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Table of Contents

CHAPTER ONE........................................................................................................ 2
INTRODUCTION...................................................................................................... 2
CHAPTER TWO....................................................................................................... 3
2.1 QUESTION/ GIVEN PROBLEM.....................................................................3
2.2 ANALYSIS ASSUMPTIONS...........................................................................4
CHAPTER THREE.................................................................................................... 5
3.1 EQUIVALENT STRESS / VON MISES STRESS...............................................5
3.2 DEFORMATION / DISPLACEMENT...............................................................7
3.3 SAFETY FACTOR....................................................................................... 10
CHAPTER FOUR.................................................................................................... 13
CONCLUSION....................................................................................................... 13

CHAPTER ONE
INTRODUCTION

Autodesk Inventor Simulation Stress Analysis includes tools to place loads and constraints on

a part and calculate the resulting stress, deformation, safety factor, and resonant frequency

modes.

With the stress analysis tools, you can:

Perform a stress or frequency analysis of a part.

Apply a force, pressure, bearing, moment, or body load to vertices, faces, or edges of the

part, or apply a motion load directly to a part.

Apply fixed or non-zero displacement constraints to the model.

Evaluate the impact of multiple parametric design changes.

View the analysis results in terms of equivalent stress, minimum and maximum principal

stresses, deformation, safety factor, or resonant frequency modes.

Animate a part through various stages of deformation, stress, safety factor, and frequencies.

CHAPTER TWO

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2.1 QUESTION/ GIVEN PROBLEM

Using software of choice, draw and design a plastic chair with four legs, two arms. Test for

the effect static loading on the chair. Also determine the amount of load that will cause failure

of the material. Draw the graph of stress versus load on the material as the loading increases

by 20N on the material. The chair design is presented below:

Fig.1: The chair design

2.2 ANALYSIS ASSUMPTIONS

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The following analyses are assumed in the course of this work:

It is assumed that the plastic material of the hair has linear material properties where

the stress is directly proportional to the strain in the material (meaning no permanent

yielding of the material).


The results of this simulation are temperature-independent.
The temperature is assumed not to affect the material properties of the plastic chair.
A static force of 1000N is applied on the plastic chair.
A static force of 1N is also applied on the arms of the plastic chair.

CHAPTER THREE

3.1 EQUIVALENT STRESS / VON MISES STRESS

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These are three-dimensional stresses and strains that normally build up in many directions. A

common way to express these multidirectional stresses is to summarize them into an

equivalent stress, also known as the Von-Mises stress.

Fig.2: Von Mises stress for the chair arm

From the simulation result above, it can be seen that the maximum stress that can be

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experienced by the material is between 1.978 MPa and below 3.956 MPa. It can also be seen

that this stress is majorly experienced around the back part of the plastic chair.

Fig.3: Von Mises stress for the sitting chamber

From the above simulation result, it can be seen that when the 1000N static is placed on the

chair, the stress will be distributed on the plastic chair with the legs, sitting chamber and back

region all effected. However, the maximum force experienced by the different parts 5.04 Mpa

and very much less than 10.08 MPa.

In Fig.4 below, It can be seen that when both the loads on the arm and the sitting chamber is

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taken into consideration, the stress effects will also be spread across the plastic chair

including the legs, the sitting chamber and the back chamber. The maximm stress

experienced by the material is between 4.69 MPa and very much below 9.38 MPa.

Fig.4: Von Mises stress for the sitting chamber and the arm combined

3.2 DEFORMATION / DISPLACEMENT

Deformation is the amount of stretching that an object undergoes due to the loading. Use the

deformation results to determine where and how much apart will bend, and how much force

is required to make it bend a particular distance.

From the below simulation result in Fig 5 and 6, it can be seen that when the 1000N static

load is placed on the chair, the displacement will be distributed on the plastic chair within the

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sitting chamber. The material experiences different displacement with the least displacement

as 0.112mm and the maximum displacement as 0.5602mm which occurs at the very centre of

the plastic chair.

Fig.5: Displacement of the sitting chamber

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Fig.6: Displacement for the sitting chamber (side view)

From the below simulation result in Fig 7, it can be seen that when the 1N static load is

placed on the chair arm, the displacement will be distributed on the plastic chairs arm. The

material (arms) experiences different displacement with the least displacement as 0.0262mm

and the maximum displacement as 0.0786mm.

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Fig.7: Displacement of the arms

From the below simulation result in Fig 8, it can be seen that when the 1N static load and the

1000N static load are considered together, the material (arms) experiences a maximum

displacement of 0.1896mm while the sitting chamber experiences a maximum displacement

of 0.4741mm which occurs at the very centre of the plastic chair.

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Fig.8 Displacement of the arm and sitting chamber combined

3.3 SAFETY FACTOR

Factor of safety results immediately points out areas of potential yield, where equivalent

stress results always show red in the highest area of stress, regardless of how high or low the

value. Since a factor of safety of 1 means the material is essentially at yield, most designers

strive for a safety factor of between 2 to4 based on the highest expected load scenario. Unless

the maximum expected load is frequently repeated, the fact that some areas of the design go

into yield does not always mean the part will fail. Repeated high load may result in a fatigue

failure, which is not simulated by Autodesk Inventor Simulation Stress Analysis.

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Fig.9: Factor of safety for the arm design

Fig.10: Factor of safety for the sitting chamber design

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Fig.11: Factor of safety for the sitting chamber and arm design

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CHAPTER FOUR

CONCLUSION

From the above simulation result in Fig 9,10 and 11, it can be seen that our factor of safety

value for this plastic chair design falls between the ranges 1.0 and 2.0 which means that this

chair can comfortably withstand the static load of 1000N on the sitting chamber and 1N on

the arms.

It should also be noted that the amount of static loading that will cause this designed plastic

chair to fail must be above 2000N on the sitting chamber and above 2N also for the arms.

Finally the use of a factor of safety does not imply that an item, structure or design is

completely safe. Many Quality assurance, engineering design, manufacturing, installation,

and end-use factors may influence whether or not something is safe in any particular

situation.

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