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it isis
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w
The people are skiing on
the crisp white snow.

Adjectives
describe nouns.
They have the
same form In
the singular and
plural. They go
before nouns
(e.g. a small
house) but after
the verbs be,
look, smell,
sound, feel,
taste, seem,
appear, become,
get, stay, etc.
(e.g. She Is
beautiful. They
seem unhappy.)
There are
opinion
adjectives and
fact adjectives.
Opinion
adjectives such
as boring,
exciting, etc.
show what a
person thinks of
somebody or
something. Fact
adjectives such
as tall, thin,
new, etc. give
us factual
information
about age, size,
colour, origin,
material, etc.
There are also
compound
adjectives which
are formed with:
a) present
participles e.g.
a never-ending
journey, b) past
participles e.g. a
broken-down
washing
machine, c)
cardinal
numbers +
nouns e.g. a
three-hour
delay (NOT: a
throo houm
doiay),

ORDER OF
ADJECTIVES
H When there are
two or more
adjectives in a
sentence, the]
Opinion
Fact >
Adjectives

s|ze gge

shape colour
01

It's a fantastic
small \ new round

red S\ H|
Ordinal
numbers (first,
second, third, etc.)
go
Life can be very
enjoyable for
retired people.
They have a lot of
spare time and can
take up interesting
hobbies.

d) well, badly +
past participle
e.g. well-behaved
children, badly-
made furniture
Wa can also use
nouns as
adjectives before
other nouns. In this
case the nouns
have no plural
form, e.g. morning
paper - morning
papers, coffee
table coffee
tables
The following
adjectives have a
difference in
meaning: a) He
gave her a gold
ring. (= ring made
of gold) They
walked on the
golden sand. (=
sand the colour of
gold) >) She
bought a silk
blouse. (= blouse
made of silk) This
new shampoo
promises to give
you silky hair. ( -
hair which feels
like silk) j) They
walked up the
stone path. (=
path made of
stone) The man
had a stony look
on his face. (= cold
look - like stone)
e^^tdwee~hour
like
stone)
PRDEROF ADJECTIVES
Opinion
Adjectiv
es
When ttnw are two or more
adjectives In sentence, they
usually 90 In tht following
order:
Fact
Adjectives
size
age shape
colour origin
material used for/be
about noun
t$*$a fantastic small
new round red Swiss
plastic alarm
clock
go pleased,
etc. are
Ordinal not
numbers followed
by nouns.
(first,
e.g. The
second, man was
third, etc.) alive.
before Karen is ill
cardinal today.
numbers
The
(one, two,
adjectives
three, etc.)
chief,
e.g. the first
elder,
two weeks
eldest,
(NOT: the
former,
fwe tint
Indoor,
weeito)
inner,
The main,
adjectives only,
afraid, outdoor,
alike, alive,
outer,
alone,
ashamed, principal,
asleep, upper are
awake, always
content, followed
glad, III, by nouns.
e.g. This is homeless,
my elder hungry,
poor, rich,
son.
strong,
We do not unemploy
usually use ed, weak,
a long list etc. e.g.
The young
of
have a lot
adjectives of energy.
before a (We refer
single to young
noun. A people in
noun is general.)
but: The
usually
young
described people of
by one, two our town
or three are
adjectives organising
at the a charity
most. e.g. a concert.
(We refer
beautiful
to a
blue specific
evening group of
dress young
Certain people).
adjectives When we
can be used talk about
with 'the' as one
nouns to person we
refer to say A/The
groups of young
people In man/woma
general. n, A/The
These are: blind
elderly, man/woma
middle- n, etc e.g.
aged, old, The young
young, woman
blind, who lives
dead, deaf, next door
disabled, is a
living, sick, medical
student.
Co mp orisons F
o
r

c
o
m
p
a
r
etc.
ough i
t to s
buyit o
irribl n
e, ier (= ,
ridlc morethi:
ukm cted, a

very

The coach is cheap It is slow, though.


ut it's not the ^

pi oamanem
dinar etc.) soft
y, voice, j, but
u$ek it was nth*.
ertai
n,
^m&-mnetmmtm
dject h n
ives i t
have n
got g
two s
torn ,
com
para e
tive t
and c
the
super e
lative. .
g
W .
e

u
s
7
e /
n
t a
h
e /
s
c
o s
m h
p o
a r
r t
a e
t r
i
v t
e h
a
f n
o
r P
m a
m
- This chair
f & more
comfortabl
p e than 9m
e other c
o We use the
p +
l
superlative
e
form + eNR
,
one
person,
t
thing, etc
in

as
ad

ill

States?
RST-
Adverbs -
Comparison
We use adjectives or their comparative or superlative
forms with the following words;
a) very + adjective
e.g. It's very cold today.
b) even / a lot / much / far a brt a Irttle / 6
slightly A
comparative
e.g. He seems much better today.
c) by far + superlative 8
e.g. She's by far the most beautiful
woman I've ever seen.
d) most + adj/adv = very
e.g. This is most unusuaL (His very
unusual.)
e) any/no + comparative (it is used m
questions and
negations)
e.g. The days aren't getting any warmer.
m.want no more of that kind of
behaviour.
..
Put the adjcrfffwes in brackets Into the
Did you enjoy the film? Yes. ft was
...the funniest seen.
James is very taM. Yes. He's
JLJU~~

comparative or supetia-ffve form, adding any necessary m o t di.

(funny) Mm I've ever

flail) boy in our class.

Adjec
tivi
i.

as + adjective + as
not so/as + adjective + as
fo
e.g. She is as tall as I am.
rt
It is not so/as hot as it was yesterday.
# afte
twice/three times, etc/half as + adjective
e.
+ as e.g. Their car was twice as expensive
g.
as ours.
the same ... as
wi
tr
e.g. Your dress is the same colour as mine.
si
less + (adjective)... than the least + m
(adjective)... of/in e.g. The Park Hotel is e.g
less expensive than the Plaza. .
The King George is the least expensive
of all.
the + comparative the + comparative
e.g. The earlier we set off, the earlier we'll
to

|
arrive. t
comparative + and + comparative e.g.
The weather is getting warmer and warmer.

Fill in the blanks, as in the examples. in<


su
<
The noise got ...louder and louder... (loud)
e.
until I MJldn't bear it any longer.
g
4 aft<
rej
in M e.g
r

Adjectives - Adverbs -

for similarities, e.g. S/?e sw/ms 3

after fee/, too*, sme/f, sound, taste | i**"' e.g. ft fee/s


//Tee s//fc
with nouns, pronouns orthe-ing form to *******
similarity or contrast.
e.g. There's no place like home. No one
can sing like him.

to say what sb or sth realty is (Jobs or roles)* e.g. S/?e ivor/cs


as a tour gu/de. (S/ie is a tour guide.) Harrison Ford was great
as Indiana Jones.
in certain expressions: as usual, as as, as much, such
as, the same as.
e.g. He started complaining as usual.
after accept, be known, class, describe, refer to,
regard, use.
e.g. He is known as the father of modem medicine.
in clauses of manner to mean 'in the way that', e.g.
Do as I tell you.

Jfll (many)
fer burst *
Fill in the gaps with like or as.