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A place to live

Tune in to Vocabulary and


Grammar (page 36)

Tune in to Reading (page 37)

1
1

This exercise reviews the Vocabulary box on


page 47 of the Students Book.

ANSWER KEY
1f
2a

3c
4e

5d
6b

1 63 is the percentage of the US population


that owns pets.
2 10 to 20 is the number of homes in a small
manufactured home park.
3 $60,000 is the price of a manufactured home,
given as an example in the text.
4 140 (square metres) is the metric equivalent
of 1,500 square feet.
5 1976 was the year the building code for this
type of home was changed.

ANSWER KEY

features of a building
attic
faade
stairs
arch
roof
ceiling
balcony

1 We lived in a house in Dover which had a


fantastic view.
2 I have a diary I write in every day.
3 Thats the new teacher who taught us this
morning.
4 Tim Burton has directed a new film which
stars Johnny Depp.
5 This is the song I love.
6 Our neighbour is a French girl whose father
is from Lyon.

This exercise reviews the Grammar box on page


49 of the Students Book.

ANSWER KEY

This exercise reviews the Grammar box on page


49 of the Students Book.

1 Barcelona is as expensive as Berlin.


2 The River Thames is not nearly as long as the
River Nile.
3 Mount Everest is a good deal higher than
Mont Blanc.
4 Silver is not as precious as platinum.
5 This car is not quite as old as that one.
6 Learning English is much less difficult than
learning Chinese.

As shown in the Tune in to Reading page for


Unit 5, topic sentences are an important aid to
finding the relevant information in a text. Topic
sentences can take different forms, like the
question/answer style adopted in the text here.
Students decide where to place the questions
in the text.

ANSWER KEY
a3

b1

c2

Students look for phrases in the text and match


them to the information that they refer to.
Accumulating details or examples in order to
support an argument is a favourite tactic with
writers. These details or examples are often
marked by certain phrases in the text. If students
can identify this sort of phrase, they will find it
much easier to navigate their way through the
information.

ANSWER KEY
1e
2c

POSSIBLE ANSWERS
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As shown in the Tune in to Reading page for


Unit 2, it is faster and easier to locate details in
the text when something stands out from the
rest of the print. This exercise focuses on
numbers.

ANSWER KEY

This exercise reviews the Vocabulary box on


page 51 of the Students Book.

materials
wood
brick
marble
steel
slate
stone

KEY

3d
4b

5a

Tune in to Writing (page 38)


This reviews the Writing section on pages 52-53 of
the Students Book. It further develops the skill of
writing a description of a place.

This is a collocation exercise. Students work in


pairs. In questions 1-4 students look for a verb.
In questions 5-8 students look for a verb and a
preposition. Do not give the answers yet as
students will look for these in 2.

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Students skim the text to check their answers to


1. Note that not all the collocations are in exactly
the same form as in 1.

ANSWER KEY
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

have a great time (extract h)


take a photo (extract c)
buy some souvenirs (extract b)
see a show (extract f)
go down a (water) slide (extract e or h)
go on a ride (extract c)
go for a swim (extract e)
stay in a hotel (extract g)

Tune in to Culture (page 39)


This Tune in to Culture page, Stereotypes,
expands on the theme of the unit. Students talk
about different stereotypes of British life.

POSSIBLE ANSWERS
a bad weather / always raining
b animal lovers
c polite, well-mannered
d they eat food like fish and chips, bad food
e very reserved
f orderly / always make a queue
Other British stereotypes might be: good sense
of humour, love sports, etc.

Students look at the quotes and decide


whether each one is a fact or an opinion.

ANSWER KEY
a
b
c
d

fact
opinion
opinion
fact

e
f
g
h

fact
opinion
fact
opinion

Students work in pairs. They look at the relative


clauses highlighted in bold in each of the
sentences to determine which of the relative
pronouns can be replaced by the word that.

far more outgoing than I expected reserved


false
very polite, say please and thank you all the
time polite true
have pets, love animals more than people
animal lovers true
food is not nearly as bad as I was expecting
bad food false
weather has been as bad as I expected, rain
every day bad weather true
The stereotype that Javier does not mention is
queuing.

The relative pronoun can be substituted with


that in sentences b, g and h.
Ask the students to write a paragraph about a
place that they have visited in their free time,
giving four reasons why they like it. Encourage
them to include the collocations and other
appropriate language from this page.

MODEL ANSWER
I recently visited a theme park near my home.
We stayed in a hotel in the park, which was
great because we could get there early in the
mornings. My sister and I went on loads of
rides. I liked the rollercoasters best, but she
preferred racing in the electric cars.
When we were there, they took a photo of us in
historical costumes which the park gave us. I
was a Viking and my sister was Cleopatra. We
also ate in the restaurants which were in the
park: they served all our favourite food. So all in
all, we had a great time and I would definitely
go back.

Students read the letter and underline any


stereotypes they find. Students then decide if
the writer thinks the stereotypes are true or not.

ANSWER KEY

ANSWER KEY

Students work in pairs. Ask students what each


of the pictures represents, and if they can then
think of any other British stereotypes.

Students read the letter again and circle the


correct words in the expressions of comparison.

ANSWER KEY
1
2
3
4
5

really
more
very
most
Lots of

6
7
8
9
10

than
nearly
lots of
really
bad

Students work in pairs and try and think of as


many stereotypes as possible, from Spain or
from their home country. Encourage them to
think of positive and negative ones, and discuss
whether they think they are true or not.
The discussion can also be opened up to the
whole class once the pairs have discussed their
opinions.

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