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D e v e lo p m e n t S t a t e m e n t

A d a p t iv e R e u s e o f t h e E x i s ti n g W o o d c h i p M ill
A s H o t e l , R e s t a u r a n t a n d F u n c ti o n F a c i lit i e s
S p r i n g B a y M i ll
5 5 5 Fr e e s t o n e P o in t R o a d , T r ia b u n n a

O c to b e r 2 0 1 6

Mersonn Pty Ltd


6/20 Wylde Street

Company Share:Mersonn:Projects:2016 Projects:216090 Spring Bay, Triabunna:SEE:SEEHotel.docx

Contents

1.0

Introduction

2.0

Site and Context

3.0

Proposed Development

42

4.0

Planning Scheme Provisions

76

5.0

Schedule 1 Considerations

90

6.0

Conclusion

97

1.0

Introduction

This report has been prepared on behalf of Triabunna Investments Pty


Ltd by Mersonn Pty Ltd and is submitted to Glamorgan Spring Bay
Council in support of a development application to adaptively reuse the
existing woodchip mill as a hotel, restaurant and f unction facilities at
555 Freestone Point Road, Triabunna (Lot 1 DP 147559).
The subject site is a 40.47 hectare parcel of land located approximately
8km south of the town of Triabunna on the eastern shore of the deep
water port of Spring Bay. The site formerly accommodated the Gunns
woodchip mill which has been decommissioned since closure in 2011.
It is proposed to adaptively reuse the existing buildings and industrial
structures on the site as a tourism facility. The first stage of this
redevelopment will include a hotel, restaurant and function facilities.
The underlying principle of the adaptive reuse is to retain the industrial
heritage and integrity of the site which has a forty year history of forest
industry use.
The design seeks to retain the coherence of the industrial structures
and illustrate the line of the log through the retention and adaptive
reuse of the existing buildings, plant and machinery with sensitive
c o n t e m p o r a r y i n s e r t i o n s t o f a c i l i ta t e t h e n e w u s e s .
The proposal will provide for an interpretative centre in the future
stages, within the weigh-bridge, which will include a display of oral and
visual histories of the site and its workers.

These histories are in the

process of being researched and compiled.


The former administration centre is proposed to be converted for use as
hotel rooms with the amenities block providing hotel reception and
administration. Additional hotel rooms are proposed to be inserted into
the crane gantries which adjoin the former woodchip pile and inserted
into the concrete chutes which fed the conveyor belt system. The
Watch Tower building will be adaptively reused as a hotel room.

Woodchip pile concrete chutes proposed to be adaptively reused as


hotel rooms.

Hotel rooms to be inserted into the gantry cranes

The Screen House building is proposed to be adaptively reused as the


hotel restaurant with contemporary insertions adjacent to the existing
structure to accommodate the kitchen and food preparation areas while
retaining the industrial plant and fabric of the building.

Screen House building is proposed to be adaptively reused as the hotel restaurant with
contemporary insertions within the existing structure
The former Small Chipper Building is proposed to be adaptively reused
as a function facility which will operate in conjunction with the adjoining
restaurant building and will be serviced from the restaurant kitchen.

A series of new freestanding beach accommodation units are proposed


to be constructed on the south-eastern edge of the site overlooking
Windlass Bay towards Maria Island. These are the only new built
structures proposed for the site.
The former caretakers residence is proposed to be altered for use as
the on-site managers residence.
It is intended that visitors and guests to the site will make use of the
parking at the site entry and all access within the site will be service
vehicles only via the one-way loop and internal site access will be via
the walking tracks, staff four wheel drive and bicycles only.
The adaptive reuse of the Big Chipper and its staging areas for future
function facilities will form the subject of a future application within the
later stages. Similarly, the workshop and its ancillary structures will be
considered for educational uses in a future application within the later
stages.
This Statement has been prepared pursuant to the Land Use Planning
and Approvals Act, 1993. The purpose of this document is to describe
the existing improvements on the site, detail the proposed
development, review the applicable planning regime relating to the
proposal, assess the degree of compliance and examine the
environmental effects of the development when considered against the
Objectives prescribed under Schedule 1 of the Land Use Planning and
Approvals Act, 1993. In respect of the assessment of the proposal,
where impacts are identified, measures proposed to mitigate any harm
to environmental amenity have been addressed in this report.
This report should be read in conjunction with:


Architectural plans prepared by Neeson Murcutt Architects;

Survey Plan prepared by Leary and Cox Land and Engineering


Surveyors;

Water Management Report prepared by Knights and McAuley;

Fauna and Flora Report prepared by North Barker Ecosystem


Services;

Bushfire Report prepared by North Barker Ecosystem Services;

Subject Site
Source: GoogleMaps 2016

2.0

The Site and Context

Subject Site

Location Plan
Source: The List Tasmania 2016
The subject site is located at the southern end of the termination of
Freestone Point Road approximately 4km south of Triabunna town. The
site is regular in shape with a western frontage to Spring Bay and a

south-eastern frontage to Windlass Bay. The site is adjoined to the


north and east by grazing land and has a total area of 40.47 hectares.

Source: The List Tasmania 2016


Freestone Point Road is a well constructed high capacity sealed road
which was designed to accommodate the high traffic flows associated
with servicing the former woodchip mill on the site during the height of
its production. It currently rarely used and only services industrial sites
since the closure of the mill.

Extract Survey Plan prepared by Leary and Cox Land and Engineering
Surveyors 2016
The site slopes down from the high point in the centre of the site
towards its coastal boundaries. The site levels have been significantly
modified to facilitate its previous use as a woodchip mill with an
extensive flattened delivery and staging area adjoining the mill and an

10

extensive gently sloping constructed to accommodate the woodchip


stockpile. The site slopes more significantly around its edges to the
high water mark.

Aerial Photograph
Source: The List Tasmania 2016

11

While the majority of the site has been significantly altered for large
scale industrial woodchip production during the past 40 years large
parts of the north-west and south-east of the site remain relatively
unaffected topographically and remain vegetated areas.
It should be noted that the subject site does not include the loading
wharf facilities located on Spring Bay immediately to the west of the
subject site.

Extract Survey Plan prepared by Leary and Cox Land and Engineering
Surveyors 2016
North-west vegetation,
South-east vegetation,

12

Cadastre Boundaries Aerial Photograph


Source: The List Tasmania 2016

The subject site accommodates a series of buildings, plant and


structures associated with its previous use as a woodchip mill facility.

13

These include the weighbridge at the entry to the site and an extensive
parking area to the east. The caretakers residence adjoins to the west
across the entry drive.

Extract Survey Plan prepared by Leary and Cox Land and Engineering
Surveyors 2016
Entry,
Caretakers cottage,
Weighbridge and
Car parking area

14

The weighbridge at the entry to the site.

Car parking with the weighbridge in the background right and


administration buildings centre.

The Administration building and its adjoining Amenities building are of


utilitarian mid-century industrial architecture which are entered from the
rear (east) but both oriented to the views of Spring Bay to the west.
The buildings are of steel portal frame construction with non-structural
internal partition walls which lend themselves to adaptive reuse.

15

Extract Survey Plan prepared by Leary and Cox Land and Engineering
Surveyors 2016

Administration Building,
Amenities Building
Workshop

16

Administration building view from the east.

Amenities building view from the east.

17

The western elevation of the Amenities building on the right and the
Administration building on the left enjoying extensive views to Spring
Bay.

A large workshop and smaller ancillary buildings are located to the west
and downslope of the Amenities and Administration buildings.
The industrial buildings, plant and structures which formed the
operational part of the woodchip mill are located further to the south
and are organised around two extensive open spaces which have been
s i g n i f i c a n t l y m o d i f i e d to a c c o m m o d a t e t h e i r f u n c t i o n . T h e f i r s t s p a c e i s
the delivery, stock pile and staging area for the timber. This area is

18

directly east of the administration building and is an expansive


asphalted which adjoins the Big and Small Chippers and provided the
location to receive and handle timber coming into the mill from the
forests in the vicinity of Hobart by an extensive log truck supply fleet. A
large secondary log storage area is located further to the east at a
lower level.

Extract Survey Plan prepared by Leary and Cox Land and Engineering
Surveyors 2016
Big Chipper,
Screen House
Small Chipper

19

Delivery, stock pile and staging area

Subject site looking south over the delivery, stock pile and staging area
with the Big Chipper to the right.

20

Secondary storage area located further to the east and at a lower level.

The Big Chipper located to the west of the delivery, stock pile and
staging area.

21

View east of the Big Chipper from the lower level.

View south-east of the Big Chipper from the lower level with the Screen
House and Small Chipper beyond.
The Big Chipper is a large volume two level structure which is cut into
the slope of the land to allow the logs to be fed into the chipper at the
upper level and the wood chips to be gravity fed onto the conveyor belt
feeding the Screen House and Small Chipper. The Small Chipper is
located to the south of the Big Chipper and is connected into the same
system of conveyor belts feeding the Screen House and Small Chipper.

22

The structures are utilitarian, large volume industrial facilities of steel


frame and corrugated iron cladding on extensive concrete footings to
absorb the vibration from the 2500 horsepower chipper which was
housed in the building. Both chipper buildings have extensive large
volume internal industrial spaces at the chipper deck level and at the
level below. The control room above the chipper deck retains the
remnants of the operational machinery and is of industrial heritage
interest.

Big Chipper view east from the lower level towards chipper deck and
loading area.

23

Control Room above the chipper deck.


The conveyor belt from the Big and Small Chippers feeds into the
Screen House which is located to the west and down slope of the
chippers.

The Screen House is built over two levels but has an

impressive interior volume and sense of space.

View south of the Screen House and Conveyor Belt connection to the
Chippers.

24

Screens and plant within the Screen House operational area.

Screen House with its impressive internal volumes and spaces.

25

26

Screens and plate steel surge feeders within the Screen House.

27

View west from the Screen House.

View south-west from the Screen House over the woodchip stockpile.

28

View east towards the Small Chipper.

2 Metre diameter log retaining walls adjoining the Small Chipper.


The Small Chipper Building is a smaller painted concrete block wall
building located to the east of the Screen House but retaining the high
volume industrial spaces with a spare aesthetic. From the Screen
House and Small Chipper the conveyor belt connects to the centre of
the woodchip stock pile where it would have been dispersed by the
centrally located 50m pivoting gantry which has since been removed.

29

Extract Survey Plan prepared by Leary and Cox Land and Engineering
Surveyors 2016
Gantry base,
Concrete Bunker Chute
Second Concrete Chute
Crane west
Crane east

30

Pivoting gantry feeding the woodchip stock pile Source: GoogleImages


2016

Pivoting gantry feeding the woodchip stock pile Source: GoogleImages


2016

31

Pivoting gantry feeding the woodchip stock pile Source: GoogleImages


2016

Aerial of woodchip stockpile and loader GoogleImages 2016

32

Woodchip stockpile and loader GoogleImages 2016


The structures remaining from the woodchip stock pile include the
remnants of the conveyor belt structure, the circular concrete gantry
wall and the concrete bunker chutes which fed the lower conveyor belt
to the loader wharf. The stockpile has been mostly removed and only a
few centimetres of compacted woodchip remain in place.

View north across woodchip stockpile towards circular gantry base.

33

Concrete bunker chutes below the stockpile area.

View west from the concrete bunker chute.

34

View from interior of the concrete bunker chute.

The second concrete bunker chute.

35

View of the interior of the second concrete bunker chute.

View from interior of the second concrete bunker chute.


The northern edge of the woodchip stockpile contains to cranes which
were used in the management of the stock pile. These are substantial
steel structures set on concrete plinths which rise above their
surroundings which are significant landmarks in the landscape and
o f f e r i n g e x c e p t i o n a l v i e w s . T h e e a s t e r n c ra n e h a s b e e n d a m a g e d b y a n
electrical fire and both require stabilisation works.

36

View east of the cranes from the lower level.

Western crane from lower level.

37

Western crane from upper level of eastern crane.

Views from upper level of the eastern crane.


In the vicinity of the cranes on the south-western portion of the site is a
m i l l s t o n e g r i n d i n g s i t e . T h e m i l l s t o n e s i t e p r e- d a t e s t h e m i l l u s e o f
the site

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Mill Stone grinding site on south-west corner of the subject site in


proximity to the wood chip stockpile.

Mill Stone groove.


The north-eastern and south-western portions of the site are less
affected by the industrial modifications made to the greater part of the
site. The north-eastern portion comprises Dry Eucalyptus globulus
forest and woodland. The Fauna and Flora report notes:

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It is likely this community formed a continuous band around the local


coastline prior to European arrival. The patches on site vary in
condition, with the patches in the northeast and south being relatively
low quality compared to the northwest. In particular the patch in the
south has evidently had the majority of emergent eucalypts removed,
leaving a dense small tree layer of Allocasuarina verticillata and
Acacia mearnsii , with only sparse Eucalyptus globulus. The patch in
the northeast has similarly few E. globulus, largely on account of small
patch size. Each of these patches has also been subjected to frequent
slashing of the understorey. The patch in the northwest however has a
continuous mature canopy of E. globulus and impacts of human
disturbance (primarily environmental weed invasion) are largely limited
to vehicle tracks and edge effects along the eastern boundary, which
abuts cleared land. Understories within all patches are dominated by
native grasses and graminoids, such as Themeda triandra , Austrostipa
species, Lomandra longifolia , Gahnia radula , Lepidosperma concavum
and Ehrharta species, as well as high diversity of herbs and small
shrubs, including Cynoglossum australe , Pimelea humilis , Lissanthe
strigosa , Hibbertia hirsute and Acaena echinata .
DGL is listed as threatened under the Tasmanian Nature Conservation
Act 2002.

The land in the south-east has been modified during the creation of a
series sediment settling ponds for the runoff from the woodchip stock
pile. These ponds sit on the land between the woodchip stock pile and
bay on the south-eastern boundary of the site. This location is raised
above the beach and offers views to the south-east and Maria Island.

Barker North Ecosystem Services Spring Bay Mill Redevelopment Flora and Fauna Assessment October
2016 p9

40

Sediment ponds to the south-east of the woodchip stockpile.

Below the sediment ponds with views to the south -east and Maria
Island.

41

South-eastern boundary of the site.

View east across Windlass Bay beach.

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3.0

Proposed Development

This section should be read in conjunction with the architectural plans


prepared by Neeson Murcutt Architects.
It is proposed to adaptively reuse the existing buildings and industrial
structures on the site as a tourism facility. The first stage of this
redevelopment will include a hotel, restaurant and function facilities.
The underlying principle of the adaptive reuse is to retain the industrial
heritage and integrity of the site which has a forty year history of forest
industry use.
The design seeks to retain the coherence of the industrial structures
and illustrate the line of the log through the retention and adaptive
reuse of the existing buildings, plant and machinery with sensitive
contemporary insertions to facilitate the new uses.
The proposal will provide for an interpretative centre in the future
stages, within the weigh-bridge, which will include a display of oral and
visual histories of the site and its workers.

These histories are in the

process of being researched and compiled.


The proposed hotel will comprise 20 suites (varying between 1 bed and
3 bed) both centralised around the main facilities and spread through
the site taking advantage of the industrial heritage and natural
landscapes within the site. The facilities will include a reception and
lounge area and restaurant and function space which will be open to the
public.
It is intended that service vehicles only will be able to utilise the oneway loop within the site. All guest and public parking will occur within
the northern car park adjoining the weighbridge and access will be via
walking trial and staff operated four wheel drives throughout the
remainder of the site. Bicycles will also be made available for guest
use.

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The former administration centre is proposed to be converted for use as


hotel rooms with the amenities block providing hotel reception and
administration. Additional hotel rooms are proposed to be inserted into
the crane gantries which adjoin the former woodchip pile and inserted
into one of the concrete bunkers which fed the conveyor belt system.
The Watch Tower building will be adaptively reused as a family
accommodation unit.
The Screen House building is proposed to be adaptively reused as the
hotel restaurant with contemporary insertions adjacent to the existing
s t r u c t u r e t o a c c o m m o d a t e t h e k i t c h e n a n d f o o d p r e p a r a ti o n a r e a s w h i l e
retaining the industrial plant and fabric of the building.
The former Small Chipper Building is proposed to be adaptively reused
as a function facility which will operate in conjunction with the adjoining
restaurant building and will be serviced from the restaurant kitchen.
A series of new freestanding accommodation units are proposed to be
constructed on the south-eastern edge of the site overlooking Windlass
Bay towards Maria Island. These are the only new built structures
proposed for the site.
The former caretakers residence is proposed to be altered for use as
the on-site managers residence.
The adaptive reuse of the Big Chipper and its staging areas for future
function facilities will form the subject of a future application within the
later stages. Similarly, the workshop and its ancillary structures will be
considered for educational uses in a future application within the later
stages.

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3.1 Design Statement


Site
Spring Bay Mill is located on the northern shore of Spring Bay, some 4
kilometres south east of the town of Triabunna. The 40.47 hectare site
is notable for its former use as a woodchip mill (1970-2013), and
significantly, for the discontinuation of this extractive industry.
The site has three distinct precincts:
Former line of the log (primary industrial) precinct
The primary industrial components can be understood in sequence as
the line of the log. These include the entry weighbridge, the open log
stacking area, the chippers, the screen house, the conveyor belts, and
the chip mound with its associated structures such as the bunker
tunnels and cranes. The wharf, a local landmark emblematic of the mill
and the final stage in the wood chipping process, is under separate
ownership.
Former support building precinct
The industrial operation was supported by administration, staff
facilities, workshops, and a managers cottage. The architecture of the
administration and staff facilities buildings is distinctly modernist
international style. They are sited within a garden. The other
buildings, like the structures of the primary industrial precinct, are
utilitarian. The ensemble is unified through colour each painted
Gunns green.
Landscape areas
In stark contrast to the industrial zones, the remaining areas contain
landscape of different types. These include blue gum forest, former
pastoral areas, and an area that was established to manage and clean
industrial water from the holding dam via a series of ephemeral ponds,
referred to here as the water treatment landscape.
Approach
The proposal is the first stage in the active rejuvenation of Spring Bay
Mill for sustainable uses, including tourism. Delicate intervention will

45

g i v e s h a p e t o t h e p l a c e a s a n a u t h e n t i c a n d m u l t i- l a y e r e d d e s t i n a t i o n
a post-industrial ecology based on a design approach that;


keeps (almost) everything;

carefully dusts off what is useful;

ameliorates with new structures;

maintains a sense of the elemental; and,

makes safe.

The retention of the industrial structures, machinery and equipment,


enables the former use to be interpreted, and in so doing, provide a
platform for engagement with issues of sustainability, human settlement
and human endeavour. It also makes it a place like no other in Australia
a post-industrial ecology.
The idea of rejuvenation broadly frames the intent of the project and
future of Spring Bay Mill environmental rejuvenation, social
rejuvenation, economic rejuvenation.
Scope
The first stage works, subject of this development application, include:
(1) Within the former line of the log (primary industrial) precinct:



a d a p t i v e r e u s e o f t h e f o r m e r s c r e e n h o u s e a s a r e s t a u r a n t;
adaptive reuse of the former small chipper building as a small
multi-function room;

Within the chip mound (primary industrial):




adaptive reuse of the western bunker tunnel as an


accommodation unit;

accommodation units added to each of the two cranes;

accommodation unit added adjacent to and incorporating the


watch tower;

(2) Within the former support building precinct:




adaptive reuse of the former administration building as an 8 room


hotel;

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adaptive reuse of the former staff building as a reception and


lounge;

renovation of the managers cottage.

(3) Within the landscape area, specifically the water treatment


landscape:


4 new pairs of accommodation units

The developed site will offer three distinctly different visitor


experiences:


hotel experience (international style architecture, cultivated


garden);

industrial experience (restaurant, woodchip mound);

e c o l o g i c a l l a n d s c a p e e x p e r i e n c e ( w a t e r t r e a t m e n t l a n d s c a p e ).

Access
This is a place one will explore by walking. Vehicle access will be
limited for safety and serenity. There is a strangely surreal feeling
knowing that a still, quiet place was once a dusty, noisy place this
contributes to the power of the experience of Spring Bay Mill today.
Visitor parking will be adjacent the existing watertank with access
across the site on foot. Service vehicles will transport bags and guests
to the more distant accommodation units. The hotel component will
include two fully accessible accommodation units. A loop road will
provide to-the-door access to the restaurant for less mobile visitors,
and also allow efficient deliveries and servicing.
Water
The project includes an holistic approach to water management,
capturing stormwater and runoff to create new ecologies whilst feeding
existing ones. Rainwater will be collected for drinking off new structures
with new roofs.
Energy

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The building interventions are climate conscious, utilizing passive


design to the maximum extent possible in order to minimize energy use.
Eventually the intention is to take the site off the electricity grid as fully
Stand Alone. Energy will be generated through solar with battery
backup.
Materiality
The exterior material palette for new elements can be described broadly
in the following principles;


Additions to existing buildings utilize the palette of the existing


building, including painted timber, painted steel sheeting, and
glass.

Additions to infrastructure elements on the chip mound such as


the cranes and bunker tunnel are predominantly galvanized steel
sheet and glass.

Buildings within or adjacent landscapes are predominantly timber


(left to weather grey) and glass.

The primary industrial structures will be tagged a portion painted in


a contrasting colour as a means of identifying them as being part of
the primary industrial process.
Cyclone wire fencing will be discretely and artfully employed to provide
site safety generally.
Descriptions
Restaurant (former screen house)
Entry is via the former screen house, an impressive cathedral -like
space internally in terms of scale and light. The dining room and
kitchen are housed immediately adjacent in a new building element that
allows them to be weather-tight. They look back to the surge bins in the
screen house, out across the chip mound, and down to Spring Bay.
Small multi-function room (former small chipper building)

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A naturally scented timber-lined room is built within the existing


concrete block building, with a new corner window providing a view to
Maria Island. Like the restaurant, entry to the habitable space is via the
industrial space, past the old wood chipper machine.
Reception and lounge (former staff building)
The former staff building is well located and appropriated scaled as a
reception and lounge. The new internal layout works with the clear logic
of its structural bays. It looks to the bay and opens to the existing
cultivated garden.
Hotel (former administration buildin g)
The boardroom additions are removed and the original building
envelope divided along the logic of its structural bays to create a total
of eight hotel rooms. Access is via a new covered walkway from the
reception, and is set off the building to create private gardens. Each
hotel room runs front to back connecting garden and bay. The gardens
are resonant of a Japanese zen gardens, alluding to the former
connection between Spring Bay Mill and Japan.
Bunker tunnel
The bunker tunnel is a spectacularly singular space a concrete tube
open to the bay at one end with a large square roof opening at the
other. Three new components entry pavilion, skylight, and chimney
flue are visible externally above the concrete lid, providing access,
light and air. Internally the stair is the sole element in the space, with
the bathing area located discretely behind it.
Cranes
Resonant with the bunker tunnel, the crane accommodation comprises a
long tube-like space, straddling the concrete feet of each of the two
cranes. The one bedroom accommodation units look directly into the
crane structure at one end, and back out across the chip mound at the
other.
Watch-tower

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The watch-tower is held within a new timber wall that defines a


courtyard and incorporates a two bedroom accommodation unit for small
groups, including families. The accommodation unit sits between the
courtyard to the north and forest to the south, participating in both
with a long north verandah and south windows. The watch -tower peers
over the courtyard wall. It is the sleep-out, the den, the cubby.
Landscape units
The four splayed buildings sit within the water management landscape
at the southern end of the site. They partake in this landscape, helping
to direct water between their splayed walls to ephemeral ponds that lie
below. Each accommodates a pair of single bedroom units. Entry is into
a private courtyard via a shared elevated boardwalk that tracks above
the ephemeral wetland. The courtyards capture north sun and protect
from wind. Broad balconies embrace the breadth of view. The splayed
walls afford each unit a dramatic sense of panorama to Windlass Bay
and Maria Island beyond, whilst maintaining complete privacy.
Managers cottage
The existing timber managers cottage is renovated with new open plan
living spaces on the north side within the existing carport envelope. An
angled wall provides privacy to the open sunny north face from the
entry road.

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3.2 Detail Description


3.2.1 Roads and Access Tracks

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Existing internal access road to be retained and extended to form


one-way loop;
o

Access spur to visitor parking area;


o

Buggy and pedestrian access to E1, E2, F1, F2

New buggy and pedestrian access track central;


o

Buggy and pedestrian access to G1, G2, G3, G4

New buggy and pedestrian access track east;


o

Demolish shed for turning loop;

New buggy and pedestrian access track west;


o

Parking for 60 cars;

Service spur to turning loop to building B2;


o

Vehicle access to buildings B1, B2, C and D;

Buggy and pedestrian access to H;

Existing walking tracks on site to remain;

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3.2.2 Reception Building B2

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RL 44.55;

Hotel Reception (205m );

Reception and lounge waiting area;

Guest lounge;

Office and meeting space;

Kitchenette;

Luggage store;

Outdoor terrace and fire pit;

Accessible ramp to B1;


o

Covered walkway;

Service vehicle access from internal access road;


o

Loading bay;

Guest drop off;

Accessible entry;

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3.2.3 Hotel Suites Building B1

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RL46.29;

Hotel suites (685m );

Suite 1; (accessible suite 60m )

Walled garden entry;

Open bath;

Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom;

Living;
2

Suite 2; (47m )
o

Walled garden entry;

Open bath;

Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom;

Living;
2

Suite 3; (47m )
o

Walled garden entry;

Open bath;

Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom;

Living;
2

Suite 4; (47m )
o

Walled garden entry;

Open bath;

Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom;

Living;
2

Suite 5; (47m )
o

Walled garden entry;

Open bath;

Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom;

Living;
2

Suite 6; (47m )
o

Walled garden entry;

Open bath;

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Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom;

Living;
2

Suite 7; (47m )
o

Walled garden entry;

Open bath;

Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom;

Living;
2

Suite 8; (accessible suite 60m )


o

Walled garden entry;

Open bath;

Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom;

Living;

Accessible ramp to B2;


o

Covered walkway;

57

3.2.4 Managers Cottage Building A

58

RL44.55;

Managers Cottage (137m );

Entry;

TV Room;

Bedroom 1;

Bedroom 2;

Bedroom 3;

Bathroom;

Living/study;

Kitchen;

Laundry;

Deck

Walled southern garden;

59

3.2.5 Restaurant Building C

60

RL 39.40;

Restaurant (440m );

Staff toilet;

Kitchen;

Dry store;

Cool room;

Bin Store;

Male toilet;

Female toilet;

Internal dining area;


o

Bar;

Lounge/waiting 6 pax;

Dining 76 pax;

External dining;
o

Dining 8 pax;

Screens and plant retained in situ;

Accessible ramp to loop road dropoff;

Service vehicle access from loop road dropoff;


o

Guest drop off;

Accessible entry;

61

3.2.6 Multi Purpose Function Space Building D

62

RL 44.14;

Function Space (120m );

Uses;

Yoga;

Meditation;

Meeting room;

Lounge;

Functions;

Service area;
o

Back of House;

Access to restaurant kitchen;

Sorter and plant retained in situ;

Accessible ramp to loop road dropoff;

Service vehicle access from loop road dropoff;


o

Guest drop off;

Accessible entry;

63

3.2.7 Crane Hotel Suite Building E1

64

RL23.07;

Crane Hotel suite (59m );

Suite 1; (59m )

Deck entry;

Lounge/fire;

Bathroom amenities;

Study;

Bedroom;

65

3.2.8 Crane Hotel Suite Building E2

66

RL24.32;

Crane Hotel suite (59m );

Suite 2; (59m )

Deck entry;

Lounge/fire;

Bathroom amenities;

Study;

Bedroom;

67

3.2.9 Bunker Hotel Suite Building F1

68

RL30.42;

Bunker Hotel suite (100m );

Suite 1; (100m )

Garden entry;

Enclosed entry stair;

Open bath;

Bathroom amenities;

Study;

Lounge;

Bedroom;

69

3.2.10 Beach Accommodation Buildings G1 G4

70

Typical Beach Accommodation Building

71

RL16.00 (varies between accommodation units);

Accommodation Units (8 x suites 705m );

Building G1

Suite 1; (88m )

Walled garden entry;

Living;

Dining;

Kitchen;

Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom;

Deck;

Outdoor bath;
2

Suite 2; (88m )
o

Walled garden entry;

Living;

Dining;

Kitchen;

Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom;

Deck;

Outdoor bath;

Building G2

Suite 1; (88m )

Walled garden entry;

Living;

Dining;

Kitchen;

Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom;

Deck;

Outdoor bath;
2

Suite 2; (88m )
o

Walled garden entry;

Living;

Dining;

72

Kitchen;

Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom;

Deck;

Outdoor bath;

Building G3

Suite 1; (88m )

Walled garden entry;

Living;

Dining;

Kitchen;

Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom;

Deck;

Outdoor bath;
2

Suite 2; (88m )
o

Walled garden entry;

Living;

Dining;

Kitchen;

Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom;

Deck;

Outdoor bath;

Building G4

Suite 1; (88m )

Walled garden entry;

Living;

Dining;

Kitchen;

Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom;

Deck;

Outdoor bath;
2

Suite 2; (88m )
o

Walled garden entry;

73

Living;

Dining;

Kitchen;

Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom;

Deck;

Outdoor bath;

74

3.2.11 Tower Accommodation Building H

75

RL36.69;

Tower Hotel suite (208m );

Suite 1; (208m )

Walled garden entry;

Walled garden;

Deck

Lounge;

Dining;

Kitchen;

Bathroom amenities;

Bedroom 1;

Bedroom 2;

Bathroom amenities 2;

Sleepout/studio;

76

4.0

Planning Scheme Provisions

The proposed development has been assessed against the relevant


requirements and guidelines set by Glamorgan Spring Bay Council. The
following provisions of the Glamorgan Spring Bay Interim Planning
Scheme 2015 are relevant to consideration of the proposal.
4.1

Zoning and Overlays

The following diagram describes the subject site within the Particular
Purpose Zone 5 Spring Bay.

Zoning Plan (Source: The LIST)


The purpose of the zone is as follows:
36.1.1 Zone Purpose Statements
36.1.1.1 To provide for a range of visitor accommodation,
community, marine and horticultural research, gardens,

77

commercial, cultural and educational uses that will allow


redevelopment of the site in a visually and ecologically sensitive
manner without competing with the settlement area of central
Triabunna as the focus for meeting daily needs of local
residents.
36.1.1.2 To encourage appropriate use or development
particularly for the visual and performing arts and cultural
activities, education and research particularly for marine and
gardens, tourism activities, accommodation and associated
facilities.
36.1.1.3 To ensure the environmental and visual values of the
site are respected and enhanced.
36.1.1.4 To ensure development of the site is ecologically
sustainable.
36.1.1.5 To encourage adaptive re-use of existing infrastructure
and buildings.
The proposal to develop the site as hotel accommodation and function
facilities providing a range of visitor accommodation and support
facilities in a visually and ecologically sensitive manner is considered
to be consistent with the purpose of the zone. The proposal does not
provide uses for meeting daily needs of local residents and will not
compete with the settlement area of central Triabunna but is intended
to attract tourists and visitors from the broader region to Triabunna.
The proposal provides for tourism activities by providing
accommodation and associated facilities and is intended in succeeding
development stages to make provision for performing arts and cultural
activities and educational activities in the buildings identified for those
future purposes.
The proposal comprises a sensitive adaptive reuse of the site to ensure
that the environmental and visual values of the site are respected and

78

enhanced and that the environmental and social history of the site is
recognised and celebrated by the design philosophy consistent with the
zone purpose.
The proposed development ensures an ecologically sustainable future
by adaptively reusing the site and repurposing industrially redundant
buildings, plant and machinery for a contemporary economic purpose.
This is supported by a water, energy and resource strategy which
focuses the ecological sustainability of the proposed development.
The proposal is exemplary in its approach to adaptive reuse of the
existing infrastructure and site improvements. The on-site demolition is
minimised and the construction of improvements for the greater part is
by considered and respectful insertion into existing fabric while
retaining the aesthetic and form of the original. The new insertions are
designed to be secondary and subservient to both the existing built
form character and the environmental values of the site.
The proposed development is considered to be consistent with the Zone
Purpose Statements.

36.1.2 Local Area Objectives


There are no Local Area Objectives for this zone.
36.1.3 Desired Future Character Statements
There are no Desired Future Character statements for this zo ne.
36.2 Use Table
The use as a hotel industry is a permitted use.
36.3 Use Standards
There are no use standards for this zone.

79

4.2

Development Standards

36.4 Development Standards for Buildings and Works


36.4.1 Building Height
Objective:
To ensure that building height contributes positively to streetscape and
landscape and does not result in unreasonable impact on the visual and
environmental amenity of the area.
Acceptable Solutions

Performance Criteria

A1

P1

Building height must be no more

Building height must not adversely

than 10m.

impact upon visual amenity of the


site when viewed from surrounding
locations and vegetation should be
used to soften visual impacts.

80

The proposed development adaptively reuses the existing buildings and


in each case the new works proposed remain well within the 10m
height.
The only exception relates to works proposed to the existing Screen
House for adaptive reuse as a restaurant. T he works proposed include
an extension to the west side of the building to allow the creation of the
restaurant dining area while retaining the industrial screens in situ.
This extension is proposed in folded metal cladding to match the
existing building and is provided with a steeply angled roof which sits
approximately 1.6m below the existing roof of the Screen House at its
apex. This new roof at its highest point is approximately 14.8m but the
height above 10m is limited to a length of around 1600mm because of a
localised excavation.

Proposed South Elevation Building C Restaurant 10m height


exceedance highlighted

81

The extension has been designed to be in sympathetic to the existing


building and is not considered to adversely impact upon visual amenity
of the site when viewed from surrounding locations. In this instance
where the building itself is a significant visual landmark it is not
considered appropriate to use vegetation to soften visual impacts as
this would detract from the importance of the existing building in the
industrial landscape.
It is considered that this limited height breach meets the performance
criteria P1.
36.4.2 Setback
Objective:
To ensure that building setback contributes positively to the
streetscape and landscape and does not result in unreasonable impact
on the amenity of adjoining land.
Acceptable Solutions

Performance Criteria

A1

P1

Building setback must comply with

Building setback must satisfy all of

all of the following:

the following:

(a) be no less than 10m to frontage

(a) be sufficient to prevent

and side and rear boundaries;

unreasonable adverse impact


on use of adjoining land;

(b) be no less than 30m to the


adjoining General Industrial
Zone.

(b) be sufficient to prevent


unreasonable loss of visual
amenity of the site when
viewed from surrounding
locations;
(c) provide for the mitigation of
visual impact and land use
conflict with appropriately

82

located and designed


vegetation.
The proposal meets the acceptable solution providing setbacks in
excess of the control on each boundary.
36.4.3 Design
Objective:
To ensure that building design does not result in unreasonable adverse
impact on visual and environmental amenity of the land.
Acceptable Solutions

Performance Criteria

A1

P1

Exterior building surfaces must

Exterior building surfaces must

comply with all of following:

avoid adverse impacts on the


visual amenity of neighbouring

(a) be coloured using colours with

land and detracting from the

a light reflectance value not

contribution the site makes to the

greater than 40 percent;

landscape, views and vistas.

(b) be coloured using dark or


muted toned colours specified
in AS2700: 2011 Colour
Standards for General
Purposes.
A2

Site coverage must prevent


unreasonable adverse impacts on

Site coverage must be no more

visual amenity of the site when

than 5%.

viewed from surrounding locations


and be sufficient to accommodate
development that is consistent
with the Zone Purpose Statements.

83

The proposal retains the existing cladding and materials in the adaptive
reuse of the existing structures and matches these materials for the
new insertions. These materials are predominantly industrial in
character with colours with a light reflectance value not greater than 40
percent. These materials and those used in the new structures are
proposed to be coloured using dark or muted toned colours. The
proposal meets the acceptable solution A1.
The proposed development has a site coverage of significantly less
than 5% which meets the acceptable solution A2.

36.4.4 Landscaping
Objective:
To ensure the environmental integrity of the land is enhanced and to
minimise potential for land use conflicts.
Acceptable Solutions

Performance Criteria

A1

P1

Landscaping is required for all

No Performance Criteria.

development by either new


plantings or retention of existing
vegetation.
A2

P2

Vegetation must be retained within

Vegetation must be retained or

30m of the Light Industrial Zone.

planted to minimise land use


conflict with the Light Industrial
Zone.

84

The proposal retains the existing vegetation by adaptively reusing the


existing buildings and structures and carefully locating the proposed
new buildings in areas which are currently predominately cleared. The
development is also proposed to be enhanced with additional plantings.
Vegetation is retained within 30m of the Light Industrial Zone.
The proposed development meets the acceptable solutions A1 and A2.
36.4.5 Subdivision
Objective:
To ensure a holistic approach to use and development of the site.
Acceptable Solutions

Performance Criteria

A1

P1

Subdivision is for the purpose of

No Performance Criteria.

providing lots for public open


space, a riparian or littoral
reserves or utilities.
A2

P2

No Acceptable Solution.

The frontage, size and dimensions


of each lot must be sufficient to
accommodate development
consistent with the Zone Purpose
Statements.

No subdivision is proposed.
Part E Codes
E1.0 Bushfire-Prone Areas Code
Explanatory Note The Bushfire-Prone Areas Code is a Statewide code

85

given effect by Interim Planning Directive No.1 Bushfire-Prone Areas


Code. The former provisions of the Bushfire-Prone Areas Code given
effect under Planning Directive No.5 have been suspended.
E1.1 Purpose of the Bushfire-Prone Areas Code
E1.1.1
The purpose of this Code is to ensure that use and development is
appropriately designed, located, serviced, and constructed, to reduce
the risk to human life and property, and the cost to the community,
caused by bushfires.
E1.2 Application of this Code
E1.2.1
This Code applies to:
(a)

development, on land that is located within, or partially within,


a bushfire-prone area, consisting of the subdivision of land; and

(b)

a use, on land that is located within, or partially within,


a b u s h f i r e - p r o n e a r e a , t h a t i s a v u l n e r a b l e u s e o r h a z a rd o u s u s e .

E1.2.2
A permit is required for all use and development to which this Code
applies that is not exempt from this Code under clause E1.4.
The bushfire code applies to the subject development. A report has
been prepared by North Barker for the subject site and the proposed
development and is submitted with the application which demonstrates
the impact of the implementation of the Bush Fire Hazard Management
Plan.
The report concludes that an acceptable solution that minimises
vegetation clearance while being acceptable under the regulations is
proposed. The proposal adopts the required BAL 12.5 separation
distances between fire prone vegetation and the buildings where
practicable but separation distances diminish to BAL 29 and 40

86

adjacent to property boundaries. A hazard management area buffer


proposed to include low threat vegetation has been included to allow for
broad scale protection and landscape development. A static water
supply with hydrants and an evacuation plan are included.
The implementation of this proposal will require the standards set out in
the Requirements for Building in Bushfire Prone Areas, the Building
Amendment Regulations 2016 and the hazard management plan to be
incorporated and maintained.
It is considered that this appropriately addresses the Bushfire-Prone
Areas Code.
E2.0 Potentially Contaminated Land Code
E2.1 Purpose of the Potentially Contaminated Land Code
E2.1.1
The purpose of this provision is to:
(a)

ensure that use or development of potentially contaminated land


does not adversely impact on human health or the environment.

E2.2 Application of this Code


E2.2.1
This Code applies to:
(a)

a use, on potentially contaminated land, that is a sensitive use,


or a use listed in a use class in Table E2.2.1 and is one of the
uses specified as a qualification; or

(b)

development on potentially contaminated land.

Table E2.2 Potentially Contaminating Activities

87

Potentially Contaminating

Potentially Contaminating Activity

Activity
Acid / alkali plant and

Mineral processing

formulation
Ammunition manufacture and

Mine sites involving waste rock or

usage (e.g. shooting ranges)

tailings deposits

Asbestos production, handling or

Oil or gas production or refining

disposal
Asphalt/bitumen manufacturing

Paint formulation and manufacture

Battery manufacturing or

Pesticide manufacture and

recycling

formulation sites

Boat/ship building, marinas, slip

Petroleum product or oil storage

ways and associated boat yards


Boiler or kiln usage

Pharmaceutical manufacture and


formulation

Chemical manufacture and

Power stations

formulation (e.g. fertilisers,


paints, pesticides, photography,
plastics, solvents)
Commercial engine and

Printing

machinery repair sites


Drum conditioning works

Radio-active material usage (e.g.


hospitals)

Dry cleaning establishments

Railway yards

Electrical transformers

Scrap yards and recycling facilities

Ethanol production plants

Sewage treatment plants

Explosives industries

Sheep and cattle dips

Fertiliser manufacturing plants

Sites of fires involving hazardous


materials, including firefighting
foam use

Fill material imported onto a site

Sites of incidents involving release

from a potentially contaminated

of hazardous materials

source
Foundry operations

Spray painting industries

Gas works

Spray storage and mixing sites

88

(e.g. for orchards)


Herbicide manufacture

Tanning and associated trades

Industrial activities involving

Textile operations

hazardous chemicals in
significant quantities
Iron and steel works

Tyre manufacturing and retreading


works

Landfill sites, including on-site

Wood preservation and storage or

waste disposal and refuse pits

cutting of treated timber

Metal smelting, refining or

Wool scouring

finishing
Metal treatments (e.g.
electroplating) and abrasive
blasting
The site does not fall within the Table E2.2 of Potentially Contaminating
Uses. The zoning of the site changed from Industrial/Commercial to a
new Particular Purpose 5 Spring Bay Zone, on 04 July 2014. The land
immediately around the facility is zoned rural.
Historical information about the site can be found in the Decommission
and Rehabilitation Plan, submitted to the EPA in January 2014. In
February 2014, Triabunna Investments Pty Ltd received advice that its
Decommission and Rehabilitation Plan (DRP) had been approved by the
EPA. Triabunna Investments engaged Timber World Pty Ltd to
implement the DRP and coordinate activity pursuant to decommission
on its behalf. The facility is now advised to be free of significant
contamination, the natural values of the site have been substantially
rehabilitated and the site is considered to pose no ongoing
environmental risk.

E5.0 Road and Railway Assets Code


E5.1 Purpose of the Road and Railway Assets Code

89

E5.1.1
The purpose of this provision is to:
(a)

protect the safety and efficiency of the road and railway networks;
and

(b)

reduce conflicts between sensitive uses and major roads and the
rail network.

The proposal does not require a new vehicular crossing, junction or


level crossing. The proposal does not intensify the use of an existing
access. The proposal is not within 50m of a utilities zone.

90

5.0

Schedule 1 Considerations

PART 1 - Objectives of the Resource Management and Planning System


of Tasmania
1. The objectives of the resource management and planning system of
Tasmania are
(a) to promote the sustainable development of natural and
physical resources and the maintenance of ecological processes
and genetic diversity; and
(b) to provide for the fair, orderly and sustainable use and
development of air, land and water; and
(c) to encourage public involvement in resource management and
planning; and
(d) to facilitate economic development in accordance with the
objectives set out in paragraphs (a), (b) and (c); and
(e) to promote the sharing of responsibility for resource
management and planning between the different spheres of
Government, the community and industry in the State.
2. In clause 1(a), sustainable development means managing the use,
development and protection of natural and physical resources in a way,
or at a rate, which enables people and communities to provide for their
s o c i a l , e c o n o m i c a n d c u l t u r a l w e l l- b e i n g a n d f o r t h e i r h e a l t h a n d s a f e t y
while
(a) sustaining the potential of natural and physical resources to
meet the reasonably foreseeable needs of future generations;
and
(b) safeguarding the life-supporting capacity of air, water, soil
and ecosystems; and
(c) avoiding, remedying or mitigating any adverse effects of
activities on the environment.
PART 2 - Objectives of the Planning Process Established by this Act
The objectives of the planning process established by this Act are, in
support of the objectives set out in
Part 1 of this Schedule

91

(a) to require sound strategic planning and co-ordinated action


by State and local government; and
(b) to establish a system of planning instruments to be the
principal way of setting objectives, policies and controls for the
use, development and protection of land; and
(c) to ensure that the effects on the environment are considered
and provide for explicit consideration of social and economic
effects when decisions are made about the use and development
of land; and
(d) to require land use and development planning and policy to
be easily integrated with environmental, social, economic,
conservation and resource management policies at State,
regional and municipal levels; and
(e) to provide for the consolidation of approvals for land use or
development and related matters, and to co-ordinate planning
approvals with related approvals; and
(f) to secure a pleasant, efficient and safe working, living and
recreational environment for all Tasmanians and visitors to
Tasmania; and
(g) to conserve those buildings, areas or other places which are
of scientific, aesthetic, architectural or historical interest, or
otherwise of special cultural value; and
(h) to protect public infrastructure and other assets and enable
the orderly provision and coordination of public utilities and other
facilities for the benefit of the community; and
(i) to provide a planning framework which fully considers land
capability.
The following matters have been given consideration in assessing the
proposal against the objectives of the Resource Management and
Planning System of Tasmania and the Plan ning Process established by
the Act.
Context and Setting
The proposal responds to its context by adaptively reusing the existing
redundant mill buildings and structures to create a new phase in the life
of the site as a hotel, function and tourist facility. Where new buildings

92

have been introduced they have been integrated into the landscape to
minimise their impact upon the context and setting.
Access, Transport and Traffic
Freestone Point Road is a well constructed high capacity sealed road
which was designed to accommodate the high traffic flows associated
with servicing the former woodchip mill on the site during the height of
its production. It currently rarely used and only services industrial sites
since the closure of the mill and the traffic generation anticipated by
the proposed use is expected to be comfortably accommodated by the
existing infrastructure.
Heritage
The proposal recognises the social significance of the site to Triabunna
and the region and more broadly to the people of Tasmania. This has
driven a respectful and low impact adaptive reuse of the site which
preserves the connections and linkages to the past use and interprets
them on-site for the benefit of future generations.
Other Land Resources
Not applicable to this application.
Water
The proposed water management servicing strategy is based on reusing
the existing infrastructure where possible and proposing new water
management infrastructure at the site where required.
The redevelopment of the Spring Bay Mill will result in a substantial
reduction in potable water use compared to its former use. The
development will result in an increase in peak wastewater generation
loads which will be accommodated by expanding the existing waste
water system. The redevelopment w ill bring about a significant
reduction in stormwater flows from the site due to the revegetation of
the large woodchip storage area.
The new development at Spring Bay Mill will include the following water
management initiatives:

93

H1.=A6C2?2B@2<3A52existing site water, wastewater and


stormwater management infrastructure.
H"2D6;A2?;.9D.A2?@B==9FA<A52;2D.00<::<1.A6<;
buildings.
H;2E=.;121D.@A2D.A2?A?2.A:2;A.;1./@<?=A6<;@F@A2:A<
accommodate the increased wastewater generation from the site.
H"2D6;A2?;.9D.@A2D.A2?@B==9F6;3?.@A?B0AB?2A<@2?C602A52
new accommodation buildings.
H!<16360.A6<;@A<A522E6@A6;4@A<?:D.A2?@F@A2:A<A?2.AD.A2?
runoff from the site including new stormwater quality initiatives.
HE=.;@6<;<3A522E6sting system stormwater reuse system to
supply non-potable uses to the accommodation buildings.
It is considered that the proposed water management initiatives will
promote the sustainable development of natural and physical resources
and the maintenance of ecological processes on the site.

Soils
No significant excavation is proposed.
Air and Microclimate
It is considered that the proposal will not give rise to any significant air
or microclimate impacts.
Flora and Fauna
A flora and fauna report has been prepared and the proposal is
designed to satisfy the recommendations for site safety made in the
report.
The report concludes that field surveys have established that the only
overlap the proposed new footprint will have in relation to threatened
natural values or weeds amounts to less than 0.01 ha of planted
potential swift parrot foraging habitat. Subsequently, direct impacts to
threatened species and their habitat are considered to be negligible.
Potential indirect impacts to the swift parrot will nonetheless be

94

addressed in a management plan that will further ensure that the


proposal has minimal impact upon natural values.

Waste
The garbage/recycling storage area is proposed to be located in the
location of the workshop and will enable easy access to the collection
point.
Energy
The proposal includes a number of energy saving design features. The
design enables cross ventilation and natural daylight to penetrate all
levels. The building interventions are climate conscious, utilizing
passive design to the maximum extent possible in order to minimize
energy use. Eventually the intention is to take the site off the electricity
grid as fully Stand Alone. Energy will be generated through solar with
battery backup.
Noise and Vibration
Construction will be conducted in a manner that will minimise the
impact of noise and vibration. After construction the development is not
expected to have any noise or vibration impacts.
Natural Hazards
A bushfire report has been prepared and the proposal is desig ned to
satisfy the recommendations for site safety made in the report.
Technological Hazards
The adaptive reuse will ensure that the buildings, structures and
facilities are made safe for workers, hotel guest and visitors to the site.
Safety, Security and Crime Prevention
Casual surveillance to the street entry is possible from habitable rooms
of the managers cottage and reception area. Appropriate security
devices will be installed throughout the development.

North Barker Ecosystem Services Spring Bay Mill redevelopment Flora and Fauna Assessment 2016 p30

95

Social Impact in the Locality


The proposal is not expected to have an adverse social impact on the
locality, as the proposal will adaptively reuse the existing facilities and
bring new employment and tourism to the locality.
Economic Impact in the Locality
Employment opportunities will be provided during the construction
phase to the benefit of the local building sector, and the proposal will
increase employment opportunities on the site and in support services.
Site Design and Internal Design
The proposal draws on guidelines set out in the planning instruments to
reinforce positive elements of development form. The proposal
incorporates open plan living, where the primary living areas open up to
outdoor areas of private open space. The proposal has been designed
in keeping with the orientation of the site, and measures have been
taken in order to create the best possible outcome within the
constraints of the site. Therefore it is considered that the proposal is an
appropriate development solution to the adaptive reuse of the site.
Construction
The building process will be managed to minimise disruption to the
local community and the environment. However some noise is inevitable
during the construction phase and this will be managed in accordance
with Councils standards. The design of the development proposal has
focused on durable renewable materials with low maintenance
requirements.
Cumulative Impacts
The subject allotment is generously sized, shaped and orientated to
a c c o m m o d a t e t h e p r o p o s e d d e v e l o p m e n t. I t i s a n t i c i p a t e d t h a t t h e
proposed alterations and additions to the existing buildings and
proposed new buildings will have a negligible cumulative effects given
the intensity of the use it replaces.
Suitability of the site for development

96

Having regard to the location of the proposal, the site will adequately
accommodate the proposed hotel tourist development and function
facilities. This is supported by the zoning of the site.
Submissions
The Consent authority will need to consider the submissions received in
response to any public exhibition of the proposed development which
m a y b e r e q u i r e d u n d e r t h e p r o v i s i o n s o f t h e p l a n n i n g s c h e m e.
Public Interest
There are no known Federal and/or state Government policy statements
and/or strategies other than those discussed in this report that are of
relevance to this particular case. We are not aware of any other
circumstances that are relevant to the consideration of this
development application.

97

6.0

Conclusion

The proposed development adaptively reuses the existing woodchip mill


as a hotel, restaurant and function facilities at 555 Freestone Point
Road, Triabunna (Lot 1 DP 147559).
The subject site is a 40.47 hectare parcel of land located approximately
8km south of the town of Triabunna on the eastern shore of the deep
water port of Spring Bay. The site formerly accommodated the Gunns
woodchip mill which has been decommissioned since closure in 2011.
It is proposed to adaptively reuse the existing buildings and industrial
structures on the site as a tourism facility. The first stage of this
redevelopment will include a hotel, restaurant and function facilities.
The underlying principle of the adaptive reuse is to retain the industrial
heritage and integrity of the site which has a forty year history of forest
industry use.
The design seeks to retain the coherence of the industrial structures
and illustrate the line of the log through the retention and adaptive
reuse of the existing buildings, plant and machinery with sensitive
contemporary insertions to facilitate the new uses.
The proposal will provide for an interpretative centre in the future
stages, within the weigh-bridge, which will include a display of oral and
visual histories of the site and its workers.

These histories are in the

process of being researched and compiled.


The former administration centre is proposed to be converted for use as
hotel rooms with the amenities block providing hotel reception and
administration. Additional hotel rooms are proposed to be inserted into
the crane gantries which adjoin the former woodchip pile and inserted
into the concrete chutes which fed the conveyor belt system. The
Watch Tower building will be adaptively reused as hotel rooms.

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The Screen House building is proposed to be adaptively reused as the


hotel restaurant with contemporary insertions within the existing
structure to accommodate the kitchen and food preparation areas while
retaining the industrial plant and fabric of the building.
The former Small Chipper Building is proposed to be adaptively reused
as a function facility which will operate in conjunction with the adjoining
restaurant building and will be serviced from the restaurant kitchen.
A series of new freestanding hotel rooms are proposed to be
constructed on the south-eastern edge of the site overlooking Windlass
Bay towards Maria Island. These are the only new built structures
proposed for the site.
The former caretakers residence is proposed to be altered for use as
the on-site managers residence.
It is intended that visitors and guests to the site will make use of the
parking at the site entry and all access within the site will be service
vehicles only via the one-way loop and internal site access will be via
the walking tracks, staff four wheel drives and bicycles only.
The adaptive reuse of the Big Chipper and Small Chipper and their
staging areas for future function facilities will form the subject of a
future application within the later stages. Similarly, the workshop and
its ancillary structures will be considered for educational uses in a
future application within the later stages.
The proposed development has been designed in accordance with
Councils policies and planning instruments and will make a positive
contribution to the locality, contribute to economic growth and job
creation and sympathetically respond to the former industrial and
environmental character of the area.
The proposal also addresses the matters for consideration under the
Land Use Planning and Approvals 1993 and Glamorgan Spring Bay

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Interim Planning Scheme 2015. The review of the applicable planning


regime relating to the proposal has assessed the degree of compliance
and examined the environmental effects of the development. Where
impacts are identified, measures have been proposed to mitigate any
harm to environmental amenity which have been addressed in this
report.
It is considered that the proposed development will deliver a suitable
and appropriate development to Triabunna and is worthy of approval.

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Development Statement prepared by:


Name:

Andrew Darroch of Mersonn Pty Ltd

Qualification:

BA (Enviro. Sc.) Master City and Regional


Planning Grad. Dip Urban Estate
Management MPIA, MEPLA, MPCA

Address:

6/20 Wylde Street, Potts Point

In respect of the following Development Application:


Land to be developed:

555 Freestone Point Road, Triabunna

Proposed development:

Adaptive reuse of existing mill to tourist


accommodation and function facility.

Declaration:

I declare that I have prepared this


Statement and to the best of my
knowledge:
1. The Statement has been prepared in
accordance with the Land Use Planning
and Approvals Act 1993.
2. The Statement contains all available
information that is relevant to the
environmental assessment of the
development to which this Statement
relates, and
3. That the information contained in the
Statement is neither false nor
misleading.

Signature:
Name:

Andrew Darroch

Date:

October 2016

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