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ETV

ETV
Launched in April 2000 as the country's first private terrestrial TV channel, Ekushey Television (ETV)
covered half the country's population and turned out to be the most popular channel offering brisk,
highly professional, and path-breaking programmes.
The channel sparked a revolution in television journalism. The objective, deeply analytical,
interpretative and investigative reports by a bunch of young and enthusiastic journalists has a serious
impact on society.
Reporting reached an international standard and for the first time reporters enjoyed stardom. ETV
immensely encouraged women towards journalism as a profession.
Nawajish Ali Khan, who was involved with the ETV, says, "Ekushey was an organised and professional
media, which was accumulated by professional, creative, talented and committed people. To ensure
quality the authority trained up the behind-the-scene people as well as the artistes and performers of
a programme."
The ETV productions were unique in nature: children's programme Muktokhabor, for instance, was a
news-based show in which the child performers would handle news with social relevance. Fifty percent
of the young team were from underprivileged families.
To name other successful items, entertainment programmes Ekusher Dupur, Priyotomashu, quiz show
Shobdo Jabdo, Shofol Jara Kemon Tara, informative programme Ekatturer Ei Diney, Ajker
Shongbadpotro, Ei Shoptaher Biswa, talk show Amrao Boltey Chai, cookery show Radhunir Rannaghar,
and of course a number of plays by gifted directors.
Another popular actor, Mahfuz Ahmed says, "Ekushey played a vital role in promoting talented young
artistes the result of which was so obvious -- many innovative ideas and commitment produced quality
programmes and the channel gained huge popularity within a short time."
However, ETV went off the air on August 29, 2002 after losing a legal battle over its broadcasting
rights.
An emotional Abdullah Abu Sayeed, founder of the Bishwa Shahitya Kendra, wrote a commentary in
the daily Prothom Alo on September 18, 2002: "ETV has been leading our seemingly aimless youth to
a healthy and capable citizenship through its promising and unique programme roster. ETV protected
the Bangladeshi viewers from the formidable influence of the satellite-culture and steered them gently
to the tasteful bouquet of Bangla programmes, discarding the Hindi channels."

Ekushey Television (ETV) (Bengali: ) is aprivate terrestrial channel in Bangladesh. It


broadcasts from Kawran Bazar, Dhaka. Ekushey Television is the first private television channel in
the history of Bangladesh.[2] Official transmission began on April 14, 2000.

Ekushey consistently is the #1 rated channel in Bangladesh; with excellent shows and its own base
audience. In 2011, Ekushey became the first Bangladeshi channel to broadcast all its content liveonline to viewers around the globe, through its official website as well as Viewers World. The channel
is popularly acknowledged as the voice of the nation and considered the most popular TV channel in
Bangladesh due to its news and other innovative programs.[3] [4]
History
Launched in April 2000 as the country's first private terrestrial TV channel, Ekushey Television (ETV)
covered half the country's population and turned out to be the most popular channel offering brisk,
highly professional, and path-breaking programmes.[5]
The channel sparked a revolution in television journalism. The objective, deeply analytical,
interpretative and investigative reports by a bunch of young and enthusiastic journalists has a serious
impact on society.
Reporting reached an international standard and for the first time reporters enjoyed stardom. ETV
immensely encouraged women towards journalism as a profession.
The ETV productions were unique in nature: children's programme Muktokhabor, for instance, was a
news-based show in which the child performers would handle news with social relevance. Fifty
percent of the young team were from underprivileged families.
ETV played a vital role in promoting talented young artistes the result of which was so obvious
many innovative ideas and commitment produced quality programmes and the channel gained huge
popularity within a short time. ETV was an organised and professional media, which was
accumulated by professional, creative, talented and committed people. To ensure quality the
authority trained up the behind-the-scene people as well as the artistes and performers of a
programme.
To name other successful items, entertainment programmes Ekusher Dupur, Priyotomashu, quiz
show Shobdo Jabdo, Shofol Jara Kemon Tara, informative programme Ekatturer Ei Diney, Ajker
Shongbadpotro, Ei Shoptaher Biswa, talk show Amrao Boltey Chai, cookery show Radhunir
Rannaghar, and of course a number of plays by gifted directors.
ETV had been leading the nation's seemingly aimless youth to a healthy and capable citizenship
through its promising and unique programme roster. ETV protected the Bangladeshi viewers from the
formidable influence of the satellite-culture and steered them gently to the tasteful bouquet of Bangla
programmes, discarding the Hindi channels.
After being in operation for two years, on August 29, 2002, Managing Director Simon Dring and three
other executives had their work permits cancelled and the station was taken off-air. [6] [7] However,
permission for the station to continue transmission once more was granted on April 14, 2005, and
transmission was resumed, on December 1, 2006.

Its official transmission started March 29, 2007 and, started 24-hour transmission on June 1. Present
Chairman of ETV is Mr. Mohammed Saiful Alam.[8]
Technical info

Satellite: Telstar 10 at 76.5 degree E orbital location

Band: C Band

Frequency: 3787 MHz

Polarization: Horizontal (H)

F E C: 2/3

Symbol Rate: 4.600 MS/S

Types of broadcasting programs

Talk show

Drama

News

Children News

Live Concert

Special talk show with specialized Topic (Health, Children etc.)

Educational documentaries

Children shows

Exploring culture, landscapes, and history driven shows

Business programming
ETV also broadcasts a dedicated band for business news everyday from 10 am to 2:30 pm during
the trading hours in the Dhaka Stock Exchange with real-time updates, live discussions and breaking
news, the first channel in the country to do so.
The channel has developed a reputation for providing current stock market news and incisive
discussions on business related issues and is a clear leader in the business news space, setting
editorial and production standards for the Bangladesh TV news market.

Current shows

Media Gosif

Phono Live Studio Concert

Golpo Solpo Gaan

Tobuo Badhan

Atopar Ami

Ekusher Raat

Ekusher Sondha

Ekusher Dupur

Ekusher Sokal

Ekusher Chokh

Former shows

Alif Laila

Gul Sanobar

Bish Kata

Baundule Express

Ekushey, Pothey Pothey

Ekushey Dupur (News)

Phono Live Studio Concert

Pather Panchali (TV Game Show)

Shoshur Bari Zindabad (Dhallywood remake)

Popeye the Sailor

Supernatural: The Unseen Powers of Animals

Zoo Quest

Life on Earth: A Natural History

The Life of Mammals

The Blue Planet: Seas of Life

WWE

Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies

Thief of Bagdad

Bubuner Baba

Hat kata Robin

See also

List of television stations in Bangladesh

References
1.

"Live ETV". Ekushey TV.

2.

Rahman, Anis (1970-01-01). "A Political Economy of the Emerging Television News Industry
in Bangladesh | Anis Rahman - Academia.edu". Sfu.academia.edu. Retrieved 2014-08-06.

3.

"Bad instance by Ekushey TV owner". Weekly Blitz. 2009-04-01. Archived fromthe original on
2009-12-30.

4.

Choudhury, Salah Uddin Shoaib (2010-04-30). "Shutting down private TV channels". Weekly
Blitz. Archived from the original on 2010-05-05.

5.

Deepita, Novera (2006). "From BTV to ETV and beyond: The television revolution". The Daily
Star.

6.

Hossain, Moazzem (2002-10-01). "Bangladesh tells TV chief to leave". BBC News.


Retrieved 2014-08-06.

7.

8.

Lawson-Tancred, Alastair (2002-10-02). "'Hero' journalist expelled from Bangladesh". The


Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 2015-08-16.

06.

"ETV goes on air again after over 4 years". The Daily Star. 2006-12-02. Retrieved2014-08-

External links

Official Website

Ekushey Web TV

Shuting Down private chanel

Current government in Bangladesh shut down another satellite based private television channel last
week. Channel-One, a popular television channel commenced its broadcast few years back, when BNPJamaat coalition government was in power. During that time, a number of broadcast licenses were issued
in favor of several influential members of the ruling coalition. Channel-One is one of those 'fortunate'
ones.
Trend of shutting down private television channels began right in 1999 when Awami League was first in
power. At that time, the government shut down country's first private television channel named ATV
[earlier A-21 TV] and brought false accusation of 'smuggling information via satellite'. Later, the court of
Metropolitan Session Judge in Dhaka [Bangladesh] not only dismissed the case, but made strong
remarks criticizing the government for bringing such fabricated case against the promoters of country's
first private television channel. Though fresh applications were submitted with the subsequent
governments with the copy of the court order seeking fresh permission to re-commence the broadcast of
country's first private television channel, none of the governments ever considered this as the owners of
the channel were not members of any of the political houses in the country.
The tendency of slicing down voice of the media continued during the next government, when BNPJamaat coalition won the general election in 2001. Broadcast license of Ekushey Television, the first
private owned terrestrial TV channel was cancelled and later the channel was shut down due to court
order. Huge number of journalists and employees of the channel turned unemployed overnight.
When military controlled interim government was in power, broadcast of country's only new based
channel named CSBC was snatched as the military controlled regime felt uncomfortable at the prolific
reporting in the channel.

Before the general election of 2008, current Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina made specific pledge of
according total freedom to media. But as soon as it came in power, there has been specific tendency of
shutting down television channels owned by political opponents while issuing license to party leaders and
affiliates with the aim of establishing monopoly in the electronic media, where no criticism of the
government would ever be allowed.
While I am very much against the very 'theme' of shutting down television channels, it is important for me
also to mention a gross via lotion of rules by the past BNP-Jamaat government, while issuing broadcast
license to its party affiliates.
Ekushey Television's broadcast license was cancelled by the BNP-Jamaat government at the instigation
of some of the so-called 'think-tanks' of it. It was alleged that, founder of this television channel got the
license in his own name, which he later illegally transferred to a company. If this was the legal ground to
cancel the licence of Ekushey TV, how the same government allowed issuing another license to NTV [a
channel owned by the political secretary of the then Prime Minister]? It may be mentioned here that the
political secretary of the then PM purchased the ownership of Total Entertainment Netrowk [TEN] TV,
which was owned by a businessman named Sajjad Ali. This channel came into broadcast just for couple
of months before it was closed down by the owners due to severe financial crisis.
If the transferring shares of Ekushey TV was seen as illegal by the BNP-Jamaat government, how the
same government issued broadcast license to NTV with the transferred share documents of TEN TV?
Subsequently, owner of NTV started a second channel named RTV. It is logically argued by many that, if
the very birth of NTV was illegal, there is no legitimacy of RTV and in such case; both the channels
should be immediately shut down.
Same thing happens in case of BOISHAKHI TV, a private television channel, share of which was recently
transferred to a 'multi-level marketing company' by the owners of the channel.
Most importantly, while Bangladesh Telecommunications Regulatory Commission sweats to find out
irregularities in private television channel, they are ignoring one extremely important point. All of the
private television channels need to pay substantial amount of rental to the satellites for using their
transponders for broadcast. According to a recent information of Bangladesh Bank, none of the channels
ever applied for permission for such transfer of foreign currency to the satellite operators for years. In this
case, it is easily anticipated that such huge amount of money is sent to the satellite operators through
illegal means, which is an offense under Money Laundering Act.
Another source in National Board of Revenue said, the private television channels are required to pay 15
per cent of the revenue collected from advertisement as Value Added Tax [VAT]. But, NBR claims that,
none of the channels ever paid even fraction of the justified amount of VAT to the National Exchequer. If
appropriate investigation will be conducted on this area, it will be revealed that, all of the channels are
continuing to evade millions of Taka only from this specific sector.
I am not mentioning these irregularities to give any provocation to the government in shutting down more
television channels in the country. The reason behind raising these points is to make one clear point that,
if the government gets determined in suffocating the voice of any of the private television channels, they
can always find ready tools in hand. But, this will not ultimately bring anything good for the very image of
the government. With the closure of each of the television channels, hundreds of journalists and
employees will turn unemployed. Hopefully, this does not go in favor of the electoral pledge of the current

government, which gave specific commitment to the nation of doing everything in resolving the
unemployment issue in the country. But, at least in media sector, the government is, contributing in
deepening the unemployment crisis instead of resolving it. Hopefully, Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina will
kindly look into this matter, with sympathy and affection for the members of media in Bangladesh.

Bad instance by Ekushey TV owner


Chairman of Ekushey Television [ETV], Abdus Salam, during a meeting with the Prime Minister on March
29, 2009 suggested 'reviewing' all the broadcast licenses issued during the BNP led Coalition
government. It is understood that such suggestions came from the owner of a private television channel
with the ultimate intension of canceling licenses of NTV, RTV, Channel-One, Boishakhi TV, Bangla Vision,
DESH TV, Diganta TV and CSB TV.
Media people in Bangladesh are greatly surprised at such unexpected demand by the owner of Ekushey
TV in canceling broadcast licenses of a number of private television channels, where hundreds of
journalists and media related people are employed.
It may be mentioned here that, Ekushey TV managed to obtain a broadcast license for terrestrial
television channel during Awami League government in 2000. Owners of this channel also launched a FM
band radio station named Radio Metro, which was continuing transmission using equipment and other
facilities of Bangladesh Betar. The management of Radio Metro failed to pay the promised charges to
Bangladesh Betar, although they continued the broadcast for several years.
Ekushey TV was originally owned by A. S. Mahmood while his hundred per cent share was purchased by
Abdus Salam, a Bangladeshi expatriate based in Germany. Their licensing process was challenged in
Bangladeshi court. ETV contested the case for years thus finally losing the battle causing in suspension
of transmission of Ekushey TV's signals via terrestrial system.
Later after legal battle for years, this channel managed to re-commence its broadcast via satellite. But, in
recent past, this channel unlawfully started broadcasting signals through terrestrial system in Chittagong.
When the matter was brought into the attention of Bangladeshi authorities and Bangladesh
Telecommunication Regulatory Commission [BTRC], a notice was served on ETV management for illegal
transmission of its signals via terrestrial system.
Meanwhile, it is further learnt from Bangladesh Bank sources that, Ekushey Television although pays
monthly rental for satellite transponders [generally US$ 35,000 per month], no permission is ever taken
from the Central Bank for remittance of such amount on a regular basis. It is understood that, owners of
this channel transfer such foreign currency through illegal channels, which falls under Money Laundering
Act in Bangladesh.
Moreover, ETV management owes millions of Taka to the package program makers in Bangladesh. Small
scale investors put their hard-earned money in making programs thus selling the same to private
television channels with the hope of getting some profit. But, instead of making profit, these small
investors are forced to serious financial sufferings due to ETV's failure in making payment of the
outstanding bills.
It may be mentioned here that during the interim government's rule although broadcast of a number of
channels such as Bijoy TV, Falgun Music, Channel-S, STV etc were snatched, some channels started

broadcast without any required license. One of such channels is My TV. Several more illegal channels are
also preparing to begin broadcast in next several weeks.
Ekushey TV owner Abdus Salam certainly made an immoral approach to the Prime Minister in
'reconsidering' the channels which got license during the past elected government. It is apprehended that,
this specific request might have been raised by the ETV owner at the prior signal of some high-ups in the
government.

Bangladesh tells TV chief to leave


A British journalist who headed Bangladesh's first independent television
station is to leave Dhaka after the government cancelled his visa and work
permit.
Simon Dring, managing director of the recently shutdown Ekushey Television (ETV) station, has been asked
by the government to leave the country immediately.

This window of the


media cannot be
shut

Simon Dring

On Monday, a case was filed against Mr Dring and three


other executives of Ekushey Television accusing them of fraud.

The case was filed by a film producer, who said he was not paid for one of
his films which was broadcast by ETV.
Police began investigating the allegations, but in the meantime Mr Dring
made preparations to leave Dhaka.
A spokesperson for ETV told the BBC that Mr Dring would leave Dhaka at
2200 local time (1600 GMT).
Independent sector
His deportation marks the end of the short-lived history
of independent broadcasting in Bangladesh, which began
with the launching of Ekushey Television in April 2000.
It was Bangladesh's first and only private terrestrial
television, which got a licence under the previous Awami
League government.
But immediately after the government of Prime Minister
Khaleda Zia came to power, ETV faced a difficult time.

Simon Dring: Said he was


determined to return

The validity of its broadcasting licence was challenged by supporters of the


ruling coalition.

The Supreme Court cancelled the licence in August this year after lengthy
legal procedures.
Ekushey Television went off the air the same day, after the government shut
down its transmission facilities.
'Objective'
ETV always said its news and current affairs coverage was neutral and
objective, but the ruling Bangladesh Nationalist Party believed it was biased
against them.
On Monday, Simon Dring was given a farewell reception, at which many of
Bangladesh's leading cultural personalities were present.
Mr Dring told the audience that he intended to return to Bangladesh again in
the future.
He said this was the second time he was being deported from Dhaka.
In 1971, during the Bangladesh war of independence, Simon Dring was
deported from Dhaka along with other western journalists who were
reporting on the atrocities carried out by the Pakistani army in the then East
Pakistan.
Simon Dring said that for many Bangladeshis, Ekushey television was a
window onto the outside world.
He said people would miss it as they now had no choice, with state-run
Bangladesh television remaining the only terrestrial channel.

'Hero' journalist expelled from


Bangladesh
A former Daily Telegraph correspondent who alerted the world to the massacres of the Bangladeshi
war of independence has been expelled from the country.
Simon Dring, 56, leaves Bangladesh after the government closed the country's only independent
television station which he set up in Dhaka two and a half years ago.

The main opposition Awami League has labelled the closure an outrageous violation of press
freedom. "Simon Dring is a hero to many Bangladeshis," said Sabher Hossain Chowdhury,
spokesman for the League.
"He was the only foreign journalist who covered the horrors of our war of independence from
Pakistan in 1971, for which he was awarded honorary citizenship of Bangladesh. To us, he has the
same status as the BBC's Mark Tully in India.
"It's obvious that he is being thrown out because we have a hardline, intolerant government
containing two radical Islamic parties that is determined to control the media."
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31 Jul 2002

Mr Dring's reports for the Telegraph, which revealed massacres in which it is estimated that more
than a million people died, included a description of a massacre by Pakistani troops in Dhaka in
March 1971. Many of his stories had to be smuggled out.
His reporting outraged officials from what was then East Pakistan and he was expelled, returning
once Bangladesh won its liberation. He later returned to Bangladesh in April 2000 and established
Ekushey Television - ETV.
The channel was renowned for the quality of its news and entertainment broadcasts, attracting
audiences of around 70 million. Although it easily outperformed state-run Bangladesh Television it is
now off-air and staff are expected to lose their jobs.
Ministers said ETV was bankrolled by the opposition and broadcast biased reports. They accused Mr
Dring of being personally opposed to the government and revoked his work permit last month. He
was given seven days to leave the country.
Mr Dring, who is managing director of ETV, was due to leave Dhaka last night, accompanied by an
official from the British High Commission because of fears that he may be arrested at the departure
gate.

Mr Dring said: "Obviously I cannot say what I really feel about my expulsion because to do so may
endanger criminal proceedings faced by colleagues. But suffice to say I'm very sorry to be leaving
the country. Before too long the disgraceful way in which I have been treated will emerge."
In August, the coalition government ordered ETV off the air after the Supreme Court ruled that it had
fraudulently acquired its licence to broadcast from the previous Awami League government. The
case against the channel was brought by supporters of the government .
Yesterday, Mr Dring was formally charged with fraud, along with senior ETV executives. He was
warned by the authorities that there was a possibility that he and his wife, Fiona McPherson, would
be arrested at the airport.
"All broadcast media in this country is now controlled by the government. People are being denied
access to an independent and free media," said Mr Dring.
"There are terrible things going on here which I am not at liberty to disclose because to do so may
endanger my colleagues. All I can say is that I have now been ejected from this country twice. The
circumstances of my second expulsion are far more sinister."

ETV goes on air again after over 4 years


ransmission of Ekushey Television (ETV) resumed yesterday after its broadcasting was stopped
four years and three months ago.
The channel can be watched without a satellite connection as before, the ETV authorities claimed
at a press conference yesterday.
The ETV has got permission to "re-broadcast" its programmes with all previous facilities, said
ETV Chairman Abdus Salam.
The transmission of ETV was stopped on August 29, 2002 following a Supreme Court order.
Salam said they are hopeful to regain the viewers' attention by presenting quality programme and
neutral and investigative news.
The ETV got its permission for transmission on April 14, 2005, but the authorities could not go
on-air due to some tangles with
Bangladesh Telecommunications Regulatory Board.

Hinting at a powerful quarter of the immediate past government, Salam said "an evil power" did
not allow them to start transmission even after getting the permission.
Asked about ETV's share owned by Gias Al Mamun, managing director of Channel 1 and a
friend of BNP Senior Joint Secretary General Tarique Rahman, Salam said, "If he had the share,
we would not have to wait for one and half years for starting transmission.
"Gias Al Mamun was one of the most powerful persons in the country during the past
government's tenure. Why have we waited such a long time if he was with us?" Salam said.
On former managing director of ETV Simon Dring's joining the channel, he said, "Time will tell
that."
Salam thanked the media for supporting the ETV in its fight to get permission to resume
operation.
ETV Director (programme) Atiqul Haq Chowdhury described the day as their "victory day",
saying, "We lost our paradise, but we have regained it."