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DEPED

LUNGSODAAN NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL


LUNGSODAAN HINUNDAYAN SOUTHERN LEYTE
SCHOOL ID: 303466

PERFORMANCE TASK
IN SCIENCE 8
( TYPHOON )

SUBMITTED BY: ALYNNA EBONY M. TERANTE

SUBMITTED TO: MR. CRISANTO GARZON

DATE: OCTOBER 3, 2016

I. INTRODUCTION
( ALL ABOUT TYPHOON )

Typhoons are a type of cyclone, a low-pressure storm with the winds swirling around the
center. They commonly occur in Southeast Asia, in countries such as the Philippines,
Taiwan, Vietnam, Hong Kong, Malaysia and even as far north as Japan.
Like tornadoes, typhoons happen when warm air mixes with cold air, creating intense
wind, rain and flooding. Typhoons occur in Pacific Ocean around Hawaii and Asia.
Typhoons most commonly form during late summer over warm seas before moving
west toward land. The low-pressure center of a typhoon is called an eye. The eye is 10
to 40 miles wide, and winds blow counter clockwise around it.
Winds in typhoons have speeds of at least 74 mph. just outside the eye of the storm,
they reach speeds of 110 mph.
To be classified as a typhoon, a storm must reach wind speeds of at least 74 miles per
hour (119 kilometer per hour). If a typhoon hits 150 miles per hour (241 kilometers per
hour) it becomes a super typhoon.
Typhoons bring heavy rain and often devastating winds when they are over land. After
large typhoons, extensive cleanup efforts are required to clear debris and rebuild
structures.

II. DIFFERENT HAZARDS BROUGHT BY TYPHOON

Hazards may be categorized into natural and anthropogenic hazards. Climate and
weather-related hazards, such as typhoons and droughts, as well as geophysical
hazards, like earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and tsunamis, are natural hazards.
A natural hazard or natural process like typhoon is potentially damaging in that it may
result in loss of life or injury, loss of property, socio economic destruction or
environmental degradation. Typhoons causes flood that results to destruction of
property and loss of life. Sometimes, typhoons also causes storm surge that destroyed
many buildings and houses and also loss of life.
The destruction from a tropical cyclone depends mainly on its intensity, its size, and its
location. Tropical cyclones act to remove forest canopy as well as change the
landscape near coastal areas, by moving and reshaping sand dunes and causing
extensive erosion along the coast even well inland, heavy rainfall can lead to mudslides
and landslides in mountainous areas.
Climate- and weather-related hazards, in particular, refer to the direct and indirect
effects of observed changes and/or projected deviations from present-day conditions of
natural climate events (such as increases and decreases in precipitation and
temperature); and impacts of changes in the frequencies and occurrences of extreme
weather/climate events (such as tropical cyclones)

III. TOP 10 TYPHOONS


(DEVASTATING TYPHOONS THAT HIT THE PHILIPPINES)

10. TYPHOON FRANK


(Fengshen) June 2008
The ferry MV Princess of the Stars capsized off the coast of San Fernando, Romblon at
the height of Typhoon Frank, killing more than 800 people.
Death Toll: 938 dead
Wind Speed: 205 kilometers per hour
Region Affected: Luzon, Visayas
Frank is now retired and replaced by the name Ferdie.
9. TYPOON SISANG
(Nina) November 1987
Sisang was the worst typhoon that stuck the Philippines in 17 years, since Yoling
(Patsy) in 1970.
Death Toll: 979 dead
Wind Speed: 270 kilometers per hour
Region Affected: Luzon
Sisang is now retired and replaced by the name Sendang.
8. TYPHOON AMY
December 1951

Amys landfall coincided with the eruption of Mt. Hibok-Hibok on Camiguin Island,
causing disruption to volcanic relief operations and displacing evacuees who evacuated
due to the volcanic eruption.
Death Toll: 991 dead
Damage: 30 million US dollars (1951 exchange rate)
Wind Speed: 220 kilometers per hour
Region Affected: Visayas
7. TYPHOON TRIX
October 1952
Death Toll: 995 dead
Wind Speed: 220 kilometers per hour
Region Affected: Bicol
6. TROPICAL STORM SENDONG
(Washi) December 2011
Death Toll: 1200 dead
Damage: 1.6 billion pesos
Wind Speed: 95 kilometers per hour
Region Affected: Mindanao
5. TYPHOON NITANG
(Ike) September 1984
Death Toll: 1440 dead
Damage: 1 billion dollars or 16.7 billion pesos (1984 exchange rate)

4. TROPICAL DEPRESSION WINNIE


November 2004
Not long after Winnie devastated the Philippines, the country was by another, more
powerful tropical cyclone Typhoon Yoyong (Nanmadol) killed 70 people.
Death Toll: 1500 dead/missing
Damage: 678 million pesos
Wind Speed: 55 kilometers per hour
Region Affected: Southern Luzon
Winnie is now retired and replaced by the name Warren.
3. TYPHOON PABLO
(Bopha) December 2012
Typhoon Pablo was considered as the strongest cyclone to ever hit Mindanao.
Death Toll: 1100 dead, 800 missing
Damage: 42 billion pesos
Wind Speed: 280 kilometers per hour
Region Affected: Mindanao
Pablo is now retired and replaced by the name Pepito.
2. TROPICAL STORM URING
(Thelma) November 1991
Through Urings wind speed was weak, it was the tremendous rainfall it produced. It
also struck the Philippines just 5 months after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo.
Death Poll: 5000 8000 dead/missing

Damage: About 27.67 million dollars or 1.23 billion pesos (1991 exchange rate)
Wind Speed: 85 kilometers per hour
Region Affected: Visayas
Uring is now retired and replaced by the name Ulding.
1. TYPHOON YOLANDA
(Haiyan) November 2013
Supertyphoon Yolanda is the deadliest typhoon that struck the Philippines and
considered as one of the most powerful cyclones ever recorded.
Death Toll: 6340 dead, 1061 missing
Damage: 89 billion pesos
Wind Speed: 315 kilometers per hour
Region most affected: Eastern Visayas
Yolanda is now retired and replaced by the name Yasmin.

IV. PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES


A. PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES
Before A Typhoon
1. Check and fix your house for any damage so that it will withstand strong winds.
2. Stock up an adequate supply of food.
3. Prepare flashlights, batteries, candles, and kerosene lamps.
4. Have a first-aid kit with enough medical supplies.
5. Keep a radio to tune in to news eve when there is no electricity.
6. Check and clean your community drainage systems to prevent flood.
7. Check your electric posts to prevent accidents.
8. Remind family members to cut all the branches of trees around your house that could
possibly fall on your house.
9. Help check all electrical warnings.
10. Teach younger members of your family what to do during a typhoon.
11. Pack a bag with clothes, batteries, flashlight, water, canned goods and other
necessities, in case you have to evacuate.
During Typhoon
When a typhoon comes, it is essential that you stay calm and you must know what to
do.
1. Stay calm and be alert.
2. Stay indoors. Postpone any travel.
3. Always tune in to the latest weather report. Check what is happening in your
surroundings.
4. Heed the advice of the local authorities if they ask you to evacuate the area.
5. If you happen to be outdoors when a typhoon comes, (a) stay away from electric
posts and wires; (b) never stand under a lone tree in an open field to avoid being hit by
lightning; (c) never fix your TV antenna during a thunderstorm; (d) stay away from boats
and from bodies of water.

After Typhoon
When the typhoon is over, there are still things that we should do.
1. Have a knowledgeable person to inspect electrical connections before using electrical
appliances.
2. Check your house for damage and make necessary repairs at once.
3. Boil water before drinking it to avoid diseases.
4. Avoid electrical wires that have fallen.
5. Wear slippers, shoes or other footwear, for protection from any sharp or pointed
objects that might have fallen.
6.Clean and clear everything damaged by the typhoon,
7. Stay in a safe place with the means of escape.

B. List of Activities that you are going to do or attend to be ready of any


typhoons.
1. Build an emergency kit.
2. Create and practice a plan of action for your family.
3. Consider installing shingles rated by UL 2218 or FM 473 as Class 3 or 4.
4. Maintain trees and shrubbery in your yard.
5. Replace rock or gravel landscaping material in your yard.
6. Stay tuned to local radio and TV stations for important weather updates.
7. Identify the safest area of your home.
8.Identify scape routes from your home or neighborhood.
9. Secure top-heavy furniture that could topple over.
10. Stay away from windows and doors when the storm arrives.

V. PICTURES
(Negative Effects of Typhoons)

VI. REFERRENCES

www.ehow.com/facts-5479398-typhoons.html
easyscienceforkids.com/all-about-typhoons-and-hurricanes/
vm.observatory.ph/hazard.html
guides.wikinut.com/Precautionary-Measures-Before,-During-and-After-aTyphoon/x1cwj3g5/
infiniteknowledge.expertscolumn.com/article/precautionary-measures-we-followduring-and-after-typhoon
www.gov.ph/laginghanda/government-information-during-natural-disasters/
news.naturalgeographic.com/news/2013/11/131107-typhoons-pacific-naturaldisasters/
tenminutes.ph/10-deadliest-typhoons-in-the-philippines/
https:llen.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effects-of-tropica-cyclones
http://www.mnn.com/family/protection-safety /sponsorstory/10-ways-to-preparefor-tornadoes-strong-winds-and-hailstorms