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Sarah

Jarnagin

Table of Contents


Theme Statement

Page 3

Day One

Page 4

Day Two

Page 5

Day Three

Page 6

Day Four

Page 6

Day Five

Page 7

Day Six

Pages 7 and 8

Day Seven

Page 8

Day Eight

Page 8

Day Nine

Page 9

Day Ten

Page 9

Resources
Text Overview

Pages 10-14 and Note Packet


Pages 15 and 16

Theme Statement

The theme of the unit is parallel lines cut by a transversal in high school
geometry. This mostly involves the angles in between and what we can
mathematically prove about them. The goal of this unit is to incorporate as many
different resources as possible to attain a complete understanding of the concepts
revolving parallel lines cut by a transversal. This unit includes a lot of vocabulary
and different theorems so a further goal of this unit is to use a multitude of different
literacy techniques to gain a complete understanding of these words and theorems
as well as how to use them. I selected this theme because geometry in general is
extremely confusing to most students at the high school level. I believe that this is
because of the strong push for thinking about mathematics visually and textually in
a way that is not touched on in any other branch of mathematics. Noting the call for
good literacy instruction in mathematics in general, I chose the relationship
between parallel lines and their transversal to address both the need for an
introduction to different literacy techniques in mathematics and the need for a
better understanding of the concepts in general.
The standards that go along with this unit include literacy standards that
address comparing texts to one another, analyzing an authors purpose, translating
information from visual to text or text to visual, determining the meaning of
symbols, and following precise multi-step procedures. I chose these because I feel as
though these are the standards that mathematics classrooms struggle with on a
regular basis. The content standards addressed in this unit include proving
theorems about lines, defining vocabulary related to lines, and analyzing meaning of
symbols. I chose these standards because proofs and their corresponding theorem
definitions are what students struggle with the most in geometry.
I selected the texts based on my goal of addressing these needs I have
encountered. I chose the newspaper article to show students that mathematics can
be very interesting and mysterious. I chose a video, a game, and a Geogebra file to
engage students visually and interactively. I chose the standard geometry book to
get students to think about how a seemingly evil resource can actually help. I chose
the note packet to assist in student understanding in a way that includes more
scaffolding. Finally, I chose the poem to introduce some fun into the mathematics
classroom and get students to think about the math in a completely different way.
Overall, this unit covers many different literacies and should provide students with
an understanding of geometry that they have never seen before.

Sequence of Lessons

Day One
Student Objective

Iowa Core Curriculum Standard

Students will question the author of a newspaper Analyze the author's purpose in providing an
article through discussion after reading the
explanation, describing a procedure, or
article.
discussing an experiment in a text, defining the
question the author seeks to address.
Students will begin creating a word wall of
Translate quantitative or technical information
important vocabulary words using both visuals
expressed in words in a text into visual form
and text after reading the article.
(e.g., a table or chart) and translate information
expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an
equation) into words.

Display the newspaper article on the board and give handouts to students,
read the article out loud.
Ask students:
o What confuses you the most about this article?
o Do you think this study is accurate?
o What emotions does this article spark in you about learning
mathematics?
o What vocabulary words do you see in the article that you think we
may cover in this upcoming unit?
Begin modeling the creation of a word wall by listing important words from
the article. Discuss prior knowledge of words.
o Planar geometry, parallel lines, Euclidean geometry
Open book to page 98
Complete listing vocabulary words from book and discussing any prior
knowledge of words
o Parallel lines, angle, alternate interior, alternate exterior,
corresponding
o Review from previous lessons (will still put in word wall for
reference): supplementary/linear pair, vertical angles, transversal,
consecutive angles, complimentary angles, perpendicular lines,
converse statements

Day Two

Student Objective

Students will use multiple resources to decode


symbols used to denote mathematical concepts.
Students will use multiple resources to clearly
define vocabulary words discussed in the
previous lesson.
Students will compare and contrast definitions
and explanations of concepts from multiple
different resources.

Iowa Core Curriculum Standard

Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms,


and other domain-specific words and phrases as
they are used in a specific scientific or technical
context relevant to grades 9-10 texts and topics.
Know precise definitions of angle, circle,
perpendicular line, parallel line, and line
segment, based on the undefined notions of
point, line, distance along a line, and distance
around a circular arc.
Compare and contrast findings presented in a
text to those from other sources (including their
own experiments), noting when the findings
support or contradict previous explanations or
accounts.

Watch Khan Academy video clip up until proofs


Ask students
o What did you notice about the way the narrator described the
concepts presented?
o How does this compare to your prior knowledge of these concepts?
Open book to page 98
Have students get in groups of three or four and discuss
o How does the book describe these concepts?
o How does it relate to how Khan Academy described them?
o Using these two resources, come up with one group product of what
you think the best definition for the words presented is.
Come together as a class and share out what was discussed in groups

Day Three
Student Objective

Iowa Core Curriculum Standard

Students will work through three stations using


different resources and compare knowledge
attained from each through discussion.

Compare and contrast findings presented in a


text to those from other sources (including their
own experiments), noting when the findings
support or contradict previous explanations or
accounts.

Hand out stations worksheet (found in resources section) and have


students get out their collaborative definitions
Working in same groups from previous lesson, have students travel around
and work through the three stations leaving time to discuss before switching
Discuss
o How did this station assist in my understanding of the concepts?
o How did this station change my understanding?
o Would I refine my previous definition? Why or why not?
Come together as a class and share out what was discussed
As a class, come up with the most complete definition of each word listed in
the word wall including visuals when necessary and have students document
them in their own word wall

Day Four
Student Objective

Iowa Core Curriculum Standard

Students will compare explanations of concepts


from a note packet to their prior knowledge.

Compare and contrast findings presented in a


text to those from other sources (including their
own experiments), noting when the findings
support or contradict previous explanations or
accounts.
Prove theorems about lines and angles.

Students will work through a note packet to


begin proving basic theorems/postulates about
lines and angles.

Using the note packet, work through page one as a class, discussing the
relationship between prior knowledge and the definitions provided in the
sheet
Think, Pair, Share
o Have students begin to look at example 2 on page 2 of the note packet
o Pair them up to work through example 2
o Come together as a class to discuss answers and issues, if any
As a class, work through the postulate and theorems on page 2
o Recommend another word wall to keep these straight (not required)
Pair up again to work through page three of note packet, scaffolding as
necessary

Day Five
Student Objective

Iowa Core Curriculum Standard

Students will create a poem based on what they


know and want to know about geometric proofs.

Translate quantitative or technical information


expressed in words in a text into visual form
(e.g., a table or chart) and translate information
expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an
equation) into words.
Compare and contrast findings presented in a
text to those from other sources (including their
own experiments), noting when the findings
support or contradict previous explanations or
accounts.

Students will compare their prior knowledge of


proofs to their note packet as well as their book.

Display Fib poem on the board and discuss how mathematics and poetry can
work together
Discuss different types of poetry
Discuss prior knowledge of proofs (should be triangle congruency) and what
students want to learn (beginning of KWL)
Break into groups of two or three and have them open book to page 117
(what does a proof look like?) to compare their prior knowledge and gain
inspiration
Hand out poetry worksheet (found in resources section) and have students
create poem in groups
Once one poem is completed within each group, jigsaw groups to discuss
poems produced and prior knowledge required in each
Share some favorites with the class

Day Six
Student Objective

Iowa Core Curriculum Standard

Students will discuss the relationship between


proofs and the vocabulary from the unit.

Analyze the structure of the relationships among


concepts in a text, including relationships among
key terms (e.g., force, friction, reaction force,
energy).
Prove theorems about lines and angles.

Students will continue to prove


theorems/postulates about lines and angles in a
geometrical way, including algebraic methods
when necessary.

Display note packet page 4 on the board


Work through introduction of converse statements and proofs (page 4) as a
class
Break students into groups of four to work through pages 5 and 6 of the note
packet
o Encourage use of book from page 123 to page 137 for comparison of
explanation of concepts
Come together to discuss the relevance of the understanding of vocabulary
words and theorems/postulates in the process of writing proofs
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Briefly discuss other ways of writing proofs, model a mathematically correct


paragraph proof (remind students that for any work turned in has the
expectation that they show both the two column and paragraph forms of
proofs)


Day Seven
Student Objective

Iowa Core Curriculum Standard

Students will work through multi-step


Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure
geometrical proofs and convert their two-column when carrying out experiments, taking
proofs into paragraph form.
measurements, or performing technical tasks,
attending to special cases or exceptions defined
in the text.
Students will compare geometrical proof
Compare and contrast findings presented in a
techniques of multiple different resources and
text to those from other sources (including their
discuss how each helped shape their
own experiments), noting when the findings
understanding through journaling.
support or contradict previous explanations or
accounts.

Watch Khan academy video from proofs until end


Have students open book to page 123 and discuss in groups how they
compare
Work through pages 7-9 in the note packet in groups, coming together as a
class when necessary to add to word wall or further discuss concepts
Have students individually journal about the different resources used to
understand proofs including which resource they think helped them the
most and why (using mathematically correct language) will collect to check
understanding

Day Eight
Student Objective

Iowa Core Curriculum Standard

Students will compare the poem they created to


their new understanding of concepts to analyze
through journaling what changes they would
make, if any, and why.

Compare and contrast findings presented in a


text to those from other sources (including their
own experiments), noting when the findings
support or contradict previous explanations or
accounts.

Have students work through page 10 of the note packet in partners, coming
together as a class when necessary
Have students get back into the groups they were in to create the poem
Discuss
o What knowledge have you acquired since the creation of this poem?
o What understandings of proofs or other mathematical concepts
addressed in the poem have changed since its creation? (KWL wrap
up)
o What would you change about your poem and why?
Have students individually journal using mathematically correct language
about their group discussion

Day Nine
Student Objective

Iowa Core Curriculum Standard

Students will create a series of city blocks


according to the procedure given and prove the
angles created.

Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure


when carrying out experiments, taking
measurements, or performing technical tasks,
attending to special cases or exceptions defined
in the text.
Translate quantitative or technical information
expressed in words in a text into visual form
(e.g., a table or chart) and translate information
expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an
equation) into words.

Students will create a series of city blocks that


visually represent the concepts of the unit and
create written proofs based on the picture
created.

Have students get with a partner and hand out the Create a City! worksheet
Remind students to email their finished product so they can receive a
corrected version as soon as possible

Day 10
Student Objective

Iowa Core Curriculum Standard

Students will complete a complex city block


problem to check their understanding of lessons
taught in the unit.

Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure


when carrying out experiments, taking
measurements, or performing technical tasks,
attending to special cases or exceptions defined
in the text.

Students will each be given my set of city blocks (displayed on


board/individual computers) and be asked to find all angles listed and prove
them (directions on assessment)
After everyone has completed, come together as a class to discuss the
triangle within the assessment
o What was the sum of its angles?
o How did you find this?

Resources


Khan Academy video- https://www.khanacademy.org/math/basic-geo/basic-geo-
angles/basic-geo-angle-relationships/v/angles-formed-by-parallel-lines-and-
transversals

Geogebra visual- https://tube.geogebra.org/material/simple/id/745651

Exploring Parallel Lines game-
http://www.learnalberta.ca/content/mejhm/index.html?l=0&ID1=AB.MATH.JR.SH
AP&ID2=AB.MATH.JR.SHAP.ANG&lesson=html/object_interactives/parallel_lines/u
se_it.html

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STATIONS
Today we will be going through three different stations that involve the vocabulary
we have been learning! Please bring your word wall with you so you can update or
refer to it at any point in each station.

Station 1-Partner Transcription
This station requires one partner. You may not use your word wall to cheat!
1. Sit back to back with your partner. Each of you should have a whiteboard and
a marker to play!
2. Refer to your list of words on your word wall. One partner will give the other
partner a word from that word wall and the listener must depict the
definition of the word visually.
a. If the listener is incorrect, he/she must write out the definition of the
word in a different way than stated in the word wall to gain a better
understanding.
b. If the listener is correct, discuss how you might have drawn the
picture differently or if not, discuss why.
c. Switch partners each turn.
3. If there is time, try the same words by describing the picture to the listener to
have them produce the theorem or vocabulary word!

Station 2- Geogebra Exploration
https://tube.geogebra.org/material/simple/id/745651

Use the website listed above to access the worksheet we will interact with at this
station!
1. Open the Geogebra file and take note of which vocabulary words the
worksheet covers and which it does not. Why do you think this is so? Would
it make sense to use all of our vocabulary words on this worksheet? Why or
why not?
2. Use the provided boxes to explore the worksheet and see how this particular
student understood the concepts provided. Would you change the way this
worksheet is set up? Why or why not?
3. Write a short but detailed journal entry of how this applet assisted in your
understanding of these concepts, or, if it did not, why you think that is so.

Station 3- Exploring Parallel Lines Game
http://www.learnalberta.ca/content/mejhm/index.html?l=0&ID1=AB.MATH.JR.SH
AP&ID2=AB.MATH.JR.SHAP.ANG&lesson=html/object_interactives/parallel_lines/u
se_it.html

Use the website listed above to find and play the game!

When you have completed the game, please write a short but detailed review of
what aspects of the game helped you and why, or, if it did not, why you think that is
so. Be sure to use mathematically correct knowledge in all write-ups!

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Poetry and Mathematics



A FIB is a poem whose lines have syllable-counts that follow the pattern of the
Fibonacci numbers: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, . . .

An example by JoAnne Growney:

If
two
angles
both are right
angles then they are
supplements and are congruent.
Math
and
also
poetry
my favorite things.
Both extend me beyond myself.


This is just one example of the many different kinds of poems!


Your task is:
1. Get into a group of no more than three and research different kinds of poems.
(i.e. haiku, sonnet, quatrain, etc.)
2. Choose one style and create a poem about your prior knowledge of
mathematical proofs and, if you can, incorporate some vocabulary from this
unit as well. Be sure to also include things that you would like to learn about
proofs in the future.
3. Only complete one poem per group. Make sure each group members
name is included on your final product and remember to use mathematically
correct language throughout!



Do not be afraid! Take a leap of faith and have fun!

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Create a City!

With a partner, you will be constructing a series of city blocks
and proving the angles within them using Geogebra!

https://www.geogebra.org/

1. Click Start Geogebra

2. Click Geometry

3. Construct a rectangle to encase your city

4. Use parallel, perpendicular, and transversal lines to
create a set of city blocks (no more than 6 blocks please)

5. Color code the congruent angles that you have created

6. Prove why the angles are congruent using both the two-
column method and the formal paragraph method

7. Use the measurement tool to measure one angle, then
find the rest of the angle measurements based on your
proofs from above

8. Email me your finished product!

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Final Assessment

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Text Overview


Whole Class
CME Geometry Textbook: Published by Pearson Education in 2009 (Curriculum
Library)

This book is a classic geometry textbook that would be used in a classroom
setting. There are multiple sections within the book that pertain to my unit
plan and I believe that the way these authors describe some of the concepts
is beneficial to student understanding and definitely worth comparing to
other resources as well. This book is used on pages 3, 4, 6, and 7 of the unit
plan.


Newspaper Article
Learning Geometry Without a Protractor by Sindya N. Bhanoo (New York Times
May 24, 2011)
This newspaper article discusses a study done on indigenous groups in the
Amazon. Researchers asked these groups if a line can be made to cross two
other parallel-looking lines. The results showed that these isolated groups
actually understood the concept to a certain extent mirroring American
children who did have formal geometry training. This brings up the question
of whether or not geometry understanding is innate. This is the opener for
my unit plan, as I am hoping that it gets students to question how hard
geometry really is, especially when it comes to parallel lines. It is also a very
interesting piece of literature that will spark good conversation about the
authors purpose in general. It is used on page 3 of my unit plan.

Poem
Fib poem by JoAnne Growney (Poetry with Mathematics Workshop July 29, 2012
http://poetrywithmathematics.blogspot.com)
This is an example of a mathematical poem that even uses the Fibonacci
sequence as a structure for the poem. The poem itself even uses a vocabulary
word that we touch on in this unit plan. I am showing students this poem to
spark their inspiration to create their own mathematically correct poem. This
poem is used on page 6 of my unit plan.

Online Texts
Angles Formed by Parallel Lines and their Transversals by Khan Academy
(https://www.khanacademy.org/math/basic-geo/basic-geo-angles/basic-geo-
angle-relationships/v/angles-formed-by-parallel-lines-and-transversals)

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This is a video describing the concepts that the unit plan is addressing. I use
this video throughout the unit plan to compare other resources to and
hopefully to assist in student understanding. Khan Academy is widely known
throughout high schools as a great tool so I figured integrating it into the
classroom and comparing the textbook to it will help students gain a better
understanding of the concepts and in which ways they learn best. This video
describes the concepts in a very different way and also provides live visual
connections as well to assist in the understanding of the relationship
between the text and corresponding visuals. This video is used on pages 4
and 7 of my unit plan.


Geogebra Visual by Lindsay Flannagan and Rachel Phillips
(https://tube.geogebra.org/material/simple/id/745651)
This Geogebra applet allows students to interact with just the visual of the
vocabulary words discussed in the unit. This is beneficial because students
are not shown definitions; they have to remember them while they explore
what this applet has to offer. It is another visual to assist in a complete
understanding of the concepts provided. This is used on pages 4 and 5 in the
stations activity for day three of my unit plan.

Exploring Parallel Lines Math Interactions (game)
(http://www.learnalberta.ca/content/mejhm/index.html?l=0&ID1=AB.MATH.JR.SH
AP&ID2=AB.MATH.JR.SHAP.ANG&lesson=html/object_interactives/parallel_lines/u
se_it.html)
This resource is an interactive game that has students answer questions
about the vocabulary discussed throughout the unit based on a picture
provided. It is a very fun game that is not too difficult and allows for students
to laugh about productive failure. This is also used on pages 4 and 5 in the
stations activity for day three of my unit plan.

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