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ELEMENTARY SURVEYING FIELD

MANUAL

FIELD WORK NO. 8


DETERMINATION OF THE HEIGHT OF A
REMOTE POINT
CE120-0F / A1

SUBMITTED BY:
NAME:

STUDENT NO.:

GROUP NO. 4
DATE OF FIELD WORK: AUGUST 14, 2014
DATE OF SUBMITTION: AUGUST 28, 2014

SUBMITTED TO:
PROFESSOR: ENGR. CERVANTES

GRADE

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FIELD WORK NO. 8 DETERMINATION OF THE HEIGHT OF A REMOTE POINT

FINAL DATA SHEET


FIELD WORK 8

DETERMINATION OF THE HEIGHT OF A REMOTE POINT

DATE: AUGUST 14, 2014


TIME: 8:00AM 10:30AM
WEATHER: SUNNY

GROUP NO.: 4
LOCATION: BONIFACIO SHRINE
PROFESSOR: ENGR. CERVANTES

A. HEIGHT OF A REMOTE POINT


STATION
A
(TELESCOPE
NORMAL)
A
(TELESCOPE
INVERTED)
STATION
B
(TELESCOPE
NORMAL)
B
(TELESCOPE
INVERTED)

ANGLE

MEAN ANGLE

90

HEIGHT OF
INSTRUMENT

MEAN HEIGHT
OF INSTRUMENT

1.535 m
2341

1.535 m

6619
ANGLE

1.535 m
MEAN ANGLE

90

HEIGHT OF
INSTRUMENT

MEAN HEIGHT
OF INSTRUMENT

1.71 m
3721

5239

1.71 m
1.71 m

DISTANCE AB = 6.67 m

COMPUTED HEIGHT OF THE

HORIZONTAL DISTANCEBC = 9.88 m

REMOTE POINT:

HORIZONTAL DISTANCEAC = 16.55 m


Mean Angle = NormalB InvertedB
Mean Angle = 90 - 5239
B. COMPUTATIONS:

Mean Angle = 3721

Mean Angle = NormalA - InvertedA


Mean Angle = 90 - 6619
Mean Angle = 2341

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FIELD WORK NO. 8 DETERMINATION OF THE HEIGHT OF A REMOTE POINT

Remote Point1 = HDAC tan(MA) + HIA


Remote Point1 = 16.55 m tan(2341) + 1.535 m
Remote Point1 = 8.7942 m

Remote Point2 = HDBC tan(MA) + HIB


Remote Point2 = 9.88 m tan(3721) + 1.71 m
Remote Point2 = 9.2502 m

Mean Height of Remote Point =

Mean Height of Remote Point =

Remote Point 1 + Remote Point 2


2
8.7942 m + 9.2502 m
2

Mean Height of Remote Point = 9.022 m

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FIELD WORK NO. 8 DETERMINATION OF THE HEIGHT OF A REMOTE POINT

SKETCH

Measuring the distance from the flagpole to the theodolite.

Setting up the theodolite.


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FIELD WORK NO. 8 DETERMINATION OF THE HEIGHT OF A REMOTE POINT

Reading the height of the instrument and the height of the remote point.

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FIELD WORK NO. 8 DETERMINATION OF THE HEIGHT OF A REMOTE POINT

DISCUSSIONS
How to Use the Theodolite
In Surveying 2 we use a theodolite to determine (read) both horizontal and
vertical angles to an accuracy of 20" and mark out the buildings on College ground
using theodolite and tape (Module requirements). A theodolite is an instrument for
measuring both horizontal and vertical angles. It consists of a telescope mounted
movably within two perpendicular axes, the horizontal and vertical axis. All students
have to use the Sokkia instrument as that is the only one in our department. Using the
same instrument students can learn from each other how to read scales and use all the
feature of the theodolite.

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FIELD WORK NO. 8 DETERMINATION OF THE HEIGHT OF A REMOTE POINT

The Axes and Circles of a Theodolite


A theodolite can measure angles in both the horizontal and vertical planes.
How accurately this can be will depend partly on the quality of the instrument, and partly
on the competence of the student.
A theodolite may not be in perfect adjustment and the lines and planes should
be checked. To minimize error as much as possible, an angle is measured a number of
times with instrument: face left (vertical circle on the left of the telescope) and face
right (vertical circle on the right of the telescope). Reading an angle face right and face
left will eliminate the errors due to the non adjustment of the line of collimation and the
trunnion axis.

Procedures to measure vertical and horizontal angles


Aim at the first specified corner of the building and zero the horizontal circle
reading. Readings for horizontal angles should be either in a clock wise or anti clock
wise direction. Do not change directions and close the circle at 360. Then read the
vertical angles (angle of elevation & angle of depression) to determine the height of the
corner of the building. Make sure the sighting points are vertical above each other. After
that sight the next specified corner and read the horizontal angle, and note the reading
of the vertical angles. The horizontal distance between all specified building corners
must be exactly measured. (Note the distance to angle A is different to angle A.)
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FIELD WORK NO. 8 DETERMINATION OF THE HEIGHT OF A REMOTE POINT

Continue reading horizontal and vertical angles as well as distance measures until the
specified corners of all buildings are completed.

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FIELD WORK NO. 8 DETERMINATION OF THE HEIGHT OF A REMOTE POINT

CONCLUSION
On this field work, we tried to determine the height of a remote point, by applying
the knowledge we have learned in analyzing right triangles using an instrument called
theodolite. Based on the data gathered, the height of the remote point we have
observed has a height of 9.022 m from the ground.
According from the lecture being discussed, the height of a remote point solved
from place to place should have value since the flagpole that was being observe was
the same all throughout the fieldwork. The common sources of error on this field work
are the inaccurate reading of measurements, human errors and instrumental errors.
Human errors include reading the height of the remote point even if the bubble is not yet
on the center and not reading the measurements on the theodolite accurately. While
instrumental errors include if the instrument/s used for getting the data in the field work,
which is a theodolite for this field work, is/are defective.
It is recommended to have patience in doing the field work because this field
work has so much part and a lot to be done and the allotted time was also minimal. Also
check first if the measuring tape is completely perpendicular to the ground before
recording the measurement to lessen the error that might be acquired. Using a plumb
bob is also recommended to see if the measuring tape is perpendicular to the ground.
Team work is also required for this experiment because everyone has their assigned
task to do to finish the field work on time. Follow the instructions on the manual carefully
to avoid errors.

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FIELD WORK NO. 8 DETERMINATION OF THE HEIGHT OF A REMOTE POINT

QUESTIONS AND PROBLEMS

1. What are the advantages/disadvantages of breaking the tape method in


measuring horizontal distance of a sloping terrain?

Its advantage is, more accurate but also depends on the difficulty of the terrain.
And as in add breaking the tape method is faster and less mathematical based data. Its
disadvantages are breaking the tape method is hard when there is such a sloping in a
terrain or a substance that hindrances the straight path.

2. Give other methods in measuring the horizontal distance between two points.

The most accurate is the measurement of TDS total distance system, we can
also use the Pythagorean theorem in determining the angle, we can also use law of
cosine, law of sine, break the tape method, abney hand level, parallel distance
measurement and many other formulas.

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