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LEI4724 Activity Portfolio #7

Ashley Font

Facilitation Technique Category: Therapeutic Use of Tai Chi


Activity Title: Simon Says
Source: Dattilo, J., & McKenney, A. (2016). Facilitation Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation
(3rd ed.). Venture Publishing, INC.
Equipment: Comfortable clothing
Activity Description: Tai Chi emphasizes on body relaxation, mental concentration, and
movement coordination, which serves as a benefit for many individuals. The purpose of this
activity is to learn eight easy forms of Tai Chi. These different forms will develop a sense of
awareness, posture, relaxation and breathing. Participants must be familiar with positions from
Tai Chi. First, have participants stand apart from each other with enough space to perform each
movement. Have them begin with a breathing exercise for relaxation. Form 1 consists of both
hands rise to shoulder level. Form 2, Repulse Monkey, right and left arm curve back 3 times.
Form 3, Grasp Peacocks Tail, stepping sideways and moving arms left and then right. Form 4,
Wave Hands Like Clouds, moving hands while left side leads, 3 times. Form 5, Fair Lady Works
at Shuttles, diagonal strides left, then right. Form 6, Golden Cock Stands on One Leg, standing
on one leg, right leg first, then left. Form 7, Brush Knees and Twist Steps, stepping and pushing
left leg, then right. Form 8 is the closing form where both hands fall to the side, left leg drawn to
the right leg. End the session by receiving the different positions of Tai Chia and discussing the
benefits and difficulties of each one.
Leadership Consideration: The CTRS functions as an instructor and also performs movements
with participants. It is recommended that the therapist possesses Tai Chi Certification and be
profoundly knowledgeable of the movements. The instructor and all staff must be well aware of
the participants abilities regarding their disabilities. The staff to participants ratio should be 1:1,
2:4, or 3:6. Before starting the session conduct a breathing warm-up. Instructor must explain
safety topics and be able to recognize emergencies. Activity instructions must be given
thoroughly and demonstrated if needed.
Adaptations:
Participants with Traumatic Brain Injury: Traumatic Brain Injury is a brain dysfunction that
is caused by an outside force to the head. To ensure a successful session, instructors should be
well aware of the severity of their impairment. Instructions should be demonstrated before and as
many times as needed. Due to inability to understand and mental confusion, the activity should
be reduced to no more than 3 movements (Staff, 2014). This activity could also be used to
challenge the participants memory and have them recall each Tai Chi move after the instructor
has said to perform them (Tai Chi 101 for TBI, 2016).
Participants with Parkinsons: Parkinsons is a degenerative condition that causes vexing
problems, such as, tremors, muscle control, and disrupt of balance (Wayne, 2013). Those who
suffer severely from Parkinsons and can no longer maintain their balance can perform the Tai
Chi movements while sitting down or holding onto either staff, a barre, or utilizing a cane.

LEI4724 Activity Portfolio #7

Ashley Font

Parkinsons also causes thinking difficulties, so cutting the number of movements and instructing
participants to increase repetition is more likely adaptable for those individuals (Staff, 2015).
Fatigue is also a factor with Parkinsons, therefore if a participant is tired they may stop when
needed or person less movements and less petitions, as long as the focus on at least two
movements for Simon Says (Staff, 2015).
Adaptation References:
Wayne, P. (2013, May 3). Tai chi improves balance and motor control in Parkinsons disease Harvard health Blog. Retrieved October 22, 2016, from Complementary and alternative medicine,
http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/tai-chi-improves-balance-and-motor-control-in-parkinsonsdisease-201305036150
Staff, M. C. (2015). Parkinsons disease complications. Mayoclinic. Retrieved from
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/parkinsons-disease/basics/complications/con20028488
Staff, M. C. (2014). Traumatic brain injury definition. Mayoclinic. Retrieved from
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/traumatic-brain-injury/basics/definition/con20029302
Tai Chi 101 for TBI. (2016, May 23). Retrieved October 22, 2016, from
http://www.lifeskillsvillage.com/blog/tai-chi-101