choreographer of Company C Contemporary Ballet, follows the custom, giving
voice to shadow and shade through the allegorical muse of an attending star, Arcane. Each year, the story goes, Arcane welcomes the dead to do what was left
undone and say what was left unsaid. It is a rich time, full of manic beauty and
second chances. Despite the somewhat unsettling premise,Arcanepromises enchantment for the whole family. Brightly festooned dancing skeletons, fire spinners, and sets drawn from a Rube Goldberg fever dream not to mention a
mysterious scratch-and-sniff technology makeArcanea richly immersive experience worthy of holding a childs attention, while adults may rest assured that
even open flame and kinetic gadgetry will not upstage Company Cs talent.
Arcaneopens at7 p.m.and continues throughOct. 31at Cowell Theater,
2 Marina Blvd., S.F. $25-$55;415-345-7575orfortmason.org. Silke Tudor
Other wOrthy events this week

illustration by a.
Burnham shute

sandow Birks
Monument to
the Free Seas

Courtesy of C. H. Simonds Co.

Event

Art

24-hour Moby Dick Marathon


Reading, featuring food trucks, bar-

Imaginary Monuments, an exhibit


of large-scale works from an ongoing
series by Sandow Birk which combines
seminal texts with imagined architecture, opens at 3 p.m. and continues
through Jan. 2 at Catharine Clark Gallery, 248 Utah St., S.F. Free; 415-3991439 or cclarkgallery.com.

rels of coffee, and over 100 readers


taking the helm in a rustic brickwalled firehouse overlooking the Bay,
starts at noon at Fort Mason Firehouse, 2 Marina Blvd., S.F. 415-3457575 or fortmason.org.

com/events/707516162714876/. Z Space, 450 Florida,


San Francisco, 626-0453, zspace.org.
The Anata Project: Fifth Home Season: Featuring
the world premiere of HomeBody and the dance film
By My Side. Oct. 23-24, 8 p.m., $15-$20, theanataproject.org. Z Space, 450 Florida, San Francisco,
626-0453, zspace.org.
Baxtalo Drom: International shimmying for lovers
of Balkan music, belly dancers, and burlesque.
Fourth Friday of every month, 9 p.m., $10-$15,
facebook.com/pages/Baxtalo-Drom-The-LuckyRoad/509158232438278. Amnesia, 853 Valencia,
San Francisco, 970-0012, amnesiathebar.com.
FIFTH OF BUTOH: A Butoh Fantasy by Vangeline Theater. Choreographed and Directed by Vangeline. Oct.
23-24, 8-10 p.m., $20, 318-9524, www.butohsf.com/
san-francisco-butoh-programming.html. NOHspace,
2840 Mariposa, San Francisco, theatreofyugen.org.
N Lei Hulu I Ka Wkiu: Kanakolu 30 Years of
Hula: Sat., Oct. 24, 8 p.m.; Sun., Oct. 25, 12 & 3 p.m.,
$15-$45, naleihulu.org. Palace of Fine Arts, 3301
Lyon, San Francisco, 567-6642, palaceoffinearts.org.
Nino de Pura: Celebrate the legacy of Paco de Lucia
with Nino de Pura when he brings his flamenco
troupe to San Francisco for the first time. Thu.,
Oct. 22, 7:30-9 p.m., $35-$55, www.omniconcerts.
com. Herbst Theatre, 401 Van Ness, San Francisco,
392-4400, www.sfwmpac.org/herbst/ht_index.html.
vv home season: 3 premieres from bay area creatives
Katie Faulkner, Rosemary Hannon, Ashley Trottier,
and a remix of repertory from Blind Tiger director,
Bianca Cabrera. Oct. 23-25, 8 p.m., $20, 1-800-838-

22 |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

3006, www.withviv.com. Dance Mission Theater,


3316 24th St., San Francisco, dancemission.com.
Your Story Was This: A new performance installation about perception, human relationships and loss
inspired by three short poems by Jane Hirshfield.
Thu., Oct. 22, 8-9 p.m.; Fri., Oct. 23, 8-9 p.m.; Sat.,
Oct. 24, 8-9 p.m.; Sun., Oct. 25, 2-3 p.m., $20 -$35.
ODC Theater, 3153 17th St., San Francisco, 863-6606,
odctheater.org.

Festivals
12th Annual Brews on the Bay: Sat., Oct. 24, 12-5
p.m., $55, sfbrewersguild.org/events. S.S. Jeremiah
OBrien, Pier 45 Fishermans Wharf, San Francisco,
544-9890, www.ssjeremiahobrien.org.
Dia De La Muertos: Performance by Aztec dance
troupe Cuauhtli Mitotiani Mexica. Arts and craft
stations, face painting, costume making, cooking
demonstration, and more. Tue., Oct. 27, 2-6 p.m.,
Free, 510-548-3333, farmersmarkets@ecologycenter.org, www.ecologycenter.org. Berkeley Farmers
Market, Center St. & Martin Luther King, Jr. Way,
Berkeley, www.ecologycenter.org/bfm.
Schroeders Oktoberfest Epic 6-Weekend Celebration: Classic Oktoberfest specialties will be featured
for diners, such as Wiener schnitzel, bratwurst, sptzle and pretzels. Patrons enjoy traditional Hofbru
activities, including stein-holding contests, polka
dancing and the crowd favorite chicken dance with
beer hall games and live music. Fridays, Saturdays,
6-9 p.m. Continues through Oct. 24, Free, 421-4778,

LETTERS

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COVER STORY

www.schroederssf.com/calendar.php. Schroeders,
240 Front, San Francisco, www.schroederssf.com.

literary events
24-hour Moby Dick Marathon Reading: Featuring
food trucks, barrels of coffee, and over 100 readers
taking the helm in a rustic brick-walled firehouse
overlooking the Bay. Sat., Oct. 24, noon, Free. Fort
Mason, Firehouse, 2 Marina Blvd., San Francisco,
345-7500, fortmason.org/venue/firehouse.
Alex Mar: Witches of America: Alex Mar discusses
and signs her book, Witches of America. Wed., Oct.
28, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Free, 510-653-9965, oakland@
dieselbookstore.com, www.dieselbookstore.com/
event/oakland-alex-mar-discusses-and-signswitches-america. Diesel, A Bookstore, 5433 College,
Oakland, dieselbookstore.com.
Alice Waters: Book signing of her new release My
Pantry: Homemade Ingredients That Make Simple
Meals Special. A Book Passage receipt for My Pantry
is required for a place in the signing line. Sat., Oct. 24,
12-1:30 p.m., Free, 835-1020, www.bookpassage.com/
event/alice-waters-my-pantry. Book Passage, 1 Ferry
Building Ste. 42, San Francisco, bookpassage.com.
Andrea Kleine: Calf: Andrea Kleine discusses and
signs her book, Calf. Tue., Oct. 27, 6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Free, 510.653.9965, oakland@dieselbookstore.com,
www.dieselbookstore.com/event/oakland-andreakleine-discusses-and-signs-calf. Diesel, A Bookstore,
5433 College, Oakland, dieselbookstore.com.
Before Passing: Great Weather for Media Anthology Release: The Beat Museum and great weather
for MEDIA present a visionary evening of cutting
edge poets and prose writers from across the U.S.
They come together to celebrate the release of great
weathers new anthology, Before Passing, which
features work by intense wordsmiths including
those youll hear tonight along with an interview
with the legendary Anne Waldman. Come prepared
for something that you wont expect., Featuring
Deborah Steinberg, Wil Gibson, Kit Kennedy, Richard Loranger, Sara Mithra, Elizabeth Rosner, Ken
Saffran, and Joan Gelfand. Fri., Oct. 23, 7 p.m., Free,
917-399-8743, www.kerouac.com/blog/beat_event/
before-passing-great-weather-for-media-anthology-release/. The Beat Museum, 540 Broadway, San
Francisco, thebeatmuseum.org.
Crculo de Lectores de Literatura en Espaol:
Spanish-language book club. Fourth Tuesday of
every month, 7 p.m., free. Modern Times Bookstore,
2919 24th St., San Francisco, 282-9246, moderntimesbookstore.com.
Holla Back: Long-running weekly poetry open mic with
a hip-hop vibe. Thursdays, 8 p.m., free/donation.
EastSide Arts Alliance, 2277 International, Oakland,
510-533-6629, eastsideartsalliance.com.
Kristin Hersh: The Throwing Muses bandleader reads
from Dont Suck, Dont Die: Giving Up Vic Chesnutt,
her written tribute to the late songwriter. Tue.,
Oct. 27, 7:30 p.m., free. Green Apple Books on the
Park, 1231 Ninth Ave., San Francisco, 742-5833,
greenapplebooks.com.
Kristin Hershs Dont Suck, Dont Die: Singer-songwriter Kristin Hersh, founding member of
Throwing Muses and 50 Foot Wave, will discuss
Dont Suck, Dont Die, her memoir of friendship
with the talented and troubled Vic Chestnutt
(University of Texas Press) with Anisse Gross.
Tue., Oct. 27, 7:30-9 p.m., Free, 742-5833, chris@
greenapplebooks.com, https://www.facebook.
com/events/443175482523674/. Green Apple
Books on the Park, 1231 Ninth Ave., San Francisco,
greenapplebooks.com.
Lisa McGuinness: In Catarinas Ring, New York Times
bestselling author Lisa McGuinness interweaves the
stories of four generations of strong, vibrant women
and has created characters both idiosyncratic and
adventurous. Thu., Oct. 22, 6-7:30 p.m., Free, 8351020, www.bookpassage.com. Book Passage, 1 Ferry
Building Ste. 42, San Francisco, bookpassage.com.
Magnet Book Club: Monthly discussion of books by
gay authors or featuring gay themes. Last Tuesday
of every month, 7:30 p.m., free. Magnet, 4122 18th
St., San Francisco, 581-1600, magnetsf.org.
Marlon James A Brief History of Seven Killings:
Marlon James will discuss his Man Booker Prize-

the calendar

Arts & Culture

eat

music

Mon 10/26 | Science

DR. NEUROSCIENCE
Mondaynightlife could be a whole lot drabber than a fun science lecture in a watering holeespecially when the speaker is Robert Sapolsky. The Stanford
University neuroscientist, who also works with the Institute of Primate Research at the National Museum of Kenya, is an expert on how stress, in people
and animals alike, affects the mind and body. Sapolsky has extensively studied
wild baboons, and his research has shown that, among primates, low social status can cause stress-related illness. Sapolsky is also a humorous storyteller, an
author of books with titles such asWhy Zebras Dont Get UlcersandMonkeyluv,and a MacArthur Genius fellow. His presentation, which will focus on evolution and behavior, is part of the Leakey Foundations Being Human series.
TheMondaygatherings feature science talks, hands-on experiments, conversation, and libations.
Being Human with Robert Sapolsky will take place from6-9 p.m.
onMonday, Oct. 26, at Public Works, 161 Erie St., S.F.; $10-$15.415-4966738orleakeyfoundation.org.AnitaKatz
longlisted novel, A Brief History of Seven Killings
Mon., Oct. 26, 7:30-9 p.m., Free, 742-5833, https://
www.facebook.com/events/1615782258680128/.
Green Apple Books on the Park, 1231 Ninth Ave.,
San Francisco, greenapplebooks.com.
Poetry at the 33: Monthly open mic with featured
poet. Last Tuesday of every month, 7 p.m., free.
3300 Club, 3300 Mission, San Francisco, 826-6886,
3300club.com.
Porchlight Open Door: The storytellers at Porchlight
host this open mic at which the best 5-minute story
about the monthly theme wins $50. Last Monday
of every month, 7 p.m., $5, porchlightsf.com.
Hemlock Tavern, 1131 Polk, San Francisco, 923-0923,
hemlocktavern.com.
San Francisco in Mystery: Past, Present, and Future
with Reece Hirsch, Kirk Russell, and Kelli Stanley:

SUNDAY

A panel discussion presented by the Mystery Writers


of America. Sun., Oct. 25, 3 p.m., Free. Borderlands
Books, 866 Valencia, San Francisco, 824-8203,
borderlands-books.com.
San Franciscos Queer Open Mic: Monthly LGBT
readings (and more) since 2004. Fourth Friday of
every month, 7:30 p.m., donation, queeropenmic.
com. Modern Times Bookstore, 2919 24th St., San
Francisco, 282-9246, moderntimesbookstore.com.
Thursdays at Readers: Weekly poetry readings
curated by Jack Hirschman. Thursdays, 6:30 p.m.,
free. Readers Bookstore, Fort Mason, Bldg. C, San
Francisco, 771-1076, friendssfpl.org.
TMI Storytelling: Hosted by Gina Gold. Fourth Thursday
of every month, 7 p.m., $10-$13, tmistorytelling.
com. 3KB Sports Bar, 3000 Broadway, Oakland,
510-465-2569, 3kbsportbar.com.

10/25

Dance

ON THIN ICE

In 2009, Luke Cole, a pioneering theorist and practitioner of environmental justice law, died in Uganda at the age of 46. During his too-brief life, the San Francisco lawyer battled mining companies, mega-dairies, and toxic waste dumps on
behalf of poor and minority communities. Through his non-profit, Center for
Race, Poverty, and the Environment, he filed landmark cases, including one
against big oil detailing the staggering impact global warning has had upon a
4,000-year-old Inupiat Eskimo village in Kivalina, Alaska.Arctic Requiem:
The Story of Luke Cole and Kivalinais an elegy and exploration of Coles
relationshipwith the Inupiat which actually beganwith a six-year legal battle
with the worlds largest zinc mine. Relying heavily on music and tribal memory,Arctic Requiemweaves together facts and folklore from the Inupiats
steadily dissolving island, where playwrightSharmon J. Hilfinger and composer
Joan McMillenspent time to gather firsthand accounts. Onstage, characters
from Inupiat myth lead Cole through the kaleidoscope of events with enough veracity to earn the approval and support of Coles wife but enough heart to feel
like an oral history.
Arctic Requiemopens at5 p.m.and continues throughNov. 15atZ Below,
470 Florida St., S.F. $30-$40;415-626-0453orzspace.org. Silke Tudor
Other wOrthy event this week

Talk
San Francisco in Mystery: Past,

Present, and Future with Reece


Hirsch, Kirk Russell, and Kelli
Stanley, a panel discussion pre-

sented by the Mystery Writers of


America, starts at 3 p.m. at Borderland
Books, 866 Valencia St., S.F. Free; 415824-8203 or borderlands-books.com.

sfweekly.com

MONDAY

10/26

tomorrow
exchange
buy *
*sell*trade
sell*trade

Technology

FAILURE TO COMMUNICATE

Among the many technology observers who are disturbed by what digital culture
is doing to our species, Sherry Turkle has addressed the issue with particular
attention and insight. For three decades, the MIT professor has written about the
psychological effects of internet usage. Along the way, she has transformed from
a technology advocate and Wired cover subject into a leading cautionary voice. We
should put down that cellphone and simply talk to each other more, says Turkle,
who believes that technology has supplanted the richer experience of a face-toface conversation. Social media, in which individuals put forth an idealized identity, may make us feel less alone, she says, but it doesnt produce the intimacy and
empathy that are essential to meaningful communication. Turkle also believes
that by changing how we craft technology, we can help remedy the situation. She
will be in town to speak about these issues in person, of course, and with a live
audience and to discuss her latest book, Reclaiming Communication.
Sherry Turkle will speak at7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 26, at the Jewish
Community Center, 3200 California St., S.F. $27.415-292-1200orjccsf.org.

AnitaKatz

Other wOrthy events this week

Zagreb Noir, the latest in the bestselling noir series that has roamed
from Havana to Singapore, lands in
Croatia with editor Ivan Sren at 7:30
at Booksmith, 1644 Haight St., Free;
S.F. 415-863-8688 or booksmith.com.
Travis Barker: Can I Say: Living Large, Cheating
Death, and Drums, Drums, Drums: Travis Barker
signs his new memoir Can I Say: Living Large,
Cheating Death, and Drums, Drums, Drums Sat., Oct.
24, 3-5 p.m., Free, 863-8688, events@booksmith.
com, www.booksmith.com/event/travis-barker-cani-say-living-large-cheating-death-and-drums-drumsdrums. The Booksmith, 1644 Haight, San Francisco,
booksmith.com.

MuseuM exhibits &


events
Aquarium of the Bay. Otters: Watershed Ambassadors:
The AOTBs newest exhibit brings an adorable
romp of North American river otters to Pier 39.
Daily. Embarcadero, San Francisco, 623-5300,
aquariumofthebay.org.
Asian Art Museum. In a New Light: The Asian Art
Museum Collection: More than 2,500 objects from
the museums permanent collection explore the
major cultures of Asia. Tuesdays-Sundays. Exquisite
Nature: 20 Masterpieces of Chinese Painting (14th18th c.): Ancient landscapes evoke feudal China in
this display of classical art. Tuesdays-Sundays.
Continues through Nov. 1. Yoong Bae: Continuity and Pursuit: 21 pensive works by the Korean
painter who balances traditional influences with
modern aesthetics. Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues
through Dec. 13. Woven Luxuries: Indian, Persian,
and Turkish Velvets from the Indictor Collection:
A vibrant selection of ten luxurious textiles (six
Mughal, three Safavid, and one Ottoman) from the
16th-18th centuries. Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues
through Nov. 1. 200 Larkin, San Francisco, 581-3500,

sfweekly.com

Talk

BuffaloExchange.com

Sarah Vowell, author, essayist, and

beloved contributor to This American


Life, provides her singular view of
American history in conversation with
Daniel Handler at 7:30 p.m. at Herbst
Theatre, 401 Van Ness Ave., S.F. $29;
415-392-4400 or cityarts.net.

asianart.org.
The Beat Museum. Permanent Collection: Glimpse
into the poetic, exuberant lives of Jack Kerouac,
Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Allen Ginsberg, Neal Cassady, and other Beat Generation characters via
original manuscripts, memorabilia, letters, personal
items, and other ephemera. Daily, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
$5-$8. 540 Broadway, San Francisco, 399-9626,
thebeatmuseum.org.
Cable Car Museum. Permanent Collection: Located in a
historic cable car powerhouse, the museum displays
a variety of cable car gear, photographs, installations
explaining how the cars work, and several antique
vehicles. Daily. Free. 1201 Mason, San Francisco,
474-1887, cablecarmuseum.org.
California Academy of Sciences. Whales: Giants of
the Deep: Though the Academys aquarium isnt
quite big enough to hold actual whales (sorry, Star
Trek IV superfans), its latest exhibit nonetheless
allows you to get closer to these giant mammals
via colossal skeleton displays, a life-sized recreation
of a blue whales heart, scale models, multimedia
presentations, and more. Through Nov. 29. Animal
Attraction: Exhibit about the wild courtship and
mating strategies in the animal kingdom. Daily.
Earthquake: Treat your senses to seismic overload in this exhibit that includes a walk-in Earth
model illustrating plate tectonics, a recreation of
a Victorian salon that shakes like two of San Franciscos most famous quakes, a planetarium show,
interactive displays, and more. Daily. Color of Life:
The Academys bright new summer show celebrates
the chromatic diversity of nature with live animals,
interactive displays, dioramas, videos, and more.

WIN TICKETS TO THE MAGIC FLUTE!


Four lucky winners will win a pair
of Box seats to The Magic Flute
on November 4 at 7:30pm
Enter at sfweekly.com/operacontest
Entries must be received by October 29, 2015

THE MAGIC FLUTE

MOZART

Oct 20Nov 20
In a fantastical world of ferocious dragons and enchanted
musical instruments, a noble prince sets out to rescue a
beautiful princess and ensure the triumph of truth and
justice. Sung in English so you wont miss a moment of
the magic!

San Francisco Opera/Cory Weaver

Reading

MISSION DIST: 1210 Valencia St. 415-647-8332


HAIGHT: 1555 Haight St. 415-431-7733
BERKELEY: 2585 Telegraph Ave. 510-644-9202

No purchase necessary to enter. Void where prohibited.


For full contest rules, go to sfexaminer.com/operacontest.

sfopera.com
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(415) 864-3330

COVER STORY

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DAVID GOCKLEY

NICOLA LUISOTTI

General Director

Music Director

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 23

Daily. Habitat Earth: The California Academy of


Sciences newest planetarium show redefines the
traditional concept of astronomical presentation,
turning the telescopes around and focusing on the
greatest wonder of the universe Earth itself as
it invites viewers to discover what it means to live in
todays connected world on the only planet known to
sustain biodiversity and life. Daily. Penguin Feeding:
Watch as the Academys flightless friends are offered
their breakfast and lunch. Daily, 10:30 a.m. & 3 p.m.
Coral Reef Dive: Scientists dive into the Academys
live coral tank and offer live explanations of its
denizens. Daily, 11:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. Ssssnake
Encounter: Get up close and personal with some of
the Academys scaly, slithering inhabitants. Daily,
3:30 p.m. NightLife: Weekly afterhours party featuring dance music, drinks, scientific presentations,
hands-on activities, and more for people who like
to pair their intellectual curiosity with a cocktail.
Thursdays, 6-10 p.m. $10-$12. calacademy.org/

events/nightlife. Sharks and Rays: Learn about the


Reef Lagoons residents. Tuesdays, Thursdays, 1:30
p.m. 55 Music Concourse, San Francisco, 379-8000,
calacademy.org.
California Historical Society Museum. Engineers
of Illumination: A Projected Light Project: Inspired
by the Jewel City of the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition, a changing rotation of artists
create illuminated installations that fill the windows
of the CHS with glowing imagery from dusk until 10
p.m. every night. Through Dec. 6. Free. City Rising:
San Francisco and the 1915 Worlds Fair: To complement its exhibit of the same name at the Palace of
Fine Arts, the CHS presents photographs, souvenirs,
videos, a detailed diorama, and other items commemorating the 1915 Panama-Pacific International
Exposition. Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through
Dec. 6. $5 donation. ppie100.org. 678 Mission, San
Francisco, 357-1848, californiahistoricalsociety.org.
Chinese Historical Society of America. Under-

ground Chinatown: Racism at the Fair The 1915


Panama-Pacific International Exposition: A look
back at one of the PPIEs most dubious attractions,
which lured visitors with such racist stereotypes
of Chinese culture as opium dens and sex slaves.
Tuesdays-Saturdays. Continues through Dec. 19.
Free. The Chinese of America: Toward a More Perfect
Union: This bilingual exhibit follows the course of
Chinese-American immigration from the 19th century
to today via photographs, artifacts, and historical
narratives. Tuesdays-Saturdays. Free. 965 Clay, San
Francisco, 391-1188, chsa.org.
Contemporary Jewish Museum. Chasing Justice: The
exhibition Chasing Justice is inspired by the biblical
exhortation of Deuteronomy (16:20) to pursue justice. Arnold Mesches, Joby Barron, and Robbin Henderson have produced bodies of work that explore
different approaches to this Jewish commitment. All
have resulted in a variety of engagement with the
government from surveillance to arrest. Thursdays,

Mon 10/26 | Talk

TRENCHTOWN ROCK
In 1976, two days after an assassination attempt, Bob Marley got on stage to sing
War in front of 80,000 people at the Smile Jamaica Concert. When asked why,
the singer famously replied,The people who are trying to make this world worse
arent taking a day off. How can I? Born in 1970 to parents who were cops, novelist Marlon James was always aware of the pitiless gang violence and political
corruption that marked the era. His novel,A Brief History of Seven Killings, uses the
Marley shooting as a point of departure, fluidly shifting voice and viewpoint between CIA operatives, gang members, music journalists, and eye witnesses just
to name a few as they weave through the roiling streets of West Kingston, into
the crack houses of 80s New York, and ultimately back to Jamaica in the 90s.
Complex but perfectly mapped, violent but perversely beautiful, James third book
has been called mythic, exhilarating, exhausting, darkly comic, and irresistible.
Less than two weeks ago, when James became the first Jamaican to win the prestigious Man Booker Prize, the judges said it was unanimous.
Marlon James speaksat7:30 p.m.at Green Apple Books on the Park,
1231 Ninth Ave., S.F.Free;415-742-5833 orgreenapplebooks.com. Silke

Tudor

SAN FRANCISCO

11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Mondays, Tuesdays, Fridays-Sundays,


11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 21. $12. www.
thecjm.org. Hardly Strictly Warren Hellman: Anyone
lucky enough to meet Warren Hellman, or see him
perform at his signature cultural creation, Hardly
Strictly Bluegrass, witnessed the utter joy and
humanity that emanated from his being (and his
banjo). The Contemporary Jewish Museum assembles rarely-seen videos of Hellmans performances
in Golden Gate Park, along with special personal
possessions like a banjo signed by star performers
and a jacket covered with rhinestones and a Star of
David. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays. Lamp
of the Covenant: Dave Lane, often described as an
outsider artist, has repurposed 6 tons of steel into
a 90-foot sheath of globes, light bulbs, old tools, and
other objects that hang over the museums central
lobby. Like the eternal light that can be found in

every synagogue, Lanes gigantic lamp can be seen


as a symbol of higher connection both literally and
figuratively. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays.
Amy Winehouse: A Family Portrait: Return to a time
before the famous beehive hairdo and infamous
drug habits to get an intimate look at the late soul
singers upbringing in London, including musical
memorabilia, family photos, clothing, and more.
Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays. Continues
through Nov. 1. 736 Mission, San Francisco, 6557800, thecjm.org.
de Young Museum. Portals of the Past: The Photographs of Willard Worden: This flashback photo
show magically transports viewers to old San
Francisco, where you can see the original Cliff
House, turn-of-century Chinatown, the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exhibition, and more.
Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Feb. 14. 50

PALACE OF FINE ARTS THEATRE


WED | NOV. 4 | 7:30 PM
THURS | NOV. 5 | 7:30 PM

TUESDAY

T H E C A S T R O T H E AT R E

Signings

THURS | NOV. 12 | 7:30 PM

10/27

HERSH WORDS

Rolling Stone named Kristin Hershs Rat Girl as one of the 10 best rock memoirs ever written, and the Noise Pop stalwart and founder of Throwing Muses
and 50 Foot Wave is coming to Green Apple Books to support her follow-up, a
eulogy of sorts for her friend, Vic Chesnutt. A disabled singer-songwriter whose
confinement to a wheelchair and lack of digital dexterity left him unable to play
more than the simplest chords, Chesnutt certainly cuts a tragic figure, but
Hershs Dont Suck, Dont Die: Giving Up Vic Chesnutt proves that the musicians-musician status his work received was more than empty condescension.
This look at their decade-long friendship goes far deeper than diagnosing the
faults of a complex personality, and Hershs conversation with S.F. writer and editor Anisse Gross is bound to tease out all the poignant moments and probably a fair amount of insults, too.
Kristin Hersh in conversation with Anisse Gross begins at 7:30 p.m., at
Green Apple Books, 1231 Ninth Ave., S.F. Free; 415-742-5833 or greenapplebooks.com. Peter Lawrence Kane

BERKELEY | NOV. 5
WALNUT CREEK | NOV. 10
REDWOOD CITY | NOV. 11
CAMPBELL | NOV. 13
SAN RAFAEL | NOV. 14
PLEASANTON | NOV. 15

OTHER WORTHY EVENT THIS WEEK

Talk

TICKET HOLDERS RECEIVE FREE RESORT AND RETAIL OFFERS FROM:

Mariana Castillo Deball, a Berlin-based artist whose diverse installations come out of long periods of field
research on matters of history and
identity, begins her nine-month residency with a talk at 7 p.m. at San
Francisco Art Institute, 800 Chestnut
St., S.F. Free with RSVP; 415-7717020 or sfai.edu.

FOR COMPLETE OFFER DETAILS GO TO

WARRENMILLER.COM

24 |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

LETTERS

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COVER STORY

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Arts & Culture

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The noticed one, confusing


itself with the many
Courtesy of the artist and Wien Lukatsch

sfweekly.com

Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive, San Francisco, 7503600, deyoungmuseum.org.


Exploratorium. Tactile Dome: One of the Exploratoriums earliest exhibits a pitch-black maze
designed to heighten ones awareness of the
sense of touch reopens at the new location
after a slight redesign. Tuesdays-Sundays. $12$15 (in addition to regular museum admission).
Full-Spectrum Science: Exploratorium scientist
Ron Hipschman lets you have fun with physics
via hands-on activities and demonstrations that
explore physical phenomena like sound, color,
temperature, etc. Fourth Thursday of every
month, 8 p.m.; Fourth Sunday of every month,
11 a.m., 2 & 3:30 p.m. Permanent Exhibits: The
family science museums gigantic new complex
is split into six separate gallery sections that
focus on human behavior, senses & perception,
biology, the environment, and much more all
with the Exploratoriums famously whimsical
and interactive features. Tuesdays-Sundays, 10
a.m.-5 p.m. Pier 15, San Francisco, 528-4444,
exploratorium.edu.
GLBT History Museum. 30 Years of Collecting Art
That Tells Our Stories: Elisabeth Cornu curates a
selection of visual art that recalls scenes from
the heady, hot, turbulent days of gay life from the
1960s to the 1990s. Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays. Reigning Queens: The Lost Photos of Roz
Joseph: An exhibit of photographs taken during
the 1970s of the Imperial Court to celebrate its
50th anniversary. Starting Oct. 23. Sundays, 12-5
p.m.; Mondays, Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-6
p.m. Continues through Feb. 1. Free. Queer Past
Becomes Present: Multipart exhibit tracing the
history of queer youth activism, exploring lost
S.F. gayborhoods, paying tribute to pioneering
lesbian magazine The Ladder, spotlighting
Bay Area HIV/AIDS organizations, and more.
Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays. 4127 18th St.,
San Francisco, 621-1107, glbthistorymuseum.org.
Legion of Honor. Breguet: Art & Innovation in Watchmaking: Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through
Jan. 10. The Salon Dor: Recently restored, this
installation recreates the extravagant French
Neoclassical interior of the Htel de la Trmoille
in Paris. Tuesdays-Sundays. Watson Adventures
Murder at the Legion of Honor Scavenger Hunt:
A curator has been murdered at the Legion of
Honor Museum, but hes left a trail of clues
connected with secrets in works of art. As your
team gathers answers about the art, youll learn
a sordid tale revolving around a planned purchase
of a rare painting by Leonardo da Vinci. Youll
have to crack a secret code in order to solve
this murder. Price does not include museum
admission. Advance purchase is required. Sat.,
Oct. 24, 2-4 p.m. $20.00 (plus museum admission). 877-946-4868. www.watsonadventures.
com/public/event/the-murder-at-the-legion-ofhonor-scavenger-hunt/. Luminous Worlds: British
Works on Paper, 1760-1900: This counterpart to
the de Young Museums J.M.W. Turner: Painting
Set Free exhibit features drawings, watercolors,
and oil sketches by Turner and his contemporaries
like William Blake, John Constable, John Robert
Cozens, Thomas Gainsborough, John Martin, and
Samuel Palmer. Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues
through Nov. 29. Bowles Porcelain Gallery:
Porcelain from England and continental Europe.
Tuesdays-Sundays. 100 34th Ave., San Francisco,
750-3600, legionofhonor.famsf.org.
The Marine Mammal Center. Marine Science Sundays: Learn about oceans and the wildlife within
during classroom presentations and docent-led
tours of the MMC. Second and Fourth Sunday of
every month, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. 2000 Bunker
Road, Sausalito, marinemammalcenter.org.
Oakland Museum of California. Pacific Worlds: From
historical artifacts to contemporary artwork, this
exhibit honors the ongoing influence of Pacific
Islander cultures in California. Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through Jan. 3. Bees: Tiny Insect,
Big Impact: With bee populations declining across
the nation, this family friendly exhibit acts as
both an introduction to these striped insects and

sfweekly.com

HALLOWEEN
EVENTS 2015

s
o
c
s
i
c
n
san fraear round
best y ume shop
cost

Groove Armada
performs Sat., Oct. 31,
at The Midway.

21st Annual Freakers Ball: Costume contest, and


performances. Sat., Oct. 24, 9 p.m., $30. The Factory,
525 Harrison, S.F., 538-7977.
36th Annual Reclaiming Spiral Dance Ritual: You
are welcomed to a ritual to honor our beloved dead
and to dance the spiral of rebirth. This ritual is Bay
Area Reclaimings largest fundraiser for the year,
and supports many of our other activities, courses,
ritual, and resources. Sat., Oct. 31, 6-11:30 p.m.,
$25-$150, www.reclaimingspiraldance.org. Kezar
Pavilion, 755 Stanyan, S.F., 831-6316.
3rd Annual Halloween Masquerade Ball: w/ DJ Bruce
Parker. Cocktail attire or masquerade costume. Fri.,
Oct. 30, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m., $25-$150. JW Marriott San
Francisco Union Square, 500 Post, S.F., 771-8600,
www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/sfojw-jw-marriottsan-francisco-union-square.
50 Shades of Grave: Featuring DJ Brian, Bradley P,
Lord Price (AKA DJ PBJ), Edward Aten, plus special
guests. Fri., Oct. 23, 10 p.m., $15-$20, www.facebook.
com/events/1488613351434900/. Mighty, 119 Utah,
S.F., 762-0151, mighty119.com.
The 90s Music Video Sing A Long Show: Halloween
Special: Fri., Oct. 23, 9:30-11:30 p.m., $10, $12 at the
door, sfindie.com. Roxie Theater, 3117 16th St., S.F.,
863-1087, roxie.com.
American Horror Story: Asylum: w/ D-Sharp (Golden
State Warriors Official DJ), ZMO, and Ant-1. Fri.,
Oct. 30, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., $10 -$20, 650-6038, www.
NorthBeachHalloween.com. Fort One Bar & Lounge,
2801 Leavenworth, S.F., fort1sf.com.
American Horror Story: FREAKSHOW: w/ Romeo
Reyes (Marque Las Vegas, Infusion), and DJ Hardy.
Sat., Oct. 31, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., $15-$25, 650-6038, www.
NorthBeachHalloween.com. Fort One Bar & Lounge,
2801 Leavenworth, S.F., fort1sf.com.
Ameriween: Part album release, part costume party.
Doctor Strikers new concept album America is
available for streaming now on Bandcamp, Spotify
and iTunes. Thu., Oct. 29, 7-11 p.m., $10. Hotel Utah,
500 Fourth St., S.F., 546-6300, hotelutah.com.
Boograss: Hillbilly Halloween!: w/ Front Country,
One Grass Two Grass, Rusty Stringfield. Costume
contest, photo booth, tricks and treats Sat., Oct.
31, 8 p.m.-midnight, $15, 255-0333. Slims, 333 11th
St., S.F., slimspresents.com.
Bruce Steivels Dracula: Based on the novel by
Bram Stoker and brought to life by Bruce Steivels
innovative choreography, this haunting tale of
Draculas eternal search for the woman he loves will
have you on the edge of your seat. Costumes are
allowed and encouraged at all Dracula performances.
Fri., Oct. 30, 8-10 p.m.; Sat., Oct. 31, 2-4 p.m., $30$60, 800-595-4849, baypointeballet.org/season/
dracula.php. San Mateo Performing Arts Center,
600 N. Delaware, San Mateo.
Clinton Sparks: Sat., Oct. 31, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., $10-$15,
843-1483. HUE Lounge & Nightclub, 447 Broadway
Street, S.F., www.huesf.com.
A Club Called Rhonda: Halloween: With Totally
Enormous Extinct Dinozaurs, Metro Area Soul Clap,

Tornado Wallace, Goddollars & Paradise. Sat., Oct.


31, 9 p.m., $45-$75. Mezzanine, 444 Jessie, S.F.,
625-8880, mezzaninesf.com.
Creatures of Nightlife: Live drag performance and
costume contest hosted by Peaches Christ and
guests. Music by DJ Omar (Popscene). Thu., Oct. 29,
6 p.m., $10-$12. California Academy of Sciences, 55
Music Concourse, S.F., 379-8000, calacademy.org.
Cruise-In: The Wastedeads: w/ Crimson Ghostbusters, Sleazy Rider Wed., Oct. 28, 6 p.m., Free.
Thee Parkside, 1600 17th St., S.F., 252-1330, theeparkside.com.
Daft Nite | 2000s Halloween Party: DJs Jamie Jams
and Emdee return with a Halloween cover set of Daft
Punk! In the back room, a classic early 2000s set
by Rocky as Mira Aroyo of Ladytron and a screening
of electroclash cult classic, Liquid Sky. Fri., Oct.
30, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., $5-$10, Free w/ 2000s costume,
974-1719, www.lastnite00s.com. 111 Minna Gallery,
111 Minna, S.F., 111minnagallery.com.
EYEHEART Halloween: DJ Vice: Fri., Oct. 30, 9 p.m.,
$15-$30 advance. Mezzanine, 444 Jessie, S.F., 6258880, mezzaninesf.com.

BeyOnD-escape.cOm

$5 Off TickeTs

SFBRAINS

DiscOunT cODe

DJ Vice

Fear Overload Scream Park Haunted Houses: Fear


Overload Scream Park is the SF Bay Areas most
outrageous haunted house event. Featuring 2
absolutely sickening haunted houses and live
horror entertainment. Thursdays-Sundays, 7-10 p.m.
Continues through Nov. 1, $25, www.fearoverload.
com. Century 16 Bayfair Mall, 15555 E. 14th St., San
Leandro, 510-276-9684, www.cinemark.com.
Ghost Ship 2015 Annihilation: Performing on Friday, Oct. 30: Goldfish, DAVID HARNESS, All Good
Funk Alliance, Laura Lisbona, Birdee, and more.
Performing on Saturday, Oct. 31: DJ Q-Bert, Krafty
Kuts, Fort Knox Five vs QDup, DJ Apollo, Mano Meter
(Germany), The Gentlemen Callers, Plaza De Funk,
and more. Oct. 30-Nov. 1, $85-$100, www.facebook.
com/events/1621637374772372/. Pier 70, 22nd St.,
S.F., pier70sf.org.
Groove Armada: w/ Seth Troxler, and Subb-an. Sat.,
Oct. 31, 9 p.m., $30-$50. The Midway, 900 Marin,
S.F., themidwaysf.com.
Hallorager: IV: w/ Mongoloid, Bobb Saggeth, Banquet
as Thin Lizzy, Family Matters as TV Personalities Sat.,
Oct. 31, 9 p.m., $10. Thee Parkside, 1600 17th St., S.F.,
252-1330, theeparkside.com.
Halloween Booootie SF: Smash-Up Derby, DJ Adrian

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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 25

HALLOWEEN
EVENTS
2015
Mysterious D, Jimi G, DJ Entyme and friends, DJ
Decay, DJ Sage, DJ Joe Radio, DJ Airsun, and DJ
Chucky Brown. Costume contest. Entertainment
by Hubba Hubba Revue. Sat., Oct. 31, 9 p.m., $30
advance; $20 before 10pm; $40 after, 626-1409,
www.dnalounge.com. DNA Lounge, 375 11th St.,
S.F., dnalounge.com.
Halloween Horror Musical: BATS cast of actors will
take inspiration from audience suggestions, as
well as classic horror films like Alien, Poltergeist,
and The Exorcist. Oct. 30-31, 8-10 p.m., $17-$20,
474-6776, www.improv.org. Bayfront Theater, 16
Marina, San Francisco.
Halloween International Ball 2015: DJs KBLO, AYKUT,
Youssef, Dr. T, Nitro, Kevin Armstrong. Fri., Oct. 30, 9
p.m.-2 a.m., $30-$150, 260-9920, www.aykutevents.
com/halloween. W San Francisco, 181 Third St., S.F.,
starwoodhotels.com/whotels.
Halloween w/ Dubfire, Audiofly, Shaded: Rooz and
Bo. Costume contests. Sat., Oct. 31, 9 p.m.-2 a.m.,
$15-$40. Public Works, 161 Erie, S.F., 932-0955,
publicsf.com.
Halloween Weekend at Mighty - Friday: Fehrplay,
Carlo Lio, Harvey Mckay, Agoria, and more. Fri.,
Oct. 30, 9 p.m., $35-$1000, www.konnektedsf.
com. Mighty, 119 Utah, S.F., 762-0151, mighty119.com.
Halloween Weekend at Mighty - Saturday: w/ John
Digweed, Guy Mantzur, Derek Hena. Sat., Oct. 31, 9
p.m., $35-$1000, www.konnektedsf.com. Mighty,
119 Utah, S.F., 762-0151, mighty119.com.
Haunted Carnival: Djs TonyTone, The Les Sat., Oct. 31,
9 p.m., Free before 10:30pm. Butterfly, Pier 33, S.F.,
864-8999, butterflysf.com.
A Haunted Concert with Abbot Kinney: w/ Travis
Hayes and the Young Daze, Vanwave, and DJ Stefan
Aronsen. Wed., Oct. 28, 8-11:30 p.m., $10-$15 door,
$10 w/ costume, 861-2011, www.facebook.com/
events/847328812042656/. Rickshaw Stop, 155
Fell, S.F., rickshawstop.com.
Haunted Hoedown 6(66): Rin Tin Tiger, Eyes on the
Shore, Curious Quail, and Frankie Boots & the County
Line. Sat., Oct. 31, 8:30 p.m., $10 in advance; $12
at the door. Bottom of the Hill, 1233 17th St., S.F.,
621-4455, bottomofthehill.com.
Heartbreak Halloween: Sage the Gemini, Kehlani,
IAMSU!,Skizzy Mars, P-Lo, Kool John, Jay Ant,
Skipper and more Sat., Oct. 31, 7 p.m., $35.00$50.00, 345-0900. Warfield Theatre, 982 Market,
S.F., thewarfieldtheatre.com.
Hell in the Armory Presents: Inferno: Violence,
sexuality, and hardcore horrors await. The Armory,
1800 Mission, S.F., 677-0456, sfarmory.com.
#HellaFunny Halloween Comedy Festival: Stroy
Moyd and FuncheapSF present the first annual
#HellaFunny Halloween Comedy Festival SF! Fri.,
Oct. 30, 8 p.m.; Sat., Oct. 31, 8 p.m.; Sun., Nov. 1, 7:30
p.m., $16.50. Cobbs Comedy Club, 915 Columbus,
S.F., 928-4320, cobbscomedy.com.
The Illogical Contraption: w/ DJ Douggpound, JP INC,
Kaseem Bentley and GHOUL. 18 and over. Two drink
minimum per person. Fri., Oct. 30, 10:15 p.m., $18.75.
Cobbs Comedy Club, 915 Columbus, S.F., 928-4320,
cobbscomedy.com.
Lifting the Veil: DJ Jibby, DJ TT. Dance party w/
performances by Allan Frias, Sexitude, Tika Morgan,
Rashad Pridgen aka Soul Nubian, and more. Fri.,
Oct. 30, 8 p.m., $10-$100. Dance Mission Theater,
3316 24th St., S.F., 273-4633, dancemission.com.
The Masquerade Macabre Do You Dare?: Lee
Presson and the Nails, Salon de Guillotine courtesy of
Thirllpeddlers, fortune teller, food by Arguello. Sat.,
Oct. 31, 7-10 p.m., Free. Presidio Officers Club, 50
Moraga, S.F., 561-4000, presidioofficersclub.com.
Metalween 2015: Sons of Satan, Dispirit, Brainoil, and

26 |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

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Arts & Culture

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a wake-up call about their ecological importance.


Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through July 24.
Rituals + Remembrance: Celebrating the theme of
memorial across cultures, the 21st annual Das de
los Muertos (Days of the Dead) exhibition, Rituals
+ Remembrance, explores how Latin American,
Filipino, Hawaiian, Japanese, Chinese and other
communities view death, memory, and healing.
Featuring artists Nancy Hom, Lilli Lanier, Yvonne
Escalante, Charles Valeroso, Bryan Keith Thomas,
Daniel King (aka Safety First), Paco Garcia, Melanie
Cervantes, and Jesus Barraza, as well as installations
created by MetWest High School, Sankofa Academy,
and the Alameda County Public Health Department.
Saturdays, 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Saturdays, Sundays, 10
a.m.-6 p.m.; Wednesdays, Thursdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
Continues through Jan. 3. $15.95. museumca.org/.
1000 Oak, Oakland, 510-238-2200, museumca.org.
Palace of Fine Arts. City Rising: San Francisco
and the 1915 Worlds Fair: To commemorate the
centennial of the Panama-Pacific International
Exhibition, the California Historical Society presents
an exhibit featuring vintage images, an animated
video, illustrated map, architectural remnants from
the fair, and the PPIEs last remaining structure, the
Palace of Fine Arts itself. Through Jan. 10, 2016, 9
a.m.-5 p.m. Free. californiahistoricalsociety.org. 3301
Lyon, San Francisco, 567-6642, palaceoffinearts.org.
Randall Museum. Meet the Animals: Live presentations about the animals who live at the museum.
Saturdays, 11 a.m. Free. 199 Museum, San Francisco,
554-9600, randallmuseum.org.
Randall Museum @ Mission Art Center. Drop-In
Science Workshop: Each week kids and parents
can participate in artistic activities that illuminate
some aspect of science. Saturdays, 10:30 a.m. $3-

$5. Meet the Animals: Though the Randalls regular


facilities in Corona Heights are temporarily closed,
the animals who live at the museum will make weekly
trips down to the Mission for free live presentations.
Saturdays, 11 a.m. Free. Drop-In Art Workshop: Get
creative with arts and crafts projects for children
and parents alike. Saturdays, 1 p.m. $3-$5. 745
Treat, San Francisco, 554-9600, randallmuseum.org.
San Francisco Airport Museum. The Tushanwan
Pagodas: Models from the 1915 Panama-Pacific
International Exposition: Through Oct. 25. ppie100.
org. SFO International Terminal, San Francisco, 650821-6700, flysfo.com/museum.
San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park
Visitor Center. A Walk Along the Waterfront: Historic
memorabilia, nautical artifacts, slide presentations,
and large-scale decorative installations recreate
the sights and sounds of San Franciscos bustling
shipping and fishing industries in this free daily
exhibit. Daily, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. 499 Jefferson,
San Francisco, 447-5000, nps.gov/safr.
San Francisco Railway Museum. Fair, Please! Streetcars to the Panama-Pacific International Exposition:
Photos show how tourists and locals used Muni trains
to visit the 1915 worlds fair in the Marina. Through
Nov. 1. Free. ppie100.org. 77 Steuart, San Francisco,
974-1948, streetcar.org.
Stanford University, Cantor Arts Center. Pop Art
from the Anderson Collection at SFMOMA: Local
collectors Harry and Mary Margaret Anderson
recently donated over 100 of their post-war artworks
to Stanford, so to celebrate Cantor is borrowing 10
from the SFMOMAs own collection, including works
by Rauschenberg, Oldenburg, Warhol, and more.
Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through
Oct. 26. Free. 328 Lomita, Palo Alto, 650-723-4177,

WEDNESDAY

10/28

Event

RETURN OF LECTROMINO

When a video was released of Boston Dynamics BigDog a four-legged


rough-terrain robot that walks, climbs, and carries heavy loads even when its
blindsided by a strong kick there were those who felt slightly uneasy.
Maybe it was the ominous music, the military-style satchels, or the slow slide
into the Uncanny Valley, where robots move enough like organic beings to set
ones teeth slightly on edge. Of course, there were others, sometimes in the
same household, who justlovedloved lovedBigDog. The latter camp has
watched biorobotics advance literally by leaps and bounds. They cheered
when BigDog climbed a pile of rubble and regained its footing on ice; they
gaped when Cheetah broke the running speed record and learned to jump obstacles; they marveled when Salamanderproved it could walk and swim in the
great outdoors. For both the dubious and excited camps, Biorobots: Dissected brings together experts from some of the most advanced robot labs
in the world EPFL, Stanford, NASA, UC Berkeley for scientific discussion and live demonstrations (you know what we mean). This presentation is
part of the 2015 Bay Area Science Festival, through which the bio-robots will
walk, trot, and crawl untilNov. 7.
Biorobots: Dissected starts at6:30 p.m.at swissnex San Francisco,
730 Montgomery St., S.F. $10-$15;415-912-5901orbayareascience.org.

Silke Tudor

OTHER WORTHYEVENT THIS WEEK

Music
Crimson Ghostbusters, a mashup

band that is not afraid to combine the


Misfits with Tom Petty, performs with
the Wastedeads, a punk-rot zombiecore band, and Sleazy Rider, an Easy
Rider-loving biker duo with a Jack
Nicholson go-go-dancer, at 6 p.m. at
Thee Parkside, 1600 17th St., S.F. Free,
415-252-1330 or theeparkside.com.

sfweekly.com

museum.stanford.edu.
The Walt Disney Family Museum. Disney & Dal:
Architects of the Imagination: Go ahead and file
this one under Strange Bedfellows: Californias
Disney Family Museum and Floridas Dal Museum
join forces to shed light on the unexpected friendship
between the kiddie cartoon pioneer and the world
famous Surrealist weirdo, as evidenced by letters,
photos, paintings, sketches, and multimedia entries,
including glimpses at an unfinished animation project
that may have been even stranger than Fantasia.
Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through
Jan. 3. Tomorrowland: Walts Vision for Today: Concept art, animation, vintage posters, and other forms
of multimedia tell the story behind Disneylands
retro-futuristic theme park in this exhibit guest
curated by Tomorrowland film director Brad Bird.
Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through
Dec. 7. 104 Montgomery, San Francisco, 345-6800,
waltdisney.org.
Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Kota Ezawa:
Boardwalk: A 2-D recreation of the Funtown Pier
boardwalk and amusement park in Seaside Heights,
NJ the destruction of which became an iconic
image of Hurricane Sandys wrath constructed
in the YBCAs Third Street courtyard. Through Nov.
30. Free. Murmur Wall: Located by the YBCA steps
at 701 Mission, this Future Cities Lab installation
lights up as it incorporates local trending search
engine results and social media postings. Onlookers
can offer their own contributions, which feed into
the data stream, light up the sculpture, and reflect
the citys volatile internet habits. Through May 31,
2017. Free. Lightswarm: This suspended window
sculpture turns the YBCAs glass wall into a glowing
parade of sound-sensing lights that changes with the
movements of nearby people and things. Through
Oct. 31, 2016. Free. 701 Mission, San Francisco,
978-2787, ybca.org.

TheaTer
Arctic Requiem: The Story of Luke Cole and Kivalina:
A play with music from Bootstrap Theatre Foundation
about an Alaskan Inupiat village and their quest for
environmental justice with lawyer Luke Cole. Starting
Oct. 23, Thursdays-Saturdays, 8-10 p.m.; Sundays,
5-7 p.m. Continues through Nov. 15, $30-$40, www.
bootstrap-foundation.org/. Z Below, 470 Florida, San
Francisco, 626-0453, zspace.org.
The Barbary Coast Revue: Mark Twain is back in San
Francisco, playing guitar and narrating as the cast
of seven acts out his colorful tale of local history set
to parodies of popular songs by Bay Area musicians
from the 80s to now. This show is unapologetically
goofy, unpretentiously fun and unforgettably
musical; The Barbary Coast Revue leaves guests
singing along for days. Thu., Oct. 22, 8-9:30 p.m.;
Thu., Oct. 29, 8-9:30 p.m.; Thu., Nov. 5, 8-9:30 p.m.;
Thu., Nov. 12, 8-9:30 p.m., $20, 350-5870, www.
barbarycoastrevue.com. Balancoire, 2565 Mission,
San Francisco, balancoiresf.com.
Beach Blanket Babylon: Steve Silvers musical revue
spoofs pop culture with extravagant costumes.
Wednesdays-Sundays, $25-$130, beachblanketbabylon.com. Club Fugazi, 678 Green, San Francisco,
421-4222, beachblanketbabylon.com.
Britishmania: Performing in 5 costume eras with
authentic guitars and gear. Oct. 23-24, 8 p.m.; Oct.
24-25, 2 p.m.; Sun., Oct. 25, 7 p.m., $39.90-$69.90,
408-792-4111, tickets@sanjose.org, sanjosetheaters.org/event/britishmania-san-jose/?instance_
id=6203. Montgomery Theater, 271 S. Market St., San
Jose, sanjosetheaters.org.
David Schein with Bob Ernst: Performing Out Comes
Butch and Distraction. Fridays, Saturdays, 8-10
p.m. Continues through Oct. 24, $10-20, 510-6583530, www.ftloose.org. Exit Theatre, 156 Eddy, San
Francisco, theexit.org.
Foodies! The Musical: A musical comedy revue of
songs and sketches that take a humorous look at
the current food scene. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.,
$34, foodiesthemusical.com. Shelton Theater, 533
Sutter, San Francisco, 882-9100, sheltontheater.org.

sfweekly.com

The Hypocrites Pirates of Penzance: Music


by Arthur Sullivan. Directed and adapted by
Sean Graney. Co-adapted by Kevin ODonnell.
Co-directed by Thrisa Hodits. Music direction by
Andra Velis Simon. Tuesdays, Fridays, Saturdays,
8 p.m.; Saturdays, Sundays, 2 p.m.; Wednesdays,
Sundays, 7 p.m. Continues through Dec. 20, $29$89, www.berkeleyrep.org/. Osher Studio, 2055
Center, Berkeley.
The Magic Flute: Music by Wolfgang Amadeus
Mozart. Libretto by Emanuel Schnikaneder.
Kaleidoscopic, multimedia production designed
by visual artist Jun Kaneko. Cast includes Paul
Appleby, Sarah Shafer, Nadine Sierra, and Albina
Shagimuratova. Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m.; Sun., Oct.
25, 2 p.m.; Thu., Oct. 29, 7:30 p.m.; Wed., Nov. 4,
7:30 p.m.; Sun., Nov. 8, 2 p.m.; Thu., Nov. 12, 7:30
p.m.; Sat., Nov. 14, 7:30 p.m.; Tue., Nov. 17, 7:30
p.m.; Fri., Nov. 20, 7:30 p.m. Continues through
Oct. 27, $26-$395, 864-3330, sfopera.com/.
War Memorial Opera House, 301 Van Ness, San
Francisco, sfwmpac.org.
Monday Night Marsh: Musicians, actors, performance artists, and others take the stage at this
regular staging of works in progress. Mondays,
7:30 p.m., $7. The Marsh Theater, 1062 Valencia,
San Francisco, 826-5750, themarsh.org.
The Nance: The Nance recreates the naughty,
raucous world of burlesques heyday and tells
the backstage story of headliner Chauncey Miles.
By Douglas Carter Beane. Directed by Dennis
Lickteig. Wednesdays-Sundays, 8 p.m. Continues
through Nov. 1, $20-$40, 861-8972, nctcsf.org.
Pound: Written and performed by Marga Gomez.
Directed by David Schweizer. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Sun., Nov. 1, 3 p.m.; Thu., Nov. 5, 8
p.m. Continues through Oct. 30, $15-$30. Brava
Theater Center, 2781 24th St., San Francisco,
641-7657, brava.org.
Solo Sundays: A monthly showcase of solo performances. Last Sunday of every month, 7 p.m.,
$12-$25, solosundays.com. Stage Werx, 446
Valencia, San Francisco, stagewerx.org.
Stories High XV: Featuring eight 10 minute plays:
18 by Aureen Almario, directed by Sandy
Panopio, Jigsaw Puzzle by Danica Ronquillo,
directed by Chris Hunt and Michelle Fajardo,
The Night Shift by Ed Mabasa, directed by
Joe Cascasan, The Gardener by Emmanuel
Romero, directed by Judith Ferrer, See Through
by Katherine Cruz, directed by Tatiana Chaterji,
to the pinays who have considered suicide by
Caroline Calderon, directed by Sammay Dizon,
Please Come Back by Steven Dominguez,
directed by Juan Berumen, Full House House
by Jericho Saria, directed by Laura Paule Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Nov. 7,
$10-$25, www.bindlestiffstudio.org/. Bindlestiff
Studio, 185 Sixth St., San Francisco, 255-0440,
bindlestiffstudio.org.
The Submarine Show: In the outlandishly
hilarious physical theater piece The Submarine
Show, two clowns bring to life a sidesplitting
adventure from the bottom of the sea up to the
sky as they embody fish, birds, monsters and even
a submarine. Utilizing slapstick and pantomime,
Emmy Award winner Slater Penney and former
Cirque du Soleil performer Jaron Hollander
bring their unique comic world to life using only
their own bodies for a show that appeals to
audiences of all ages. Wednesdays-Saturdays,
8-9 p.m.; Sundays, 2-3 p.m. Continues through
Oct. 25, $28-$32, 510-843-4822, boxoffice@auroratheatre.org, https://auroratheatre.org/index.
php?option=com_theatre&view=show&id=120.
Aurora Theatre Company, 2081 Addison, Berkeley,
auroratheatre.org.
Whoa-Man! A Musical!: Fou Fou Ha!s clownish
cabaret returns for an encore run of music, dance,
and satire in which gender expectations get spun
colorfully around. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.
Continues through Nov. 21, $35-$75, foufouha.
net. Shelton Theater, 533 Sutter, San Francisco,
882-9100, sheltontheater.org.

Halloween events 2015


Ails. Presented by Lucifers Hammer. Fri., Oct. 30, 9
p.m., $8 in advance; $10 at the door, 552-7788. Elbo
Room, 647 Valencia, S.F., elbo.com.
Monsters Bash: The Cocktail Monkeys, costume
contest, and attractions about the ship. Cash only.
Sat., Oct. 31, 7:30 p.m.-1 a.m., $30-$70. USS Hornet
Museum, Pier 3, Alameda Point, Alameda, 510-5218448, uss-hornet.org.
Mother: Halloween A Party: Guest hostess Peaches
Christ! Presented by Heklina. Drag show and costume
contest. Sat., Oct. 31, 10 p.m., $20, 795-3180. Oasis,
298 11th St., S.F., sfoasis.com.
My Boo: Featuring Cutso, Royce Rufino, Boogie
Brown Sat., Oct. 31, 9 p.m., $5 with costume before
$10pm. John Colins, 138 Minna, S.F., 512-7493,
johncolins.com.
My Maana Comes: Halloween Date Night: Come
dressed as the worst job youve ever had with a
special discount of $10 off 2 tickets using codeL
DATOWEEN., Four busboys at an uptown restaurant
learn the hard way when a slow summer season
leads to pay cuts and jeopardizes their plans, their
dignity and their camaraderie. By Elizabeth Irwin.
Directed by Kirsten Brandt. Sat., Oct. 31, 7:30 p.m.,
$20-$58. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller, Mill
Valley, 388-5200, marintheatre.org.
A Nightmare on Ellis Street: w/ DJ Five. Sat., Oct. 31,
10 p.m.-2 a.m., $20 -$40, 421-8700. Infusion Lounge,
124 Ellis, S.F., infusionlounge.com.
Nightmare on Van Ness: 3 floors, 4 rooms of music,
7 DJs, and costume contest. Sat., Oct. 31, 9 p.m.-2
a.m., $40-$1700, www.nightmareonvanness.com.
The Regency Center, 1290 Sutter, S.F., 673-5716,
www.regencycentersf.com.
Oct 31 / Mega HALLOWEEN International Ball:
DJs Trevor Simpson, Aykut, Tati, Santero, Dr. T,
Youef, Kevin Armstrong. Sat., Oct. 31, 9 p.m.-2
a.m., $35-$150, 260-9920, www.aykutevents.com/
halloween_westin.htm. The Westin St. Francis, 335
Powell, S.F., westinstfrancis.com.
Phantasm: A Karnival of Mischief at the Armory:
The Polish Ambassador, Rob Garza, Croatia Squad,
Syd Gris and Vau de Vire Society. Sat., Oct. 31, 9 p.m.,
$50-$140, 799-8060, www.phantasmsf.com. The
Armory, 1800 Mission, S.F., sfarmory.com.
Saturday Night Soul Party!: DJs Lucky, Paul Paul,
and Phengren Oswald. Sat., Oct. 31, 10 p.m., $5
with costume; $10, 415-552-7788. Elbo Room, 647
Valencia, S.F., elbo.com.
Scream Punk: Day 1: w/ Jason Ross. Thu., Oct. 29,
9 p.m.-2 a.m., $15-$25, 693-0777. Ruby Skye, 420
Mason, S.F., rubyskye.com.
Scream Punk: Day 2: w/ Vicetone, California Casual.

The Titan-Ups: w/ The Cramp-ons (Cramps Tribute)


and costume contest. Sat., Oct. 31, 7:30-9:30 p.m.,
$8. Make-Out Room, 3225 22nd St., S.F., 647-2888,
makeoutroom.com.
Trick or Treat at Pier 70: w/ Circus Bella, games, bouncy
castles, candy, dog costume contest, face painting,
fire trucks and more. Sat., Oct. 31, 12-5 p.m., Free,
www.facebook.com/events/1662623690651489/,
415-865-2118, pier70partners.com. Pier 70, 22nd
St., S.F., pier70sf.org.
Villains & Vixens: Shortkut, Neil Armstrong, Mr. E,
Scotty Fox, Goldenchyld, Illefect. Free entry for
birthday celebrants all night. Sat., Oct. 31, 9 p.m.,
$5 w/ costume before 10pm. 111 Minna Gallery, 111

Minna, S.F., 974-1719, 111minnagallery.com.


World Famous Halloween Pub Crawl San Francisco
Edition: Put on your coolest, scariest or sexiest
costume and head out to Union Street and the
Marina District for this massive Halloween Pub Crawl
over two Spook-tacular nights. During select hours
on Friday, October 30 and Saturday, October 31,
participating venues throughout the neighborhood
will offer great drink specials to help get you in the
Halloween spirit. Fri., Oct. 30, 5 p.m.-2 a.m.; Sat.,
Oct. 31, 5 p.m.-2 a.m., $15, 573-0740, sfhalloween.
com/event.aspx?e=35825. Bar None, 1980 Union,
S.F., sfbarnone.com.

Vicetone
Sat., Oct. 31, 9 p.m., $35-$950. Ruby Skye, 420
Mason, S.F., 693-0777, rubyskye.com.
ShangriLa FANG-TASTIC Vampires Pre-Halloween
Party: w/ Russ Rich and Jim Z. Sat., Oct. 24, 10 p.m.,
Free before 11PM, $20 after 11PM, 896-1075, www.
facebook.com/events/1507538069566233/. The
EndUp, 401 Sixth St., S.F., theendup.com.
Shocktoberfest 16: Curse of the Cobra: An evening
of new one-act plays: Cracking the Vein, Down at
the Donner Party Diner, The Model House, and
The Revenge Of The Son Of The Cobra Woman.
Wednesdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through
Nov. 21, $25-$35, 377-4202, hypnodrome.org. The
Hypnodrome, 575 10th St., S.F., thrillpeddlers.com.

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| 27

arts & Culture

ERASE ERRATA

The Twilight Zone


Got Gentrified

An ex-Missionite reflects on parallel cultural changes that are giving him the boot
in NYC.
By Jonathan Curiel
In David Lyles There Goes the

Neighborhood, a woman straight from a


1950s Norman Rockwell setting lily
white skin, drab haircut, plain dress
covers a badly graffitiedpassageway with
rolls of fancy wallpaper. In Lyles G is For
Gentrification, a man who resembles the
conservative icon Jesse Helms removes a
trash can that contains a frazzled Cookie
Monster from Sesame Street. Like Banksy
and the cartoonist Tom Tomorrow, Lyle
mines the aesthetics of past eras like the
1950s for their association with innocent times, and then introduces an element of modernist absurdity. But Lyle
does something that Banksy and Tomorrow do not: He creates detailed, largescale paintings that seem at first glance
to be photographs. And Lyles emphasis
on black-and-white textures accentuates
his arts retrograde feel as if hes presenting a screen shot of an old TV image
thats been brought back to life.
My mom is an antique collector,
so I always had this fondness for old
things especially with photographs,
Lyle, 44, said in a phone interview
from his New York studio. Everything
is digital now, so I just have this thing
for old crafts.
Lyles exhibit at 111 Minna Gallery,
Damaged Goods, is a homecoming of
sorts, as the ex-San Franciscan made

finds in estate sales, flea markets, and


online auctions. Hell look at upwards
of 10,000 images before seeing one
that gives him an aha! moment.
From there, he primes a canvas with
white gesso, applying all black paint,
then spends weeks and weeks rubbing
it in and off in strategic places.
Im working with shapes and shades
a lot, he says, and I do a lot of erasing.
Its almost like a charcoal process but
with oil. I never thought Id paint with
one color for the past 20 years, but its
still fulfilling and challenging.
As much as Lyles paintings area
window into eras that existed before
he was born, theyre also a window
into Lyles current life. There Goes the
Neighborhood and G is For Gentrification
are commentaries on the real-estate
squeeze enveloping Tribeca, Lyles
Manhattan neighborhood. Hes being
forced out of the studio where he
lives and paints because his building
is being torn down. Tribecas ongoing
beautification also means stamping
out the graffiti and street art that was
once synonymous with the area, and
with New York generally.
The same thing thats happening in
San Francisco is happening here, Lyle
says, and Im being evicted in a couple
of months. I live in the last artists
building in Tribeca, which is now like
a billionaires neighborhood. They just

a much bigger name for himself since


leaving for New York a decade ago.
As one barometer of Lyles art-world
status, actress Cameron Diaz commissioned him last year to paint a Muppet
scene that she could give to actor
Jason Segel, who starred in the 2011
Muppets film (and in Sex Tape with
Diaz). Lyle came up with Ladies Night,
in which Miss Piggy and a phalanx
of other excited women cajole a nude
man in a strip club. Also indicative of
Lyles growing stature: More people are
telling Lyle they dislike his paintings.
Too dark, they say. Too embracing of
eras that were painful to live through.
Being hated is arguably a sign that Lyle
is reaching more art-goers than ever.
There is a dark side to my paintings,
Lyle said. My satire is dark satire.
In fact, the darkness in Lyles paintings has a slight resemblance to the
dark plot lines in a black-and-white
TV show that originated in the 1950s:
The Twilight Zone. Like Rod Serlings
masterful series, Lyles artwork contains twists that usually undermine
the scenes initial impression. In
Family Time, an Eisenhower-era family
watches an old TV set thats airing
a Simpsons episode where Homer is
strangling Bart, violence enters the
50s from another dimension.
For all his paintings, Lyle works
from vintage photographs that he

Know Your Street Art

Form Is
Emptiness,
Emptiness
Is Form
755 Valencia St. (near 19th St.)
Photograph by Kevin Kelleher

28 |

October 22-28, 2015

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In 2012, a year after Jonathan

Matas began a residency at Facebooks


Menlo Park headquarters where he
added images to walls, and even to Mark
Zuckerbergs laptop Matas received another ideal assignment. He was to paint the
front of this prominent Mission house any

Arts & Culture

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music

David Lyle

painted over this old graffitied wall


that has been here forever.
This whole show, he adds, is basically about me. Its a retrospective of
the last 10 years of my life.
In other words, its Lyles life after
San Francisco. Lyle lived here about
a decade. He got his first gallery representation here. He formulated his
now-signature painting style here. He
lived here when renting an art studio
was relatively cheap. He doesnt regret
moving to Manhattan (saying of his
move, I was ready for a change). But
as hes forced to think about where hell

live next in New York City, he remembers his old Mission studio and gets,
well, a bit wistful, laughing at himself.
Nostalgia and laughter are fundamental parts of David Lyles approach.
I had a cool warehouse space on
Florida Street, between 19th and
20th, he says. I kill myself that I gave
that up.

way that he wanted. And so began an outdoor project that has gone through multiple incarnations, with letters, faces, figures,
and colors that have piled atop each other
like a Robert Rauschenberg collage.
The first incarnation of Form Is Emptiness, Emptiness Is Form, completed in
late 2012, bathed the homes lower third
with outlines of shapes on a white background, the yin to the top two-thirds
more colorful yang. Now, the lower third
is more colorful than the section above
and not as obviously connected. Matas free-flowing approach borrows from
Buddhism, as does the title.
That comes from the famous
Buddha quote in the heart sutra, says
Matas, a Santa Cruz resident who was
living in San Francisco in 2012. The
first time, the house was a unified thing.
I had no idea Id be doing an ongoing,

evolutionary mural. It was blue into teal


into white, top to bottom, using the
words form and emptiness, and blending them into one another. I dont know
if anybody could see it, but there was a
profile of a face at the bottom. We normally associate the face with form. And
the space around with emptiness, but I
switched that, so the face was all made
up of the word emptiness, and the
background was made up of the word
form. They blended into one another.
When Matas first re-did the bottom
part, after it was tagged with graffiti, he
created images of figures looking at their
mobile devices as they walked down the
street, then added the tag #happy holidays. Hes reworked the mural several
times more.
It seems, he says, to be turning
into an ongoing mural. JC

David Lyle: Damaged Goods


Through Oct. 31 at 111 Minna
Gallery, 111 Minna St., S.F.
Admission is free; 415-974-1719 or
111minnagallery.com.

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ARTS & CULTURE

YES MEANS YES

Ask First and


Shoot Later

have known better. And once I said no,


he stopped, right? Right. Case closed.
Until recently, the mainstream cultural understanding of what consent is
has relied on the concept of no means
no, implying that people (i.e., women)
In high school, I ran with an older crowd.
are assumed to be DTF unless they
As a 15-year-old sophomore, I mostly
specifically say otherwise.
hung out with a group of upperclassmen
But as of last year, that definition
with a predilection for binge-drinking
began to shift, after California adopted
and promiscuous sex.
new laws requiring state universities
I drank my first hard liquor, kissed
to taking meaningful steps to prevent
a girl for the first time, and experisexual assault on campus by establishenced my first sexual assault at parties
ing a policy of affirmative consent
that ended in unsupervised, co-ed
before students engage in sex acts.
sleepovers inside million-dollar homes
Earlier this month, Gov. Jerry
left unattended for the weekend.
Brown also signed two new consent
I remember that I had gone to bed
wearing a Star Wars T-shirt and pajama bills into law, mandating that sex education courses in secondary schools
pants, but when I woke up, the pajama
now include instruction on affirmapants were gone and C-3P0 was pulled
tive consent, replacing no means no
up over my breasts.
with yes means yes.
Id been drinking, so my body felt
It is important to educate and
as heavy as if it were filled with sand as
inform our youth about healthy relaI realized that Mike, my best friends
tionships and address the underlying
boyfriend, was the one responsible for
problems that lead
undressing me.
to sexual assault
It was confusing, but it would be
and violence, the
untrue to say that I wasnt excited
Association of
that this older boy, who
California School
had already captured
Administrators
the heart of my
said in a stateblonde, blue-eyed
ment of support.
best friend, was
Of course,
now turning
there are nayhis drunken
sayers who
attention to
worry that
me, her chubby,
this cultural
freckle-faced
shift towards
sidekick.
explicit conBut as I
sent will ruin
regained consex lives and
sciousness, the
implicate the inreality of the
nocent. (Even leftsituation sank in. I
Ph
m
wing cultural critics
didnt want to hook
ot
.co
o
ler
like Slavoj Zizek seem
up with my best friends graph by
res
d
l
e
Isabel Dresler/isab
more concerned with the
boyfriend not at all. He
death of seduction than with prewas cute, and a part of my drunk
venting sexual assault.) But the fact is,
insecure teenage brain was flattered,
when the Centers for Disease Control
but its not something I would have
surveyed high school students in 2013,
initiated or desired. I closed my legs,
it found that more than 7 percent were
but he pushed them back open and
forced to have sex against their will.
began to pull down my underwear,
And thats simply not okay.
breathing on my neck and pressing his
Shifting our cultural understanding
body against mine. I started to panic,
away from victim defense and toward a
but I was still only half-awake.
culture of clear communication and neFinally, I was able to find my voice:
gotiation is a step in the right direction,
Mike! Stop!
addressing rape culture and making
And thankfully, he did.
meaningful policy changes to address it.
We paused, panting, and looked at
And while these new policies repeach other in the dim morning light.
resent a meaningful shift, in practice,
Ice poured into my stomach, and I
California is simply requesting that we
quickly left the room. Later, as the
all remember to ask first.
sun rose and the house began to stir,
Initiating sexual contact when
Mike came and found the couch I had
someone is asleep does not allow conescaped to, gingerly putting his hands
sent to be obtained. What happened to
on my frozen body.
me as drunk chubby sophomore wasnt
Im sorry, he said. But I couldnt
criminal, but it certainly wasnt okay
really hear him.
it wasnt then and it isnt now.
Several of my peers experienced
I hope that future generations of
something similar with Mike, but since
chubby, freckle-faced sidekicks know
he was cute, talented, and charming,
that.
no one confronted him. Besides, I
thought, I had been drinking and
TheWhoreCast@gmail.com
crawled into bed with him I should
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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 29

ARTS & CULTURE

FILM REVIEWS

The Assassin
Not rated. OpensFriday
at the AMC Metreon 16.

Even under the best of circumstances,


martial arts period pieces can be sink-orswim affairs for American audiences.
Getting deep into arcane history is a part
of the wuxia genre, and whether or not
the viewer is up to speed with the intrigue among ancient Chinese dynasties
is not the films problem. Few films in recent memory have cared less about the
audience following along than Hou
Hsiao-HsiensThe Assassin, which won
Best Director this year at Cannes. Its a
beautifully directed film, no question, but
also a glacially paced one, with performances that often give the impression
that the cast chugged Robitussin before
the cameras rolled. On the surface, the
plot is simple enough: Over a decade after
being kidnapped by a nun (Sheu
Fang-Yi)and trained to be an assassin, 23
year-oldNieYinniang (Shu Qi) returns to
her familys estate under orders to kill her
former fianc (Chang Chen). But HsiaoHsienis less concerned with action than
with gorgeous production design and
vast amounts of 78rpm-played-at-33 dialogue. Although the texture is very different, his picture brings to mind another
self-consciously slow-paced film which
promised action but instead delivered
meditation: Nicolas Winding RefnsOnly
God Forgives.The Assassinprobably wont
wind up on as many Worst-Of lists,
though. Sherilyn Connelly

Experimenter
Rated PG-13. OpensFriday
at the Opera Plaza Cinema.

Michael Almereydas biopicExperimenteris an experiment in and of itself. In


1961, less than 20 years after the Holocaust, social psychologist Stanley Milgram (Peter Sarsgaard, in a wonderfully
understated performance) conducted a
series of experiments that tested peoples
willingness to hurt strangers solely because an authority figure instructed them
to. Most people were willing to do as they
were told, even when the stranger they
were hurting begged them to stop.Experimenterfollows Milgrams life from those
experiments up through his death in
1984, and how his notoriety and clinical
view of humanity affected his relationship
with his wife Sasha (Winona Ryder) and
the world at large. Almereyda makes no
attempt to the hide the artificiality of
moviemaking: Sarsaard narrates the film
Experimenter

30 |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

failingly positive, henceNyna Pais Caputis troubling but vital documentaryPetals


in the Dust: The Endangered Indian Girls,
which looks at the oppression and violence against women in modern India.
Meanwhile, making its American premiere is a digital restoration of Kamal
Swaroops 1998 cult filmOm Dar-B-Dar, a
surreal coming-of-age story which one
critic called the great Indian LSD trip.
What more do you need to know? Get
thee to 3rdi, and feed your head. SC

Truth
Rated R. OpensFridayat the
Sundance Kabuki Cinemas and the
Century San Francisco Centre 9.

Haider

to the audience, documentary film is


mixed in with the new footage, and there
are frequent uses of an intentionally fake
rear-projection, sometimes in black-andwhite. The result often feels like a stage
play and would work well as one but
with that fakeness,Experimenterparadoxically feels more real than it might have if
it was played as a straight narrative. Indeed,Experimenteroften feels like an Errol Morris documentary, and though it
never quite answers why humans are capable of such inhumanity to one another,
neither could Milgram. SC

Extraordinary Tales
Not rated. OpensFriday
at the 4-Star Theatre.

Horror anthologies have been on the upswing in recent years, with series such
asV/H/SandThe ABCs of Death. Less popular these days is Edgar Allen Poe, who
has long since been supplanted as the
most popular old-timey horror writer by
H.P. Lovecraft, since modern readers
seem to prefer Lovecrafts monsters and
spooky mythologies to Poes psychodramas. Those psychodramas get the anthology treatment in Raul
GarciasExtraordinary Tales, a collection of
animated shorts based on five Poe stores.
The framing device finds Poe himself (Stephen Hughes) as a crow visiting a cemetery, where Death psychoanalyzes the
poets obsession with mortality, and, as is
the case with anthologies, the segments
are hit-and-miss. The highlight is The
Tell-Tale Heart, animated in a stark blackand-white style of Uruguayan graphic
novelist Alberto Breccia, with narration
provided by a 1940s acetate of Bela Lugosi
reading the story, scratchy record sounds
thankfully left in.Other big names in-

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clude Guillermo del Toro narrating The


Pit and the Pendulum, and Roger Corman voicing Prosperos one line in the
otherwise word-free Masque of the Red
Death. Corman is an inspired choice, having directed that and other Poe films in
the 1960s, including a live-action anthology, 1963s Tales of Terror. Haunted by
death as he was, Poe would have been
pleased to know that everything comes
back around. SC

San Francisco International


South Asian Film Festival
OpensFridayat the Castro Theatre
andNewPeopleCinema.

The mission of 3rdi Films San Francisco


International South Asian Film Festival is
to promote diverse images of South Asian

people through indie film, ranging from


art-house classics to Bollywood spectaculars. Indeed, the theme of this 13th annual shindig is Bollywood and Beyond,
and one of this years highlights is Vishal
BhardwajsHaider, which transposesHamletto the political turmoil of
1995 Kashmir. Theres really no way to
screw upHamlet, and Bhardwajs terrific
film absolutely demands to be seen on the
Castros big screen, particularly for the
films lone corker of a dance scene. Bollywood also gets its due with the opening
night film at New People Cinema, Umesh
AggarwalsJai Ho, a documentary about
Indian music superstar A.R. Rahman
(whose work American audiences will
know if they sawSlumdog Millionaire).
Diverse images are not the same as un-

James Vanderbilts fascinating proceduralTruthis the not-made-up story of


the bad days at Black Rock in 2004 when
CBS News producer Mary Mapes (Cate
Blanchett) and anchor Dan Rather (Robert Redford) ran a report on60 Minutes
IIasking whether George W. Bush leaned
on his privilege to avoid serving in Vietnam. When the right-bloggers allege that
the investigations key documents were
faked, the underlying question of Bushs
service record gets swept away in the ensuing shitstorm which cost both Mapes
and Rather their jobs. Redfords presence
seems predestined, asTruthis a spiritual
descendent to his turn as the president-investigating Bob Woodward inAll
the Presidents Men, and he also directed
the criminally underrated truth-in-television dramaQuiz Show. But perhaps because Dan Rather was never an especially
incendiary personality to begin with, Redfords performance never catches fire. Instead, the picture belongs to Cate
Blanchetts Mary Mapes, as she endures a
very public scrutiny of both her gender
and her politics, particularly at a time
when liberal and feminist were treated
as four-letter words. (Even more so than
they are now, that is.)Truthalso has
plenty of tasty typography porn; it may
well be the first time that kerning has
been a plot point in a major motion picture, but hopefully it wont be the last. SC

Truth

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SFWEEKLY.COM

arts & Culture

film listings

Film Showtimes

To submit a listing (at least 10 days before issue


date), email film@sfweekly.com.
4-Star Theatre. Shanghai: This period drama concerns an American (John Cusack) in Shanghai
who, through the investigation of the death of
a friend, ends up falling in love while stumbling
upon a political conspiracy. 1408 helmer Mikael
Hfstrm directs. Gong Li and Ken Watanabe
co-star in the production, from a script supplied
by Hossein Amini. Daily. Lost in Hong Kong: Xu
Lai had dreams once. To be an artist and marry
the girl of his dreams. 15 years later, hes sick of
designing bras, humoring his baby-crazy wife, and
catering to loopy in-laws. But his upcoming family
vacation, now including his DVD-pirating, aspiring-documentarian brother-in-law, has a hidden
agenda: a chance meetup with his old flame. But
ditching his clan for a clandestine hookup might
be the least of his worries. Theres been a murder,
and his new hot pursuit might be from the cops
who want a word with him. Daily. Crimson Peak:
When her heart is stolen by a seductive stranger,
a young woman is swept away to a house atop
a mountain of blood-red clay: a place filled with
secrets that will haunt her forever. Between desire
and darkness, between mystery and madness,
lies the truth behind Crimson Peak. From the
imagination of director Guillermo del Toro comes
a supernatural mystery starring Tom Hiddleston,
Jessica Chastain, Mia Wasikowska and Charlie
Hunnam. Oct. 23-29. Paranormal Activity: The
Ghost Dimension: Using a special camera that can
see spirits, a family must protect their daughter
from an evil entity with a sinister plan. Oct. 23-29.
2200 Clement, San Francisco, 666-3488, lntsf.
com/4-star-theatre.html.
Balboa Theatre. Popcorn Palace: Every Saturday at
10 a.m. $10 gets ticket plus popcorn and drink!
10/24: Beetlejuice. 10/31: Free Halloween Cartoons.
Saturdays. Steve Jobs: With public anticipation
running high, Apple Inc. co-founders Steve Jobs
(Michael Fassbender) and Steve Woz Wozniak
get ready to unveil the first Macintosh in 1984.
Jobs must also deal with personal issues related
to ex-girlfriend Chrisann Brennan and their young
daughter Lisa. Eventually fired, Jobs launches
NeXT Inc. and prepares to release a new computer
model in 1988. Ten years later, Jobs is back at
Apple Inc. and about to revolutionize the industry
once again with the iMac. Oct. 23-29. 3630 Balboa,
San Francisco, 221-2184, balboamovies.com.
Brava Theater Center. The Other Barrio: Thu., Oct.
22, 7:30 p.m. $12. 2781 24th St., San Francisco,
641-7657, brava.org.
Castro Theatre. Tested: The Show: Tested.coms
Adam Savage, Will Smith, and Norman Chan
bring to stage visions of the past, present, and
future as seen through the eyes of makers. Enjoy
an afternoon of fantastic homebrew projects,
demonstrations of exciting new technologies, and
conversations with makers about new frontiers
of innovation. The show will also include a live
recording of Adam Savages interview series
The Talking Room, with a surprise guest. Fri.,
Oct. 23, 7 p.m. $35 Preferred/$20 General. Youre
The Expert/Quizotron: Quiz-o-Tron is the worlds
greatest comedic science-themed panel quiz
show, hosted by Rebecca Watson and starring
internet host Veronica Belmot, astronomer Seth
Shostak, and more! Watch as talented comedians
compete against learned scientists to answer
questions pertaining to the latest discoveries in
astrophysics as well as whatever The Daily Mail is
calling science these days. Audience interaction
is encouraged with the chance to win fantastically
terrible prizes. You will learn things you can never
unlearn. Youre the Expert is a live show, podcast,

sfweekly.com

and new public radio program that uses comedy


to make academic research more accessible
and exciting. Through games, sketches, and
hilariously misguided guesses, a panel of hilarious
comedians will try to get to the bottom of what a
distinguished scientist does all day. Fri., Oct. 23,
9:30 p.m. $20. A 20th Anniversary Celebration of
Toy Story: In a special presentation moderated by
the Film Societys Noah Cowan, Pixars legendary
innovators John Lasseter, Ed Catmull, Andrew
Stanton and Pete Docter will take audiences on
a personal tour of the studios early days and the
explore the process and creative vision that led
to the first ever fully computer-animated feature
film. An intimate prescreening VIP reception will
precede the presentation and a screening of Toy
Story will follow. VIP tickets include admission
to the reception, the talk and the film screening.
Mon., Oct. 26, 7 p.m. 429 Castro, San Francisco,
621-6120, castrotheatre.com.
Christopher B. Smith Rafael Film Center. Ingrid
Bergman Films: Casablanca, Notorious, A Journey
to Italy, A Womans Face, Intermezzo, and June
Night. Through Oct. 22, 6:30 p.m. $7-$11. 1118 Fourth
St., San Rafael, 454-1222, rafaelfilm.cafilm.org.
Clay Theatre. Zombie: Lucio Fulcis worm-infested,
violent voodoo masterpiece returns, digitally
remastered from the original negative and completely uncut! Fri., Oct. 23, 11:54 p.m.; Sat., Oct.
24, 11:54 p.m. The Doom Generation: The story of
a hot chick, her loser boyfriend and a bleeding
dude who become way more than friends. Tue.,
Oct. 27, 7 p.m. 2261 Fillmore, San Francisco, 2674893, www.landmarktheatres.com/san-francisco/
clay-theatre.
Embarcadero Center Cinema. Experimenter: In
1961, famed social psychologist Stanley Milgram
(Peter Sarsgaard) conducts a series of radical
behavior experiments that test our willingness
to obey authority. Oct. 23-29. Goodnight Mommy:
The psychological horror film Goodnight Mommy
is a twisted and fantastical take on the home
invasion thriller. In the heat of the summer lays an
isolated house in the Austrian countryside, where
nine-year-old twin brothers await their mothers
return after cosmetic surgery. Shes recovering
from an accident that has left her face covered
in bandages, unrecognizable to her precocious
sons. During her recovery her temper runs short
with the boys, her behavior is domineering and
her punishments turn harsh. The boys begin to
suspect she isnt really their mother and they go
about finding out for certain. What ensues is an
atmospheric, terrifying observational struggle
with fatal consequences on par with The Shining
and Dead Ringers. Written and directed by Severin
Fiala and Veronika Franz (writer of Dog Days and
the Paradise trilogy). (Fully subtitled) Daily. Room:
Confined to a windowless, 10-by-10-foot space,
a loving mom and her young son, who has never
known the real world, enact a risky plan to escape.
Oct. 22-29. Meet the Patels: A laugh-out-loud,
real-life romantic comedy about Ravi Patel, an
Indian-American who embarks on a worldwide
search for the woman of his dreams. Daily. Beasts
Of No Nation: Idris Elba stars in the gripping tale of
a child soldier torn from his family to fight in the
civil war of an African country. Through Oct. 29.
1 Embarcadero Center, San Francisco, 267-4893,
www.landmarktheatres.com/san-francisco/
embarcadero-center-cinema.
Exploratorium. Saturday Cinema: Weekly thematic
film screenings presented in the Kanbar Forum
by the Exploratoriums Cinema Arts program.
Saturdays. Free with museum admission. Pier
15, San Francisco, 528-4444, exploratorium.edu.
Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts. Best of
Bernal Heights Outdoor Cinema: Encore presentation of the three award-winning films of the 2015
season: the Best of Bernal, Spirit of Bernal and
Good Life Audience Awards. Join with filmmakers

and fellow film lovers in a Q&A and reception


following the screening. Tue., Oct. 27, 7-9:30 p.m.
Free. www.bhoutdoorcine.org. 2868 Mission, San
Francisco, 821-1155, missionculturalcenter.org.
Multiple San Francisco Locations. 13th Annual
San Francisco International South Asian Film
Festival 2015: 3rd is 13th Annual San Francisco
International South Asian Film Festival launches
at New People, and Castro Theater. The festival
will screen 15 programs of narrative, documentary
features, and shorts by independent filmmakers
from South Asia and the South Asian Diaspora,
including stories from India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka,
UK, and USA. Oct. 22-25. $10, Passses $38-$125.
Multiple addresses, San Francisco.
Opera Plaza Cinema. Coming Home: Released from
a Chinese labor camp after 20 years, a husband
(Chen Daoming) returns home to his wife (Gong
Li), who does not recognize him. Oct. 23-29.
Phoenix: Hitchcockian tale of a WWII survivor who
tries to figure out if the man she loves may have
been the one who betrayed her to the Nazis. Daily.
The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution: The
first feature documentary to explore the significance of the Black Panther Party. Documentarian
Stanley Nelson goes straight to the source, using
rare archival footage and the voices of the people
that were there. Daily. Freeheld: The true love
story of Laurel Hester (Julianne Moore) and Stacie
Andree (Ellen Page) and their fight for justice and
equality. Oct. 23-29. 601 Van Ness, San Francisco,
267-4893, www.landmarktheatres.com/market/
SanFrancisco/OperaPlazaCinema.htm.
Presidio Theatre. Extraordinary Tales: 3D animated anthology of five masterworks by Edgar
Allan Poe, narrated by Sir Christopher Lee, Bela
Lugosi, Julian Sands, and Guillermo del Toro. Fri.,
Oct. 23, 3:30 & 8:40 p.m. $12. 2340 Chestnut, San
Francisco, 776-2388, lntsf.com.
Roxie Theater. Last Photo Project Screening:
View the entire Last Photo Project in its entirety
(45-min run time), plus a 30-minute presentation
and Q&A with the filmmaker. Thu., Oct. 22, 7-8:30
p.m. General Admission: $10. 863-1087. https://
www.facebook.com/events/512205812286348/.
The 90s Video Sing A Long Show: Halloween

Special: Theres a chill in the air, so it must be Fall,


which as any 90s TV watcher knows means its
Halloween Special time on your favorite shows:
Saved by the Bell, My So Called Life, Fresh Prince
of Bel-Air, and of course The Simpsons. So this
version of our insanely popular 90s Music Video
Sing A Long Show will feature all the fly video hits
and one hit wonders you jammed to in school plus
some seasonal extras. Fri., Oct. 23, 9-11:30 p.m.
10/advance, 12/door. 820-3907. info@sfindie.com.
sfindie.com/?p=2863. Japanese Horror Week: This
Halloween, the Roxie brings San Francisco a whole
week of modern Japanese horror classics. Since
the late 80s, American audiences have been
increasingly spooked by stories of surreal spirits,
malevolent technological forces and sadistic
torture from across the Pacific. While films like
Kairo (Pulse) and Ju-On: The Grudge were remade
by Hollywood with limited success, the Roxie is
pleased to bring you the scares of the original
Japanese movies, alongside artistically intense
works by acclaimed directors such as Takashi
Miike and Sion Sono. Oct. 25-31. 3117 16th St., San
Francisco, 863-1087, roxie.com.
Stanford, Cubberley Auditorium. Between Two
Worlds: An Evening with MIRA NAIR: The evening begins with a screening of The Reluctant
Fundamentalist followed by a conversation with
Mira Nair, Professor Robert Crews (Stanford,
Department of History), and Professor Aishwary
Kumar (Stanford, Department of History). Wed.,
Oct. 28, 5-9 p.m. Free. 650-725-9098. https://
islamicstudies.stanford.edu/events/betweentwo-worlds-evening-mira-nair-film-screeningand-conversation. 485 Lasuen Mall, Stanford,
650-724-2464, live.stanford.edu.
Vogue Theatre. The Martian: When astronauts blast
off from the planet Mars, they leave behind Mark
Watney (Matt Damon), presumed dead after
a fierce storm. With only a meager amount of
supplies, the stranded visitor must utilize his wits
and spirit to find a way to survive on the hostile
planet. Meanwhile, back on Earth, members of
NASA and a team of international scientists work
tirelessly to bring him home, while his crew mates
hatch their own plan for a daring rescue mission.

CATE BLANCHETT
ROBERT REDFORD
TOPHER GRACE ELISABETH MOSS AND DENNIS QUAID

Oct. 23-29. 3290 Sacramento, San Francisco,


346-2288, voguesf.com.
The Walt Disney Family Museum. Tomorrowland:
Walts Vision For Today: Through animated sequences, musical compositions, sound bites,
graphics, audio visuals, vintage posters, and
more, Tomorrowland: Walts Vision for Today will
immerse visitors in the story of Walts hopes and
vision for the future, as reflected in his creation of
the 1967 version of Tomorrowland at Disneyland.
This exhibition allows visitors to experience Walts
perception of this beautiful tomorrow in a robust
and vibrant way. Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays.
Continues through Dec. 7. 104 Montgomery, San
Francisco, 345-6800, waltdisney.org.
Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Architecture
& Design Films Showcase 2015: In our second
Architecture and Design Film series, we present a
showcase of 14 films and more than 20 screenings
that cover architecture and design from every
angle and aspect. Come and discover the DIY
graphic arts scene in the UK, a history of land art,
tiny houses, contemporary women architects, the
battle to renovate the Rijksmuseum, and much
more. Through Nov. 8. 701 Mission, San Francisco,
978-2787, ybca.org.

ADVENTUROUS

IN FORM AND THOUGHT,


NOT JUST IN SUBJECT.
MANOHLA DARGIS, THE NEW YORK TIMES

UNCANNILY
BEAUTIFUL.
THRILLINGLY
REFLECTIVE.

DAVID EDELSTEIN, NEW YORK MAGAZINE

MATT PRIGGE, METRO

STANLEY KUBRICK
WOULD HAVE LOVED IT.

Far and away director


Almereydas strongest,
most moving film.

A GRIPPING, BEAUTIFULLY
EXECUTED JOURNALISTIC THRILLER.
SO WELL WRITTEN AND ACTED...
CATE BLANCHETT IN ONE OF HER
GREATEST SCREEN PERFORMANCES.

AMY TAUBIN, FILM COMMENT

Official selection

NEW
YORK

FILM FESTIVAL

-Stephen Holden, THE NEW YORK TIMES

Truth

The New York Times

(HIGHEST RATING)

-Rex Reed, NEW YORK OBSERVER


WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM
JAMES VANDERBILT BASEDTHE BOOKON TRUTH AND DUTY: THE PRESS, THE PRESIDENT, AND THE PRIVILEGE OF POWER BY MARY MAPES
DIRECTED
BY JAMES VANDERBILT
FRANCISCO
SAN FRANCISCO
STARTS FRIDAY, SAN
CENTURY SAN FRANCISCO
SUNDANCE KABUKI CINEMAS
CENTRE 9
Post St at Filmore
(415) 346-3243
OCTOBER 23 845 Market St (800) CINEMARK 1881
SCREENPLAY
BY

A MICHAEL ALMEREYDA FILM


PETER SARSGA ARD

W INONA RY DE R

EXPERIMENTER

VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.TRUTH-FILM.COM

THE STANLEY MILGR AM STORY

3.95" X 3.5"

SF WEEKLY
DUE MON 6PM

THURS 10/22

STARTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23


ALSO AT:
LANDMARK SHATTUCK
SMITH RAFAEL
FILM CENTER

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ARTS & CULTURE

CHAMBER[MAID] OF HORRORS

Scream Queens
and Horror Hotels
The three scariest shows on

SAN FRANCISCOS TASTIEST COVERAGE

32 |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

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TV right now, not counting Best Time Ever


With Neil Patrick Harris [shudder], have to
be Scream Queens on Fox, American Horror
Story: Hotel on FX, and The Walking Dead
on AMC.
I have to make an embarrassing
admission: I dont watch that last one.
I tried I really did but I quickly
became uninterested. I lasted until the
part where they meet up with that one
dude in the laboratory, or something,
and then my mind wandered. Sorry.
Also, zombies bore me. I like my monsters to have a cerebral cortex.
But its not about the zombies!
youre thinking. Its about the people
struggling for survival and their relationships! Well, I didnt particularly
care about the
people, either; I
was rooting for the
undead. When you
hope the protagonists die a horrible
death, thats not
a good sign. It reminds me of that
joke on The Golden
Girls, when Dorothy
says that the local
theaters production
of The Diary of Anne
Frank was so bad that every time the Gestapo came onto the stage the audience
would yell, Theyre in the attic!
I do give every spooky show a
gander, though. Scream Queens had a
spectacular pilot, opening with Bat For
Lashes played over a 90s sorority party
okay, wrong decade for the music,
but whatevs as the camera pans to
a well-coiffed twit covered in blood.
Did you just get your period all over
yourself? asks twit No. 2. No, a fellow
sister had just given birth in a bathtub
upstairs. Everyone panics because, like,
theres a party going on and this means
one fewer bathroom.
Main character and lead twit Chanel
Oberlin is played by Emma Roberts
(of American Horror Story fame), and
she perfectly embodies the stuck-up,
self-centered bitch whos needed for the
role of head sorority wench. There are
obvious nods to Cher from Clueless, complete with an aura of billowy feathers attached to nearly everything around her,
but shes also likeable underneath it all.
Her douchebag boyfriend Chad Radwell
(Glen Powell) treats her like dirt, and we
cant help but side with her when she
quips gems like, Im as skinny as Karen
Carpenter at the morgue and Chad Radwell still wont commit to me!
The plot of Scream Queens is a bit
murkier. Why is it that every Fox show
has to start out strong and then drift off
into a million aimless directions? The
dean of the school, deftly played by that

scream queen of yore, Jamie Lee Curtis,


demands that the sorority be more inclusive. That means that nonwhite, possibly
disabled, or totally-unfuckable-to-theChad-Radwells-of-the-world types have
to be allowed to pledge. Then theres a
maniac in a devils costume whos going
around killing people. After that, about
25 subplots emerge. The show wins for
its witty writing and satire, but like a keg
party where someone forgot the spigot,
until a main vein is located and tapped,
there aint gonna be a party.
On to American Horror Story: Hotel.
Wow, for a show that prides itself on
pushing the gore and gnar-gnar envelope,
they have really topped themselves with
this one. The setting is the fictional
thank god! Hotel Cortez in L.A. Vampires, ghouls, and strange wretches who
live inside mattresses are the occupants;
hapless guests are their dinner. Lady
Gaga plays a gorgeous countess who owns
the place, sustaining her beauty through
vigorous bouts of sex
and the blood of small
children who have
feasted on blood themselves. The depravity is
pronounced: A heroin
addict checks in, shoots
up, and proceeds to
be brutally raped by a
demon. All of this is on
film, which makes the
grandma in me worry
that someone small
and unattended might
watch this basic cable show and be forever scarred. But I cant save all the children
of the world, alas.
AHS is known for its recurring actors,
and in Season 5 we see Kathy Bates as
the manager, Sarah Paulson as Sally,
and Mare Winningham in housekeeping
which is no easy job when bodies are
repeatedly mutilated in 4B, and definitely deserving of a living wage. Chlo Sevigny also returns, this time as a doctor,
and though I usually find her acting to be
weak, she is quite good so far. But maybe
I just liked watching an on-screen physician berate a mother who refused to
inoculate her children and now has a kid
with measles. Whats the treatment?
the mother asks, after a long, blistering
lecture from Sevigny. There is none!
she responds. Thats scary.
So far, both shows are like those
variety packages of Jelly Bellys. You pick
through handfuls at a time for some
tasty morsels, only to realize that half
of the package is left and it contains the
worst flavors: bubblegum, black licorice,
coconut, and tutti frutti. Desperate, you
eat the rest of them, pretending that
youre enjoying the experience. Sure,
you couldve just gotten a nice big bag of
juicy pear Jelly Bellys, but noooo.
So, Fox and FX, take this Halloween
candy metaphor and run with it, will
you? We want a solid bag of delicious
plot next time.
KatyStC@Yahoo.com

sfweekly.com

eAt

CANDID CMARA

Cove of Wonders

Mexico City superstar chef Gabriela Cmaras S.F. debut dispenses with authenticity.
By Peter Lawrence Kane
When we spent a week in Mex-

ico City this spring, my boyfriend and I


mostly gorged on street tacos and the
cheap things we bought at the booths
that surround major metro stops. Our
sole splurge was lunch at Gabriela
Cmaras Contramar, a high-end spot in
the posh Condesa neighborhood where
even factoring in the Latin American
preference for a hearty lunch over a big
dinner the atmosphere of indulgence
surprised us. Beyond excellent pulpos a
la gallega and some really good bread, it
struck me as a conservative, almost
starchy place, more Fillmore-and-Pacific
than Valencia-and-22nd. (I hate clubs
with visible security minders, but seeing
their unsmiling faces at lunch is an even
bigger buzzkill.)
So I was a little apprehensive about
Cala (Spanish for cove), Camaras San
Francisco debut. Although the chef has
made clear her distaste for slavishly
adhering to ideas of authenticity, I
thought it might feel out of step with
casual San Francisco. Was I ever wrong.
Everything deviates slightly from
whats expected and not just because I expected to see octopus all over
the menu and there wasnt any but
the stridently un-conservative Cala is
clearly Cmaras playspace. (Note: Prices include the service charge, so keep
your sticker shock in check.)
Replacing the usual mignonette
with a beef tendon escabeche, the
Miyagi oysters ($4 each) were surprisingly spicy without being over-seasoned, and with a nice crunch. The
clam aguachile ($19 for a serving of
three) was basically avocado-chile
ceviche on the half shell, with the
clam juice like a cold, filtered broth.
(Its the diametric opposite of the Old
Clam Houses shot of hot clam juice,
which I also love dearly.) Artfully
overstuffed though these clams were,
it was the only time I winced at Calas
portion-to-price ratio; theyd make a
better amuse-bouche. By contrast, the
squid-and-halibut frito mixto ($15),
essentially a fancy version of fried
calamari, was nice and light, with a
slowburner of an habanero salsa that
should replace marinaras everywhere.
However seafood-heavy the menu
might be, nopales popped up twice.
The first appearance was a salad ($17)
that was not my cup of tea. As someone who is strongly biased against
nutrition and toward things that are
terrible for you, a cold, gooey, Green
Goddess-like parsley salsa with a bit
of heat is not something I would order
sfweekly.com

KINGDOM OF DUMPLING
AUTHENTIC CHINESE DIM SUM

Kevin Kelleher

mean they must be something special


again although the tomatoes were
very good (and goat cheese is never un- and they were, whipped and airy,
almost like a mousse.
welcome). The second was a nopal with
A supple mixiote of black cod ($36)
eggplant ($17). Earthy and smoky, it
with a red chile adobo was the grandwas much more to my taste, although
daddy of the menu, the fish steamed
as a messy-looking, brown-black puree
until it flaked apart just by gazing softinside a charred corn husk, its not the
ly at it. We were encouraged to eat the
prettiest thing youll ever see.
envelope of collard greens, for which
The tamal de mejillones ($16) had
I am grateful, as many mixiotes come
a depth of flavor that yawned straight
sheathed in inedible things. After the
away to infinity, although we were
prior plates husks, I was reflexively
confused by the mussels, as its a little
seeing right past these, and theyre
off-putting to lick masa off a shell. It
an integral part of the dish, adding
barely mattered, though, because they
bitterness to the
were so good. Grantadobo.
ed, it was more than
Cala
Dessert was
three times the price
simpler, with a chocof what the Tamale
149 Fell St.,
olate ice cream ($9)
415-660-7701 or
Lady unwraps from
calarestaurant.com
and a prickly pear
her treasure chest on
Hours: Mon-Sat, 5-10
meringue granita
wheels, but its probap.m., Sun, closed.
($9) that I was very
bly the first tamal Ive
skeptical of and
ever had that could
which had way more
arm-wrestle any of
flavor than I thought it could.
hers to the ground. (Sorry, Tamale
I was warned that the Martini OaxLady. Im comin for ya next time Im
aqueo ($15) would be olive-y, and it
really drunk at the Eagle beer bust.)
was. To cut it, Cala adds fennel, of all
One thing I find myself saying now
and again is, That was the best version things, which may not appease people
who like their aperitifs bone-dry. The
of [insert banal side dish] Ive ever
A La Antigita ($14) was a gorgeous
had! and for Cala, it was the black
take on an Old Fashioned, and its combeans ($4). Oddly, theyre the only
bination of reposado tequila, chocolate
side dish on the menu, which I took to
LETTERS

news

COVER STORY

Hand Made and Fresh

Butter clam aguachile

Over 20 Kinds of Dim Sum

bitters, orange, and a brandied cherry


must have taken more than a few tries
to get right. Wordplay notwithstanding, the A-Peru Spritz (Pisco, Cardamaro bitters, Aperol, Verjus, and Cava,
$15) is great but will definitely drop
out of season as soon as El Nio hits.
Perfumed with star anise, the elderflower-and-cucumber Tonica Classica
($13) was lovely and strikingly similar to the standout cocktail at Calavera,
another high-end Mexican restaurant
with a similar name. This might be
overthinking it, but I like a crisp,
light-tasting drink thats heavy in the
hand from the weight of all the ice, and
the Tonica Classica was exactly that.
It all got me thinking about the
function of Contramar, which is considerably less playful than its Hayes
Valley descendent. Is the mothership a
dependable moneymaker that can fund
more experimental projects? If Calas
opening menu is Gabriela Cmara
dipping her toe in the water to test the
temperature, it will be very exciting to
see what happens when she plunges
right in.

Dumplings
Pot Stickers
Won Ton
Pancakes

TAKE OUT: 2048 Taraval St. 415.665.6617


DINE IN: 1713 Taraval St. 415.566.6143
FALL IN LOVE, HAPPENS, GROWS AND STAYS
www.kingofchinesedumpling.com

KING OF NOODLES
Hand-Pulled Everyday
1639 Irving St., 415.566.8318

PKane@sfweekly.com

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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 33

EAT FRESH EATS


Deli counter

contact@sixthcourse.com

415-829-2461

Scott Carroll

Hours

The Ram is
Ascendent at
Oaklands Grand
Fare Market

Mon & Tues Closed


Wed-Sat 12pm - 10pm
Sun 12pm - 6pm

1544 15th Street


San Francisco, CA 94103

By Jeffrey Edalatpour
Grand Fare Markets presiding

O P E N E V E R Y D AY
5 : 3 0 PM 10 PM

ACCLAIMED
INDIAN CUISINE

3145 FILLMORE ST | 4 1 5 . 3 4 6 . 4 9 0 0
L A S A N S F. C O M

FREE

draft beer or soda


with pizza purchase
with this coupon.

Mon - Fri:
11am-3pm & 5-9pm
Sat:
12pm-9pm

2347 3rd Street

415.829.8999
LongBridgePizza.com
34 |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

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image is that of a ram, with horns flowing like Rapunzelsgolden tendrils. Its
stamped on the menus, its affixed to the
picture window facing Grand Avenue,
and it hangs on the sign above the entrance. Artist Freya Prowe settled upon
the image with her husband, and Grand
Fares owner, Doug Washington. There
were other iterations ox and hog
but the ram offered up the quality of enchantment, a talisman to summon just
the right amount of luck for the successful launch of a new business.
Open two weeks now, Grand Fare
has already created an atmosphere for
itself. Strings of garden lights canopy
the sandy floored outdoor seating area.
Walking in from the busy street, its
like walking through a portal to a foreign market of abundant riches. There
are weird and wonderful flowers poised
to seduce passersby as they enter the
market hall.
Once inside, the first stop is the raw
bar with a daily selection of oysters
(half-dozen, $18; one dozen, $36).
Why not pair it with a glass of French
Sparkling Val de Mer ($13)? But prepare yourself: This is but the beginning
of an ever-increasing tab. In the center
of the room, you place your order for
cold and hot sides, meats, salads, and
sandwiches. When was the last time
you had okra that wasnt deliciously
transformed into Indian bhindi? Heres
your chance to try it fried with a green
goddess dressing ($7). A server passed

SFWEEKLY.COM

by with a compliment, Good choice.


Yes. Yes, it was.
Of the sampled sandwiches, leg
of lamb ($13), albacore tuna ($13)
and avocado and sprouts ($12), the
standout was the lamb. With a case of
charcuterie on display, this place is a
carnivores dream, although the Little
Gem Lettuces ($10) dressed in buttermilk are fine enough for anyone who
loves a light repast of salad.
Baked goods live in the corner. A
slice of apple gallette ($4) was nice
and forgettable, beat out for the Most
Delicious Award by a cut of pound cake
($6), while the most tempting loaf of
bread was Josey Bakers ($7.50).
Once the round inside is complete,
you circle back outside to one of two
separate garden areas to sit. The main
patch is for diners to be waited upon.
The menu doesnt appear to differ for
them, but instead of paying at the
counter inside and carrying the goods
away in a basket, a balletic corps of
wait staff glide in and out of the kitchen with plates of Moroccan meatballs
($15) or duck confit ($19). For the
crowd of self-servers, the rectangle
against the wall has plenty of shared
table space to spread out their purchases for a sudden urban picnic.
But what about coffee, which was
the soul of Monkey Forest Road, the
spaces previous inhabitant? The 1940s
Spartan trailer, refurbished and shining
in the perfect hue of royal blue, has it
all: Linea coffee, house-made pastries,
and Humphry Slocombe ice cream. For
a brand new establishment, Washington has clearly created a space that not
only welcomes but encourages European-style lingering. Its easy to find yourself there at sunset, eating and drinking
until the late stars appear, your wallet
thinning in the bright evening air.

Grand Fare Market,


3265 Grand Ave., Oakland, 510-8999610 or grandfaremarket.com.
>> p36
sfweekly.com

sfweekly.com

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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 35

EAT FRESH EATS

SERVING THE

FINEST NY STYLE PIZZA


FOR 25 YEARS!

Deli counter

99

ANY SLICE
& SODA with ad

plus tax, one slice per coupon,


not valid with other offers
SF Weekly Coupon, In-store only

VOTED
BEST
PIZZA 3
TIMES

Scott Carroll

The Ram is
Ascendent at
Oaklands Grand
Fare Market
By Jeffrey Edalatpour
Grand Fare Markets presiding

image is that of a ram, with horns flowing like Rapunzelsgolden tendrils. Its
stamped on the menus, its affixed to the
picture window facing Grand Avenue,
and it hangs on the sign above the entrance. Artist Freya Prowe settled upon
the image with her husband, and Grand
Fares owner, Doug Washington. There
were other iterations ox and hog
but the ram offered up the quality of enchantment, a talisman to summon just
the right amount of luck for the successful launch of a new business.
Open two weeks now, Grand Fare
has already created an atmosphere for
itself. Strings of garden lights canopy
the sandy floored outdoor seating area.
Walking in from the busy street, its
like walking through a portal to a foreign market of abundant riches. There
are weird and wonderful flowers poised
to seduce passersby as they enter the
market hall.
Once inside, the first stop is the raw
bar with a daily selection of oysters
(half-dozen, $18; one dozen, $36).
Why not pair it with a glass of French
Sparkling Val de Mer ($13)? But prepare yourself: This is but the beginning
of an ever-increasing tab. In the center
of the room, you place your order for
cold and hot sides, meats, salads, and
sandwiches. When was the last time
you had okra that wasnt deliciously
transformed into Indian bhindi? Heres
your chance to try it fried with a green
goddess dressing ($7). A server passed

36 | OCTOBER 22-28, 2015


SFWEEKLY.COM

by with a compliment, Good choice.


Yes. Yes, it was.
Of the sampled sandwiches, leg
of lamb ($13), albacore tuna ($13)
and avocado and sprouts ($12), the
standout was the lamb. With a case of
charcuterie on display, this place is a
carnivores dream, although the Little
Gem Lettuces ($10) dressed in buttermilk are fine enough for anyone who
loves a light repast of salad.
Baked goods live in the corner. A
slice of apple gallette ($4) was nice
and forgettable, beat out for the Most
Delicious Award by a cut of pound cake
($6), while the most tempting loaf of
bread was Josey Bakers ($7.50).
Once the round inside is complete,
you circle back outside to one of two
separate garden areas to sit. The main
patch is for diners to be waited upon.
The menu doesnt appear to differ for
them, but instead of paying at the
counter inside and carrying the goods
away in a basket, a balletic corps of
wait staff glide in and out of the kitchen with plates of Moroccan meatballs
($15) or duck confit ($19). For the
crowd of self-servers, the rectangle
against the wall has plenty of shared
table space to spread out their purchases for a sudden urban picnic.
But what about coffee, which was
the soul of Monkey Forest Road, the
spaces previous inhabitant? The 1940s
Spartan trailer, refurbished and shining
in the perfect hue of royal blue, has it
all: Linea coffee, house-made pastries,
and Humphry Slocombe ice cream. For
a brand new establishment, Washington has clearly created a space that not
only welcomes but encourages European-style lingering. Its easy to find yourself there at sunset, eating and drinking
until the late stars appear, your wallet
thinning in the bright evening air.

2109 Polk
715 Harrison St 1737 Haight
415-345-0600 415-896-0700 415-668-5577
The Castro
415-252-1515

333 Bush
415-421-0700

3242 22nd St.


415-206-0555

ORDER ONLINE AT

WWW.ESCAPEFROMNEWYORKPIZZA.COM

Grand Fare Market,


3265 Grand Ave., Oakland, 510-8999610 or grandfaremarket.com.

LETTERS

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Caputo Fills a
Long-Dormant
Space on The
Embarcadero
By Peter Lawrence Kane
In a 4,100-square-foot space

that formerly housed The Slanted


Door (and, once upon a time, Sutro)
comes Caputo, now serving rustic
trattoria-style Italian cuisine of the
antipasti-insalate-pizza
variety.Executive chef and partner
Sam Ramadans idea of rusticity
includes things like braised lamb
tongue and a squid ink spaghetti alla
chitara, (with Rock 19 shrimp,
Parmigiano Reggiano, garlic, white
wine, and lemon zest) but also makes
room for dishes like a pecorino flan
and Chucks Mac and Cheese.
But this being a borderlinewaterfront restaurant, if youre
suspecting theres an additional
wrinkle, youre right. A wood-fired
oven set to 900 degrees will be
churning out Neapolitan pizzas
every two minutes including
aCarnivore (speck, pancetta,
calabrese, pepperoni, housemade
fior di latte, basil, and San Marzano
tomato) and the Zucca (roasted
butternut squash, gorgonzola
dolcelatte, caramelized sweet
onions, toasted walnuts, and sage
oil) along with items such as
whole branzino and a porcini-dusted
Wagyu coulotte steak, each roasted
overalmond wood. Having cooked
at a number of well-regarded places
in the Pacific Northwest, Ramadan
has received some attention from
PBS television, winning a Best in
the City nod from Zagat, while his
chef de cuisine, Carrie Anne Lopez,
was until recently the executive sous
chef at S.F.s own Michael Mina.
The dining rooms capacity has
been slightly reduced from its
formerly massive layout, with room
for 100 indoors, another 40 patrons
on the patio (which has two steel
gas fireplaces), and spots for 17 at
a bar that looks out onto the Bay.
And the name has nothing to do
with the Italian word for head (or
with the likably grumpy assistant
warden on Orange is the New Black,
for that matter). Its a reference to
00 Caputo, the pizza dough flour
thats highly prized for its finely
ground character and low gluten
content, which should satisfy a lot
of people in a town that still cant
shake an association with belowaverage pizza.

Caputo,
100 Brannan St., 415-543-9720 or
caputosf.com.

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| 37

EAT KISS THE GLASS

The Myth of Mezcal

Every night

How Mezcal Amores Santiago


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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

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ORDER ONLINE
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3881 24TH ST

B/T vicksburg & Sanchez

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By A. K. Carroll
The dark eras are for trans-

forming, no? Santiago Suarez says. Were


in a third-floor room of Anchor Brewing,
comparing San Franciscos boom with
Mexico Citys struggles. Suarez is the
founder and CEO of the six-year-old Mezcal Amores Mezcal Amars in the U.S.
and he is constantly traveling, evangelizing on behalf of mezcals mystery.
The first time I contacted mezcal
was on a hippie beach in Mexico, Suarez
recounts. I was 18 years old, and the
moment was perfect.
An older man, 60 or 65, was carrying
bottles as he walked across the sand. He
approached Suarez and his friends and
made them an offer: 50 cents for a liter
of the white spirit, a dollar if they wanted the glass bottle. Suarez held out an
empty plastic bottle, and the man filled
it with mezcal.
We couldnt go into the ocean that
day, so we started drinking the mezcal.
It was one of the best drinks Id ever
had, says Suarez. Later, he and his
friends went looking for the man. We
wanted to buy more, but we couldnt
find him. He was like a myth.
The encounter stuck with Suarez. After finishing a degree in industrial engineering, he worked with a nonprofit that
had a campus in Oaxaca. It was then the
Mexico City native started to notice the
cultural differences between regions.
A really important part of the community was mezcal, he tells me, describing the role of the spirit in the celebration
of birthdays, quinceaeras, the Day of the
Dead, and other festivals. It was a part of
those special days, and I got to know it.
Suarez spent two years learning
about the spirits history and production,
and launched Mezcal Amores on Dec. 12,
2010, during the celebration of the Virgin of Guadalupe. Over time, the brand
has expanded, growing horizontally rather than vertically a distinction that
Suarez insists on. While a single factory
can produce anywhere from 1,000-4,000
liters, it isnt possible to use the traditional process on a grand scale.
And if we lose the way its produced,
we lose a lot of this product, says Suarez.
While Mezcal Amores exhibits a particular flavor, process, and expression of
terroir, it varies from bottle to bottle and
from one mezcalero to the next. To select
his partnering mezcaleros currently
there are 11 Suarez has visited more
than 200 factories throughout Mexico,
some of which are dirt-floor, thatch-roof
facilities run by mezcaleros who have
hundreds of years of collective experience. Of the four mezcaleros who contribute to Amores Espan variety, three
have been in the industry for more than
six decades. One recently turned 93.

Making mezcal is labor-intensive and


requires patience, as plants can take up
to 35 years to mature. Once ready to reproduce, their leaves begin to open and
the agave shoots up, growing more than
60 feet in six to nine months.
The plant takes its whole life to
survive and reproduces only once before
it dies, Suarez explains. If you think
about it, youre drinking all of the energy that the plant has stored up. The
plant is sacrificing its life for us, and not
doing what living things want to do,
which is reproduce.
Once cut, the agaves core (or pia)
is extracted, cut into pieces, and cooked
for up to five days over a fire made in a
conical in-ground oven lined with stone.
Its then sliced and ground into meal,
to oxygenate it. The resulting liquid is
fermented for eight to 25 days, slowcooked, and distilled in batches of less
than 400 liters. (Every ton of agave
yields roughly 100 liters of mezcal.)
Each time you do this you cant
reproduce it, says Suarez. Its very
organic, unique.
Each mezcalero works according to
his own specifications. There can be
variations on the type of wood burned
in the oven, the type of fermentation
pots, and the amount of time spent in
any stage. And then there is the agave
itself, with 23 species and 350 subspecies. Its a wonder that one bottle of
mezcal even resembles the next.
Its a mystery were still figuring
out, Suarez says. There is no cultivation of wild agave. Thats why we dont
harvest wild plants if we dont have a
reforestation plan. Each year, we plant
10 to 15 for each plant we use.
Mezcal Amars espadin, a balance
of smoke and agave flavor, is what
Suarez considers the perfect way to
enter the mezcal world. It is centered,
but not explosive. On the other side is
cupreata, developed in Guerrero state.
Where espadn is a point of entry, cupreata shows mezcals complexity. We
wanted to show the extremes of what it
can do, says Suarez. [Cupreata] can be
spicy like chili or bell pepper. Think of
the flavor green, he says, as I take small
sips. It does, indeed, taste like a deep
jungle green, lush and herbaceous.
When Mezcal Amores decided to
distribute in the U.S. under the name of
Mezcal Amars, it did so with the desire
to keep the mezcal tradition, moving
when the moment was right. Though
mezcal only makes up 1 percent of tequila sales, the age-old drink is quickly
growing in popularity. As it does, it is
important to Suarez that it is consumed
responsibly and carefully: We should
honor it by drinking in celebration with
friends, respecting the life of the plant.
For me, the best way to enjoy a
mezcal is sipping it, Suarez says. You
never shoot a mezcal; you should kiss
the glass. If you feel like youre swallowing, youre doing it wrong. To him, a
good shot should last 20 to 30 minutes.
Youre taking a journey through the
soul of the plant, he tells me, Tasting
the biodiversity of Mexico.
Feedback@SFWeekly.com

sfweekly.com

musiC ConCert Cash

Pay to Play

San Francisco concert ticket prices (almost) match the rent.


By Matt Saincome

LIVE MUSIC 6 NIGHTS A WEEK

San Francisco has become a city

full of expensive things and people with


expensive taste. Whether its that fabled slice of toast, the worlds most expensive cocktail, or a $1400 bunk bed
in a hacker hostel, its no secret that if
you want something in San Francisco,
youre going to pay top dollar for it.
Longtime working class residents
and young, financially insecure artists have been affected by this for a
long time. Weve reported on venue
closures, festivals moving to Oakland,
and artists being evicted from their
apartments with depressing frequency. Its hard to witness, but when
comparing San Franciscos ticket prices with neighboring cities, its also
hard to see why anyone would choose
to see an act in San Francisco.
According to Vivid Seats, the average ticket price in San Francisco
($129) is 59 percent higher than the
rest of the Bay Area ($74).
Alex Petralia, 25, singer of punk
band Nopes, has been living in San
Francisco for seven years. He originally moved here to study at SF State,
but now, more than ever, he finds
himself heading out of the city to attend concerts that interest him.
Yo La Tengo was up to almost
$150 a head at the Masonic in San
Francisco, Petralia said. Meanwhile,
I can get tickets for $21 in Santa Cruz
at the Rio, go on roller coasters at the
Boardwalk before the show, and still
have money left over for In-N-Out on
the way back.
He added, Im choosing Santa
Cruz.
The reason for the price jump isnt
simple, according to various independent and in-house bookers. The Bay
Area is one of two major markets on
the West Coast, and San Francisco is
the Bays crown jewel. Artists ask for
more money in major markets, knowing they should be able to draw bigger
crowds. And any well-planned tour
schedule aims to land artists in major
markets on weekend nights when
more people are free increasing
demand and skewing average ticket
prices up.
One manager told me he took that
notion of the big city weekend show
so seriously that after his client had a
show in San Francisco, he decided to
keep the artist relaxing in the city for
a week, before officially continuing
his tour in L.A. the next weekend.
The manager had looked at playing

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Seeing Billy Joel at


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5 costs as much as
$129.50 about
average in SF.

Freestyle Hip-Hop

Owen Sweeney/Invision/AP

smaller markets, like Santa Barbara,


to kill time, but decided against it.
The restless artist, eager to perform,
decided to play some solo shows in
other, smaller markets although at
a much-reduced ticket price.
But Yo La Tengos Santa Cruz and
San Francisco shows are both scheduled for weekend nights (Saturday
and Sunday, Nov. 14-15). And although music fans in other major cities suffer similar problems, at times
it seems that San Franicsco residents
are getting the particularly short end
of the stick when it comes to ticket
prices.
When Brit Floyd, a popular Pink
Floyd Tribute band, recently toured
the country, Vivid Seats calculated
the average ticket price in several
California cities and in one famously
expensive major market across the
country.

Average Brit Floyd Ticket Prices:


Bay Area: $75
San Diego: $80
Fresno: $82
New York: $82
Los Angeles: $84
Sacramento: $94
San Francisco: $103
Its not just greed that drives the
price up, Nick Bane, an independent
Bay Area booker, said. If youre a
venue in San Francisco, you have to
compete with other venues over the
same tour package. This creates an
up-bidding of which venue can offer
the artists the most money. These
bands are not loyal to any particular
venue, so they go where they get the
most money and the cost is passed on
to the audience.
The issue isnt just about supply
and demand economics, either. There
are extra factors specific to San FranLETTERS

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*DJ KEVVY KEV*


*THE GEMSTONE BAND*
TUESDAY OCT 27 $5 ADV

cisco, which add to the woes of concert attendees at the ticket booth.
One in-house booker said that
even successful San Francisco shows
need higher prices to fund venue
retrofitting efforts to silence the complaints of cranky neighbors. Another
said that the rental prices of Bay Area
venues is so high that putting on a
concert anywhere without a bar is
near-logistically impossible one
of the many reasons San Francisco
is severely lacking all-ages venues.
But the high prices come with higher
expectations, and one booker said
he has begun to experience angry
emails from fans after disappointing
performances failed to live up to the
price tag.
I understand their frustration,
he sighed.

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MSaincome@SFWeekly.com

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music |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 39

muSiC Some ThoughTS of a CerTain Sound

British Bass
Invasion
The bay plays host to some of
Britains finest bass music.

By Chris Zaldua
Ive long championed bass

music in this column. I know, I know


its a terrible, non-descriptive genre name.
By bass music, I dont mean the tacky
festival fodder that sounds like something
you might hear in an advertisement for
Axe body spray. No, I mean it in the British
sense, the latest point in a long timeline
that began with early rave music, then
drum and bass and jungle, then two-step
and garage, then grime, then dubstep, and
now, just bass music. The terms
non-specificity speaks to the all-inclusive
nature of the artists working under its umbrella, picking bits and pieces from all over
to craft dance music that sounds at once
totally familiar and completely new. Peverelist and Kowton, two producers and DJs
from Bristol, England, stand at the very
forefront of this mutant sound.
Peverelists career begins almost a
decade ago, in 2006, after releasing his
debut record on his own label, Punch
Drunk. Early Peverelist material sat
firmly in the dubstep camp, coming

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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

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kowton ( left)
and peverelist
as that sound was peaking in the U.K.
Peverelists tracks, although designed for
dancefloors, were always infused with
a spaciness and eerie atmosphere that
his peers lacked; each record seemed to
be reaching further and further into the
outer limits.
Kowtons early productions were
basically instrumental grime tracks
reworked to fit a techno palette raw,
hard-hitting, and heavier than a ton of
bricks, effectively bridging the worlds of
bass music and techno. In 2011, Peverelist and Kowton paired up and launched
a new record label called Livity Sound,
dedicated to their own productions
alongside a few close friends.
With Livity Sound, Peverelist and
Kowton took the shackles of genre and
cast them aside. Nothing else sounds
like Livity Sound does; with each suc-

cessive record, the pair seem to be more


and more comfortable just doing their
own thing, whatever that may be. Seventeen records in and theyve built one
of the most astonishingly unique and
breathtakingly good bodies of work
in modern dance music.
Theyre superb DJs to boot, each
playing off the other expertly and
playfully. Theyre going back-to-back
all night, open-to-close, serving up the
latest and greatest sounds from the
U.K. and beyond. For those folks who
appreciate going a little bit outside their
comfort zone on the dancefloor, theres
no better place to be this weekend.

Parameter presents
Peverelist & Kowton
(all night long) at F8, 10 p.m.-4 a.m.
Friday, Oct. 23. $15-$20; feightsf.com

Other wOrthy parties this week

Future classic showcase featuring


classixx, sophie, cyril Hahn, HNNY, and
more at 1015 Folsom, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.
Thursday, Oct. 22. $20-$25; 1015.com
As the mainstream music industry has become more and more comfortable letting
electronic musicians sit at its table, pop music and electronic music have begun sharing
each others meals in some fascinating (and
effective) ways. This showcase, courtesy of
melbourne label future classic, features a
slew of artists producing their own unique
variation on electronic pop music (or poppy
electronic music). on the poppy tip are
classixx, who produce smooth n easy disco-flavored indie dance; cyril Hahn, whose
edits of pop and R&B tracks have made him
a soundcloud sensation; and Basenji, who
makes candy-coated future R&B. on the
electronic tip are HNNy, a swede who makes
chilled deep house with pop-song samples;
kenton slash Demon, a duo from Denmark
who make lush dance music; and sophie, a
prankster pushing pop music to its extremes. Theres more artists on deck, too
this is a heavily stacked lineup.
INsIGHT and Public Works present
Adriatique, mind Against, and Job Jobse
at Public Works, 9:30 p.m.-4 a.m. Friday,
Oct. 23. $22-$25; publicsf.com
Remember minimal? If you went clubbing
in the mid-00s, you certainly do: it was inescapable. stripped-down, minimal (duh), eschewing melody, and focused instead on
rhythmic basslines and repetition, it was

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Arts & Culture

eat

music

everywhere including san francisco. But


times change and in contrast to minimals
relentless, er, minimalism comes a kind of
glossy, tightly-composed tech-house, full of
big, melodic, emotional peaks and valleys.
Its taking european clubs by storm, and
slowly but surely making its way to our
shores. (Describing it has proved tricky;
some suggest trance, an accurate but obviously confusing nom de genre.) on friday,
three of the premier artists pushing this
sound invade Public works: Adriatique, a
duo from switzerland; mind Against, a duo
from Italy; and Job Jobse, a DJ from the
Netherlands. Adriatique is more poppy,
mind Against more psychedelic, while Jobse
has a knack for tying it all together. matt
Hubert and solar will support.
Raindance presents 21st Annual
Freakers Ball at The sound Factory,
9 p.m.-6 a.m. saturday, Oct. 24. $30;
raindancepresents.com
If youre like many san franciscans, and Halloween begins for you on oct. 15, then
theres no better place to be than the 21st
edition of the freakers Ball at the massive
multi-room soma club The sound factory.
The freakers Ball is one of san franciscos
many enormously popular annual costume
parties, and the lineup this time around is
an interesting mashup of the old, the new,
the (relatively) standard, and the very, very
strange. older heads are well-represented,
with a strong showing from the original 90s
Bay Area rave crews (Jen from wicked; DJ

Tracy; solar and Galen from sunset sound


system; and more). Theres a large contingent of future bass (aka dubstep American style) performers, like ill.Gates,
Andreilien, and many, many more. Representing the very strange contingent is otto
von schirach, a miami-based producer who
worships papayas (Google it) and whose music is truly, truly out-there.
stamina presents Bladerunner and sam
Binga at F8, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. sunday, Oct.
26. Free; feightsf.com
Drum & bass, once a thriving staple of
dancefloors all over the U.k. (with strong regional showings in the states, especially
here in san francisco), has become more
and more of a niche sound, especially as
other sub-types of bass music (especially
dubstep and its kin) have taken the world by
storm. In truth, the shrinking popularity of
drum & bass has been something of a boon,
as it has forced producers dedicated to the
sound to double down and innovate. staminas sunday night weekly at f8 (always
free!) plays host to a number of these diehards, including its latest, featuring genrebender sam Binga and traditionalist
Bladerunner. Binga burst onto the scene just
two years ago and quickly became one of
dnbs most compelling producers by incorporating influences from all across the bass
music spectrum. Bladerunner, meanwhile,
produces no-nonsense up-tempo dnb, turnof-the-century style. stamina resident Adept
will warm up the floor.
LETTERS

nEwS sfweekly.com
COVER STORY

Th

music

listings

THURSDAY 10/22

Club listings are offered as a free service to


SF Weekly readers and are subject to space
restrictions. To have a listing added, email
(Calendar@sfweekly.com), fax (777-1839), or
mail (835 Market St., Suite 550, S.F., CA 94103).
To change an existing listing, call 536-8147.
Deadline is noon Tuesday for the following
weeks issue. Our Concerts section lists major
shows and special events. Call individual clubs
for show details. Except as noted, all phone
numbers are in the 415 area code. Listings rotate
regularly, as space allows. Our complete listings
of local clubs searchable by keyword, date, and
genre are available online.

ROCK

cOncERts
THURSDAY 10/22
Allen Stone: W/ JMSN, 8 p.m., $27.50
advance. Fox Theater - Oakland, 1807
Telegraph, Oakland, 510-548-3010.
Daley: 8 p.m., $22. Great American Music Hall, 859 OFarrell, San Francisco,
885-0750.
Florence & The Machine: 7 p.m., $60.50
advance, apeconcerts.com. UC Berkeley, Greek Theatre, Gayley & University, Berkeley, 510-642-9988.

FRIDAY 10/23
Ghost: W/ Purson, 9 p.m., $27.50-$38.
Warfield Theatre, 982 Market, San
Francisco, 345-0900.
Hozier: W/ Little Green Cars, 8 p.m.,
$49.50 advance. UC Berkeley, Greek
Theatre, Gayley & University, Berkeley,
510-642-9988.
Luna: W/ Quilt, 9 p.m., $25 advance. The

DANCE

DNA Lounge: 375 11th St., San Francisco,


626-1409. Sepultura, 8 p.m., $18-$22.
Slims: 333 11th St., San Francisco, 2550333. Lydia, Seahaven, Turnover, The
Technicolors, 7:30 p.m., $16-$18.
Thee Parkside: 1600 17th St., San Francisco, 252-1330. Subhumans (U.K.), 9
p.m., $15.

Fillmore, 1805 Geary, San Francisco,


346-6000.
MS MR: W/ Jack Garratt, Tigertown, 8
p.m., $29.50 advance. Fox Theater
- Oakland, 1807 Telegraph, Oakland,
510-548-3010.

SATURDAY 10/24
29th Annual Bridge School Concert:
bridgeschool.org. Shoreline Amphitheatre, 1 Amphitheatre, Mountain
View, 650-967-3000.
Janes Addiction: Performing Ritual de lo
Habitual, 8:30 p.m., $75-$90. Warfield
Theatre, 982 Market, San Francisco,
345-0900.
Na Lei Hulu I Ka Wekiu: Kanakolu
30 Years of Hula: 8 p.m., $15-$45,
naleihulu.org. Palace of Fine Arts,
3301 Lyon, San Francisco, 567-6642.
The Neighbourhood: W/ Bad Suns,
Hunny, 8 p.m., $35. Fox Theater Oakland, 1807 Telegraph, Oakland,
510-548-3010.

Aunt Charlies Lounge: 133 Turk, San


Francisco, 441-2922. Tubesteak Connection, w/ DJ Bus Station John, 9
p.m., $5-$7.
Beaux: 2344 Market, San Francisco, 8634027. My So-Called Night, 90s dance
party with VJs Jorge Terez & Becky Knox,
9 p.m., free.
The Cafe: 2369 Market, San Francisco, >>

Owl City: W/ Rozzi Crane, 8 p.m., $25$30. The Regency Ballroom, 1300 Van
Ness Avenue, San Francisco, 673-5716.

SUNDAY 10/25
29th Annual Bridge School Concert:
bridgeschool.org. Shoreline Amphitheatre, 1 Amphitheatre, Mountain
View, 650-967-3000.
Camera Obscura: 8 p.m., $28. Bimbos
365 Club, 1025 Columbus, San Francisco, 474-0365.
Heartless Bastards: W/ Slothrust, 8
p.m., $22.50 advance. The Fillmore,
1805 Geary, San Francisco, 346-6000.
Na Lei Hulu I Ka Wekiu: Kanakolu
30 Years of Hula: 12 p.m., $15-$45,
naleihulu.org. Palace of Fine Arts,
3301 Lyon, San Francisco, 567-6642.
Nick Jonas: W/ Bebe Rexha, 7:30 p.m.,
$29.50-$35 advance. The Masonic,
1111 California, San Francisco, 877598-8497.
SOJA: W/ J Boog, Dustin Thomas, 8
p.m., $29.50-$40. Warfield Theatre,
982 Market, San Francisco, 345-0900.

MONDAY 10/26
All Time Low: W/ Sleeping with Sirens,
One OK Rock, 6 p.m., $32.50-$35. City
National Civic, 135 W. San Carlos, San
Jose, 408-792-4145.
Creative Collab Tour: W/ Matthew
Espinosa, Jake Foushee, more, 6:30
p.m., $25-$28. The Regency Ballroom,
1300 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco,
673-5716.
Eagles of Death Metal: 9 p.m., sold
out. Great American Music Hall, 859
OFarrell, San Francisco, 885-0750.
Walk the Moon: W/ Saint Motel, Holychild, 8 p.m., $30 advance. The Masonic, 1111 California, San Francisco,
877-598-8497.

TUESDAY 10/27
The Neighbourhood
performs on Sat.,
Oct. 24, at the Fox
Theater in Oakland.

sfweekly.com

The Zombies: 8 p.m., $39.50 advance.


The Fillmore, 1805 Geary, San Francisco, 346-6000.

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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 41

621-4434. Xcess Thursdays, w/ resident DJs Krazy, Becky Knox, and Frisko
Eddy, 9 p.m., free.
703-8964. Class of 84, w/ DJs Damon,

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22 9:30 PM


$5 BEFORE 11 PM

BRAZA! PRESENTS
ANTONO GUEDES

LIVE SAMBA ROCK PLUS DJS

THURS OCT 22 7:30PM $8

ELAN & IZZY WISE

PEACERS ELISA AMBROGIO

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23 9PM - $8

FOLLOWING AT 9:30PM FREE

FRACAS

DJS MEDIuM RARE & OMAR PEREz

GLAM NIGHT

ALCOHOLOCAUST PRESENTS

THE BAR FEEDERS,

70S GLAM, BuBBLEGuM, PROTOPuNk & HIGH ENERGy ROCk N ROLL!

FRI OCT 23 6PM FREE

TONGUE (L.A.), RULETA RUSA

SHAkE APPEAL
HAPPy HOuR

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24 9 PM
$10 ADV/ $12 DOOR

GARAGE, SOuL, PSyCH, GLAM, ROCkNROLL


W/ DJS GALINE MODMOSELLE, OMAR PEREz,

LUCIFERS HAMMER PRESENTS

HAMMERS OF
MISFORTUNE
HIGH SPIRITS
(CHICAGO)(HIGH ROLLER RECORDS),

WALKEN

9942. Next Level Thursdays, 10 p.m.,

www.facebook.com/pages/Thursday-

free with RSVP.

nights-at-Cat-Club/191272240888168.

Underground SF: 424 Haight, San Fran-

The Cellar: 685 Sutter, San Francisco,

cisco, 864-7386. Bubble, 10 p.m.,

441-5678. XO, 10 p.m., $5, facebook.

free, facebook.com/LowerHaightbubble.

com/PartyXO.

HIP-HOP

Infusion Lounge: 124 Ellis, San Francisco,


421-8700. Trend Thursdays, 10 p.m.,
$10.
Pops Bar: 2800 24th St., San Francisco,

FOLLOWING AT 10PM
$5 BEFORE 11PM, $10 AFTER

ing BFF.fm DJs spin a variety of tunes


including indie rock, garage, electronic
music, and more., 9 p.m., Free, bff.fm.

ACOUSTIC

Bazaar Cafe: 5927 California, San Francisco, 831-5620. Acoustic Open Mic with
Josh Beemish, 7 p.m., free.
The Chieftain: 198 Fifth St., San Francisco,
615-0916. cRossRhodes, 8 p.m.
Plough & Stars: 116 Clement, San Francisco, 751-1122. Tipsy House, fourth
Thursday of every month, 9 p.m., free.
JAZZ

Burritt Room: 417 Stockton, San Francisco,

John Colins: 138 Minna, San Francisco, 512-

400-0555. Kamikaze Butterfly, 7 p.m.

7493. Groove Theory, w/ DJ Natural &

Le Colonial: 20 Cosmo, San Francisco,

Lando1, 10 p.m., free.


Skylark Bar: 3089 16th St., San Francisco,

931-3600. Steve Lucky & The Rhumba


Bums, 7:30 p.m.

621-9294. Peaches, w/ Lady DJs

The Royal Cuckoo: 3202 Mission, San

DeeAndroid, Lady Fingaz, That Girl,

Francisco, 550-8667. Charlie Siebert &

Umami, Inkfat, and Andre, 10 p.m., free,

Chris Siebert, 7:30 p.m., free.

facebook.com/peachesladydjcrew.

Savanna Jazz Club: 2937 Mission, San

SAT OCT 24 6:30PM


$5 TO $20 SLIDING SCALE

WRITERS WITH DRINkS!

DUB MISSION
1000

SUBATOMIC SOUND SYSTEM

W/ CHARLIE JANE ANDERS


ADAM JOHNSON FAITH ADIELE
FAyETTE FOx DAPHNE GOTTLIEB
LOREN RHOADS BRONTEz PuRNELL
FOLLOWING AT 10PM
$5 BEFORE 11PM, $10 AFTER

(LEE SCRATCH PERRY BAND LEADER/NY)

DJ EL kOOL kyLE y DJ ROGER MS

OUR 1000TH SHOW WITH A BAY AREA-EXCLUSIVE:

FEATURING EMCH

EL SuPERRITMO!

DUB MISSION SOUND SYSTEM


WITH MC LUV FYAH

CuMBIA, DANCEHALL, HIP-HOP, REGGAETON, SALSA BuENA y MAS!

DJ SEP, MANEESH THE TWISTER


AND VINNIE ESPARZA

TOTAL uNICORN (AuSTIN), SkATE LAW!

SuN OCT 25 7:30PM $8

SHE GEES

AND ALL THE RESIDENTS:

MON OCT 26 6PM FREE

DJ CANDy CRuSH

MONDAY, OCTOBER 26 9 PM - $7

HAPPy HOuR

LA FIN ABSOLUTE DU MONDE,

POWER POP, NEW WAVE, POST PuNk, GLAM, LO-FI!


FOLLOWING AT 9PM FREE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27 9PM $8

LIkE MTVS 120 MINuTES ON DRuGS! VJS, DJS, MORE!


TuES OCT 27 6PM FREE
ANCHOR BREWING PRESENTS

INFERNO OF JOY, STORM DOOR

420 MINuTES

ABANDONED FOOTWEAR

HOM, CAMERON SHAFTI,


FLUORESCENT GREY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28 10 PM - $5

SHUTTER -

THE RESURRECTION

DRINk STEAM W/ LOCAL MAkERS!


MISSION BICyCLE

BICyCLE ASSEMBLy DEMO, BICyCLE DISPLAy


INTERVIEW/Q&A WITH MISSION BICyCLE FOuNDER
FOLLOWING AT 9:30PM FREE

SLOW JAMS

DEEP & SWEET 60S SOuL & STuFF


DJ PRIMO & FRIENDS

WITH DJS

NAKO, OMAR, JUSTIN

WED OCT 28 7PM $8

BIG WEDNESDAy

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29 9 PM
$10 ADVANCE/ $12 DOOR

HOSTED By JEREMy WHEAT

BODYSHOCK PRESENTS

A COMEDy SHOW WITH SOME VARIETy!


FOLLOWING AT 10PM FREE

LIVE SETS FROM

INTL FREAkOuT A-GO-GO!

SILENT SERVANT (JEALOUS GOD),


VARG (SWEDEN),
MARSHSTEPPER (ASCETIC HOUSE),
JOCK CLUB
PLUS DJS CRACKWHORE (BODYSHOCK)
& KERRI LEBON (DISCIPLINE)
OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

guests, 9 p.m., $8 ($6 before 9:30 p.m.),

DJ 2SHy-SHy & DJ MELT W/u

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25 9 PM
$7 ADVANCE /$10 DOOR

42 |

facebook.com/1999sf.
Temple: 540 Howard, San Francisco, 978-

BARON VON WEST, & VALENTINO

BOOM! SHAk-A-LAk-A

1999, w/ DJ Mark Andrus., 9 p.m., Free,

Steve Washington, Dangerous Dan, and

872-5160. BFF.fm, w/ Drew Smith. Rotat-

FuNk, SOuL, DISCO, WAVE, SyNTH-POP,


HIP-HOP, GROOVE, INTERNATIONAL

2877. #Homo, 9 p.m., free.


Raven: 1151 Folsom, San Francisco, 431-1151.

Cat Club: 1190 Folsom, San Francisco,

ELBO ROOM IS LOCATED AT 647 VALENCIA NEAR 17TH


ADVANCE TICKETS WWW.BROWNPAPERTICKETS.COM

Q Bar: 456 Castro, San Francisco, 864-

60S 70S SOuL-FuNk-DISCO-POP-PSyCH


FROM AROuND THE WORLD!

DJS SPECIAL LORD B.,


BEN BRACkEN BOBBy GANuSH!

3225 22nd ST. @ MISSION SF CA 94110


415-647-2888 www.makeoutroom.com
LETTERS

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Heavy Metal

Gwar
Gwar, with Osiris, Battlecross. 7:45 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 25, $26.50-$28,
at The Regency Ballroom; www.theregencyballroom.com

Are you the kind of person that wants to be sprayed with fake blood when youre out for the evening? Do you mostly enjoy
bands who wear a special combination of loincloths and physical weaponry? Do you long to spend your time in the presence
of so many pyrotechnics that you are at real risk of losing your eyebrows? If the answer was a resounding yes to all of those
questions, then you probably already have your tickets for this Sundays pre-Halloween Gwar show. After the sad death of
Oderus Urungus in early 2014, the world wondered if Gwar could or would continue. But clearly, these interplanetary barbarians are as invincible as they look. Plus, this happens to be an all-ages show, so if there are kids in your life who need to be
scared half to death, bring em along! Theyll never forget it and you probably wont either. Rae Alexandra

Arts & Culture

eat

music

sfweekly.com

Sepultura performs on
Thu., Oct. 22, at DNA
Lounge.

Francisco, 285-3369. Savanna Jazz Jam


with Eric Tillman, 7 p.m., $5.

Space 550: 550 Barneveld, San Francisco, 550-8286. Sundance Saloon,

Zingari: 501 Post, San Francisco, 885-

Gay-friendly country dancing, Thurs-

8850. Barbara Ochoa, 7:30 p.m., free.

days, 6:30 p.m.; Sundays, 5 p.m., $5,

INTERNATIONAL

sundancesaloon.org.

Pachamama Restaurant: 1630 Pow ell, San


Francisco, 646-0018. Flamenco Fusion
World Music Cafe, 8 p.m.

EXPERIMENTAL

The Luggage Store: 1007 Market, San

Sheba Piano Lounge: 1419 Fillmore, San

Francisco, 255-5971. LSG New Music

Francisco, 440-7414. Latin Breeze, 8:30

Series, 8 p.m., $6-$15 sliding scale,

p.m.

outsound.org.

FRIDAY 10/23
BLUES

Tupelo: 1337 Green, San Francisco, 9819177. G.G. Amos, fourth Thursday of
every month, 9 p.m.
COUNTRY
Bob Hakins

ROCK

The Regency Ballroom: 1300 Van Ness


Avenue, San Francisco, 673-5716. Django
Django, w/ Wild Belle, 9 p.m., $250$27,
www.theregencyballroom.com/events.
WALK THE MOON

AWOLNATION

SAINT MOTEL, HOLYCHILD

MEG MYERS, IRONTOM

JOSH GROBAN

GLEN HANSARD

November 3 & 4

November 10

October 26

G.G. Amos performs


on Thursday, Oct. 22,
at Tupelo.

October 29

LENA HALL

/SFMasonic

@sfmasonic

PASSION PIT

RAC, COLEMAN HELL

October 30

YO LA TENGO

AOIFE ODONOVAN

FEATURING DAVE SCHRAMM

VISIT SFMASONIC.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION

/sfmasonic

November 14

sfmasonic

Limit 8 tickets per person. All dates, acts and ticket prices are subject to change without notice. All tickets are subject to applicable service charges. *Advance tickets will still
be available with NO SERVICE CHARGE on Sunday 10:00am to 3:00pm at the Fillmore box office only. Charge by phone at 800-745-3000. Buy tickets at livenation.com.

sfweekly.com

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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 43

Dina Douglass

Singer-Songwriter

Kristin HersH
Kristin Hersh, with Zachary Blizzard. 8 p.m. Monday, Oct.
26, at Bottom of the Hill. $20; www.bottomofthehill.com
The strength and resonance of Kristin Hershs vocals are matched only by her
extraordinary lyrical-writing abilities. The magical combination of those two
things is why Hersh has maintained such a long career, from her early days in
the (eternally popular) Throwing Muses, through nine solo albums, as well as
her 50 Foot Wave side-project. But perhaps most remarkably, Hersh has used
her unique voice and point of view to author a memoir (Rat Girl), a childrens
book (Toby Snax), and has even created an interactive app for kids. Yes, this
Rhode Island native is a busy lady, so be sure to catch her while you can especially in a venue as intimate at Bottom of the Hill. Its sure to be a special
evening. Rae Alexandra

DJs Daniel Skellington & Melting Girl,


DANCE

fourth Friday of every month, 9:30 p.m.,

Beaux: 2344 Market, San Francisco, 863-

$8 ($5 before 10 p.m.), facebook.com/

4027. Manimal, 9 p.m., free before


10 p.m.

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

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music

The Cellar: 685 Sutter, San Francisco,

The Cafe: 2369 Market, San Francisco,

441-5678. F.T.S.: For the Story, 10 p.m.

621-4434. Boy Bar, 9 p.m., $5, gus-

Infusion Lounge: 124 Ellis, San Francisco,

presents.com.

44 |

clubdarkshadows.

421-8700. Flight Fridays, 10 p.m., $20.

Cat Club: 1190 Folsom, San Francisco,

Madrone Art Bar: 500 Divisadero, San

703-8964. Dark Shadows, w/ resident

Francisco, 241-0202. I the 90s,


sfweekly.com

w/ DJs Samala, Teo, Mr. Grant, & Sonny


Phono, fourth Friday of every month, 9
p.m., $5, www.iheartthe90s.com.
Mezzanine: 444 Jessie, San Francisco,
625-8880. On&On, w/ Guy Gerber,

mons, Jake Phillips, 9 p.m., $25.


The Sports Basement: 610 Old Mason,
San Francisco, 437-0100. Breakfast
with Enzo, w/ Enzo Garcia, 10 a.m., $7,
www.enzogarcia.com.

Matthew Dear (DJ set), Mark Slee, 10

4442. Club Papi!, fourth Friday of


every month, 10 p.m., $12-$15, clubpapi.

FACEBOOK: /THEFILLMORE
TWITTER: @FILLMORESF
INSTAGRAM: @THEFILLMORE

JAZZ

p.m., $20-$25 advance, ononsf.com.


Oasis: 298 11th St., San Francisco, 985-

1805 GEARY (AT FILLMORE)


SAN FRANCISCO
SHOW INFO:415-346-6000

FOLLOW THE FILLMORE

Atlas Cafe: 3049 20th St., San Francisco,


648-1047. Quinoa Co-Op, fourth Friday
of every month, 7:30 p.m., free.
Bird & Beckett: 653 Chenery, San Fran-

com.
Origin: 1538 Fillmore, San Francisco, 8250338. OMGF, 9:30 p.m.
Public Works: 161 Erie, San Francisco,
932-0955. Adriatique, Mind Against,
Job Jobse, 9:30 p.m., $15-$25 advance.
Raven: 1151 Folsom, San Francisco, 431-1151.
Club Raven, Every Friday with DJ Mark
Andrus. Free before 11pm., 9 p.m.-2 a.m.,
$10, 431-1151, info@ravenbarsf.com,
www.ravenbarsf.com/.
S.F. Eagle: 398 12th St., San Francisco,

cisco, 586-3733. Chuck Peterson Quintet, fourth Friday of every month, 5:30
p.m., $10 suggested donation per adult.
Jazz Bistro at Les Joulins: 44 Ellis, San
Francisco, 397-5397. Charles Unger
Experience, 7:30 p.m., free.
Top of the Mark: One Nob Hill, 999 California, San Francisco, 616-6916. Black
Market Jazz Orchestra, 9 p.m., $10.
Zingari: 501 Post, San Francisco, 885-

DIIV

NO JOY, SUNFLOWER BEAN


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22

8850. Joyce Grant, 8 p.m., free.

626-0880. Loaded, w/ DJs Dugg,

INTERNATIONAL

C-Pap, Ghost Dad, and guests, fourth

Amnesia: 853 Valencia, San Francisco, 970-

Friday of every month, 8 p.m., $3.

TONIGHT!

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6

HEARTLESS
BASTARDS

PRESERVATION HALL BALL

9942. Future Factory, 10 p.m., $10-$15.

DOORS 7/ SHOW 8 $53. 00

PRESERVATION
HALL JAZZ BAND

SLOTHRUST

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS


BEATS ANTIQUE & MESHELL NDEGEOCELLO

Underground SF: 424 Haight, San Fran-

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27

com/3amDevices.
Wish: 1539 Folsom, San Francisco, 2789474. Back & 4th, w/ resident DJ Jayvi

FEATURING: PLINY THE ELDER...ALL DAY, EVERYDAY


KITCHEN OPEN MON - SAT AT 5:00 PM

10/24 THE GHOST NEXT DOOR


(OAKLAND ALT METAL)

LOWCASTER
10PM $5

10/25 SCHLITZ INDUSTRY NIGHT

10 p.m., free.

$4 SHOTS OF FERNET BRANCA,


$2 SCHLITZ BOTTLES,
$5 SHOTS BULLEIT BOURBON,
$3 STOLI SHAKEY SHOTS

HIP-HOP

John Colins: 138 Minna, San Francisco,


512-7493. 4th Fridays with DJ Lady Char,

10/26

free before 11 p.m.


Mercer: 255 Rhode Island, San Francisco,
938-7173. 80s vs. 90s, w/ resident

10/27

8PM

DJ Mr. E, fourth Friday of every month,

TEQUILA TWO-WHEELED
TUESDAYS

10 p.m., $5 before 11 p.m.

$6 SHOT OF TEQUILA
WITH A CAN OF TECATE

ACOUSTIC

The Chieftain: 198 Fifth St., San Francisco,


615-0916. Ivor Collins, 8 p.m.
The Independent: 628 Divisadero, San
Francisco, 771-1420. William Fitzsim-

sfweekly.com

ART CLOSING PARTY


FOR DAPHNE KNOX

10/28

WHISKEY WEDNESDAYS
$5 PBR AND WHISKEY SHOT

THE FALL OF TROY


KYLESA, POWWERS

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29
DOORS 7/ SHOW 8 $26. 50

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9

SHAKEY GRAVES

COLLECTIVE SOUL

DOORS 7/ SHOW 8 $29. 50

OCTOBER 30 SHOW SOLD OUT!

MAGNETS & GHOSTS

TENNIS

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 10
DOORS 7/ SHOW 8 $28. 50

NOVEMBER 3 & 4

THE RICHARD
THOMPSON TRIO

DOORS 6/ SHOW 7 $80.00

HANSON

ROOTS & ROCK N ROLL

2 NIGHT EVENT
PAUL MCDONALD (NIGHT 1) & CARRICK (NIGHT 2)

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14
DOORS 8/ SHOW 9 $25. 00

PIMPS OF JOYTIME
CON BRIO

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5
DOORS 7/ SHOW 8 $35. 00

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15

DARLINGSIDE

CHRIS STAPLETON

PATTY GRIFFIN

ALL NIGHT LONG

BENDERS BAR & GRILL


415.824.1800
806 S. VAN NESS @ 19TH
MON-THU 4PM-2AM FRI-SUN 2PM-2AM
WWW.BENDERSBAR.COM

DOORS 6:30/ SHOW 7:30 $22. 50

THE ZOMBIES

MOJITO MONDAYS
$5 MOJITOS ALL DAY
AND ASS-END HAPPY HOUR
11 PM TO 2 AM
$1 OFF DRAFT/WELL

fourth Friday of every month, 9 p.m.,

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 8

DOORS 7/ SHOW 8 $39. 50

(RIFF HEAVY STONER ROCK FROM SF)

Velasco, fourth Friday of every month,

THIS
SATURDAY!

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24

DOORS 7/ SHOW 8 $22. 50

0012. Baxtalo Drom, International >>

cisco, 864-7386. Studio 3AM, fourth

MY NAME IS YOU

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25

Temple: 540 Howard, San Francisco, 978-

Friday of every month, 10 p.m., facebook.

ON SALE
FRIDAY!

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27 & THURSDAY, JANUARY 28

DOORS 7/ SHOW 8 $25. 00

THE WALCOTTS

Limit 8 tickets per person. All dates, acts and ticket prices are subject to change without notice. All tickets are subject to applicable service charges. *Advance tickets will still
be available with NO SERVICE CHARGE on Sunday 10:00am to 3:00pm at the Fillmore box office only. Charge by phone at 800-745-3000. Buy tickets at livenation.com.

LETTERS

news

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Arts & Culture

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music |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 45

shimmying for lovers of Balkan music,

BLUES

belly dancers, and burlesque., fourth

LEVYstudio: 19 Heron, San Francisco,

Friday of every month, 9 p.m., $10-$15,

701-1300. Friday Night Blues, weekly

facebook.com/pages/Baxtalo-Drom-

blues dance lessons and DJ party, 8

The-Lucky-Road/509158232438278.

p.m., $11-$15, sundownblues.com/friday-

Bissap Baobab: 3372 19th St., San Fran-

night-blues.html.

cisco, 826-9287. Paris-Dakar African

DJ

Mix Coupe Decale, 10 p.m., $5.

Infusion Lounge: 124 Ellis, San Francisco,

Space 550: 550 Barneveld, San Francisco,


550-8286. Dance Fridays, weekly

421-8700. Flight Fridays, Featuring a

Joyce Manor performs


on Saturday, Oct. 24, at
Slims.

salsa & bachata party, 7:30 p.m., facebook.com/DanceSalsaOnFriday.

guest DJ every week., 6 p.m.-2 a.m., $10$20, 421-8700, info@infusionlounge-sf.


com, sf.infusionlounge.com/.

FOR OUR COMPLETE


SCHEDULE VISIT:

PUNCHLINECOMEDYCLUB.COM

FULL BAR 7 DAYS Happy Hour M-F 12-7pm


open mon-saT aT noon
kiTchen open daily sunday Brunch (11am-3pm)

The Best Comedy Club in The USA! DAVE CHAPPELLE

SubhumanS

SF COMEDY SHOWCASE - EVERY SUNDAY!


TUESDAY 10/27

THURSDAY 10/22 - SATURDAY 10/24

STEPHEN FUREY & FRIENDS

BOBBY SLAYTON

TUESDAY 11/3

DINOSAURS OF COMEDY

THE PITBULL OF COMEDY!

WITH MICHAEL MEEHAN, LARRY BUBBLES


BROWN, JOHNNY STEELE & STEVEN PEARL!

WEDNESDAY 10/28 - SATURDAY 10/31

WEDNESDAY 11/4

ANDY HAYNES

IAN HARRIS

FROM JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE!

FROM CONAN AND FALLON!

WEDNESDAY 11/11 - SATURDAY 11/14

LOUIS KATZ

THURSDAY 11/5 - SATURDAY 11/7

FROM HBO AND COMEDY CENTRAL!

BIG JAY OAKERSON

THURSDAY 11/19 - SATURDAY 11/21

JOEY COCO DIAZ

FROM COMEDY CENTRAL AND IFC!

FROM GRUDGE MATCH


& THE JOE ROGAN EXPERIENCE!

UPSTAIRS AT 444 BATTERY STREET 18 & OVER 2 DRINK MINIMUM

FOR OUR COMPLETE


SCHEDULE VISIT:

COBBSCOMEDY.COM
THURSDAY 10/22

COBBS COMEDY SHOWCASE


SFS BEST LOCAL TALENT!

THE FUNNY DROP

FRIDAY 10/23 - SATURDAY 10/24

WEDNESDAY 10/28

TONY HINCHCLIFFE

SLANTED COMEDY

FROM KILL TONY & JOE ROGAN EXPERIENCE PODCASTS!

THURSDAY 11/12 - SATURDAY 11/14

LUENELL

FRIDAY 11/6 - SUNDAY 11/8


FRIDAY 11/20 - SUNDAY 11/22

FROM BORAT AND THINK LIKE A MAN!

JO KOY

SUNDAY 11/15

VIR DAS

TWO WEEKENDS!

TOP BOLLYWOOD COMEDIAN!

915 COLUMBUS AVENUE (@ LOMBARD) 18 & OVER 2 DRINK MINIMUM


tickets
per person.
tickets
arewith
subject
to
ALL SHOWS: Cover chargeLimit
plus 8two
beverage
minimumAll
18
& older
valid ID
SHOW
applicable
service
charges.
915 COLUMBUS AVENUE ( @ LOMBARD ) , SAN
FRANCISCO
INFO: 415-928-4320
Validated Parking @ Anchorage
Garage,
500
St.
Avoid Online
Fees at
ourBeach
Box Office.

46 |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

LETTERS

news

COVER STORY

the calendar

10114
6TH
THUR AUG
/ STREET
9PM
BASE
10114
6th
street
THUR& MONARCH
AUG
/PRESENT:
9PM
THUR
28 /PRESENT:
9PM
BASE &AUG
MONARCH
OCT 22
COYU
(SPAIN)
MONARCH & BASE PRESENT:
COYU
(SPAIN)
THUR
AUG
14KRAFT
/ 9PM
ELVI
/
KEITH
CANLI, ANTONIO,

BASE
PRESENT:
ELVI&/MONARCH
KEITH KRAFT

RICHIE PANIC
& KIRIN RIDER
COYU
(SPAIN)
RICHIE PANIC,
ANTONIO, CANLI
ELVI / KEITH KRAFT
on & on PreSentS:

H.O.S.H.

Friday, 10/23 9pm $10/$12

soma producTions presenTs

The SaddeST landSCape


STaTe FaulTS
red Wood
ourFaTherS

saTurday, 10/24 9pm Free

deTenTion: preppy vs. punk

arT ShoW,
birThday parTy, dJS

sunday, 10/25 4pm Free


original Famous Twang sundays

ruben diaz

loST dog STreeT band


cruise-in: Bikes, Bands, Booze, BaBes

MARY LYNN RAJSKUB

TUESDAY 10/27

TorSo
KorroSive
CloSeT FiendS

wednesday, 10/28 6pm Free

FROM 24 AND 2 BROKE GIRLS!

SUNDAY 10/25

Thursday, 10/22 8:30pm $15

101 6th street


101 6th street

The WaSTedeadS
CrimSon ghoSTbuSTerS
Sleazy rider
upcoming shows

10/31 - hallorager iv: mongoloid,


BoBB saggeTh, BanqueT as Thin lizzy,
Family maTTers as Tv personaliTies
11/03 - denver Broncos uk, spencer moody, nocTooa
11/06 - TripTides, leviTaTion room, Balms,
mysTery Flavors
11/13 - haTcheT, Fog oF war, hell Fire
11/19 - holly golighTly and The BrokoFFs,
Tom heyman
11/21 - open mike eagle, milo + saFari al,
serengeTi, The genie, BoTTled waTer
12/09 - agnosTic FronT, no limBs, roadside BomBs
12/12 - poison idea, moses, i madman, cheap skaTe
12/16 - Terror, code orange, BiTTer end,
Take oFFense, malFuncTion

theeparkside.com
1600 17th Street 415-252-1330
Arts & Culture

eat

music

EXPERIMENTAL

Audium: 1616 Bush, San Francisco, 771-1616.


Audium 9, 8:30 p.m., $20.
FUNK

Revolution Cafe: 3248 22nd St., San


Francisco, 642-0474. Fourth Fridays
Freestyle Fiesta with MSK.fm, fourth
Friday of every month, www.msk.fm.

PAPA LU / CHEMICAL ALI

FRI AUG 15 / 9PM


FRI AUGJAY
15 / 9PM
JUSTIN
OCT 23

JUSTIN JAY / CULPRIT)


(DIRTYBIRD
FRI
AUG 15 / 9PM
(DIRTYBIRD
CULPRIT)
SEPEHR,
FRITZ
CARLTON
FRI
AUGJAY
29
// 9PM
JUSTIN
SEPEHR, PRESENTS:
FRITZ CARLTON
MONARCH
(DIRTYBIRD / CULPRIT)
RETROBURN
MODS
monarCH & Sweater funk PreSentS:
SEPEHR,
FRITZ
CARLTON
+EGYPTIAN
ROCKERS
UNITED
LOVER
AGAINST
BURNING
MAN
SWEATER FUNK DJS
12 DJS 2 FLOORS

OCT 24

SAT AUG 16 / 9PM


FOuR
SwEATERS
SAT AUG
16 /PRESENTS
9PM
FOuR LOONY
SwEATERSLUAU
PRESENTS
THE
SAT AUG 16 / 9PM
THE AUG
LOONY
DETROIT
SWINDLE
FOuR
SwEATERS
PRESENTS
SAT
30
/LUAU
9PMreunIon:

DETROIT
SWINDLE
THE
LOONY
LUAUWITH
LEON
VYNEHALL
BEATS
4 FREAKS
DJ KRAMER
(DISTRIKT)
LEON
VYNEHALL
MIKE
FRUGALETTI
DETROIT
SWINDLE
BELLS
&
WHISTLES
ALEX WHALEN / JAMES BRENNAN / CHRISTIAN NELSON
VEDDA,
BEAU
KELLY, MARIO DUBBZ
BELLS
& WHISTLES
LEON
VYNEHALL
OCT 25
BELLS & WHISTLES

SOUL

Edinburgh Castle: 950 Geary, San Francisco, 885-4074. Take a Trip: Old Music
for Dance People, w/ DJ John Diaz, 10
p.m., free, facebook.com/takeatripeveryfriday.

SATURDAY 10/24
ROCK

The Independent: 628 Divisadero, San


Francisco, 771-1420. Small Black, 9
p.m., $15.
Slims: 333 11th St., San Francisco, 2550333. Joyce Manor, Girlpool, Dogbreth,
9 p.m., $16-$18.
DANCE

Beaux: 2344 Market, San Francisco, 863-

WEEKLY
SunSet Halloween CoStume Boat after Party:
WERD
SUNDAYS HOUSE & TECHNO
WEEKLY
MIDLAND
PATLAC /
SOLAR / GALEN
/ DIRTY
DAVE /
WERD
SUNDAYS
HOUSE
& TECHNO
WEEKLY
MONDAYS
WEEKLY
WERD N
DJS
WERD
SUNDAYS
HOUSE &NIGHT
TECHNO
WERD
SUNDAYS
TECHNO
ROCK
ROLL INDUSTRY
MONDAYS
10.28 ZEBUEL
10.31 MONTY LUKE
MONDAYS
MONDAYS
ROCK
N ROLL INDUSTRY
NIGHT
TUESDAYS
ROCK
N ROLL LIVE
INDUSTRY
NIGHT
10.29 CONVEXTION
11.5 HOTFIRE
ROCK
N
ROLL
INDUSTRY
NIGHT
SOUNDPIECES
BASE/ELECTRONIC
TUESDAYS
10.30 BLOND:ISH
11.6 FINNEBASSEN
TUESDAYS
TUESDAYS
SOUNDPIECES
BASE/ELECTRONIC
SOUNDPIECES
FOR pRIVATE EVENTS CONTACT
SOUNDPIECES
BASE/ELECTRONIC
MANNY@MONARCHSF.COM

TuESDAY-FRIDAY 5:30 - 8:30

4027. Bleaux, w/ Lindsay Slowhands


& DJ Haute Toddy, fourth Saturday of
every month, 9 p.m.
DNA Lounge: 375 11th St., San Francisco,
626-1409. Bootie S.F., 9 p.m., $10-$20,
bootiesf.com.
The Empire Room: 555 Golden Gate, San
Francisco. Empire Ballroom, 9 p.m.,
$20 before 11 p.m., empireballroomsf.
com.
sfweekly.com

ON SALE
FRIDAY
AT 10AM!

the flaming lips

ratatat * tycho (live + dj set)


gramatik * geographer * xxyyxx
gigamesh * shigeto * worthy
pumpkin * thriftworks
late night radio * mOtion potion

new year's eve - december b1


bill graham civic auditorium

sfweekly.com

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news

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Arts & Culture

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music |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 47

The EndUp: 401 Sixth St., San Francisco,


646-0999. Ibiza Day Club, 2 p.m.,
ibizadayclub.com.

JBoogie plays
Saturday, Oct. 24,
at Mighty.

Jump N Funk, w/ J Boogie and visuals by

626-0880. Sadistic Saturdays, w/

Mark Hines, 10 p.m., $5-$15.

Michael Brandon & DJ Guy Ruben, fourth

Neck of the Woods: 406 Clement, San

Saturday of every month, 10 p.m.

The Knockout: 3223 Mission, San Fran-

Francisco, 387-6343. The Cotton Pony

Showdown: 10 Sixth St., San Francisco,

cisco, 550-6994. Galaxy Radio, w/

Party: A Dance Party for Girls, fourth

255-7920. Loading..., w/ Cali King

resident DJs Smac, Emils, Holly B,

Saturday of every month, 9 p.m., $10,

Crab Productions, fourth Saturday of

and guests, fourth Saturday of every

uhaulsf.com.

every month, 10 p.m., free, facebook.

month, 10 p.m., free, facebook.com/

Q Bar: 456 Castro, San Francisco, 864-

galaxyradiosf.
Lookout: 3600 16th St., San Francisco,
703-9751. Bounce!, 9 p.m., $3.

2877. Buck Wild, w/ resident DJ Becky

HIP-HOP

Knox, fourth Saturday of every month,

Balancoire: 2565 Mission, San Francisco,

9 p.m., $5.

Mighty: 119 Utah, San Francisco, 762-0151.

com/CaliKingCrab.

S.F. Eagle: 398 12th St., San Francisco,

920-0577. Perfect Saturdays, w/ DJs


Beat Thoz & MoMix, 10 p.m.
Mezzanine: 444 Jessie, San Francisco,
625-8880. Lido, 8:30 p.m., $22.
Slate Bar: 2925 16th St., San Francisco,
558-8521. Supa Steezy, w/ DJs Lando1

22 THU

OCT

& Natural, fourth Saturday of every


month, 10 p.m., $5.

MATOMA

ACOUSTIC

LIVING THE DREAM TOUR

Atlas Cafe: 3049 20th St., San Francisco,

23

FRI

OCT

648-1047. Craig Ventresco and/or MereINSIGHT & PUBLIC WORKS PRESENT

ADRIATIQUE MIND AGAINST


JOB JOBSE SOLAR

HALLOWEEN WEEKEND
PUBLIC WORKS & OPULENT TEMPLE PRESENT

CARL COX

30 FRI
PUBLIC WORKS PRESENTS

ADANA TWINS

AUDIOFLY

SHADED live

SATURDAY 10.24

WEDNESDAY 11.4

NONSTOP BHANGRA: DIWALI


FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS CELEBRATION

FAN JAM SESSIONS #1 FEAT. HIRIE

SATURDAY 10.24 - LOFT

ZERO F*CKS: HOUSE OF BASS

HOMECOMING SF: FUNDRAISER FOR


PROJECT HOMELESS CONNECT & HANDUP

MONDAY 10.26

SATURDAY 11.7

LEAKEY FOUNDATION:

PW & FORWARD: MARC HOULE


MARK HENNING ADNAN MIRA

BEING HUMAN W/ DR. ROBERT SAPOLSKY

THURSDAY 11.5

MORE INFO @ PUBLICSF.COM


NEWS

COVER STORY

THE CALENDAR

ARTS & CULTURE

Francisco, 642-0474. West Side Jazz


Club, 4:30 p.m.
Francisco, 440-7414. Nora Maki, 6 p.m.;
The Robert Stewart Experience, 9 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL

991-1015. Pura, 9 p.m., $20, puraclub.

DUBFIRE

LETTERS

Revolution Cafe: 3248 22nd St., San

1015 Folsom: 1015 Folsom, San Francisco,

SAT
PUBLIC WORKS & DEEP BLUE PRESENT

Jazz Bistro at Les Joulins: 44 Ellis, San

NIKOLA BAYTALA

OCT

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

400-0555. Kamikaze Butterfly, 7 p.m.

Sheba Piano Lounge: 1419 Fillmore, San

CASSY CATZ N DOGZ

48 |

Burritt Room: 417 Stockton, San Francisco,

& Jazz Nostalgia, 7:30 p.m., free.

OCT

31

JAZZ

Francisco, 397-5397. Bill Doc Webster

29 THU

OCT

dith Axelrod, Saturdays, 4-6 p.m., free.

EAT

MUSIC

com.
Balancoire: 2565 Mission, San Francisco,
920-0577. Tango Brunch, 11 a.m., $10 for
tango lesson (free dance after 1 p.m.).
Bissap Baobab: 3372 19th St., San Francisco, 826-9287. Paris-Dakar African
Mix Coupe Decale, 10 p.m., $5.
Caffe Trieste: 601 Vallejo, San Francisco,
392-6739. Caffe Trieste Saturday Concert, 2 p.m.
El Rio: 3158 Mission, San Francisco, >>
SFWEEKLY.COM

sfweekly.com

LETTERS

news

COVER STORY

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Arts & Culture

eat

music |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 49

Blind Lemon
Pledge peforms
on Sunday, Oct.
25, at The Pour
House.
James Byfield

282-3325. Mango, fourth Saturday of


DANCE

every month, 3 p.m., $8-$10, facebook.

Beaux: 2344 Market, San Francisco, 863-

com/mangosf.
Make-Out Room: 3225 22nd St., San

4027. Big Top, 9 p.m., free.

Francisco, 647-2888. El SuperRitmo,

The Cellar: 685 Sutter, San Francisco, 441-

w/ DJs Roger Mas & El Kool Kyle, 10

5678. Replay Sundays, 9 p.m., free.


The Edge: 4149 18th St., San Francisco,

p.m., $5-$10.
OMG: 43 Sixth St., San Francisco, 8966374. Bollywood Blast, fourth Saturday of every month, 9 p.m., $10,
facebook.com/FuzionEvnts.

863-4027. Kick It!: 80s at 8, w/ DJ


MC2, 8 p.m.
Elbo Room: 647 Valencia, San Francisco,
552-7788. Dub Mission, Sunday night

Space 550: 550 Barneveld, San Fran-

excursions into the echo-drenched outer

cisco, 550-8286. Club Fuego, 8 p.m.,

realms of dub with resident DJ Sep and

facebook.com/pages/Club-Fuego-

guests, 9 p.m., $6 (free before 9:30

Space-550/216021538521870.
BLUES

Lous Fish Shack: 300 Jefferson, San


Francisco, 771-5687. Willie G, 8 p.m.
The Saloon: 1232 Grant, San Francisco,
989-7666. Dave Workman, fourth Saturday of every month, 4 p.m.
EXPERIMENTAL

Audium: 1616 Bush, San Francisco, 771-1616.


Audium 9, 8:30 p.m., $20.

p.m.), dubmissionsf.com.
The EndUp: 401 Sixth St., San Francisco,
646-0999. Sundaze, 1 p.m., free before 3 p.m.
F8: 1192 Folsom, San Francisco, 857-1192.
Stamina, w/ DJs Lukeino, Jamal, and
guests, 10 p.m., free, staminasundays.
com.
The Knockout: 3223 Mission, San Francisco, 550-6994. Sweater Funk, 10
p.m., free, facebook.com/sweaterfunk.
Lookout: 3600 16th St., San Francisco,

SUNDAY 10/25
ROCK

The Regency Ballroom: 1300 Van Ness


Avenue, San Francisco, 673-5716. Gwar,
w/ Born of Osiris, Battlecross, 7:45 p.m.,
$26.50-$28, www.theregencyballroom.
com/events.

50 |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

LETTERS

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Arts & Culture

eat

music

703-9751. Jock, Sundays, 3-8 p.m., $2.


MatrixFillmore: 3138 Fillmore, San Francisco, 563-4180. Bounce, 10 p.m.,
facebook.com/BounceSundays.
Q Bar: 456 Castro, San Francisco, 8642877. Gigante, 8 p.m., free.
S.F. Eagle: 398 12th St., San Francisco,

sfweekly.com

626-0880. Studio 84, fourth Sunday

Francisco, 550-8667. Lavay Smith &

of every month, 7 p.m., $5.

Chris Siebert, 7:30 p.m., free.

The Stud: 399 Ninth St., San Francisco,

Savanna Jazz Club: 2937 Mission, San

863-6623. Cognitive Dissonance,

Francisco, 285-3369. Savanna Jazz Jam

fourth Sunday of every month, 6:30

with Eric Tillman, Danny Castro, and Nick

p.m., facebook.com/CognitiveDisso-

Fishman, 7 p.m., $5.

nancePresents.

INTERNATIONAL

Bissap Baobab: 3372 19th St., San Fran-

HIP-HOP

cisco, 826-9287. Brazil & Beyond, 7

Boom Boom Room: 1601 Fillmore, San

p.m., free.

Francisco, 673-8000. Return of the

El Rio: 3158 Mission, San Francisco, 282-

Cypher, 9:30 p.m., free.


Double Dutch: 3192 16th St., San Francisco,

3325. Salsa Sundays, second and fourth

503-1670. Select Sundays, w/ DJs

Sunday of every month, 3 p.m., $8-$10.


Revolution Cafe: 3248 22nd St., San

Lando1 & Natural, 10 p.m.

Francisco, 642-0474. The Balkan EveACOUSTIC

The Chieftain: 198 Fifth St., San Francisco,


615-0916. Traditional Irish Session,
6 p.m.

ning, 8:30 p.m.

Natalie Prass
performs on
Monday, Oct.
26, at The
Independent.

Thirsty Bear Brewing Company: 661


Howard, San Francisco, 974-0905. The
Flamenco Room, 7:30 & 8:30 p.m.

The Lucky Horseshoe: 453 Cortland, San


Francisco. Bernal Mountain Bluegrass
Jam, 4 p.m., free.
Plough & Stars: 116 Clement, San Francisco, 751-1122. Seisin, 9 p.m.

sfweekly.com

Ryan Patterson

JAZZ

Docs Lab: 124 Columbus, San Francisco,


649-6191. Electric Squeezebox Orches-

tra, 6 p.m., free.


Jazz Bistro at Les Joulins: 44 Ellis, San
Francisco, 397-5397. Bill Doc Webster
& Jazz Nostalgia, 7:30 p.m., free.

LETTERS

news

COVER STORY

BLUES

Madrone Art Bar: 500 Divisadero, San

Club Deluxe: 1511 Haight, San Francisco,

Francisco, 241-0202. Sunday Sessions,

552-6949. The Luxomatics, 6 p.m., free,

10 p.m., free.

facebook.com/TheLuxomatics.

The Royal Cuckoo: 3202 Mission, San

the calendar

Arts & Culture

eat

The Pour House: 1327 Polk, San Fran- >>

music |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 51

cisco, 440-7662. Blind Lemon Pledge,

COUNTRY

Last Sunday of every month, 7 p.m., free.

Space 550: 550 Barneveld, San Fran-

The Saloon: 1232 Grant, San Francisco,

cisco, 550-8286. Sundance Saloon,

989-7666. Blues Power, 4 p.m.; The

Gay-friendly country dancing, Thurs-

Door Slammers, fourth Sunday of every

days, 6:30 p.m.; Sundays, 5 p.m., $5,

month, 9:30 p.m.

sundancesaloon.org.

Sheba Piano Lounge: 1419 Fillmore, San

MONDAY 10/26

Francisco, 440-7414. Bohemian KnuckBorn of Osiris


performs
on Sunday,
Oct. 25 at
The Regency
Ballroom.

leboogie, 8:30 p.m., free.


Swig: 571 Geary, San Francisco, 931-7292.
Sunday Blues Jam with Ed Ivey, 9 p.m.,
free, facebook.com/swigjam.

SeLL

buY

traDe

neW

CDs

uSeD

LPs

DANCE

Beaux: 2344 Market, San Francisco, 8634027. Opulence, 9 p.m., free.

DVDs bLu-raY bOOkS POSterS

Planet Mu RecoRds

enteRtainMent one

THE STORE
WITH MORE!

Luke Vibert
bizarster

12CD
98

What makes Viberts music so essential


is his rare ability to blur the boundaries
of electronic music by combining his
irresistibly wonky dayglo funk with a
British sensibility. Double-LP: $27.98

13CD

the Game

98

the Documentary 2

An explosive new album from the West


Coast hip-hop legend, The Game.
Featuring an all-star roster of guests
including Ice Cube, Dr. Dre, will.i.am,
Diddy, Kanye West, Drake, & many
others. Also available, The
Documentary 2.5 CD: $13.98

LIVE SHOWS CALENDAR


San FranciSco - ALL SHows ARE FReE & ALL-agES!

Friday October 30 5Pm Dorit cHrySler:


kiD coOl tHereMin ScHOol
Saturday November 28 2Pm tHirD eye BlinD

SELL US YOUR STUFF!


Vinyl, CDs, DVDs, Blu-rays, MusiC Books,
& ViDeo GaMes - HiGhest PriCes PaiD!!

We Buy larGe Collections - Will PiCk-uP! (Call for Details)

SaLe enDS
11/12/15

1855 Haight Street San FranciSco (415) 831-1200


2455 telegrapH avenue Berkeley (510) 549-1125

BUY-SELL-TRADE: DVDS, CDs, LPS, ViDEo gAmES & moRE! HigHEST PRiCES PAiD IN CASH oR TRADE!
PARkiNg IS EAsY! kEzAR STaDiUm LoT iN S.F. (wE VALiDaTe) & SATHER gATe GaRAgE iN BERkeLEY (1ST HoUR FREe!)

ALwaYS Free SHipPIng oN mUSiC & moViES oN AmOEBa.COm!


52 |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

LETTERS

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Arts & Culture

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sfweekly.com

DNA Lounge: 375 11th St., San Francisco,

Francisco, 387-6343. SalsaCrazy Dance

626-1409. Death Guild, 18+ dance

Night, w/ lessons by Evan Margolin, 7

party with DJs Decay, Joe Radio, Melting

p.m., $60/four weeks, www.dancesf.

Girl, & guests, 9:30 p.m., $3-$5, www.

com.

deathguild.com.
El Rio: 3158 Mission, San Francisco, 2823325. Latin Lover, fourth Monday of
every month, 8 p.m., $5.
Madrone Art Bar: 500 Divisadero, San
Francisco, 241-0202. M.O.M. (Motown

REGGAE

Skylark Bar: 3089 16th St., San Francisco,


621-9294. Skylarking, w/ I&I Vibration,
10 p.m., free, facebook.com/ivibesound.
BLUES

on Mondays), w/ DJ Gordo Cabeza &

Balancoire: 2565 Mission, San Francisco,

Timoteo Gigante, 8 p.m., free, www.

920-0577. Bad to the Bone, blues >>

motownonmondays.com.
Oasis: 298 11th St., San Francisco, 9854442. Beat It!: An 80s Night, 8 p.m.,
free.
ACOUSTIC

Amnesia: 853 Valencia, San Francisco,


970-0012. The Pick Bluegrass Jam,
fourth Monday of every month, 6 p.m.,
free, www.thepicksf.com/jam.aspx; The
Earl Brothers, fourth Monday of every
month, 9 p.m., free.
Fiddlers Green: 1333 Columbus, San
Francisco, 441-9758. Terry Savastano,
9:30 p.m., free/donation, www.terrysavastano.com.
Hotel Utah: 500 Fourth St., San Francisco,
546-6300. Open Mic with Brendan
Getzell, 8 p.m., free.
Osteria: 3277 Sacramento, San Francisco,
771-5030. Acoustic Bistro, 7 p.m., free,
www.kcturnerpresents.com.
The Saloon: 1232 Grant, San Francisco,
989-7666. Peter Lindman, 4 p.m.
JAZZ

Burritt Room: 417 Stockton, San Francisco,


400-0555. Terry Disleys Rocking Jazz
Trio, 6 p.m., free.
Jazz Bistro at Les Joulins: 44 Ellis, San
Francisco, 397-5397. Eugene Pliner
Quartet with Tod Dickow, 7:30 p.m., free.
Le Colonial: 20 Cosmo, San Francisco,
931-3600. Le Jazz Hot, 7 p.m., free.
Sheba Piano Lounge: 1419 Fillmore, San
Francisco, 440-7414. City Jazz Instrumental Jam Session, 8 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL

Neck of the Woods: 406 Clement, San


sfweekly.com

LETTERS

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the calendar

Arts & Culture

eat

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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 53

night with Tom Mounsey & guests, Mondays, 7-10 p.m., free.
Elite Cafe: 2049 Fillmore, San Francisco,

ised Land Sound, 8 p.m., $20.

421-8700. Startup Tuesdays, 10 p.m.,

Underground SF: 424 Haight, San Francisco, 864-7386. Shelter, 10 p.m., free,

Aunt Charlies Lounge: 133 Turk, San Fran-

free with RSVP.


Monarch: 101 Sixth St., San Francisco, 284-

673-5483. Fried Chicken & Blues,

cisco, 441-2922. High Fantasy, w/ DJ

9774. Soundpieces, 10 p.m., facebook.

6 p.m.

Myles Cooper, drag performances, more,

com/soundpieces.

The Saloon: 1232 Grant, San Francisco,


989-7666. The Bachelors, 9:30 p.m.

TUESDAY 10/27

DANCE

10 p.m., $5, facebook.com/highfantasy.

Q Bar: 456 Castro, San Francisco, 864-

Beaux: 2344 Market, San Francisco, 863-

2877. Switch, w/ DJs Jenna Riot

4027. Cock Shot, 9 p.m., free.


DNA Lounge: 375 11th St., San Francisco,

ROCK

626-1409. Sequence, 18+ dance party,

The Independent: 628 Divisadero, San


Francisco, 771-1420. Natalie Prass, Prom-

9 p.m., $7-$10, sequence-sf.com.


Infusion Lounge: 124 Ellis, San Francisco,

& Andre, 9 p.m., free before 10 p.m.,

www.facebook.com/shelter.sf.
HIP-HOP

Raven: 1151 Folsom, San Francisco, 431-1151.


Phat Tuesday, w/ DJs Scotty Fox &
Clinton Lee, 8 p.m., free.
ACOUSTIC

facebook.com/switch.sf.

Plough & Stars: 116 Clement, San Francisco, 751-1122. Seisin, 9 p.m.
JAZZ

Burritt Room: 417 Stockton, San Francisco,


400-0555. Terry Disleys Rocking Jazz
Trio, 6 p.m., free.
Club Deluxe: 1511 Haight, San Francisco,
552-6949. Smith Dobson, 10 p.m., free.

Swig: 571 Geary, San Francisco, 931-7292.

Madrone Art Bar: 500 Divisadero, San

Jazz Bistro at Les Joulins: 44 Ellis, San

BoomSwing Tuesdays, w/ DJ Tyler

Francisco, 241-0202. The Crow Eaters,

Francisco, 397-5397. Clifford Lamb, Mel

Ryan, 9 p.m., free, mixcloud.com/DJTR.

7 p.m., free.

Butts, and Friends, 7:30 p.m., free.

H
A
W
L
L E
O E
WK
E E
E N
N D
54 |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

LETTERS

news

COVER STORY

the calendar

Arts & Culture

eat

music

sfweekly.com

Le Colonial: 20 Cosmo, San Francisco,

Pops Bar: 2800 24th St., San Francisco,

931-3600. Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot

872-5160. Tropicana Tuesdays, w/

Skillet Lickers, 7 p.m.

rotating DJs The Whooligan, El Kool

Revolution Cafe: 3248 22nd St., San

Kyle, Mr. Lucky, J-Boogie, Ras Rican,

Francisco, 642-0474. West Side Jazz

and Stepwise, 9 p.m., facebook.com/

Club, 4:30 p.m.; The Pleasure Palace,

TropicanaNight.

fourth Tuesday of every month, 9 p.m.


Verdi Club: 2424 Mariposa, San Francisco,
861-5048. Tuesday Night Jump, w/
Stompy Jones, 9 p.m., $12-$15, tues-

REGGAE

Milk Bar: 1840 Haight, San Francisco, 3876455. Bless Up, w/ Jah Warrior Shelter
Hi-Fi, 10 p.m., $5, jahwarriorshelter.net.

daynightjump.com.

BLUES

Wine Kitchen: 507 Divisadero St., San


Francisco, 525-3485. Hot Club Pacific,

The Saloon: 1232 Grant, San Francisco,


989-7666. G.G. Amos Duo, 4 p.m.

7:30 p.m.

Wine Kitchen: 507 Divisadero St., San


INTERNATIONAL

Francisco, 525-3485. Delta Blues Din-

Balancoire: 2565 Mission, San Francisco,

ner Party, w/ Bill Phillippe, second

920-0577. Noche Tropical, Tuesdays,

and fourth Tuesday of every month,

7-10 p.m., free.

7:30 p.m.

Bombadil performs on
Tuesday, Oct. 27, at Brick
& Mortar Music Hall.

POP

F8: 1192 Folsom, San Francisco, 857-1192.


Underground Nomads, w/ rotating
resident DJs Amar, Sep, and Dulce Vita,
plus guests, 9 p.m., $5 (free before 9:30
p.m.), undergroundnomads.com.
Fort One Bar & Lounge: 2801 Leaven-

Brick & Mortar Music Hall: 1710 Mission,


San Francisco, 800-8782. Bombadil,
w/ Peachelope, and Nym., 9 p.m.-midnight, $10.
SOUL

worth, San Francisco, 671-8081. Echale

Make-Out Room: 3225 22nd St., San

Mas Salsa, 8 p.m., free ($10 with salsa

Francisco, 647-2888. Slow Jams,

lessons), playasf.com.

w/ DJ Primo & friends, 9:30 p.m., free,

sfweekly.com

LETTERS

news

COVER STORY

the calendar

Arts & Culture

eat

music |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 55

Travis Hayes performs


on Wednesday, Oct. 28,
at the Rickshaw Stop.
647-2888.

703-8964. Bondage-A-Go-Go, w/ DJ

WEDNESDAY 10/28

Damon, Tomas Diablo, guests, 9:30 p.m.,


$7-$10, facebook.com/bondageagogoSF.

ROCK

Rickshaw Stop: 155 Fell, San Francisco,


861-2011. A Haunted Concert with Abbot
Daze, Vanwave, and DJ Stefan Aronsen.,

Housepitality, 9 p.m., $5-$10, www.

8-11:30 p.m., $10-$15 door, $10 w/ cos-

housepitalitysf.com.

Slims: 333 11th St., San Francisco, 2550333. FIDLAR, Dune Rats, 8 p.m., $16-

DANCE

Beaux: 2344 Market, San Francisco, 8634027. Pussy Party, w/ Sasha, Ms. Jackson, and guests, 9 p.m., free, facebook.
com/pssypartysf.
Cat Club: 1190 Folsom, San Francisco,
LETTERS

news

COVER STORY

the calendar

Arts & Culture

eat

music

Infusion Lounge: 124 Ellis, San Francisco,


421-8700. Spotlight Wednesdays, 10
p.m., $10.
Lookout: 3600 16th St., San Francisco,
703-9751. What?, 7 p.m., free.

$18.

p.m., $10-$20, eprlife.com.

Kinney, w/ Travis Hayes and the Young

com/events/847328812042656/.

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

339-8686. EPR, 18+ dance party, 9


F8: 1192 Folsom, San Francisco, 857-1192.

tume, 861-2011, https://www.facebook.

56 |

City Nights: 715 Harrison, San Francisco,

Q Bar: 456 Castro, San Francisco, 8642877. Booty Call, w/ Juanita MORE!
and guests, 9 p.m., $3, bootycallwednesdays.com.
Raven: 1151 Folsom, San Francisco, 431-1151.
Wayback Wednesday, w/ DJ Mark

sfweekly.com

Andrus, 8 p.m., free.

Experience, 7:30 p.m., free.

Wish: 1539 Folsom, San Francisco, 278-

Le Colonial: 20 Cosmo, San Francisco, 931-

9474. EQ Wednesdays, 10 p.m., free.

3600. The Cosmo Alleycats featuring Ms.

HIP-HOP

Emily Wade Adams, 7 p.m., free.

Double Dutch: 3192 16th St., San Francisco,

Revolution Cafe: 3248 22nd St., San Fran-

503-1670. West Coast Wednesdays,

cisco, 642-0474. 29th Street Swingtet,

w/ DJs LazyBoy & Mr. Murdock, Last

fourth Wednesday of every month,

Wednesday of every month, 10 p.m., free.

9 p.m.

John Colins: 138 Minna, San Francisco,

Savanna Jazz Club: 2937 Mission, San

512-7493. Mixtape Wednesdays, 10

Francisco, 285-3369. Savanna Jazz Jam

p.m., $5.

with Eric Tillman, 7 p.m., $5.


ACOUSTIC

Plough & Stars: 116 Clement, San Francisco, 751-1122. The Toast Inspectors,
Last Wednesday of every month, 9 p.m.
The Saloon: 1232 Grant, San Francisco,
989-7666. Zach Brough & Friends, 4 p.m.
JAZZ

Amnesia: 853 Valencia, San Francisco,


970-0012. Gaucho, Eric Garlands Jazz
Session, The Amnesiacs, 7 p.m., free.
Balancoire: 2565 Mission, San Francisco,
920-0577. Cats Corner, 9 p.m., $10.

ALL SHOWS ALL AGES


THU OCT 22

SEPULTURA

(30TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR)

W/ ANISOPTERA,
SECTION 5150, ELEKTRIX
FRI OCT 23

THE DOLLYROTS &


GO BETTY GO W/

THE PALACE BALLROOOM,


THE HAMMERBOMBS
SUN OCT 25

MC LARS

W/ KOO KOO KANGAROO,


PECK THE TOWN CRIER
WED OCT 28

Burritt Room: 417 Stockton, San Francisco,

TRICOT

400-0555. Terry Disleys Rocking Jazz

THU OCT 29

Trio, 6 p.m., free.

W/ SAVE US FROM THE ARCHON,

Club Deluxe: 1511 Haight, San Francisco,


552-6949. Patrick Wolff, 10 p.m., free.
Jazz Bistro at Les Joulins: 44 Ellis, San
Francisco, 397-5397. Charles Unger

W/ STRAWBERRY
GIRLS, WANDER

ANGEL VIVALDI

BROTHERHOOD OF ELLIPSIS
FRI OCT 30

DNA LOUNGE AND HUBBA


HUBBA REVIEW PRESENT:

ALL HALLOWS EVE


FRI NOV 6

SWINGIN UTTERS

W/ SUCCESS, THE BOMBPOPS,

ONE LESS ZERO


FRI NOV 6

HOLIDAY MOUNTAIN
W/ EL ELLE, AND SPECIAL GUESTS
SUN NOV 8

DARKEST HOUR

W/ LIGHT THIS CITY,


EARLY GRAVES
SUN NOV 8

ARKAIK W/ BERMUDA,
ENFOLD DARKNESS
TUES NOV 10

JOHN 5 & DOYLE


W/ THE VILE AUGURY
THU NOV 19

EVERCLEAR

(SPARKLE & FADE 20TH


ANNIVERSARY TOUR)
FRI NOV 20

TESSERACT

W/ THE CONTORTIONIST,
ERRA, SKYHARBOR
FRI NOV 20

TAXES W/ JOHN
TRAVOLTAGE, VACANSES,
THE WEATHER MACHINE
TUES NOV 24

GIRL BAND

W/ SPECIAL GUESTS

FRI NOV 27

THE PHENEMONAUTS
W/ FLEXX BRONCO, SLIME GIRLS
SUN NOV 29

AUTHORITY ZERO
W/ EKEN IS DEAD
WED DEC 2

BOOK OF LOVE

375 ELEVENTH ST.


415-626-1409
ADVANCE TIX @
WWW.DNALOUNGE.COM

sfweekly.com

LETTERS

news

COVER STORY

the calendar

Arts & Culture

eat

music |

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 57

Jake Nielsens
Triple Threat
performs on
Wednesday, Oct.
28, at Boom
Boom Room.

Top of the Mark: One Nob Hill, 999 California, San Francisco, 616-6916. Ricardo

DRINKS FOOD MUSIC

OPEN MIC EVERY MONDAY FREE AT 8

INTERNATIONAL

THURS 10/22 7PM $37 ADV / $39 DOOR

Bissap Baobab: 3372 19th St., San Fran-

IRIS DEMENT WITH PIETA BROWN


SAT 10/24 8PM $30 ADV / $32 DOOR

SUPER DIAMOND
THE NEIL DIAMOND TRIBUTE

SUN 10/25 7PM $15 ADV / $20 DOOR

MOONALICE
TUES 10/27 7PM FREE

STEEP RAVINE

eat

music

atalicious, 7 p.m., $5-$10, playasf.com.


Make-Out Room: 3225 22nd St., San
Francisco, 647-2888. International

every month, 10 p.m., free.


BLUES

Boom Boom Room: 1601 Fillmore, San


Francisco, 673-8000. Jake Nielsens
Triple Threat, fourth Wednesday of every
month, 9:15 p.m., $5.
SOUL

Monarch: 101 Sixth St., San Francisco, 2849774. Smoked Out Soul, w/ Zebuel &

(FORMERLY OF TRAIN & PAINBIRDS)

guests, fourth and second Wednesday

WITH THIS OLD EARTHQUAKE,

of every month, 9 p.m., facebook.com/

FOR PRIVATE EVENTS EMAIL: AARON@SWMH.COM


19 CORTE MADERA AVENUE MILL VALLEY, CA
415-388-3850 | SWEETWATERMUSICHALL.COM
Arts & Culture

worth, San Francisco, 671-8081. Bach-

ROB HOTCHKISS

AN EVENING WITH VETIVER

the calendar

Fort One Bar & Lounge: 2801 Leaven-

and Special Lord B, Last Wednesday of

THURS 11/5 9:30PM $20 ADV / $22 DOOR

COVER STORY

5-10 p.m.

FRI 10/30 8PM $35 ADV / $37 DOOR

KIT SMITH & TANYA LIVINGSTONE

news

621-4434. Latin Lounge, Wednesdays,

Bracken, Bobby Ganush, Mark Gergis,

SUN 11/1 7PM $15 ADV / $17 DOOR

LETTERS

The Cafe: 2369 Market, San Francisco,

FAUST & FOX

NEW RIDERS OF THE PURPLE


SAGE HALLOWEEN BASH
FEAT. STEVE KIMOCK

party with DJ WaltDigz, 10 p.m., $5.

Freak Out A Go Go, w/ resident DJs Ben

SAT 10/31 8PM $40 ADV / $42 DOOR

OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

cisco, 826-9287. Baobab!, timba dance

THURS 10/29 7PM $20 ADV / $22 DOOR

NEW RIDERS OF THE PURPLE


SAGE HALLOWEEN BASH

58 |

Scales, Wednesdays, 6:30-11:30 p.m., $5.

smokedoutsoul.
The Royal Cuckoo: 3202 Mission, San
Francisco, 550-8667. Freddie Hughes
& Chris Burns, Every other Wednesday,
7:30 p.m., free.

sfweekly.com

savage LOve

One Last time

By Dan Savage
Im a straight guy, married for 16 years, kids in
school. My wife cannot find a way to be intimate with
me. Weve had therapy individually and together. I
nearly divorced her, but we decided to stay together we do love each other, and the economics and
child-rearing favor it. After I asked for a divorce,
she fucked the shit out of me for the first time in 10
years. That was the last time she fucked me. Shes
broken her word, not mine, and her final answer.
When the subject of affairs came up in the past, she
said, I wouldnt blame you. I could jack off only so
many times before I cracked. I went online and met
a very sexual woman with a strictly NSA thing for
married men, and we fucked. I plan on doing it again.
I know this could go all kinds of bad ways, but divorce
just isnt realistic. We had that one conversation,
but we do not have an explicit understanding. I dont
want to head into my 50s with 10-plus years of celibacy behind me and decades of celibacy ahead of me.
But I want to keep my marriage. Which kind of idiot
am I?

Help Understanding Boundary-Breaking


Yearnings

If I were required to answer particular types


of questions based on the percentage of the mail
they constitute, I would answer two questions
like yours every week, HUBBY. The majority of
the mail I receive is from unhappy people in sexless marriages they either dont want to end (they
have kids, they do love each other, everything
besides the sex is working) or cant afford to end
(they dont have enough money for lawyers or
two households, one depends on the other for
income/health insurance/caregiving).
So which kind of idiot are you? The most common kind, Im afraid.
Im going to take a break from questions like
these from questions like yours, HUBBY because Im sick of the subject and my regular readers must be, too. But for you, HUBBY, and one
last time, heres my advice for people in your situation: Do what you gotta do to stay married and
stay sane. Have a convo with the wife about the
accommodation you require permission to get
it elsewhere to stay in the marriage. Reassure
her that youre prepared to spend the rest of your
life with her while emphasizing that you refuse to
be celibate for the rest of your life. So every now
and then, for your own sanity, and for the greater
good, youre going to have sex with other women. Youll do it discreetly, rarely, and NSA-ly, but
youre gonna do it. If this isnt something your
wife can accept, HUBBY, then your only other
option is divorce.
These are things I (28, gay, male, single) did
last night, and they show how fucked up I am. (1) I
hooked up with a guy off Craigslist. It was lame, he
wasnt cute, I was bored. (2) I came home and went
on Tinder (which says Im looking for an LTR, despite
that hookup). I saw a guy from the gym but he
didnt swipe right, and I was devastated. (3) I went
online and sold a pair of my used undies. I dont know
what Im doing with my life. I could use some advice.
Im sure what you say wont be nearly as bad as what
the voice inside my head is yelling at me.

What Is My Life?

1. I hooked up with this dude once, and it


happened so fast and it was so sleazy that
I had to fish his drivers license out of his wallet
when he was in the shower because I couldnt resfweekly.com

REAL PEOPLE
REAL DESIRE
REAL FUN

member his name. And that sleazy hookup led to


a relationship so good that I wound up marrying
sleazy hookup dude. Twice. So in my experience,
WIML, and the experiences of millions of other people in LTRs with people they fucked the
first time they met, hooking up isnt proof that
someone isnt looking for an LTR. So that underwhelming hookup doesnt make you a hypocrite,
okay?
2. Gym dude isnt into you just like you
werent into the dude you hooked up with last
night. Are you into every dude you see at your
gym? No. Do you swipe right on every dude you
see on Tinder? No. So last night you got rejected
quickly and impersonally Tinder-style but
youve dished out that kind of rejection too. Dont
be a hypocritical baby about it, okay?
3. You made an underpants perv very happy,
WIML, and you made yourself a little money.
Nobody was lied to or misled, no one got hurt,
and the total amount of joy in the world ticked
up slightly. You have nothing to be ashamed of,
okay?
One eventful night does not an out-of-control
sleazebag make. But if you feel out of control,
WIML, take things slower. Resolve to be a bit
choosier about who you hook up with, remind
yourself to be grown-up about rejection when it
comes your way, and refrain from kink-shaming
yourself the next time you make an underpants
pervs day.
Ive come into professional contact with a respected and successful artist. She is a woman in her 60s;
I am a man in my 40s. Im really attracted to women
who are strong, talented, and smart. Shes all that,
and funny. Ive never been attracted to someone that
much older than myself. Nobody bats an eye when
a guy gets with a woman who is 20 years younger,
but how do I pursue her without her thinking I have
some creepy fetish? Am I a creep? I dont think so.
Im pretty average, I have an unusual but boring job
developing woodworking tools, and I dont have any
kinks or fetishes to speak of. Ive gone out of my way
to make her feel special on several occasions, but it
has only caused her to remark on my great customer
service and not in a flirty way. How can I let her
know that I want to move into something else besides
a professional relationship without creeping her out?

CHATLINE TM

415.765.1796

Try for FREE


Ahora en Espaol

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000


www.livelinks.com

Teligence/18+

FREE TRIAL

AMERICAS HOTTEST GAY CHATLINE

1-415-402-1007

Ahora en Espaol/18+

She Makes A Real Turn-on

Set aside the age difference, and how you


met, and those sexist and dehumanizing double
standards. (An older man with a younger woman
is an attractive guy with game, an older woman
with a younger man is a fetish object with no
self-respect.) Set all that aside, SMART, and what
do we have left? Person A is attracted to Person
B; Person A doesnt know how Person B feels, so
Person A has to hit on Person B. Even if Person A
does their best to mitigate the risks of creeping
out Person B Person A is polite, respectful, and
does their hitting on by asking out not by lunging at the risk cannot be entirely eliminated.
Your best bet, SMART, is to be unambiguously
direct with her (I think youre great, and Id love
to take you out on a date) and to invite her to be
unambiguously direct with you (If youre not interested, just say no Im a grown-up and I can
handle rejection). And if shes squicked out by
the age difference or wonders if youre a fetishist,
urge her to google the term sapiosexual.
E-mail Dan Savage: mail@savagelove.net
@fakedansavage on Twitter

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OCTOBER 22-28, 2015

| 59

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62 |

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT
File No. A-0367322-00
Fictitious Business Name(s):
Crescent Restaurant, 561
Valencia St., San Francisco, CA
94110, County of San Francisco
Registered Owner(s):
Duna LLC (CA), 561 Valencia
St., San Francisco, CA 94110
The business is conducted by:
a limited liability company
The registrant commenced to
transact business under the
fictitious business name or names
listed above on 10/15/15.
I declare that all information in
this statement is true and correct.
(A registrant who declares as true
any material matter pursuant to
Section 17913 of the Business
and Professions code that the
registrant knows to be false is guilty
of a misdemeanor punishable
by a fine not to exceed one

thousand dollars ($1,000).)


S/ Nicolaus Balla, Manager
Duna LLC
This statement was filed with
the San Francisco County
Clerk on October 15, 2015.
NOTICE-In accordance with
Subdivision (a) of Section 17920,
a Fictitious Name Statement
generally expires at the end of
five years from the date on which
it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided
in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920,
where it expires 40 days after any
change in the facts set forth in the
statement pursuant to Section
17913 other than a change in the
residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be filed
before the expiration. The filing of
this statement does not of itself
authorize the use in this state
of a Fictitious Business Name in
violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common
law (See Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12/15
CNS-2807030#
SAN FRANCISCO WEEKLY
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT
File No. A-0366584-00
Fictitious Business Name(s):
Its All About You Salon, 4051
18th Street San Francisco CA
94114, County of San Francisco
Registered Owner(s):
Hieu Vu Nguyen, 440 Campbell
Ave., San Francisco, CA 94134
The business is conducted
by: an individual
The registrant commenced to
transact business under the
fictitious business name or names
listed above on 9/2/2015
I declare that all information in
this statement is true and correct.
(A registrant who declares as true
any material matter pursuant to
Section 17913 of the Business

and Professions code that the


registrant knows to be false is guilty
of a misdemeanor punishable
by a fine not to exceed one
thousand dollars ($1,000).)
S/ Hieu Vu Nguyen
This statement was filed with
the San Francisco County
Clerk on September 2, 2015
NOTICE-In accordance with
Subdivision (a) of Section 17920,
a Fictitious Name Statement
generally expires at the end of
five years from the date on which
it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided
in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920,
where it expires 40 days after any
change in the facts set forth in the
statement pursuant to Section
17913 other than a change in the
residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be filed
before the expiration. The filing of
this statement does not of itself
authorize the use in this state
of a Fictitious Business Name in
violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common
law (See Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
10/1, 10/8, 10/15, 10/22/15
CNS-2799884#
SAN FRANCISCO WEEKLY
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT
File No. A-0367018-00
Fictitious Business Name(s):
Aerial Artique, 132 9th St #302, SF,
CA 94103, County of San Francisco
Registered Owner(s):
Aerials Aspen, LLC CA, 132 9th St
#302, San Francisco, CA 94103
The business is conducted by:
A Limited Liability Company
The registrant commenced to
transact business under the
fictitious business name or
names listed above on 8/28/15
I declare that all information in
this statement is true and correct.
(A registrant who declares as true

any material matter pursuant to


Section 17913 of the Business
and Professions code that the
registrant knows to be false is guilty
of a misdemeanor punishable
by a fine not to exceed one
thousand dollars ($1,000).)
S/ ---, Manager
Aerials Aspen, LLC
This statement was filed with
the San Francisco County Clerk
on September 28, 2015
NOTICE-In accordance with
Subdivision (a) of Section 17920,
a Fictitious Name Statement
generally expires at the end of
five years from the date on which
it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided
in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920,
where it expires 40 days after any
change in the facts set forth in the
statement pursuant to Section
17913 other than a change in the
residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be filed
before the expiration. The filing of
this statement does not of itself
authorize the use in this state
of a Fictitious Business Name in
violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common
law (See Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29/15
CNS-2801274#
SAN FRANCISCO WEEKLY
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT
File No. A-0367157-00
Fictitious Business Name(s):
Prospettiva Financial Partners,
465 California Street, #838,
San Francisco, CA 94104,
County of San Francisco
Registered Owner(s):
Rhodes, Pamela, 465 California St,
#838, San Francisco, CA 94104
Sean Fletcher, 465 California St,
#838, San Francisco, CA 94104
The business is conducted
by: A General Partnership

The registrant commenced to


transact business under the
fictitious business name or names
listed above on August 18, 2015
I declare that all information in
this statement is true and correct.
(A registrant who declares as true
any material matter pursuant to
Section 17913 of the Business
and Professions code that the
registrant knows to be false is guilty
of a misdemeanor punishable
by a fine not to exceed one
thousand dollars ($1,000).)
S/ Pamela Rhodes, Member
This statement was filed with
the San Francisco County
Clerk on October 5, 2015
NOTICE-In accordance with
Subdivision (a) of Section 17920,
a Fictitious Name Statement
generally expires at the end of
five years from the date on which
it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided
in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920,
where it expires 40 days after any
change in the facts set forth in the
statement pursuant to Section
17913 other than a change in the
residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be filed
before the expiration. The filing of
this statement does not of itself
authorize the use in this state
of a Fictitious Business Name in
violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common
law (See Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/15
CNS-2805157#
SAN FRANCISCO WEEKLY

(CA) 1000 Brannan St #202,


San Francisco, CA 94103
The business is conducted
by: A Corporation
The registrant commenced to
transact business under the
fictitious business name or names
listed above on 1/16/2008
I declare that all information in
this statement is true and correct.
(A registrant who declares as true
any material matter pursuant to
Section 17913 of the Business
and Professions code that the
registrant knows to be false is guilty
of a misdemeanor punishable
by a fine not to exceed one
thousand dollars ($1,000).)
S/ Idan Tepman, President
Trade Commercial Group, Inc.
This statement was filed with
the San Francisco County Clerk
on September 21, 2015
NOTICE-In accordance with
Subdivision (a) of Section 17920,
a Fictitious Name Statement
generally expires at the end of
five years from the date on which
it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided
in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920,
where it expires 40 days after any
change in the facts set forth in the
statement pursuant to Section
17913 other than a change in the
residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be filed
before the expiration. The filing of
this statement does not of itself
authorize the use in this state
of a Fictitious Business Name in
violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common
law (See Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/15
CNS-2803724#
SAN FRANCISCO WEEKLY
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT
File No. A-0367158-00
Fictitious Business Name(s):
The One Fine Arts, 351

DIRECTOR OF DESIGN RESEARCH


Company: SonicRim Ltd.
Location: San Francisco, CA
Position Type: Full Time

Works for design research consulting firm & interacts at high level w/
client design teams to inspire innovation in product design. Drives
use of info. design & visualization in research & workshops. Leads
project planning, fieldwork to gather data, & in-house analysis. MS in
Interaction Design, HCI, or closely related field; Info. Design coursework;
6 yrs progressive post-MS product design research exp. Ability to apply
info. design & visualization to design research & incite innovation in
products. Email resume to carolyn@sonicrim.com
Faxon Ave., S.F, CA 94112,
County of San Francisco
Registered Owner(s):
Benny Ching Liao, 351 Faxon
Ave., S.F, CA 94112
The business is conducted
by: an individual
The registrant commenced to
transact business under the
fictitious business name or names
listed above on 10-05-2015
I declare that all information in
this statement is true and correct.
(A registrant who declares as true
any material matter pursuant to
Section 17913 of the Business
and Professions code that the
registrant knows to be false is guilty
of a misdemeanor punishable
by a fine not to exceed one
thousand dollars ($1,000).)
S/ Benny Ching Liao
This statement was filed with
the San Francisco County
Clerk on October 5, 2015
NOTICE-In accordance with
Subdivision (a) of Section 17920,
a Fictitious Name Statement
generally expires at the end of
five years from the date on which
it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided
in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920,
where it expires 40 days after any
change in the facts set forth in the
statement pursuant to Section
17913 other than a change in the
residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be filed

before the expiration. The filing of


this statement does not of itself
authorize the use in this state
of a Fictitious Business Name in
violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common
law (See Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/15
CNS-2803404#
SAN FRANCISCO WEEKLY

Commercial Managers Energy


and Infrastructure. Resp for
ensuring long-term financial
success of energy, environment
& large infrastructure projects.
San Francisco, CA. Freestone
International, LLC c/o office@
freestoneinternational.com. Ref: 1A

SAN FRANCISCO MEDIA COM

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT
File No. A-0366905-00
Fictitious Business Name(s):
Soma Commercial, 1000 Brannan
St #202, San Francisco, CA 94103,
County of San Francisco
Registered Owner(s):
Trade Commercial Group, Inc.

SAN FRANCISCO MEDIA COMPANY

SAN FRANCISCO MEDIA COMPANY

EXCELLENT MASSAGE
I like to have fun, relax, and enjoy
myself. Maybe you would too?
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SULLIVAN PROPERTIES, INC.


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D I F F E R E N T. L O C A L . R E L E VA N T.
THE VOICE OF SAN FRANCISCO

The highest circulated newspaper in San Francisco and th

D I F F E R E N T. LO C A L . R E L E VA N T. F R E E
THE VOICE OF SAN FRANCISCO

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