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SEMI-DETAILED LESSON PLAN IN TLE 7

I.

OBJECTIVES
At the end of the lesson, the students will be able to:
A. Discuss the definition of embroidery
B. Name the different basic tools and materials used in embroidery
C. Discuss the elements and principles of design

II.

SUBJECT MATTER
A. Topic: Handicraft Embroidery
B. Time Allotment 8 hours (4 meetings)
C. References Skills for a Lifetime in TLE 7 by Virginia C. Esmilla Sercado (2014)
pp. 195-210
D. Materials Book, Blackboard, Chalk, Embroidery Needle, Scissors, Embroidery Fabric,
Embroidery Thread, Pencil, Short Coupon Bond, Needle Threader, Thimble,
Pincushion, Masking Tape

III.

PROCEDURE
A. Routine Activity
-

Prayer

Checking of Class Attendance

B. Motivation
Show the different Embroidery Tools and Materials to the class and ask them to identify
each using their books as their guide.
C. Lesson Proper
Embroidery is the art of decorating fabric and/or materials with designs stitched with thread
using a needle.
Needlework anything that uses a needle for construction
Materials and Tools Used in Embroidery
1. Embroidery Needles choose the right needles to suit your fabric and thread. Good quality
needles are the stitchers most important tool.
Types of Embroidery Needles:
a. Crewel or Embroidery Needle this is the most commonly used needle. It has a sharp point
and large eye that is used for crewel work.
b. Chenille needle this is similar to a crewel needle but with a thicker shaft. The chenille
needle is good for heavy threads and coarse grounds.

c. Tapestry needle this is a think-shafted, large-eyed needle with a round-pointed end; the
tapestry (or yarn) needle works best for evenweave fabrics because it is designed to slip
between the threads rather than to pierce them as a crewel needle does.
d. Beading needle this is a fine, long needle with a tiny eye used for sewing small beads.
2. Embroidery scissors this is used for trimming scallops, clipping threads, and cutting large
eyelets.
3. Embroidery threads these are available in various types. They differ in terms of texture, fiber
content, number of strands and color. They can be bought in skein, balls, or spools.
4. Stiletto this is usually made of wood, bone or metal. It is used to make eyelets in the fabrics
to be embroidered.
5. Embroidery hoop this works to hold fabric taut for stitching. It keeps a section of fabric
stretched between two rings. The outer ring usually has an adjustable screw or spring that
allows the hoop to hold different weights of fabric.
6. Thimble this protects the finger from pricking while sewing.
7. Pincushion this is used for corral pins and needles and protect them from rust.
8. Embroidery marker this is used for drawing designs on fabric.
9. Embroidery transfer pencil this is used for hot-iron transfer designs.
10. Needle threader this makes threading the needle easier.
11. Masking tape this is used to bind edges of fabric to prevent raveling.
12. Dressmakers carbon paper this is used to transfer designs to fabric.
13. Embroidery fabric this is an evenly woven fabric wherein the number of threads per square
inch is the same for both warp and weft.
Types of fabric:
a. Aida fabric this is used for counted thread embroidery such as cross stitch.
b. Even weave fabric this may be used for all types of counted thread embroidery, and finer
counts may also be used for free style embroidery.
c. Hardanger fabric this is similar to Aida fabric, but 20-22 or 24 counts are the usual sizes
for Hardanger work.
d. Plain fabric this is normally used in freestyle embroidery, when the design stitched
without reference to the woven surface.
Different Embroidery Stitches
There are different embroidery stitches which you can choose from when you do embroidery
work. Some of the embroidery stitches commonly used are the following:
1. Running Stitch it is considered to be the easiest stitch for outlining.

2. Chain Stitch it is a method of embroidering by which the stitches resemble a chain. It is one
of the most popular stitches used for outlining.
3. Back Stitch it is the stitch most often used to outline a design. This stitch also forms the
baseline for the other embroidery stitches.
4. Holbein Stitch it is also called double running stitch. This stitch is often used to outline back
work embroidery.
5. Stem Stitch it is a sort of back stitch worked from left to right. Stem stitch is used for flower
stems and lines.
6. Feather Stitch a stitch with a loop and stitches evenly worked on both left and right sides of a
design area.
7. Cretan Stitch it is the variation of the feather stitch which has a uniquely textured center that
resembles the natural central vein of a leaf.
8. Satin Stitch it is a solid filling that is used to cover a design area with long, straight stitches
work very close together.
9. Lazy Daisy Stitch it is also known as detached chain stitch. It is a little looped stitch perfect
for working small flowers.
10. French Knot it is used for the centers of such flowers as the daisy or wild rose, and sometimes
for the anthers of others. It is also known as the knotted stitch.
Designing for Embroidery
The first step in any embroidered project is choosing a design. A basic understanding of the
elements and principles of design can help in the process of choosing a design that is pleasing to the
eye. Elements are the tools used to create a design. Principles are guidelines for deciding how these
tools will be used to create a design.
Design is an orderly arrangement of lines, shapes, and colors. It involves the problem of choosing
these and arranging them properly. A good design shows not only an orderly arrangement but also
beauty in the finished product.
Principles of Design
The principles of design are used as a guide to assess the beauty and functionality of any work
of art. The principles of design are:
1. Balance this is the equal distribution of weight from central point of area. It is the state of
equilibrium. It means rest or repose.
a. Formal balance when the designs on both sides of the article are exactly the same and
are equidistant from the center.

b. Informal balance when the designs on both sides are not exactly alike but the
distances are equal.
2. Proportion this refers to the pleasing relationship of one part to the other. The size, shapes,
and the spaces between parts of the design should fit the whole design.
3. Emphasis the principle which rules that there should be a center of interest.
4. Rhythm this refers to the pleasing sense of organized movement that gives continuity to a
design. It is referred to as related movement.
5. Harmony or unity this means the design looks complete and while. There is pleasant relation
between the parts.
Elements of Design
1. Line a mark used to denote directions or contours.
2. Shape a two-dimensional object or area having height and width.
3. Form a three-dimensional object having height, width, and depth.
4. Space a surface area that has height, width, and the illusion of depth.
5. Texture the look or feel of the surface quality (rough, smooth, raised, open, etc.)
Choosing of Colors
Once your design is chose, you are ready to select colors, decision that will greatly affect the
mood of your finished project. With colors as with most design problem, there are guidelines that can
help you to make a successful choice.
Properties of Colors
Colors have three dimensions. They are hue, value and intensity. Dimensions are also called
properties, characteristics, or qualities.
1. Hue this is the name of a color. It may be warm or cool according to the effect it has upon
objects. Warm lines are advancing colors that seem to make an object appear larger and nearer.
Red, orange, and yellow are warm hues. The cool hues are green, blue, and violet. They are
receding colors because they make objects appear smaller and farther away.
2. Value this refers to the intensity of the light present. When light is at its fullest intensity,
colors will become bright, when at its least intensity, colors become dim. Value may be changed
by adding black or white to a standard color.
3. Intensity this refers to the brightness or dullness of a color.
Classes of Colors
There are three classes of color. They are primary, secondary, and intermediate colors.
1. Primary Colors These are red, yellow, and blue. They are the colors from which all colors are
made.

2. Secondary Colors These are green, orange, and violet. They are made by mixing equal parts
of two primary colors. The secondary colors are made thus: equal parts of red and yellow mixed
together produce orange, equal parts of yellow and blue produce green, equal parts of blue and
red product violet.
3. Intermediate Colors These result when a primary and a secondary color are mixed in equal
amounts.
Color Harmonies
Color harmonies mean pleasing combination of colors. They are classified into:
1. Related color harmony a combination of colors that lie next to each other on the color chart.
a. Monochromatic color harmony it is a combination of colors with different values or
shades of one color.
b. Analogous harmony it is a combination of neighboring colors which lie next to each
other on the color chart.
2. Contrasting color harmonies these are the combinations of color opposite each other on the
color chart.
a. Complementary harmony it is a combination of colors opposite on the chart.
b. Split complementary it is a combination of a color and a color on either side of its
complement.
c. Triad harmony it is a combination of any three colors that make an equilateral chart.
Transferring Designs
Transferring a design to fabric is the first step in most areas of needlework. No method is
perfect, and each is better suited to certain fabrics and uses than others. There are many ways of
transferring a design. Whichever way you choose a design to your material, be sure to prepare your
material very carefully. Crooked or irregular designs give poor results. Designs to be embroidered
need to be neatly transferred on cloth. The following are several ways of transferring designs on cloth:
1. Ironing the design is transferred by laying the design on the fabric and passing over a hot
flatiron on the transfer sheet. The design will then be imprinted on the cloth
2. Tracing this is the simplest method of transferring design. Use a light-colored carbon paper
face down on the cloth and lay the design on top. With a pencil and a steady hand, transfer the
design to the fabric.
IV.

EVALUATION

A. Perform the Sample Project on page 207 entitled Embroidered Luncheon Set.
B. Answer the Assessment on pages 208-210 on the Reference Book.

V.

ASSIGNMENT

A. Make a portfolio on the different embroidery stitches.


Prepared by:
MARIA KRISIA FAE R. DE ASIS

SEMI-DETAILED LESSON PLAN IN TLE 7


I.

OBJECTIVES
At the end of the lesson, the students will be able to:
A. Identify the tools and materials used in bead crafts
B. Name the different kinds of beads
C. Demonstrate how to make some articles made of beads

II.

SUBJECT MATTER
A. Topic: Handicraft Bead Crafts
B. Time Allotment 4 hours (2 meetings)
C. References Skills for a Lifetime in TLE 7 by Virginia C. Esmilla Sercado (2014)
pp. 211-222
D. Materials Book, Blackboard, Chalk, Beads, Nylon thread, Scissors

III.

PROCEDURE
A. Routine Activity
-

Prayer

Checking of Class Attendance

B. Motivation
Show the different kinds of beads to the class and ask them to identify each using their
books as their guide.
C. Lesson Proper
Bead craft the art or craft of attaching beads to one another or to cloth, usually by the use of a
needle and thread or soft, flexible wire.
Beads these are one of the most common materials used in fashion accessory making. These
come from different places, including China, Taiwan, Brazil, and India and are usually sold by
string. The size of the beads tells roughly how many beads, strung end-to-end, equal 1 inch (2.5
cm). For example, 10 beads of size 10/0 (pronounced ten-aught) should equal about 1 inch. Good
quality seed beads are uniform in size, in shape, and in diameter of the hole through the center.
Different Kinds of Beads
There are many types of beads available, and choosing the right beads for a project is essential.
Most beads are sold either by weight (grams) or in hanks.
1. Seed beads these are small beads in glass, metal or crystal, clear or opaque. They also
come in mini size and are used in embroidery on clothes. These are the most popular types
of beads and there are two types.

a. Japanese beads are cylindrical in shape and range in size from 6 (the largest) to 22
(the smallest). To be more uniform in size and have larger holes than the equivalent
size of Czech beads. They are ideal for all types of beadwork.
b. Czech beads range in size from 7 to 20. They are usually more doughnut-shaped than
Japanese ones, and are best used for off-loom beading and bead embroidery.
2. Delica beads (antique beads) these superior beads are perfectly cylindrical in shape and
have thin walls and large holes. They are ideal for bead weaving where a very flat, smooth
finish is required. There are only two sizes: size 11 and size 8. They are more expensive than
seed beads, but well worth using for that special project.
3. Bugle beads these are long cylindrical beads available in a variety of colors, finishes, and
twists. They are sized in millimeters, the most common sizes being 2mm, 3mm, and 5mm.
Take care when using them as they can have quite sharp edges which could cut through
thread. They are mainly used for edgings and fringes.
4. Shaped beads apart from the usual cylindrical shape, there are also other shapes of beads
triangles, squares, and hexagonal which can give unusual and different textures.
5. Faceted beads crystals are a good example of faceted beads. They are useful as accent or
feature beads. They are sized in millimeters from 3mm to 10mm.
6. Wooden beads these may be plain, patterned, or textured. They can be very light-colored
or very dark-colored wood, be glazed with a shiny coating or left uncoated and more rustic
looking. Many wood beads are round or oval, but square and other shapes of wood beads
are also available. The sizes of wood beads range from tiny spacer beads to big round or
oval beads the size of a plum.
7. Gemstones of all kinds are made into beads. Amber is a warm brown gemstone with
swirls of neutral colors and is popular for pendants and other beads. Hemalite is an iron ore
mineral that can have a magnetic a well as nonmagnetic quality depending on the type of
hemalite. Hemalite beads are available in many different colors and are often used in
making magnetic bracelets.
8. Sterling silver is not only used for chains, but also for beads. Sterling silver beads may be
smooth and shiny or have a corrugated or other texture to them. Tiny spacer beads, tube or
macaroni beads and sterling silver beads shaped like moons or stars are all available.
Some sterling silver beads have cubic zirconia (CZ) inserted into them for extra sparkle.
9. Glass beads - are made in a wide range of colors and styles. Swirled patterned glass beads
can have the appearance of polished stones. Some glass beads have flowers painted on
them. Glass beads may be in any shape including tube, square and heart-shaped. Animal-

shaped beads such as tiny glass cats, birds, dogs, and fish can be great accents when used
with plainer beads.
10. Porcelain beads are often rounded and may be white with dainty Victorian floral designs
or they may be in primary colors with more graphic patterns on them. Cloisonn beads are
shiny and elaborately painted with floral patterns in rich, bright jewel toned colors.
Cloisonn beads are usually sold in the form of larger circular pendants in order to let the
detailed patterns show.
Other materials needed for seed bead crafts depend on the project, but beading needles,
sewing thread, nylon beading thread, and even white school glue are all commonly used and
available at craft and hobby stores.

Beaded magnet
Craft projects with glue are good starter projects for those who have not worked
with seed beads before. Magnets and poster board make simple bases for designs of
white glue, and you can either sprinkle the beads on it.

Stringing materials
These are the materials that need to hold the beads together when making
necklaces, drop earrings, or bracelets. String materials are labeled by number
according to their thickness. The higher are number, the thinner the string.
Types of threads to use:
The threads support and hold the rings and jewelry.
1. Nylon thread comes in various thickness and colors. Its strong supple, and
discreet when in the clear form.
2. Metallic thread also comes in different thicknesses and shades, also in brass
and silver form. They are good to work with because they do not loosen once
they have been pulled tight. They give a stronger structure to rings. However,
they are more likely to break than nylon thread.

Tools
1. Flat nose for jewelry making
2. Round nose pliers to form the loops for the accessories
3. Wire cutter
4. Angled nose pliers
5. Pair of scissors

Tips for Using Beads


If you have never worked with beads before, the following tips will make your first project
much easier to complete.
Remember, beads are a choking hazard and should always be kept away from children and
pets.
Make sure your craft area has an adequate light source. Because beads are so tiny, eyestrain
can be a serious problem for many crafters.
Take frequent breaks when working with intricate projects. Stretching is important to prevent
straining your neck and back when working with small beads.
Cover your work area with a bead mat to keep your beads from slipping and rolling.
Synthetic beeswax, also known as microcrystalline wax, can be used as a thread conditioner to
help keep your thread from tangling during projects that involve stinging.
When working with double sided craft tape, maintain the strength of the adhesive by using a
craft knife to peel the protective backing off in small sections.
A triangle scoop makes it easy to clean up your beads when you are finished working.
When working with seed beads of various sizes and colors, consider storing your leftover beads
as a bead soup mixture that will make it easier to create a coordinating look for future
projects.
IV.

EVALUATION

A. Answer the Assessment on page 222 of the Reference Book.


B. Make the following bead craft. Follow the procedures that are discussed in the lesson.
a. Beaded bracelet
b. Bead necklace
V.

ASSIGNMENT

A. Research ways on how to create beads from recycled materials.


Prepared by:
MARIA KRISIA FAE R. DE ASIS

SEMI-DETAILED LESSON PLAN IN TLE 7


I. OBJECTIVES
At the end of the lesson, the students will be able to:
A. Identify the tools and materials used in gift wrapping and gift bag making
B. Demonstrate how to make a gift bag and a ribbon
II.

SUBJECT MATTER
A. Topic: Handicraft Gift Wrapping
B. Time Allotment 4 hours (2 meetings)
C. References Skills for a Lifetime in TLE 7 by Virginia C. Esmilla Sercado (2014)
pp. 233-247
D. Materials Book, Blackboard, Chalk, Gift Wrapper, Scissors, Sticky Tape

III.

PROCEDURE
A. Routine Activity
-

Prayer

Checking of Class Attendance

B. Motivation
Bring different boxes in class wrapped using different techniques of gift wrapping.
C. Lesson Proper
Gift Wrapping refers to the act of enclosing a gift in some sort of material. Wrapping paper is a
kind of paper designed for gift wrapping. Gifts may also be wrapped in a box. They may be held closed
with ribbon and topped with a decorative bow (an ornamental knot made of ribbon).
Tools and Materials Used In Gift Wrapping

Tools
1. Scissors
2. Tapes regular and double-sided
3. Ruler and tape measure
4. Specialty scissors
5. Colored pens

Wrappings
1. Rolls of gift wrap
2. Cellophane bags
3. Colored tissue paper
4. Gift bags

Gift Wrapping Paper


Gift wrappers need not necessarily be the ones that are sold in the store, you can make
wrappers of your too.
1. Use attractively colored and printed fabrics to wrap your gifts.
2. Use comic covers or comic sheets from the Sunday papers to wrap up gifts for kids.
3. Art and paintings of your children can also be used to wrap gift items.
4. If you have a stock of any wallpaper samples in good condition, you can use them to wrap gifts.
5. You can make use of map sheets to wrap gifts that are meant for outdoor gears or any
expedition gifts.
6. Give your gift a natural look by tying the wrapper with a pine cone, fir, cedar branch tips, or
flowers.
7. Select gift wrapping paper that comes in a tube instead of pre-cut sheets to avoid creases and
crumpling.
Gift Wrapping Ideas
Gift wrap comes in many forms, from simply designed wrapping paper, to bags, tissue, boxes,
and more. Traditionally, gift wrap refers to wrapping paper only, while wrapping a gift can refer to
placing it in a decorative box or bag, or using wrapping paper. Choices of what kind of wrapping
materials to use vary in both price and quality. People can also get highly creative with plain-colored
or brown wrapping paper by decorating it with stickers, stamps or illustration. The following are other
suggested gift wrapping ideas:
1. Furoshiki wraps Furoshiki is a Japanese gift wrapping technique using fabric instead of
paper.
2. Gift bags these are excellent for oddly shaped gifts, and the gifts can be covered with a few
layers of tissue so that the recipient cannot see the gift. These bags come in numerous shapes
and sizes, and some are even made for specific items, like wine bags. These are easy to make
and look great as a group.
Other Gift Wrapping Ideas
3. You can sew your own simple gift bags. Gather small scraps of material and come up with
innovative bags to hold gifts.
4. Clear or printed cellophane bags are another gift wrapping idea. Wrap up candles or candies or
even homemade goodies in cellophane paper.
5. Use gift tags or greeting cards to make your own gift tag cards.
6. Embellish your gift wrapping with strings of raffia or ribbon. Wrap the ends round a pencil for
a curly effect.

7. Glitter wire can be put to good use by twisting it in interesting ways to close your gift wrap
bags.
8. Consider wrapping a gift in sheaves of poetry or sheet music.
9. Cotton muslin can work well as gift wrapping paper. With the right embellishments, this gift
looks beautiful and natural.
Eco-friendly Gift Wrapping Ideas
There are alternatives to traditional gift wrapping. Finding eco-friendly gift wrapping ideas
often involves shaking off the preconception of how a gift should look. Once you are comfortable with
the fact that a childs birthday present doesnt need to be covered with wrapping paper that features
the latest cartoon characters or that a wedding present is no less appreciated if it is not wrapped in
traditional wrapping paper, you can start to become more creative in your approach. There are many
eco-friendly gift wrapping ideas. These include:
a. Recycle one of the easiest ways to find eco-friendly gift wrap is to recycle gift wrap
from other gifts. The key to successfully recycling gift wrap is to carefully remove the
wrapping paper. While it might be a challenge to stop youngsters from gleefully
tearing the paper from their gifts, older people can carefully remove the paper so it
can be used again. Some paper can be ironed flat, using a low setting on the iron.
b. Newspapers and Magazines a sheet of newspaper or a page from a magazine can
make for an interesting alternative to commercial gift wrap. The key here is to make
the gift look well presented. If the newspaper is shoddily wrapped around the gift
then the gift is going to look like an afterthought. However if the gift is attractively
wrapped then this can make a good alternative form of wrapping.
10. Do-it-yourself wrapping paper it is easy to customize paper and make your own wrapping
paper. Newspaper, for instance, can be decorated to give it a theme. Rubber stamps are an
ideal way to decorate paper. If you do not have any rubber stamps then making stamps from
potatoes is a great way to print paper with a range of different designs. Handprints are also fun
and make great patterns on paper. This can be a good project for children as they enjoy the
process of making handprints on paper using paint.
11. Gift bags an eco-friendly alternative to wrapping paper is to use gift bags. Almost any bag can
be turned into a gift bag. A simple paper grocery bag, for instance, can be embellished and
decorated to create an interesting alternative to a shop bought gift bag. One of the attractive
things about gift bags is that they are easy to use time and time again.
12. Embellishments one key to using alternative forms of gift wrapping is to ensure that the
wrapped gifts look attractive. Adding some well-chosen embellishments will help to give a
finished look to the gift wrap.

How to Wrap A Gift


1. Place all the required materials for wrapping a gift on a flat and clean surface.
2. Remove the price tag from the gift item.
3. Lay the box facedown atop the gift wrap, leaving paper attached to a roll. Cut the paper along
one side, yielding a wide enough sheet to cover both sides of the box.
4. While standing on the same side of the table as the roll, pull paper tautly up and over the far
end of the box. Adhere with double-sided tape, and crease paper along the boxs edge with
thumb and forefinger.
5. Unroll paper and bring it to meet the already wrapped end. Cut paper from the roll, leaving an
inch of overhang. Fold that inch under and crease along the gold. Adhere using double-sided
tape.
6. Push sides of paper inward, creating four 45-degree-angle flaps, then crease along the flaps.
7. Fold down top flap. Crease sharply along the top of the box, and then crease again where the
paper meets the bottom edge of the box. Cut paper along that bottom crease. Adhere to the
box.
8. Fold under any excess paper on the bottom flap so that it lines up perfectly with the top of box.
Apply double-sided tape to the bottom flap, then fold it over top flap and adhere.
9. Repeat steps 4 through 6 on the boxs remaining open end. Finish all sides by running your
pinched thumb and forefinger along edges to create sharp lines.
How To Make A Gift Bag
1. Stick a tip of the double sided tape along the bottom edge of the page on the side that you do
not want to use.
2. Then pull it over and stick to the right side of the other end of the page to form a tube.
3. Fold it flat.
4. Then open it and fold it flat an inch along from the first fold.
5. Decide which will be the bottom and the top of the bag and fold the bottom edge as if you are
folding the corners of a parcel. You can slide something inside the bag and fold around it.
6. Stick the flaps down with a strip of double-sided tape.
7. The bottom of the bag should look like this.
8. Stand it up and fold it flat two-thirds of the way down.
9. Then fold over the top.

IV.

EVALUATION
A. Answer Assessment on page 247 of the Reference Book.
B. Demonstrate how to:

V.

wrap a gift

make a gift bag

ASSIGNMENT
A. Create your own gift wrappers using recycled materials.
Prepared by:
MARIA KRISIA FAE R. DE ASIS