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CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON

College of Education
Department of Educational Leadership
EDAD 566-56: Community Engagement for School Leaders
Spring 2017

Location: SGMH 2307 (Mihaylo Hall)


Day and Time: Face-to-Face Meetings Saturdays
Instructor: Daniel Choi
Office: College Park (CP) 520-7
E-mail: dchoi@fullerton.edu
Phone: (657) 278-3903
Office hours: Wednesdays 2-5pm and by apppointment
Technical support: (657) 278-8888

Table 1: Education Unit Conceptual Framework

EDUCATION UNIT CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK


Mission
The College of Education is committed to the preparation and
professional development of innovative and transformative
educators who advance just, equitable, and inclusive education.
As a professional community of scholar-practitioners, we
promote creativity, collaboration, and critical thinking as
fundamental to student achievement and success in a diverse
and interconnected world.

Program Outcomes and Indicators


After successful completion of a program of study, our credential recipients and program
graduates are:

1. Knowledgeable and Competent Specialists who


a) demonstrate a strong foundation of knowledge
b) implement effective practice
c) use current technologies for teaching and learning
2. Reflective and Responsive Practitioners who
a) advance just, equitable, and inclusive education
b) make informed decisions
c) participate in collaborative endeavors
d) think critically and creatively
3. Committed and Caring Professionals who
a) demonstrate leadership potential
b) maintain professional and ethical standards
c) engage in continuous improvement
2
PROFESSIONAL DISPOSITIONS EXPECTED OF CANDIDATES
Faculty model and encourage all candidates to reflect dispositions that represent the values and
attitudes expected of professionals in the field of education. These dispositions are based on the
Education Units conceptual framework and encompass several behavioral indicators within the
three program outcomes. As candidates move through their programs it is expected they
demonstrate these dispositions. Please review the full list of dispositions found at the faculty
documents section of the COE website..

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP MISSION


Our mission is to prepare school leaders who demonstrate strategic, instructional, organizational,
political and community leadership; and to provide the community a source of scholarship and
assistance in interpretation and application of scholarship.

RESPONSE TIME
Contacting the instructor can be accomplished in a variety of ways, although e-mail is the preferred
method. The instructor will usually respond to all e-mails within 24 hours (weekend responses may
mean a 48 hour response window). The instructor will maintain office hours, as listed above. E-mails
sent to the instructor during this time will be answered more quickly. Telephone contact is also an
option. Also, the turnaround time for grading and returning submitted assignments is 1-2 weeks.

EDAD 566 COURSE DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: admission to Preliminary Credential and/or M.S. program in Educational


Administration. The role of the school leader in engaging community and family stakeholders in
transforming schools and communities. Identifying and incorporating community and familial
needs and resources in the vision of the school. Leadership, reflective practice, human relations,
the school leaders role in community outreach. One or more sections offered online.

Table 2. STUDENT LEARNING GOALS AND RELATED OBJECTIVES

California
Professional Activity or
Elements Course Objectives (Indicators)
Standards for Assignmen
Students will learn how:
Ed. Leaders t
CPSEL 4. 4A: Parent and Teacher/staff perceptions of Annotated
Family and Family community and families Resource
Community Engagement impact/influence parental and Collection
Engagement Leaders community engagement
Education meaningfully How to identify and incorporate Community
leaders involve all resources/assets offered by Asset
collaborate parents and families and communities in Mapping
with families families, ways that will impact students
and other including learning/schooling experiences? Proposal
stakeholders to underrepresented How to address/correct deficit Paper (part
address diverse communities, in perception of families and 2, 6, 7)
student and student learning
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community and support community among staff/teachers
interests and programs. and increase cultural proficiency Journals
mobilize among staff/teachers
community Annotated
resources. 4B: Community Identify the ways in which Resource
Partnerships schools can shift organization Collection
Leaders establish culture/practices to make use of
community unique resources in
partnerships that communities/families
promote and Respectfully interact with
support students community gatekeepers
to meet Correct/realign school practices
performance and that exclude or diminish the
content contributions of marginalized
expectations and communities
graduate ready
Broaden staff/teachers
for college and
perceptions of community
career.
resources beyond formal
institutional arrangements
Determine how they can
advocate for larger community
beyond school setting

4C: Community Community capital can be found


Resources and in both institutional (formal) and
Services informal spaces (e.g. neighbors,
Leaders leverage families)
and integrate To identify the institutional and
community in-formal community resources
resources and and their gatekeepers in their
services to meet community
the varied needs To identify and incorporate
of all students. resources/assets offered by
families and communities in
ways that will impact students
learning/schooling experiences?
To address/correct deficit
perception of families and
community among staff/teachers
and increase cultural proficiency
among staff/teachers

CPSEL 5. Element 5A: Reflect on areas of improvement


Ethics and Reflective Engage professional learning to Reflection
Integrity Practice be up-to-date in best practices Journals
Leaders act upon Engage in continuous growth of
Education a personal code cultural proficient skills Proposal
leaders make of ethics that Paper (part
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decisions, requires including competency in the 4, 5)
model, and continuous curriculum
behave in ways reflection and
that learning.
demonstrate
professionalism Element 5B: Review multiple measures of
, ethics, Ethical data & research on effective Reflection
integrity, Decision- teaching and learning, Journals
justice, and Making leadership, and other pertinent
equity and hold Leaders guide areas to inform decision-making Proposal
staff to the and support Identify and analyze institutional Paper
same standard. personal and biases that derive from (parts 3, 4,
collective actions economic, socio-emotional, 5, 7)
that use relevant racial, linguistic, cultural,
evidence and gender-based, or physical
available discrimination
research to make
fair and ethical
decisions.

Element 5C: Use a variety of strategies to


Ethical Action lead others in examining Reflection
Leaders personal assumptions and Journals
recognize and challenge beliefs that negatively
use their affect improving teaching & Proposal
professional learning for all students. Paper
influence with Communicate expectations and (parts 4, 5,
staff and the support for professional 7)
community to behavior that reflects ethics,
develop a climate integrity, justice, and equity
of trust, mutual Use leadership and knowledge
respect, and to protect the rights of students,
honest staff, and families.
communication
necessary to
consistently
make fair and
equitable
decisions on
behalf of all
students.

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP DEPARTMENT GOALS


The goals of the department are to prepare educational leaders who demonstrate a wide array of
knowledge, skills, attributes and commitment.

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Strategic Leadership - Leadership requires the ability to develop with others vision and
purpose, utilize information, frame problems, exercise leadership processes to achieve common
goals and act ethically for educational communities
A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students
by facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of
learning that is shared and supported by the school community. ii
A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students
by modeling a personal code of ethics and developing professional leadership capacity. ii

Instructional Leadership - Leadership requires the ability to design appropriate curricula and
instructional programs to develop learner centered school cultures, to assess outcomes, to
provide student personnel services, and to plan with faculty professional development activities
aimed at improving instruction.i
A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students
by advocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and instruction program conducive to
student learning and staff professional growth.ii

Organizational Leadership - Leadership requires the ability to understand, initiate and/or


improve the organization, implement operational plans, manage financial resources, and apply
effective management processes and procedures.i
A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students
by ensuring management of the organization, operations, and resources for a safe, efficient, and
effective learning environment.ii

Political Leadership - Leadership requires the ability to act in accordance with legal provisions
and statutory requirements, to apply regulatory standards, to develop and apply appropriate
policies, to understand and act professionally regarding the ethical implications of policy
initiatives and political actions, to relate public policy initiatives to student welfare, to
understand. i
A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students
by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal and
cultural context.

Community Leadership - Leaders must collaborate with parents and community members;
work with community agencies, foundations, and the private sector; respond to community
interests and needs in performing administrative responsibilities; develop effective staff
communications and public relations programs; and act as mediators for the various groups and
individuals who are part of the school community.
A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students
by collaborating with families and community members, responding to diverse community
interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources. ii

Education leaders for 21st century must demonstrate:


commitment to high standards;
strong ethical values;
credible instructional leadership;
understanding of social and political trends and changing role of education in our society;
problem solving ability and skills necessary to promote and adapt to change and use of
collaboration to build a shared vision for schools;
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capacity to collaborate effectively with a wide range of non-school agencies and community
organizations which can help schools achieve their mission;
commitment to lifelong learning which empowers students, staff, and themselves.

REQUIRED TEXTS

.
Henderson, A. T. (2007). Beyond the bake sale: The essential guide to family-school
partnerships. New York: New Press.

Hong, S., & Anyon, J. (2011). A cord of three strands: A new approach to parent engagement
in schools. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard Education Press.

OTHER REQUIRED MATERIALS


Other supplemental readings, as noted or provided during the course, will be provided. These
items will be provided during class or students will be asked to access the materials on Titanium.

ATTENDANCE

Every individual enrolled in the course has responsibility for the overall quality of the course and
can enhance the knowledge and perspectives developed by every other member of the class. To
make this happen, each student must prepare for and participate fully in class. This includes
being on-time for class and notifying the instructor before class if an absence is necessary (not
after the fact). Of course, the exception is in case of emergencies. Absences without notifying the
instructor will result in an automatic loss of points.

If you miss any part of a class, it is your responsibility to make arrangements with a classmate
for missed instruction, assignments and/or handouts.

GRADING POLICY AND GRADING STANDARDS FOR THE COURSE

Student grades for the course will be based on the quality of their work and participation. This
course will use the plus/minus system for grades. The scale used for determining course grades
is based on the combined weighted averages of the grades earned for participation, the individual
assignments, and the final exam.

A = 100-95
A-= 94-92
B+= 91-88
B = 87-85
B-= 84-82
C+= 81-78
C = 77-72
C-= 71-68
D= 67-65
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F= < 65

LATE ASSIGNMENTS
Late work will be docked. Any student turning in work late will not be eligible to earn a grade of
A for the assignment and will not be eligible to earn a grade of A in the course. The best
grade that the student may earn for work turned in late is a grade of B.

With the exception of extenuating circumstances, late individual assignments will only be accepted one
week after the due date; the grade earned will be lowered by one whole letter grade (A- will become B-).
Please inform the instructor of any extenuating circumstances as soon as possible.

ASSIGNMENT DESCRIPTIONS AND GRADING

*** You will create a simple Weebly website (instructions to be posted on Titanium) to post all of
the following assignments, as described below. On the first day, we will set up the websites.

Annotated Resource Collection- ARC- (10 %)


Students will collect 10 resources from a range of sources that will help: 1) understand the
principles and goals of community engagement; 2) conceptualize and envision concrete
examples of community engagement in practice; and 3) learn and plan steps for building a plan
for planning a community engagement project/program. Students will collect and annotate the
following: journal article; articles from a professional periodical; Web page source (organization
websites); Blogs; and Youtube video (or some other social media video source). Annotations of
each resource should include: 1) an APA citation of the source; 2) a brief summary of the source;
and 3) a brief explanation of what aspect(s) of the paper it informed and how. Each annotation
should be no more than a half-page each.

Journal (10%)
Minimally 5 Reflection journal entries will be due throughout the term. The journal entries should be no
more than 1 page in length. Students are expected to address any set of issues regarding their project,
which they wish to reflect on including:
What you are learning about your problem?
Are you satisfied with your progress?
What challenges are you facing, and how have you overcome them?
What do you want to do next?
What inhibits an outcome for which you search? The outcome you are trying to achieve?
Who might help you overcome these challenges?
How are the dynamics of your school team affected with the research?
What new assumptions have you uncovered?
How can you test these new assumptions?
Is my theory of action reflective of my questions?
Are your questions aligned to your theory of action?
Reflections should be uploaded to the course website under the appropriate assignment by no later than
11:59 pm on Friday of the week they are due. The reflections must be 12-pt font, Times New Roman,
and have 1-inch margins. (They do not need to be double-spaced)

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Community Asset Mapping- The purpose of this assignment is to examine community-based
assets that inform the learning of students in your action research setting. It is to help you realize
assets in and around your school community that often go unnoticed and therefore, is untapped-
for collaboration. You will: map what you deem to be resources in the community, will identify
the sociohistorical context of resources in your current school community. You will gather
photos, artifacts, and draw a community map. You will reflect in written form, on this map and
share with peers exchanging feedback, making suggestions for improving current schooling
practices through community mapping knowledge. (Adapted from assignment in Reading
Department developed by Dr. Rosario Ordonez-Jasis). Further details on the assignment will be
available on Titanium.

Community Engagement Action Plan


You will design an action research plan for your inquiry. The research plan will include the following ten
steps:

1. Write a Intro + Purpose Statement The introduction briefly describes the current state of
community engagement at your school. In this section, you will explain what current practices
(as effective or ineffective as you might think they are) have been at work. This should also
include some concrete examples of what had taken place at the site, and your informal
assessment of the current effort (i.e., what you are satisfied and dissatisfied with). You should
also discuss what indicators (or criteria) there are that you can rely upon to verify progress made
signaling improvement. This should lead into then the purpose statement. A purpose statement
identifies the practical significance that is to come out of your Community Engagement Plan.
This should include what practical significance your plan will seek to accomplish
[1- 1.5 pages 10%]

2. Describe your TARGET Participants (2 parts) 30% total]


a. Part 1- Describe the participants of your action plan and what roles the participants play
in the plan. Please address, also, the characteristics of each participant group, and what
about them are perceived as obstacles and what about them may be untapped
(unrecognized) assets. Describe also, the geographic area of the neighborhood,
surrounding the school. Who will you be working with? Why are they critical to the
problem you are trying to address? In completing this part, you will be required to
interview (interact with) a person from the community, asking them to review your
description; and then based on your interview, make any adjustments- and explain what
you had to adjust following your interview. [1/2 page 5%]
b. Part 2- Community Asset Mapping- The purpose of this assignment is to examine
community-based assets that inform the learning of students in your action research
setting. It is to help you realize assets in and around your school community that often go
unnoticed and therefore, is untapped- for collaboration. You will: map what you deem to
be resources in the community, will identify the sociohistorical context of resources in
your current school community. You will gather photos, artifacts, and draw a community
map. You will reflect in written form, on this map and share with peers exchanging
feedback, making suggestions for improving current schooling practices through
community mapping knowledge. (Adapted from assignment in Reading Department
developed by Dr. Rosario Ordonez-Jasis). Further details on the assignment will be
available on Titanium. [2-3 pages 25%]

3. Baseline assessment and evaluation plan You will review the goals and purpose as articulated in
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the Intro + Purpose Statement section, and out of that, formally decide upon 3 concrete
objectives. For each objective, you will decide on ways to assess progress made towards meeting
each one. This means identifying what data that may be at your site to measure progress; or if
you do not feel adequate measures exist, it may mean describing what types of new data you
could collect. A key part of this section will be to focus on what you can point to, now, that can
support your assessment (formally and informally) of how effective the current community
engagement is between the school and the community. Necessarily then, you will need to come
up with some standard/criteria by which you assess current and future effort. Therefore, you will
create or adapt an implementation rubric of this plan. Overall, this section of the paper is an
important component because how important it is to growing, sustaining and improving practice.
[2-3 pages 20%]

4. Describe your Implementation Plan Describe what you are going to do to address or improve
the community engagement situation at your school. In other words, you will create your theory
of action. You will need to provide a thorough statement of what you will do, in what order and
why (i.e. I will incorporate a student participation component in student parent conferences).
There should be a brief narrative of the rationale behind the sequence. Your implementation plan
must be represented visually, as in some type of figure (or graphic organizer). This functions as a
blueprint or design of the plan [2-3 pages 25%]

5. Develop a Timeline Describe what you will be doing and when. Also use this to anticipate
where and when your inquiry will take place. I will provide a template for this assignment when
the time comes. [1 page 5%]

6. Develop a Statement of Tools/Resources Describe the resources that you will need to enact
your plan. This is akin to listing the materials in a lesson plan. (Nothing worse then starting a
lesson plan to then find out that you are missing the necessary manipulatives you need to achieve
your objective). This should be based on the implementation plan and broader objectives. For
each one, you should list out each resource and the role it plays in a successful implementation.
[1-2 pages 5%]

7. Review of Action Plan You will have the last week of class to put all of the sections above into
one cogent document. Once the paper is put together, you will be required to share the plan with
your mentor. You will schedule a meeting and then will write up a brief summary (no more than
a page) of the feedback you got. You will be required to obtain a signature of your mentor that
s/he has reviewed it. At the last face-to-face meeting, you will present a 5-10 minute summary
presentation of your final paper, very much like you would a proposal [5%]

Check-list
__Introduction and Purpose Statement (10%)
__Describe your Target Sample (30%)
__Baseline Assessment and Evaluation (20%)
__Implementation Plan (25%)
__Timeline (5%)
__Statement of Resources and Tools (5%)
__Put it all together (5%)

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Titanium
As a registered student you are enrolled in Titanium. You may access Titanium for all your
classes by clicking on your student portal, found on the CSUF website. Problems? Contact (657)
278-5619. If you still need more help, contact (657) 278-7777. Check Titanium weekly, the night
before class, for any pertinent or last minute, updated information.

Students with Special Needs


Please inform the instructor during the first week of classes about any disability or special needs
that you may have that may require specific arrangements related to attending class sessions,
carrying out class assignments, or writing papers or examinations. According to California State
University policy, students with disabilities must document their disabilities at the Disability
Support Services (DSS) Office in order to be accommodated in their courses.

Academic Dishonesty Policy


Academic dishonesty includes such things cheating, inventing false information or citations,
plagiarism, and helping someone else commit an act of academic dishonesty. It usually involves
an attempt by a student to show a possession of a level of knowledge or skill which he/she in fact
does not possess. Cheating is defined as the act of obtaining or attempting to obtain credit for
work by the use of any dishonest, deceptive, fraudulent, or unauthorized means. Plagiarism is
defined as the act of taking the work of another and offering it as ones own without giving credit
to that source. An instructor who believes that an act of academic dishonesty has occurred (1) is
obligated to discuss the matter with the student(s) involved; (2) should possess reasonable
evidence such as documents or personal observation; and (3) may take whatever action (subject
to student appeal) he/she deems appropriate, ranging from an oral reprimand to an F in the
course. Additional information on this policy is available from University Policy Statement
300.021 found at the UPS section of the Academic Senate website.

Two week plan for distant instruction should on-campus instruction be interrupted
In case of instruction interruption, please check the course website for weekly instructional
activities, which may include multimedia presentations, discussion forums, group work (to be
conducted via Titanium groupings), and text and electronic readings. For additional information,
please call the California State University, Fullerton Campus Operation and Emergency Closure
Information Line: 657-278-4444

Emergency Contact
In the event of emergency, contact the University Police at (657) 278-3333. Additional
information can be found at the CSUF Emergency Preparedness website.

Library Support
Pollak Library Assistance available for Online Students with online instruction guidelines are
available on the CSUF library website.

ASSIGNMENT AUTHENTICATION AND SUBMISSION The instructor will authenticate student


work via the use of multiple assessments for this course. As noted on the schedule, assignments are to be
submitted electronically.

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ALTERNATIVE DELIVERY OF ASSIGNMENTS
If insurmountable technical difficulties arise, contact the instructor for alternative delivery of
assignments (e.g., face-to-face or U. S. mail).

COMMUNICATING WITH THE COURSE INSTRUCTOR AND PEERS Contacting the instructor
can be accomplished in a variety of ways, although e-mail is the preferred method. The instructor will
usually respond to all e-mails within 24 hours (weekend responses may mean a 48 hour response
window). The instructor will maintain office hours, as listed above. E-mails sent to the instructor during
this time will be answered more quickly. Telephone contact is also an option.

Each student is expected to conduct himself/herself in a professional manner during the class -
whether face-to-face or online - taking full advantage of the learning opportunities available.
This includes active participation in group work, participating in weekly discussions (forums)
and assignments, and adhering to proper netiquette. Netiquette refers to a set of behaviors that
are appropriate for online activity-- especially with e-mail and threaded-discussions. The core
rules of netiquette for this course is adapted from Northern Arizona University: e-Learning
Center: http://www2.nau.edu/d-elearn/support/tutorials/discrubrics/netiquette.php)

Students with Special Needs: Please inform the instructor during the first week of classes
about any disability or special needs that you may have that may require specific arrangements
related to attending class sessions, carrying out class assignments, or writing papers or
examinations. According to California State University policy, students with disabilities must
document their disabilities at the Disabled Student Services Office in order to be accommodated
in their courses. UPS 300.000 www.fullerton.edu/disabledservices/
Academic Dishonesty Policy: Academic dishonesty includes such things cheating, inventing
false information or citations, plagiarism, and helping someone else commit an act of academic
dishonesty. It usually involves an attempt by a student to show a possession of a level of
knowledge or skill which he/she in fact does not possess. Cheating is defined as the act of
obtaining or attempting to obtain credit for work by the use of any dishonest, deceptive,
fraudulent, or unauthorized means. Plagiarism is defined as the act of taking the work of another
and offering it as ones own without giving credit to that source. An instructor who believes that an
act of academic dishonesty has occurred (1) is obligated to discuss the matter with the student(s)
involved; (2) should possess reasonable evidence such as documents or personal observation;
and (3) may take whatever action (subject to student appeal) he/she deems appropriate, ranging
from an oral reprimand to an F in the course. Additional information on this policy is available
University Policy Statement 300.021,
http://www.fullerton.edu/senate/documents/PDF/300/UPS300-021.pdf

In the event of emergency, contact the University Police at 657-278-3333.


http://emergencypreparedness.fullerton.edu/

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TENTATIVE SCHEDULE (Subject to Change)

Week 1: January 21- MEET IN PERSON


Topic(s)
Introductions; Overview of Community Engagement
Introducing action research in a leadership context- for community engagement
Introducing a problem of practice related to community engagement and
Introduce Purpose- an actionable orientation; Introduce determining target population
Go over templates: for journals and for literature collection and research question
Introduce Baseline reporting- and Community Asset Mapping component

Assignments Due
None

Reading Assignments covered:


Beyond the Bakesale (BB) Ch.1 & A Cord of Three Strands (CTS) Ch. 1; Action Research Handout

Week 2: February 3
Topic(s)
Finding a focus to your topic
Start exploring a variety of sources for literature search (academic and non-academic)

Assignments Due
Draft Rough Intro+ Purpose Statement around community engagement- based on professional experience
only- as Journal #1

Reading Assignments Due


Beyond the Bakesale (BB) Ch.2 & A Cord of Three Strands (CTS) Ch. 2; Action Research for
Educational Leaders pdf (on Titanium)

Week 3: Febrary 10
Topic(s)
Refining Focus by conducting inventory of research within literature review
What have others done in research to address your problem
Now that you have a scope of the problem, also thing about your target population

Assignments Due
Practitioner Interview
Draft Target Sample
Draft Rough Intro+ Purpose Statement around community engagement- based on professional experience
now integrating ARC- as Journal #2

Reading Assignments Due


Beyond the Bakesale (BB) Ch. 3, 4; Action Research for Educational Leaders pdf (on Titanium) part 2

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Week 4: Feb. 13-17 Individual Meetings (via ZOOM) reviewing draft problem and purpose
statements (review drafts paper progress and spot check on annotated bibliographies and journals

Week 5: Feb. 24
Topic(s)
Connecting the literature and your proposed area of inquiry to a set of variables or elements to be
observed and measured

Assignments Due
Intro+ Purpose Statement and Draft plan/outline for Target Population Due- on Titanium

Reading Assignments Due


A Cord of Three Strands (CTS) Chapters 3-5; Action Research for Educational Leaders pdf (on Titanium-
part 3)

Week 6: March 3
Topic(s)
Reflection of initial ideas in order to design a working question
Community Mapping as part of your Baseline Report

Assignments Due
Baseline Report (Description plan for parts 1 and 2)

Reading Assignments Due


Beyond the Bakesale (BB) Ch.5; Online reading (pdf)- PAR for Educational Leadership Ch.3

Week 7: March 10
Topic(s)
What practices, interventions, or innovations will you conduct to address your inquiry

Assignments Due
Baseline Report identifying data for community mapping and action research
Journal #3

Reading Assignments Due


A Cord of Three Strands (CTS) Ch. 6; Action Research for Educational Leaders pdf (on Titanium)

Week 8: March 18 Face-to-Face Meeting -


Topic(s)
Designing an Intervention/ Action Plan
Baseline Report Writing Narrative of data identified.
Utilizing Action Research Template according to Research Questions

Assignments Due
Draft of Community Map Component of Baseline Report due
Informal Presentation of Community Asset Map (non-graded)

Reading Assignments Due

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Online reading- PAR for Educational Leadership Ch.4 & 5
Data Collection techniques (will hand out in class)

Week 9: March 24
Topic(s)
Moving towards obstacles in collecting data
Identifying data sources and their value

Assignments Due
Draft of Baseline Report and Research Questions Due
Journal #4

Reading Assignments Due


Beyond the Bakesale (BB) Ch.7 & A Cord of Three Strands (CTS) Ch. 6; Online reading- PAR for
Educational Leadership Ch.6

SPRING BREAK: March 27 March 31:

Week 10: April 7


Topic(s)
Reviewing Instrumentation options- adapting or building
Drawing out implementation plan

Assignments Due
Draft of Baseline Report and Research Questions Due
Research Template with instrumentation Due
Implementation Plan Draft due
Journal #5

Assignments Due
Beyond the Bakesale (BB) Ch. 9; review Action Research for Educational Leaders pdf (on Titanium)

Week 11: April 10-14 INDIVIDUAL MEETINGS- (review drafts of paper progress and spot check on
annotated bibliographies and journals)

Week 12: April 21


Topic(s)
Organizing your time to conduct your study
Re-Evaluate your intervention plan: What do you need and how long?

Assignments Due
Baseline Report
Journal #6

Reading Assignments Due


Beyond the Bakesale (BB) Ch.10 & A Cord of Three Strands (CTS) Ch. 7; review Action Research for
Educational Leaders pdf (on Titanium)

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Week 13: April 28


Topic(s)
What resources will you need to conduct your study including data that already exist?

Assignments Due
Instrumentation plan for data collection Due
Building Timeline

Reading Assignments Due


A Cord of Three Strands (CTS) Ch. 8-9; review Action Research for Educational Leaders pdf (on
Titanium)

Week 14: May 6 LAST FACE-TO-FACE MEETING


Topic(s)
The messy process of action research

Assignments Due
Presentation of Action Research Implementation Plan (not all Components)

Reading Assignments Due


A Cord of Three Strands (CTS) Ch. 10; review Action Research for Educational Leaders pdf (on
Titanium)

Week 15: May 13


Topic(s)
Putting the assignment together

Assignments Due
All Journals Due
Final ARC Due

Reading Assignments Due


Online reading- PAR for Educational Leadership Ch.12

Week 16: May 20


Topic(s)
Putting Assignment together
Assignments Due
*Final paper due Tuesday May 13th

Updated January 2017