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How to Write a Critique

Capitalization

What is a critique?

Builds upon a summary

a formalized, critical reading of a passage that includes a


personal response

purpose is to turn a critical reading of a passage into a


systematic evaluation to deepen a readers
understanding of that passage

Addresses two broad questions

To what extent does the author succeed in his/her purpose?


To what extent do you agree with the author?

How to Organize a Critique


1. Introduction

identify the article title and author


provide background information that answers one or
more of the following questions:

Why is the subject of current interest?


How or why is the subject of the passage controversial?
What is the authors background?
Under what circumstances was the passage written?

include a specific thesis statement

How to Organize a Critique


2. Summary

summarizes the authors main points and purpose for


writing

is brief, complete, objective, and avoids plagiarism

How to Organize a Critique


3. Assessment of presentation

essay objectively assesses the validity of the authors


presentation by commenting on the authors success in
achieving his/her purpose by reviewing 3 or 4 specific
points

How to Organize a Critique


3. Assessment of presentation

The specific points are based upon the following


criteria:

Is the information accurate?


Is the information significant?
Has the author clearly defined terms?
Has the author used and interpreted information
fairly? Has the author argued logically?

How to Organize a Critique


4. Personal response to the
presentation

Essay responds to the authors views


Essay discusses reasons for agreement and/or
disagreement
Questions to answer include:

With which views do you agree? Why?


With which views do you disagree? Why?

How to Organize a Critique


5. Conclusion

states conclusions about the overall validity of the


article
assesses authors success at achieving aims
mentions personal reactions to authors views
restates the thesis by mentioning the
weaknesses/strengths of passage

In Groups

Read and grade critique sample essays

Capitalization

Capitalization
Always capitalize the first word in a
direct quote.
The manager yelled, be quiet or get out!
When a quote is broken, the second
part is not capitalized unless it is a
new sentence.
Lets not, he stated, Make any quick
decisions.

Capitalization
Capitalize a persons name (or initials)
and any title that comes before the
name.
At that point senator h.b. Jones and
doctor joyce ray entered the room.
Always capitalize the days of the week
and months of the year. Do NOT
capitalize the seasons.
His birthday is friday, october 2, but mine is in
the Summer.

Capitalization
Always capitalize the names of races,
nationalities, languages, and religions.
The african american man was a baptist
and the spaniard was a catholic.
Capitalize words describing the Deity
God, the Savior, the Lord, Jehovah
and holy books
Catholics study the bible.

Capitalization
Do not capitalize the nonspecific use of
the word god.
The word polytheistic means the
worship of more than one God.
Always capitalize geographical areas,
but not directions.
He found the pace of life slower in the
south than in the north.
He was traveling South on the interstate.

Capitalization

Capitalize the first word and other important


words in the name of abook, play, poem, or
song.
Jerrys favorite book is the catcher in the rye.
Capitalize the name of historic events and
periods. Do not capitalize century numbers.
It is often said that the second world war ushered in
the atomic age.

Capitalization

Capitalize the names of specific


buildings, specific places, specific
organizations, and specific things.
Radio city music hall is located in new
york city.

For Tuesday

Review rules for capitalization, shifts, run-ons, fragments


(Not due til Thursday 9/29) Read the articles:
A Cloudful of Stormy Weather by Harold Arlen & Ted
Koehler
How to Talk and Write about Popular Music by Greg Blair
Comparing & Contrasting Three Covers of Stormy Weather
by Greg Blair
Why Do Some Covers Disappoint? by Jeff Turrentine
The Greatest Covers of All Time
Answer these questions about the articles:
Is the information accurate?
Is the information significant?
Has the author clearly defined terms?
Has the author used and interpreted information fairly? Has
the author argued logically?
With which views do you agree? Why?
With which views do you disagree? Why?