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What does it mean to be American?

Martha St Jean
9 Week Unit Plan 7th Grade English Language Arts
Stage 1 Desired Results
Established Goals (Content Standards)

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.1
Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences
drawn from the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an
objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and
connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g.,
alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.5
Analyze how a drama's or poem's form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its
meaning

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.6
Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators
in a text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.A
Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using
strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g.,
headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.B
Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and
examples.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.C
Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.D
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

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CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.4.C
Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and
digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.4.D
Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred
meaning in context or in a dictionary).
Understandings: Essential Questions:

The idea of what it means to be American 1. What does it mean to be


has changed over time. American?
The idea of America is difficult, and complex; 2. What makes someone American?
people have varying ideas of what America is. Why are some Americans privileged
There are many different conceptions of what and others not?
it means to be American, specifically in light 3. Should undocumented people be
of culture, class, gender, time period, and lived considered American?
experiences. 4. Are metaphors necessary to explain
or communicate about life?
5. Are songs poems, or are poems
songs? Whats your stance?
6. How do master writers create voice
and make meaning through their
texts?
7. Can life be fully described using
poetry?
8. How does the voice of the writer add
or change the meaning of a text?

Students will know Students will be able to


Key content terms for 7th grade ELA
regarding literary devices and genres. Basic Skills: Reading
and recognize tiers two and three academic comprehension and grammar
and content vocabulary including: conventions
immigration, Civil Rights, race, poetry, stanza, Communication Skills: Expressive
lines, verse, speech, essay, narrator, mood, writing and organization of ideas,
setting, figurative, literal etc. written and verbal
Important Events/People: Walt Whitman, Research Skills: How to find
Langston Hughes, Julia Alvarez, Donovan relevant information, and relate it
Livingston Thinking Skills: Recognize and
apply thematic and narrative
vocabulary
Study Skills: Annotation
Interpersonal/Group Skills:

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Collaboration, Discussion

Stage 2 Assessment Evidence


Performance Tasks: Other Evidence:
Identify the theme in a text
Summative task: Students will create a poster board, Compare and contrasts the
PowerPoint presentation, speech, or painting to perspectives of different authors
present the class with a reflection of what it means to
writing about different topics
be American.
Determine the figurative and
Complete multiple choice assessments connotative meanings of words in a
Complete in class written assignments text
Participation in collaborative group work Analyze the impact of rhymes and
Write three essays other repetitions of sounds (e.g.,
Participate in two socratic seminars alliteration) on a specific verse or
Create a multi-modal representation of what it
stanza of a poem or section of a
means to be American.
Self-reflection story or drama.
Analyze how a drama's or poem's
form or structure (e.g., soliloquy,
sonnet) contributes to its meaning

Stage 3 Learning Plan

Where are your students headed? Where have Students have been learning about theme,
they been? How will you make sure the students exploring ideas of identity and belonging,
know where they are going? and are now learning to make more complex
analyses based on critical thinking.

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How will you hook students at the beginning of the Students will be hooked through an
unit? anticipation guide, where they answer
personal questions, share with other
students, and discuss as a whole class their
beginning of unit ideas of what it means to
be American.

What events will help students experience and This unit is based on a series of paired texts
explore the big idea and questions in the unit? that will allow students to explore the big
How will you equip them with needed skills and idea of the unit, and answer the questions
knowledge? throughout.

How will you cause students to reflect and rethink? Reflective practice will be embedded in
How will you guide them in rehearsing, revising, students use of content standards, as they
and refining their work? think about the imagery of America through
various poems, a song, speeches, and
essays. They will examine the perspectives
of privilege, power, and poverty through the
different American voices represented.

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How will you help students to exhibit and self- Students participation in discussions, think-
evaluate their growing skills, knowledge, and pair-shares, collaborative practices, and
understanding throughout the unit? completion of multiple choice questions,
short-answer responses, and finally the
presentation of a multimodal project will
serve to assess their understanding.

How will you tailor and otherwise personalize the All students will be required to participate
learning plan to optimize the engagement and in the unit, there will be scaffolding and
effectiveness of ALL students, without multiple means of access including but not
compromising the goals of the unit? limited to visuals, graphic organizers, and
art.

How will you organize and sequence the learning All pieces are sequenced chronologically in
activities to optimize the engagement and order for students to be able to relate the
achievement of ALL students? ideas of the Civil Rights movement,
segregation, immigration, and modern day
oppression as related to their personal
histories.

Format from: From: Wiggins, Grant and J. Mc Tighe. (1998). Understanding by Design,
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development
ISBN # 0-87120-313-8 (ppk)

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Lessons 1
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: What does it mean to be American?
Planning
Learning Objective: IWBAT use information from a variety of texts and visuals to formulate
written questions about the unit theme of What does it mean to be American?

Language Objective: IWBAT answer a variety of guided questions and write predictions about
the theme of the unit.

State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.D


Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

Materials Needed: Anticipation Guide, Guided Notes, PowerPoint, desk placards with questions.

New (Revised) Vocabulary: American, immigrant, fiction, non-fiction, literary devices, genre

2. Grouping: Groups were created based on instructional reading levels because this task is focused
on reading.
3. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Visual Aid (picture, movie, chart, table,
etc); Explicit review of procedures/directions/checklist. Preferential seating; Small group work.
Assessment
Formative: Teacher observations of (1) Student predictions (2) student verbal responses in
conversations during group work.

Summative: Written response

Learning/Teaching Experiences:

School wide class entry procedures: Teacher As Role: Makes sure that the all
Teachers will welcome students and supporting elements are prepared (PowerPoint,
reinforce entry procedures during three- bins in student materials, etc.) Support entry
minute transitional period. procedures and behavior expectations.
1. Coats/hoods off. Teacher B Role: Completes attendance, support
2. Supplies out. entry procedures and behavior expectations.
3. Homework out for collection Teacher C role: Collects homework from
4. Volume level, etc. students, and places on the back table.
5. Place new sections of unit work book
in their ELA binder.

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Part I: Do Now (3 min)
T will receive a small white half slip for Quick Write and will respond to the prompt:
Based on your understanding of the word American what themes and topics do you think
this unit will address? Why?
Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/ Do Now activity.
Teacher will call on a student will read aloud Do Now for students.
Teachers will circulate during the DN to ensure that students are completing the work
Teachers will choose 3 students to provide an answer to the do now, calling on an extra
participant in the case that students do not arrive to fully developed conclusion. (Provide
students who answer with participation credit.)

Part 2: Learning Target (3 min)
Teacher A: will call on two students to read the days learning and language targets out
loud. (Multiple students are expected to volunteer, and two students will be chosen to
read.)
Teacher B announces, Today we are starting a new unit expected to last the next 2 months
and a half. The theme of the Unit is: What does it mean to be American? During this time
you will participate in 2 Socratic Seminars, and write 3 essays covering a range of texts.
These texts will include a variety of literature.
o Q1: What are some types or structures of literature? (Students are expected to
answer: fiction, non-fiction, written in the form of poetry, autobiography, biograph,
speech, etc.) Teacher will clarify the difference between types of literature and the
genre in which it is written. Teacher will also tell students that as they review
different texts they will have time to explore the different genres.
Team Teaching

Part 3: Previewing Topic and Text Terms (7)
Teacher re-emphasize the unit title, What does it mean to be American? Students will use this
idea to continue to work on 7th grade common core standards of finding theme, making
inferences, identifying figurative language, and examining the structure of a text.

Teachers will narrate: To get us started we are going to watch a short video, also called a mini-
documentary created by WNYC, New York Citys public radio station.
Before we go any further, who knows what a documentary is? How does the prefix mini,,
change the meaning or the structure of the documentary? (Teachers should emphasize that
it is a movie or television program that tells the facts about actual people and events.
Merriam Webster Dictionary for ELLs.)
Teacher continues to narrate: The title is What Does it Mean to be American? and the
people who appear in this mini-documentary are students at Baruch College, a school
located in Manhattan.
One teacher will lead the facilitation of previewing the text related questions with
students, and narrate, We are going to preview the questions we want to be able to
answer after watching the mini-documentary. Second, we are going to watch and listen
very carefully to the mini-documentary. Then, we are going to stop and answer the
comprehension questions we previewed in our small groups at our table clusters. Cold
call 3 students to read questions for participation credit.
Q1. What do you think the theme of What Does it mean to be American will be and why?

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(Reflection)
Q2. Why do you think the first girl who spoke in the video thinks the question What does it mean
to be American is complex or difficult to answer? Analyze)
Q3. Do the terms Dominican-American, Mexican-American, Chinese-American, Indian-American,
Jamaican-American, etcchange your idea of what it means to be American? (Evaluate)
Q4. Is being American about race? (Evaluate)
Part 5: Whole Class viewing of poetic text mini-documentary (4min)
Class provided with directions for the first time mini-documentary run through. Following the
question preview, Teacher A will direct student attention to the front of the class to begin viewing
the mini-documentary.
All teachers in the classroom will circulate, and continue supporting the students they
worked with during the beginning of class.
Students will be following along with the written text in their unit binder books

o Part 5: Extended think-pair-share = SurveyThinkPairShareListen (20 min)
Students will be given 2 minutes to review the questions for reflection. (2min)
Following their reflection students will work in partners to write and discuss and
formulate responses. (6 min)
Students will review responses, extending ideas in their table clusters. (8 min)
Students will now share out in an all class discussion. (5 min)
Independent & Collaborative Peer Teaching

Part 7: Exit Slip (3 min)
Formative assessment: Based on group discussions student will create 3 questions about, What it
means to be American?



Lessons 2
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: What does it mean to be American?
Planning
Learning Objective: IWBAT correctly identify literary vocabulary that is particular to the unit
theme of What does it mean to be American?

Language Objective: IWBAT complete a multiple choice activity which correctly identifies
academic and content area vocabulary. (2) IWBAT write two sentences providing examples of a
metaphor and imagery.
State Standards:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.4.C
Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both
print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or
its part of speech.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.4.D
Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the
inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

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Materials Needed: Student binders, Video, PPT

New (Revised) Vocabulary: Various literary devices, and genres

4. Grouping: Groups were created based on instructional reading levels because this task is focused
on reading.
5. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Visual Aid (picture, movie, chart, table,
etc); Explicit review of procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential
seating, Dictionaries
Assessment
Formative: Teacher observations of (1) Student predictions (2) student verbal and written
responses.

Learning/Teaching Experiences:

School wide class entry procedures: Teachers Teacher As Role: Makes sure that the all
will welcome students and reinforce entry supporting elements are prepared
procedures during three-minute transitional (PowerPoint, bins in student materials, etc.)
period. Support entry procedures and behavior
1. Coats/hoods off. expectations.
2. Supplies out. Teacher B Role: Completes attendance,
3. Homework out for collection support entry procedures and behavior
4. Volume level, etc. expectations.
5. Place new sections of unit work book in Teacher C role: Collects homework from
their ELA binder . students, and places on the back table.


Part I: Do Now (3 min)
Teachers will welcome students and reinforce school entry procedures.
Students will be provided with a three-minute transitional period.
Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/do now activity.
A student will read aloud Do Now for students.
o Teachers will circulate during the DN to ensure that students are completing
the work
o Teachers will choose 3 students to provide an answer to the do now, calling
on an extra participant in the case that students do not arrive to fully
developed conclusion. (Provide students who answer with participation
credit.)

Team
Part 2: Learning Target (2 min) Teaching
Teacher A: will call on two students to read the days learning and language
targets out loud. (Multiple students are expected to volunteer, and two
students will be chosen to read.)

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Part 3: Previewing Vocabulary and the Topic (30 min)

Before going into topic, it must be noted that today we are going to be doing some really
difficult work. The content is not difficult, but the difficult work is making sure we keep up
our stamina as we go through many definitions.
T asks: Why must we review definitions. (Students expected to answer that they are
foundational to reading comprehension, and to understanding text.) Teacher will clarify that
these particular definitions will be review, but are to ensure understanding of the craft and
structure of the text.
Verse ________________________________.
Metaphor ______________________________.
- Notes include specific examples of metaphors.

Rhyme: The repetition of identical concluding syllables in different words, most often at the
ends of lines. Example: June--moon.
Stanza: group of poetic lines corresponding to paragraphs in prose; the meters and rhymes
are usually repeating or systematic.
Metaphor: A comparison between two unlike things, this describes one thing as if it were
something else. Does not use "like" or "as" for the comparison (see simile).
Speaker or Narrator
T will use a doc cam or PPT and have students follow along using guided notes.
T will first ask students to provide their own definitions/recall the definitions of the
following words:
o Poetry, Stanza, Line, Rhyme, Imagery, literary elements, speaker, narrator, author.
[Students should be able to provide a close approximation of what these mean they
should be able to identify a poem as a specific type of text with certain conventions
may possibly identify that some have rhymes, may be spoken word or free-style.]
Teacher will ask students what is the word we use to refer to the words of a song. [Expected
response: Lyrics]
Teacher will explicitly review the definition of lyrics, verse, and metaphor.
Students will be filling in the Guided Notes during the discussion:
o Poetry __________________________________.
o Stanza__________________________________.
o Line ___________________________________.
o Rhyme_________________________________.
o Imagery ________________________________.

Teacher will remind students that the speaker, narrator, character, or author in a particular
text may or may not be the same person.
Teacher will explicitly guide students through the definitions of:
o Lyrics ________________________________.

T will ask students: What part of the definitions would you like clarification on? Do we need
more examples of metaphors?

Part 7: Exit Slip (3 min)
Students will be provided with an exit slip and asked to write two sentences providing examples of
a metaphor and imagery.

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Lesson 3
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: What does it mean to be American?
Planning
Learning Objective: IWBAT make predictions and infer ideas and concepts that will be explored
throughout the unit.

Language Objective: IWBAT complete my anticipation guide with predictions, gists, and inferences
regarding what it means to be American.

State Standards:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.1
Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text.

Materials Needed: Graphic organizer, Text of interview, text of song, audio of the song; unit
workbook resources

New (Revised) Vocabulary: American, metaphor

6. Grouping: Flexible

7. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Visual Aid (picture, movie, chart, table,
etc); Explicit review of procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential
seating; Small group work; 1:1 check in with Students: A, B, C

Assessment

Formative: Textual annotation, students writings and drawings.

Learning/Teaching Experiences:

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School wide class entry procedures: Teacher As Role: Makes sure that the all
Teachers will welcome students and supporting elements are prepared
reinforce entry procedures during three- (PowerPoint, bins in student materials, etc.)
minute transitional period. Support entry procedures and behavior
1. Coats/hoods off. expectations.
2. Supplies out. Teacher B Role: Completes attendance, support
3. Homework out for collection entry procedures and behavior expectations.
4. Volume level, etc. General Educator role: Collects homework
5. Place new sections of unit work book in from students, and places on the back table.
their ELA binder.

Part 1: Do Now (3 min)


Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-up/
Do Now activity.
Teacher will call on a student will read aloud Do Now for students.
Do Now will be a 3 minute think-pair-share
Minute 1: Students will reflect on their answer to the previous classs exit slip activity.
Minute 2-3: Students will divide the remaining minutes to explain to their partner their
stance or opinion as to whether a song is a poem or a poem is a song.
o Ts will circulate, and perform a formative assessment during the Do Now checking
for the technical language or rhyme, scheme, poem, song, lyrics, stanza, verse, and
ideas of structure.
o T will choose 3 students from 3 different groups to consolidate the pairs response
and share it with the class.
o T will provide students who participate in the whole class share out with
participation credit.
Part 2: Learning Target (2 min)
Teacher A: will call on two students to read the days learning and language targets out
loud. (Multiple students are expected to volunteer, and two students will be chosen to
read.)
Teacher B announces, Today we are beginning our expanded text set, which is two or
more types of readings or media that have similar ideas/gists/or themes. We are doing this
so that in 3 weeks we can participate in a Socratic Seminar using multiple texts including 2
speeches, poems, photographs, and other types of literature. As we go through the unit, you
will come upon different projects that we will complete to help us develop an
understanding of this concept.
Part 3: Pre-Reading Activity (10 min)
T will re-iterate 7th grade goals: Students will use this idea to continue to work on 7th
grade common core standards of finding theme, making inferences, identifying figurative
language, and examining the structure of a text.
T will narrate: I want to make sure we understand a term that was introduced yesterday.
This term or academic vocabulary is very pertinent or important to the unit. It is metaphor.
T will call on 5 students.
o 2 students will provide definitions of metaphor.
o 3 students will provide examples.
Part 4: Introduction to the topic (12 min)
T will introduce the topic by providing students an Anticipation Guide in the form of a graphic

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organizer.
Students are allowed to speak during activity and work in their cluster groups.
o The graphic organizer allows students to also draw or write their idea of America,
using 2 -5 of the questions from the anticipation guide. (Students should have
coloring utensils at their desk.

Anticipation guide: Sentence stems:
1. When you hear America what is the first word that comes to mind?
2. Draw a picture of what you imagine when you think America.
3. Compare and contrast America to another country you are familiar with.
4. In three sentences describe America to an alien from outer space.
5. If you had to pick on thing about this country that you love what would it be.
6. One thing I hate is
7. When I think of America I feel
8. I believe America is.
9. Life in America is
10. One word to describe America is.

Cluster share in their collaborative groups students should share about what they drew, or wrote.
Teacher will collect students work for grading.
Part 4: Pre-Reading Activity (15 min)
Students will be introduced to the song America the Beautiful using WBURs Here & Nows
Jeremy Hobsons interview with Elisa Phelps of the History Colorado Center which aired
February 20th 2017. (Interview will play 2xs -
http://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2017/02/20/america-the-beautiful)
Students will receive a copy of the interview to annotate:
Students should understand that
o It was originally thought of only as a poem;
o It became a song set to a tune by Samuel Ward
(https://public.wsu.edu/~campbelld/amlit/poeterms.htm)
o All teachers in the classroom will circulate, and continue supporting students with
specific language impairments. Also support students who have difficulty in tracking
the writing on the page, and with pacing while listening.
Part 5: Closing Activity (6 min)
Students will respond to two multiple choice questions retrieved from CommonLit.org
1. When and who wrote America the Beautiful written?
2. Why do you think the song is title America the Beautiful?

Homework: Answer the following: Can a song be a poem or can a poem be a song. Justify your
response using the text from America the Beautiful?


Lesson 4
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: What does it mean to be American?
Planning

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Learning Objective: IWBAT analyze how specific text structures help to convey the themes in
America, the Beautiful

Language Objective: IWBAT develop a written summary of the given song text using at least one
conjunction and an appositive.

State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.1


Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text.

Materials Needed: America the Beautiful workbook pages, PPT

New (Revised) Vocabulary: Figurative Language, Repetition, Word Choice

Grouping: Groups were created based on instructional reading levels because this task is focused
on reading.
8. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Visual Aid (picture, movie, chart, table,
etc); Explicit review of procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential
seating; Small group work; 1:1 check in with students with IEPs. Check with students who
struggle with structure and craft.
Assessment
Formative: Textual Annotation
Summative:

Learning/Teaching Experiences:
Part I: Do Now (3 min)
Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/ Do Now activity.
Teacher will call on a student will read aloud Do Now for students.
Part 2: Review Learning Target/Prior Learning (30 min)
T will introduce the days learning target: IWBAT analyze how specific text structures help
to convey the themes in America the Beautiful.
After a brief review we are going to listen to the song America the Beautiful sung by Kelly
Clarkson.
Students should be asked to go into their notes and remove the lyrics from the song they
received the prior day so as to follow along.
Quick check-in Yesterday, we listened to a program Here & Now which broadcasted a
segment or a short news story on America the Beautiful
o Q1. Who wrote America the Beautiful?
o Q2. Why did she write it?
PLAY SONG ONCE
T will remind students that we are looking to analyze how specific text structures convey
theme. Therefore, students will use their lyrics sheet to annotate for evidence of theme.
Provide students with the following directions:
Students should use 3 different colored pens pencils or highlighters of their choice to
differentiate between three types of literary elements in the text:
Imagery

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Repetition
Comparison (metaphors)
o Emphasize that students must remain consistent. For example if they begin to
highlight repetition in red they must continue to do so throughout ALL
assignments in the unit. This will help with organization.
T will play song a second time, and all teachers will circulate and support to make sure
students are correctly annotating the text/following along.

Part 3: Parallel Teaching in Small Groups (7 min)
Teachers will prompt students to turn to page x of their Unit workbooks to the song,
America the Beautiful
Focus on this stanza: T should emphasize - Rhyme & Parallel structure (repetition)
O beautiful for spacious skies,
For amber waves of grain,
For purple mountain majesties
Above the fruited plain!
America! America! God shed His grace on thee,
And crown thy good with brotherhood
From sea to shining sea!

Part 3: Closing Activity CFU
Students will now be provided with the final 3 minutes of this segment to review their annotations
for examples of the three literary elements in the text. (Formative assessment)



Lesson 5
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: America the Beautiful Ctd.
Planning
Learning Objective: IWBAT to compare and contrast my experience of America to that of
Katherine Lee Bates.

Language Objective: IWBAT compare and contrast my experience of America to that of Katherine
Lee Bates, using song text. I will use at least one conjunction and an appositive.

State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.7.2 a . Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to


follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification,
comparison/contrast, and cause/effect.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY W.7.1b Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using
accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY W.7.1c Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the
relationships among claim(s), reasons, and evidence
Materials Needed: Binders, Sentence Stems, Analysis Resource sheets

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New (Revised) Vocabulary: Figurative Language, Repetition, Word Choice, Accountable talk
sentence stems
Grouping: Independent Activity

9. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Visual Aid (picture, movie, chart, table,
etc); Explicit review of procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential
seating; 1:1 check in with students with IEPs that have a language-specific need
Assessment
Summative: Well-developed short response that includes a claim, evidence, and analysis.
Learning/Teaching Experiences:
School wide class entry procedures: Teacher A: Makes sure that the all supporting
Teachers will welcome students and elements are prepared (PowerPoint, bins in
reinforce entry procedures during three- student materials, etc.) Support entry
minute transitional period. procedures and behavior expectations.
1. Coats/hoods off. Teacher B: Completes attendance, support
2. Supplies out. entry procedures and behavior expectations.
3. Homework out for collection Collects homework from students, and places
4. Volume level, etc. on the back table.
5. Place new sections of unit work book in
their ELA binder.

Part I: Do Now (3 min)
Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/ Do Now activity.
Teacher will call on a student will read aloud Do Now for students.
As teachers circulate the classroom checking for correct response direct students
who finish early to turn to page X in their unit workbook to please review the textual
annotations, and begin to examine how is language used to convey the theme?

Part 2: Learning Target/Review (12 minute)


Teacher A will ask for a student volunteer to read the days learning and language
targets out loud.
Teacher B continues: Brief overview of yesterday. We are going to listen to America
the Beautiful one more time. This time while you listen I want you to think about how you
experience America, do you see it from the same perspective/angle as the author
Katherine Lee Bates and be ready to explain.

Part 3: Move to small (flexible) groups for Language analysis (2 minutes): Following turn-
and-talk direct students to prepare to move into small groups.
Teacher B will Ask a student why are we moving into smaller groups? [Students should be able
to respond for individualized attention based on learning needs.] T will emphasize the need to
complete a comprehensive analysis of language to help us understand the text.

All students need:
- pen or pencil
- planner

16
- binder

Part 4: Partner Work (8 min)
Students will move into small groups and discuss their perspectives with their
peers.
o Teacher will direct students to use their anticipation guide from day one to think
about their image of what is means to be American.
o Teacher will emphasize the language of literature as students discuss. (Are
they using the words imagery, repetition, etc.? Are they going back into their unit
books and reviewing the reflection questions?)
Part 5: Summative Assessment (12 min)
Teachers will direct students to split up from their partners and begin to individually formulate a
response to the question:
Using SEEA, explain how does your life, your environment, your neighborhood affect how
you see/imagine America? Would you use some of the same descriptions as Katherine Lee
Bates?
Emphasize language target: IWBAT compare and contrast my experience of America to
that of Katherine Lee Bates, using song text. I will use at least one conjunction and an
appositive.
Expectations:
- No speaking.
- Before asking a teacher for help use your resources.
- Use your Check-in with me flashcard or raise your hand to get the teachers attention.
- Challenge yourself: Ask, Is my writing at my highest possible level? Am I trying my best? If the
answer is no, readjust your mindset.



Lesson 6
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: America the Beautiful
Planning
Learning Objective: IWBAT analyze how specific text structures help to convey the themes in
America, the Beautiful

Language Objective: : IWBAT develop a written summary of the given song text using at least one
conjunction and an appositive.

State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.1


Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text.

Materials Needed: Binders; worksheets; PPT

New (Revised) Vocabulary: Figurative Language, Repetition, Word Choice

17
Grouping: Independent activity

10. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Explicit review of


procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential seating; 1:1 check in with
students with IEPs.
Assessment
Summative: Summary with a topic sentence, evidence, and analysis.

Learning/Teaching Experiences:
Part I: Do Now (3 min)
Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/Do Now activity.
- Teacher will call on a student will read aloud Do Now for students.
Part 2: Learning Target and Activity (30 min)
Teacher will introduce the days learning target: IWBAT analyze the development of the
theme in Xs America the Beautiful through language and word choice.

Students will independently fill out their guided notes on Analyzing Text: What is central
idea or the theme of the song? [Expected Response: Students should be able to identify that
the title is the theme.]

Teacher will remind students that over the course of this unit we have been annotating for
that information. We want to make sure we reach our 7th grade target of understanding
how language as a literary element affects theme. Todays Check for Understanding will
require students to build 2 paragraphs that support the theme America is Beautiful T will
quickly review language as a literary element used by authors that conveys theme. T will
ask students for the three ways in which authors use language.

Students should be going back into their notes to find the literary devices which they
annotated.
1. Comparison/Metaphors
2. Imagery
3. Repetition

Students will also receive a rubric/checklist which outlines the following grading criteria:
1. Planning, Organization, and Structure
a. Ideas
b. Sentence Fluency and Word Choice
c. Language

Part 4: Closing Activity Summative Assessment

IWBAT develop a written summary of the given song text using at least one conjunction and an
appositive. Students will use the Claim, Evidence, A1, A2, A3 method.
Students should be asked to go into their notes and remove the lyrics and independently
complete the activity using a graphic organizer.

Students who do not complete the assignment will be provided with 15 minutes at lunch to finish.

18
Students who need extended time may take the entire lunch period.
Students who need an extension activity: Why may some people not share Katharine Lee Bates
view that America is beautiful? Make a connection to your Social Studies class.




Lesson 7
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Walt Whitman/Langston Hughes Poetry
Planning
Learning Objective: IWBAT make predictions and infer the gist of Walt Whitmans poem I Hear
America Singing and I Too, Hear America Singing, by Langston Hughes using the title as a text
feature.
Language Objective: : IWBAT make a written connection between Whitman, Hughes, and the
song America the Beautiful.

State Standards:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.1
Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the
text; provide an objective summary of the text.
Materials Needed: Unit workbook pages, post-its

New (Revised) Vocabulary: Figurative Language, Repetition, Literary Devices

Grouping: None

11. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Visual Aid (picture, movie, chart, table,
etc); Explicit review of procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential
seating.

Assessment
Summative: Students will write: 3 things they individually believe one of the poems is trying to
convey; 2 questions the students have using inferences from the timing of both; 1 connection to
the song America the Beautiful.

Learning/Teaching Experiences:

19
School wide class entry procedures: Teacher As Role: Makes sure that the all
Teachers will welcome students and supporting elements are prepared
reinforce entry procedures during three- (PowerPoint, bins in student materials, etc.)
minute transitional period. Support entry procedures and behavior
expectations.
1. Coats/hoods off.
2. Supplies out. Teacher B Role: Completes attendance,
3. Homework out for collection support entry procedures and behavior
4. Volume level, etc. expectations.
5. Place new sections of unit work book in
their ELA binder. General Educator role: Collects homework
from students, and places on the back table.
Part I: Introduction

Teachers will welcome students and reinforce school entry procedures.


Students will be provided with a three-minute transitional period.
Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/do now activity.
A student will read aloud Do Now for students. DO NOW: MOOD

Part 2: Learning Target + Collaborative Activity (30 min)


Teacher will ask for a student volunteer to read the days learning and language targets out
loud.
Teacher will then narrate that today A teacher will announce that today we are continuing
the unit What does it mean to be American? We are going to read two poems I Hear
America Singing, by Walt Whitman and I Too, Hear America Singing, by Langston
Hughes.
Brief intro to Walt Whitman and Langston Hughes as an author/narrator.
Provided students with timeline of when each was written. Directions (also on PPT and in
graphic organizer.)
o Based on the authors biographies and the titles of the poems students will be
expected to make predictions of what the poem will be about and identify the
mood of the poem based on their understanding of what mood is.
o Each table will receive a particular color post-it, each group member will make a
prediction of what they think the theme and mood of the text is.
o After completing this activity students will rotate between different groups
keeping their same colored post-its and respond to the ideas left by another group.
o (For example if Cluster one is green, they will post in green at their group, and
respond to at least two other groups musings or ideas with green post-it notes.)
Part 3: Closing Activity Exit Ticket
Students will complete a 3-2-1 Exit ticket
3 things they individually believe one of the poems is trying to convey.

20
2 questions the students have using inferences from the timing of both.
1 connection to the song America the Beautiful.


Lesson 8
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Walt Whitman/Langston Hughes Poetry
Planning
Learning Objective: IWBAT use text evidence to compare and contrast Walt Whitmans point of
view in I Hear America Singing and Langston Hughes I Too, Sing America

Language Objective: : IWBAT write a claim and formulate an analysis regarding the authors
point of view using evidence from the text.

State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.A


Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information,
using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include
formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding
comprehension.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.B
Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other
information and examples.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.C
Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and
concepts.
Materials Needed: Unit workbook pages

New (Revised) Vocabulary: Figurative Language, Repetition, Literary Devices, Compare, and
Contrast
Grouping: Whole class

12. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Visual Aid (picture, movie, chart, table,
etc); Explicit review of procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential
seating; Small group work; 1:1 check in with students who struggled during the prior class.

Assessment
Summative: Students will complete 1 short answer and 5 multiple choice questions from
commonlit.org

Learning/Teaching Experiences:

21
School wide class entry procedures: Teacher As Role: Makes sure that the all
Teachers will welcome students and supporting elements are prepared
reinforce entry procedures during three- (PowerPoint, bins in student materials, etc.)
minute transitional period. Support entry procedures and behavior
expectations.
1. Coats/hoods off.
2. Supplies out. Teacher B Role: Completes attendance,
3. Homework out for collection support entry procedures and behavior
4. Volume level, etc. expectations.
5. Place new sections of unit work book in
their ELA binder. General Educator role: Collects homework
from students, and places on the back table.
Part I: Introduction (8 min)

Teachers will welcome students and reinforce school entry procedures.


Students will be provided with a three-minute transitional period.
Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/do now activity.
A student will read aloud Do Now for students. DO NOW: MOOD (Focus day 3)
Part 2: Learning Target + Comparing and contrasting - Independent work Building
Background knowledge + Understanding (25 min)
Teacher will ask for a student volunteer to read the days learning and language targets out
loud.
Students will have the opportunity to re-read both text either with a partner, as a table
cluster, or independently. Following the reading students will complete 1 short answer
question and 5 multiple choice questions from commonlit.org including
PART A: In the final line, what does the phrase "Singing with open mouths" suggest about what it
means to be American?
a. that they are diverse, open-minded, tolerant people.
b. that they want to be heard.
c. that they are generous and benevolent people.
d. that they are bold and proud people
PART B: Which phrase provides the best support for the answer to Part A?
a. varied carols
b. blithe and strong
c. what belongs to him or her and to none else
d. delicious singing of the mother

*DURING THIS COLLABORATIVE + INDEPENDENT ACTIVITY ONE TEACHER WILL BE
CONFERENCING/WORSKSHOPPING WITH STUDENTS WHO MAY STRUGGLE WITH
CRAFT/STRUCTURE + COMPARING + CONTRASTING. THESE STUDENTS WILL ONLY BE REQUIRED
TO COMPLETE THE MULTIPLE CHOICE. THEIR ACTIVITY AND ASSESSMENT WILL BE MODIFIED TO
MEET THEIR NEEDS.

ALL STUDENTS will receive a scaffolded statement sheet to help them organize their thoughts.
They will continue to build upon the prior days work. Students will be provided with the
opportunity to share out their responses.
Both _________________________ [Text 1] and __________________________[Text 2] deal with

22
_____________________________ [Topic/Theme], but they do so in different ways.
(Source for statement: https://www.middleweb.com/19839/parcc-prep-better-way-teach-
compare-contrast/)

Part 3: Closing Activity Check for Understanding (5 min)


All students will come back together and teachers will review the importance of comparing and
contrasting in relation to text structure.


Lessons 9+10 Station activities about the Setting of Walt Whitmans and Langston Hughes
poems.
Lesson 11
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Walt Whitman/Langston Hughes Poetry (Comparison CTD)
Planning
Learning Objective: IWBAT use text evidence to compare and contrast Walt Whitmans point of
view in I Hear America Singing and Langston Hughes I Too, Sing America

Language Objective: : IWBAT write a claim and formulate an analysis regarding the authors
point of view using evidence from the text.

State Standards:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.A
Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information,
using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include
formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding
comprehension.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.B
Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other
information and examples.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.C
Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and
concepts.

Materials Needed: Unit workbook pages

New (Revised) Vocabulary: Figurative Language, Repetition, Literary Devices, Compare, and
Contrast
Grouping: Whole class

13. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Visual Aid (picture, movie, chart, table,
etc); Explicit review of procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential
seating; Small group work; 1:1 check in with students who struggled during the prior class.

23
Assessment
Summative: Students will complete 1 short answer and 5 multiple choice questions from
commonlit.org

Learning/Teaching Experiences:
School wide class entry procedures: Teacher As Role: Makes sure that the all
Teachers will welcome students and supporting elements are prepared
reinforce entry procedures during three- (PowerPoint, bins in student materials, etc.)
minute transitional period. Support entry procedures and behavior
expectations.
1. Coats/hoods off.
2. Supplies out. Teacher B Role: Completes attendance,
3. Homework out for collection support entry procedures and behavior
4. Volume level, etc. expectations.
5. Place new sections of unit work book in
their ELA binder. General Educator role: Collects homework
from students, and places on the back table.
Part I: Introduction (8 min)

Teachers will welcome students and reinforce school entry procedures.


Students will be provided with a three-minute transitional period.
Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/do now activity.
A student will read aloud Do Now for students. DO NOW: MOOD
Part 2: Learning Target + Comparing and contrasting (17 min)
Teacher will ask for a student volunteer to read the days learning and language targets out
loud.
A teacher will facilitate this portion of the class. The other teacher will circulate and
support, providing clarification to students who are struggling, or are holding up a Check
in with me please placard. will announce that today we are continuing our work on what
it means to be American for English Language Arts. We are moving onto the more complex
work of compare and contrasting.
Using graphic organizers students will compare and contrast the ideas in both poems.
Teacher will demonstrate structure using the graphic below.


Students will receive a scaffolded statement sheet to help them organize their thoughts. Students
will be provided with the opportunity to share out their responses.

24
Both _________________________ [Text 1] and __________________________[Text 2] deal with
_____________________________ [Topic/Theme], but they do so in different ways.
(Source for statement: https://www.middleweb.com/19839/parcc-prep-better-way-teach-
compare-contrast/)

Part 3: Closing Activity Check for understanding
Using sentence stems students will work independently to organize their claim-evidence-analysis
Both _________________________ [Text 1] and __________________________[Text 2] deal with
_____________________________ [Topic/Theme], but they do so in different ways.
o E text one compared/contrasted to Evidence Text 2
o Analysis 1
o Analysis 2
o Analysis 3


Lesson 12
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Walt Whitman/Langston Hughes Poetry
Planning
Learning Objective: IWBAT use text evidence to compare and contrast Walt Whitmans point of
view in I Hear America Singing and Langston Hughes I Too, Sing America

Language Objective: : IWBAT write a claim and formulate an analysis regarding the authors
point of view using evidence from the text.

State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.A


Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information,
using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include
formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding
comprehension.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.B

Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other
information and examples.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.C
Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and
concepts.

Materials Needed: Unit workbook pages, sentence stems for analysis

New (Revised) Vocabulary: Figurative Language, Repetition, Literary Devices, Compare, and
Contrast
Grouping: Whole class

14. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Visual Aid (picture, movie, chart, table,
etc); Explicit review of procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential

25
seating; Small group work; 1:1 check in with students who struggled during the prior class.

Assessment
Summative: Students will complete 1 short answer and 5 multiple choice questions from
commonlit.org

Learning/Teaching Experiences:
School wide class entry procedures: Teacher As Role: Makes sure that the all
Teachers will welcome students and supporting elements are prepared
reinforce entry procedures during three- (PowerPoint, bins in student materials, etc.)
minute transitional period. Support entry procedures and behavior
expectations.
1. Coats/hoods off.
2. Supplies out. Teacher B Role: Completes attendance,
3. Homework out for collection support entry procedures and behavior
4. Volume level, etc. expectations.
5. Place new sections of unit work book in
their ELA binder. General Educator role: Collects homework
from students, and places on the back table.
Part I: Introduction (8 min)

Teachers will welcome students and reinforce school entry procedures.


Students will be provided with a three-minute transitional period.
Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/do now activity.
A student will read aloud Do Now for students. DO NOW: MOOD (Focus day 3)
Part 2: Learning Target + Comparing and contrasting - Independent work Building
Background knowledge + Understanding (25 min)
Teacher will ask for a student volunteer to read the days learning and language targets out
loud.
Students will have the opportunity to re-read both text either with a partner, as a table
cluster, or independently. Following the reading students will complete 1 short answer
question and 5 multiple choice questions from commonlit.org including
PART A: In the final line, what does the phrase "Singing with open mouths" suggest about what it
means to be American?
a. that they are diverse, open-minded, tolerant people.
b. that they want to be heard.
c. that they are generous and benevolent people.
d. that they are bold and proud people
PART B: Which phrase provides the best support for the answer to Part A?
a. varied carols
b. blithe and strong
c. what belongs to him or her and to none else
d. delicious singing of the mother

26
*DURING THIS COLLABORATIVE + INDEPENDENT ACTIVITY ONE TEACHER WILL BE
CONFERENCING/WORSKSHOPPING WITH STUDENTS WHO MAY STRUGGLE WITH
CRAFT/STRUCTURE + COMPARING + CONTRASTING. THESE STUDENTS WILL ONLY BE REQUIRED
TO COMPLETE THE MULTIPLE CHOICE. THEIR ACTIVITY AND ASSESSMENT WILL BE MODIFIED TO
MEET THEIR NEEDS.

ALL STUDENTS will receive a scaffolded statement sheet to help them organize their thoughts.
They will continue to build upon the prior days work. Students will be provided with the
opportunity to share out their responses.
Both _________________________ [Text 1] and __________________________[Text 2] deal with
_____________________________ [Topic/Theme], but they do so in different ways.
(Source for statement: https://www.middleweb.com/19839/parcc-prep-better-way-teach-
compare-contrast/)

Part 3: Closing Activity Reflection (5 min)
Students will fill out their Socratic Seminar Reflection worksheet evaluating their
participation.



Lesson 13
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Socratic Seminar
Planning
Learning Objective: Using copies of my annotated texts IWBAT participate in a Socratic Seminar
comparing and contrasting the ideas in America the Beautiful, I Hear America Singing, and I
Too, Hear America Singing based on the perspectives of the different authors (2) Students will
identify personal perspectives to incorporate into the discussion of how do they sing America.
Language Objective: : Using sentence stems, students will be able to orally compare and contrast
the viewpoints of Walt Whitman and Langston Hughes on what it means to sing America.

State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative


discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts,
and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1.A: Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material
under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or
issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
Materials Needed: Binders; Socratic Seminar, Sentence Stems

New (Revised) Vocabulary: Figurative Language, Repetition, Literary Devices, Compare, and
Contrast, Accountable talk stems
Grouping: Parallel Groups

15. Modifications and Accommodations Graphic Organizer; Visual Aid (picture, movie, chart, table,
etc); Explicit review of procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential

27
seating; Small group work.

Assessment
Summative: Participation in Socratic Seminar where students are provided with the opportunity
to verbally demonstrate understanding and application of analysis of authors purpose and
meaning in a text.

Learning/Teaching Experiences:
School wide class entry procedures: Teacher As Role: Makes sure that the all
Teachers will welcome students and supporting elements are prepared
reinforce entry procedures during three- (PowerPoint, bins in student materials, etc.)
minute transitional period. Support entry procedures and behavior
expectations.
1. Coats/hoods off.
2. Supplies out. Teacher B Role: Completes attendance,
3. Homework out for collection support entry procedures and behavior
4. Volume level, etc. expectations.
5. Place new sections of unit work book in
their ELA binder. General Educator role: Collects homework
from students, and places on the back table.
Part I: Introduction (8 min)

Teachers will welcome students and reinforce school entry procedures.


Students will be provided with a three-minute transitional period.
Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/do now activity.
Astudent will read aloud Do Now for students. Students are expected to use the prompt:
The poem that I can relate to the most is _______________ becauseStudents must provide a
three sentence explanation/analysis.
Part 2: Teacher model
T will announce that today we are continuing the unit What does it mean to be
American?
Socratic Seminar: Ts will model a high level discussion. Questions will be chosen at
random from a jar.
o T1: Why do you think Langston Hughes wrote I Too, Sing America?
o T2: I think it reminds me of when youre a kid and mom and dad say they are
taking your sibling somewhere, and you say, Wait, me too, I want to go. I feel like
Lnagston Hughes, a black man, and African American living in a time of deep racial
prejudice and discrimination was saying, Me too! I sing America! I have the same
hopes and dreams as any white American, but because I am black, I dont get to
experience the same America like white people?
o T1: Can you clarify what you mean by not experiencing the same America as white
people?
o T2: Well by that I mean that blacks, they were and still are considered minorities,
and they were segregated or separated from whites. Schools were different,
neighborhoods were different. It was like they were excluded or left out of the

28
community.
o T1: Id like to build on that by adding
o [End model]

Part 3: Move to parallel groups (2 min)


Split class into flexible parallel groups in order for all students to have the ability to participate in
the discussion.

Questions from: https://www.nwabr.org/sites/default/files/SocSem.pdf

Sample questions to serve as the key question or interpret the text:


- What is the main idea or underlying value in the text?
- What is the authors purpose or perspective?
- What does (a particular phrase) mean?
- What might be a good title for the text?
- What is the most important word/sentence/paragraph?
Sample questions to move the discussion along:
- Who has a different perspective?
- Who has not yet had a chance to speak?
- Where do you find evidence for that in the text?
- Can you clarify what you mean by that?
- How does that relate to what (someone else) said?
- Is there something in the text that is unclear to you?
- Has anyone changed their mind?
Sample questions to bring the discussion back to students in closing:
- How do the ideas in the text relate to our lives? What do they mean
- for us personally?
- Why is this material important?
- Is it right that.? Do you agree with the author?
Sample debriefing questions:
- Do you feel like you understand the text at a deeper level?
- How was the process for us? Did we adhere to our norms?
- Did you achieve your goals to participate?
- What was one thing you noticed about the seminar?

29




Lesson Plans Julia Alvarez Text (Lessons 14-21)

Lessons 14
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: What does it mean to be American?
Planning
Learning Objective: IWBAT use background information on Julia Alvarez to make inferences and
analyze her thoughts as a child about what it means to be an American.

Language Objective: Students will be able to use textual evidence to articulate - verbally and
through writing - how the theme of the text is conveyed the literary element: language.

State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.6


Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes
his or her position from that of others.

Materials Needed: Anticipation Guide, Guided Notes, PowerPoint, desk placards with questions.
http://www.notablebiographies.com/A-An/Alvarez-Julia.html

New (Revised) Vocabulary: Immigrants, notable, goods (as in products for sale), dictator, arrival

16. Grouping: Groups were created based on instructional reading levels because this task is focused
on reading.
17. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Visual Aid (picture, movie, chart, table,
etc); Explicit review of procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential
seating; Small group work; 1:1 check in with CP, JN, JE, DA; Movement break(s)
Assessment
Formative: Teacher observations of (1) Student predictions (2) student verbal responses in
conversations during group work.

Summative: Check for understanding using multiple-choice questions, and a short response
stating the theme of the piece.
Learning/Teaching Experiences:

30

School wide class entry procedures: Teacher As Role: Makes sure that the all
Teachers will welcome students and supporting elements are prepared (PowerPoint,
reinforce entry procedures during three- bins in student materials, etc.) Support entry
minute transitional period. procedures and behavior expectations.
1. Coats/hoods off. Teacher B Role: Completes attendance, support
2. Supplies out. entry procedures and behavior expectations.
3. Homework out for collection Teacher C role: Collects homework from
4. Volume level, etc. students, and places on the back table.
5. Place new sections of unit work book
in their ELA binder (if not done on Monday).


Part I: Do Now (3 min)
(Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/ Do Now activity.)
Teacher will call on a student will read aloud Do Now for students.
Team
Part 2: Learning Target (2 min) Teaching
Teacher A: will call on two students to read the days learning and
language targets out loud. (Multiple students are expected to volunteer,
and two students will be chosen to read.)
Teacher B announces, Today we are continuing our text set, which is two
or more types of readings or media that have similar ideas/gists/or themes.
We are doing this so that in another 2 weeks, we can participate in a
Socratic Seminar using multiple texts.


Part 3: Learning Target (1 min)
Teacher A will continue the lesson by introducing, Julia Alvarezs Biography from the
Encyclopedia of World Biography (http://www.notablebiographies.com/A-An/Alvarez-
Julia.html)
Check for understanding: What is a biography? (Students should be able to articulate that a
biography is the story of someones life told by another person.)
All students will be asked to open their binders to page X for an introduction on Julia
Alvarez.
o
o Part 4: Reading the Text + Annotating the text (15 min)
Students will take turns reading the text out loud. One student per table cluster is
expected to read.
Students will annotate text while reading.


Part 5: Listen Portion of the Protocol (10 min)

31
o Extended think-pair-share = SurveyThinkPairShareListen (15 min)
Students will be given 2 minutes to skim the text.
Following the skimming of the text students will write the gist of the text.
Students will then re-read the text in full and answer the question:
After re-reading the text in full do you agree with your first response? If not, can you write 2
sentences on your new idea of what the gist/theme of the reading is.
Using accountable talk students will share with their responses with the person next to
them. (2.5 minutes per student for a total of 5)
Students will now share out in an all class discussion


Part 7: Exit Slip (3 min)
Formative assessment: Using textual evidence, students will write 5-6 sentences about how Julia
Alvarez would describe herself.




Lessons 15
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: What does it mean to be American?
Planning
Learning Objective: IWBAT use information from an interview to state who Julia Alvarez is in my
own words.

Language Objective: Students will be able to use textual evidence to articulate - verbally and
through writing - how the theme of the text is conveyed the literary element: language.

State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.6


Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes
his or her position from that of others.

Materials Needed: Anticipation Guide, Guided Notes, PowerPoint, HW text for preview, desk
placards with questions.

New (Revised) Vocabulary:

18. Grouping: Groups were created based on instructional reading levels because this task is focused
on reading.
19. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Visual Aid (picture, movie, chart, table,
etc); Explicit review of procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential
seating; Small group work; 1:1 check in with CP, JN, JE, DA; Movement break(s)
Assessment

32
Formative: Teacher observations of (1) Student predictions (2) student verbal responses in
conversations during group work

Summative: Check for understanding using multiple-choice questions, and a short response
stating the theme of the piece.
Learning/Teaching Experiences:

School wide class entry procedures: Teacher As Role: Makes sure that the all
Teachers will welcome students and supporting elements are prepared
reinforce entry procedures during three- (PowerPoint, bins in student materials, etc.)
minute transitional period. Support entry procedures and behavior
1. Coats/hoods off. expectations.
2. Supplies out. Teacher B Role: Completes attendance, support
3. Homework out for collection entry procedures and behavior expectations.
4. Volume level, etc. Teacher C role: Collects homework from
5. Place new sections of unit work book students, and places on the back table.
in their ELA binder (if not done on Monday).


Part I: Do Now (3 min)
(Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/ Do Now activity.)
Teacher will call on a student will read aloud Do Now for students.
Team
Part 2: Learning Target (2 min) Teaching
Teacher A: will call on two students to read the days learning and
language targets out loud. (Multiple students are expected to volunteer,
and two students will be chosen to read.)
Teacher B announces , Today we are continuing our text set, which is two
or more types of readings or media that have similar ideas/gists/or themes.
We are doing this so that by the end of next week, we can participate in a
Socratic Seminar using multiple texts.

o Pair-Share Portion of the Protocol: Teacher sets four-minute timer One Teach
1. Following the Do Now Teacher B narrates, Please turn to the person next to you One Assist
and share your thoughts about what this information makes you think/notice.
Students will engage in pair share- 2 minutes
Finally as a table discuss the meaning of this information. What does it make
you think?
Students will participate in whole table share out - 2 minutes

Part 3: Learning Target (1 min)
Teacher A will continue the lesson by narrating, Today we are starting what is known text set,
which is two or more types of readings or media that have similar ideas/gists/or themes. We are
doing this so that in two weeks, we can participate in a Socratic Seminar about the two texts.

33

Teacher poses Q1. - Based on our Do Now, and your anticipation guide workwhat do
you predict the two texts or media we will be using be about?
Students should be able to transfer and apply knowledge from the morning and make
an educated guess that it will be about immigration and ones American identity.
Multiple students are expected to raise their hands, and teachers will choose 2-3 to
quickly respond.
All students will be asked to open their binders to page X for the first text of the set 'All-
American' writer Julia Alvarez talks immigrant experience, red pickup before Gifford Lecture
(http://www.syracuse.com/entertainment/index.ssf/2015/03/all-
american_writer_julia_alvarez_talks_immigrant_experience_red_pickup_before_g.html) .
Students will turn to the reading to follow along as teachers read the text aloud to
model fluency for Part V.
o Team
o Part 4: Previewing Text Related Questions (3 min) Teaching
The teachers will tag team facilitate previewing the text related questions
with students, and narrate, We are going to preview the questions we want
to be able to answer after reading the text. Second, we are going to follow
along very closely. Then, we are going to stop and answer the comprehension
questions.
n
n Cold call 2 students to read questions for participation credit.
Q1. How does being an immigrant affect Alvarezs identity as an author? Do
you think it changes what she writes about (Reflection)
Q2. Why do you think she prefers to view herself as an all-American author
versus being defined as a Latin-American writer? (Analyze/Evaluate)

Part 5: Whole Class reading (10 min): Class provided with directions for the first time reading
run through. Following the question preview, the Teacher A will remind students to follow along
as both teachers tag-team read the news article.

Both teachers in the classroom will circulate, and teacher not currently reading will
continue supporting the students they worked with during the beginning of class.
Students will be following along in their unit binder books

Part 6: Rereading Text and annotate (9 min)
Teacher B explains that now there will be an all class read out. Students will begin
rereading the text beginning with the Q&A portion. Students will popcorn read. Ts will
emphasize voice, fluency, as pacing.


Part 7: Exit Slip (3 min)
Formative assessment: Using textual evidence, students will write 5-6 sentences about how Julia
Alvarez would describe herself.

34



Lesson 16 & 17 - 2 days
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: What does it mean to be American?
Planning
Learning Objective: (1) Using textual evidence students will be able to identify the main
idea/theme of Name/Nombres and respond accurately to comprehension questions related to it.
(2) Using Julia Alvarezs text Name/Nombres IWBAT write an analysis about the impact of names
on a persons identity, and connect it to the idea of being American.
Language Objective: Students will be able to use textual evidence to articulate - verbally and
through writing - impact of names on a persons identity, and connect it to the idea of being
American.
State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.6
Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes
his or her position from that of others.

Materials Needed: Audio of Name/Nombres, Anticipation Guide, Guided Notes, PowerPoint, HW


text for preview, desk placards with questions.

New (Revised) Vocabulary: Ethnicity, Florid, Convoluted

20. Grouping: Whole class teaching, One-to-one help, Groups were created based on instructional
reading levels because this task is focused on reading.
21. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Visual Aid (picture, movie, chart, table,
etc); Explicit review of procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential
seating; Small group work; 1:1 check in with Students: A, B, C

Assessment

Formative: Teacher observations of (1) Student predictions (2) student verbal responses in
conversations during group work
Summative: Check for understanding using multiple-choice questions, and a short response
stating the theme of the piece.

Learning/Teaching Experiences:

35
School wide class entry procedures: Teacher As Role: Makes sure that the all
Teachers will welcome students and supporting elements are prepared (PowerPoint,
reinforce entry procedures during three- bins in student materials, etc.) Support entry
minute transitional period. procedures and behavior expectations.
1. Coats/hoods off. Teacher B Role: Completes attendance, support
2. Supplies out. entry procedures and behavior expectations.
3. Homework out for collection General Educator role: Collects homework from
4. Volume level, etc. students, and places on the back table.
5. Place new sections of unit work book
in their ELA binder (if not done on Monday).

Part I: Do Now (3 min)


Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/ Do Now activity.
Teacher will call on a student will read aloud Do Now for students.
Part II: Extension Activity (8 min) Differentiation:
Teachers will provide students with blank pieces of paper and colored Writing,
pencils/markers. Teachers will narrate that this is a freewrite/drawing drawing
activity. Students are expected to complete a Whats in a name multiple access
points.
activity? During this activity students can write/draw/or create a
meaning for their name.
Part 2: Learning Target (2 min)
Teacher A: will call on two students to read the days learning and language targets out
loud. (Multiple students are expected to volunteer, and two students will be chosen to
read.)
Teacher B announces, Today we are continuing our text set, which is two or more types
of readings or media that have similar ideas/gists/or themes. We are doing this so that by
the end of next week, we can participate in a Socratic Seminar using multiple texts.
Part 3: Reviewing Vocabulary (One teach, one assist) (12 min)
One teacher will direct students to play a dictionary games (Reiss, 2008). Teacher B will
assist students struggling with finding words. (If completed using computers please allot
more time.
Students will work in their table clusters.
Teacher will announce that it is a competition of who can find the following definintions
the fastest: Ethnicity (noun): a social group that shares a common distinctive culture,
religion, or language; affiliation to such a group. Florid (adjective): elaborate or intricate.
Convoluted (adjective): extremely complex and difficult to follow
Teacher will set up a two-minute timer while students will write the definitions of the word
in their notebooks.
At the end of the activity the teacher will conduct a class share out and ask students to
extend their knowledge by providing real-life examples of the words.

36
Adapted from: Evidence Based Intervention Network. (n.d.). Retrieved April 21, 2017, from
http://ebi.missouri.edu/ and Fiction & Nonfiction Literacy Resources. (n.d.). Retrieved April 21,
2017, from https://www.commonlit.org/
o Part 4: Whole Class Listening activity (15 min)
One teacher will provide the class with directions for the first time audio run through.
Students are provided with the option of following along using the text or simply listening
the first time through. If they are following along using the text Teacher will tell students
to:
1. Turn to page X in your unit packets.
2. Make sure to underline any key or significant moments in the text.
3. Circle any words you do not know.
4. Use annotation symbols to express your feelings about the text.
5. (Regardless of choice all students are asked to think critically.) Finally, and most
importantly, think about this central question: how does your name affect your
identity.
All teachers in the classroom will circulate, and continue supporting students with specific
language impairments. Also support students who have difficulty in tracking the writing
on the page, and with pacing while reading.
Students will be following along in their unit binder book.Part 3: Whole Class
Listening & Active Annotation
Part 5: Closing Activity (2 min)
Students will respond to two multiple choice questions retrieved from CommonLit.org
3. PART A: Which of the following identifies the theme of the text?
a. Names are powerful and influence how people view themselves.
b. People give their children certain names so they will succeed in America.
c. It is wrong to force Americanized names on people who are from other countries.
d. It does not matter if you change your name during your life.
4. PART B: Which detail from the text best supports the answer to Part A?
a. When we arrived in New York City, our names changed almost immediately.
(Paragraph 1)
b. You know what your friend Shakespeare said, A rose by any other name would
smell as sweet. (Paragraph 4)
c. I was a popular kid, and it showed in my name. Friends called me Jules or Hey
Jude, and once a group of troublemaking friends my mother forbade me to hang
out with called me Alcatraz. (Paragraph 5)
d. Someday, the family predicted, my name would be well-known throughout the
United States. I laughed to myself, wondering which one I would go by. (Paragraph
32) (Source: Commonlit.org)
Linked Lesson (Part II)

37
School wide class entry procedures: Teacher As Role: Makes sure that the all
Teachers will welcome students and supporting elements are prepared (PowerPoint,
reinforce entry procedures during three- bins in student materials, etc.) Support entry
minute transitional period. procedures and behavior expectations.
1. Coats/hoods off. Teacher B Role: Completes attendance, support
2. Supplies out. entry procedures and behavior expectations.
3. Homework out for collection General Educator role: Collects homework from
4. Volume level, etc. students, and places on the back table.
5. Place new sections of unit work book
in their ELA binder (if not done on Monday).

Part I: Do Now (3 min)


Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/ Do Now activity.
Teacher will call on a student will read aloud Do Now for students.
Part 2: Review Learning Target/Prior Learning (8 min)
One teacher will announce, Today we are continuing our work on Julia Alvarezs
Names/Nombres. Before we jump in Id like one student to read the days learning targets.
Using textual evidence students will be able to identify the main idea/theme of Name/Nombres
and respond accurately to comprehension questions related to it. (2) Using Julia Alvarezs text
Name/Nombres IWBAT write an analysis about the impact of names on a persons identity, and
connect it to the idea of being American.
Conduct a brief review of vocabulary and correct misconceptions.
Review answers to prior days multiple choice questions and have students justify their
responses.
Before beginning the review of Name/Nombres Teacher B will complete an all class informal
assessment of understanding by asking students to answer the following questions:
Q1. What is the theme of this text?
Q2. Why do you think the author chose to name her text what she did?
Part 3: Audio Annotation/Assessment (25 minutes )
Co-teachers will team teach this activity. One Teacher Announces that the class will listen again to
the story. This is followed up with the question, Can one person give me a detailed or
comprehensive reason why we are re-watching it? Students are expected to say that we re-
watch or review material in order to develop a better understanding.
Teacher will tell direct students to:
1. Turn to page X in your unit packets.
2. Make sure to underline any key or significant moments in the text.
3. Circle any words you do not know.
4. Use annotation symbols to express your feelings about the text.
5. (Regardless of choice all students are asked to think critically.) Finally, and most
importantly, think about this central question: how does your name affect your identity.

Announce, In order to successfully complete this annotation. We are going to pause the
annotation four times and provide you with space to answer the following four guided reading
questions located in your unit packet.

38
Stop 1: Paragraph 3 - Why do people in America call Julia by different names?
Stop 2: Paragraph 9 - Why was Julias mother embarrassed by Mauricias name?
Stop 3: Paragraph 15- What is the significance of this moment?
Stop 4: Paragraph 26- Why is Julia embarrassed when her classmates ask her where she is from?
Conclusion: Final Paragraph- How does Julia feel at her graduation.

At the end of this second listen, have students leave their notes in their binder to inform the next
days activity.
Questions adapted from Fiction & Nonfiction Literacy Resources. (n.d.). Retrieved April 21, 2017,
from https://www.commonlit.org/



Lesson 18
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: What does it mean to be American?
Planning
Learning Objective: Using Julia Alvarezs Names/Nombres text students will be able to cite
several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly, and make
inferences drawn from the text.
Language Objective: Using specific details and evidence students will be able to construct a
written analysis that identifies the theme of the text and supports my claim.

State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.1


Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text.

Materials Needed: Binders; ACT Day Two: Analyzing Literary Elements and Theme Text
Structure Partner/Independent Practice worksheets; PPT

New (Revised) Vocabulary: Figurative Language, Repetition, Word Choice

Grouping: Groups were created based on instructional reading levels because this task is focused
on reading.
22. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Visual Aid (picture, movie, chart, table,
etc); Explicit review of procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential
seating; Small group work; 1:1 check in with students with IEPs.
Assessment
Formative: Teachers will observe (1) What words are students highlighting? (2) What tools are
they using to figure it out?
Summative: Using the S-E-E-A (Statement - state your answer, Example evidence from the text,
Explanation the main idea, and Analysis) framework students will construct a written response
to the prompt: What is the theme of Name/Nombres and how is literal language used to convey
the theme?
Learning/Teaching Experiences:
Part I: Do Now (3 min)

39
Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/ Do Now activity.
Teacher will call on a student will read aloud Do Now for students.
Part 2: Review Learning Target/Prior Learning (8 min)
One teacher will announce, Today we are continuing our work on Julia Alvarezs
Names/Nombres. Before we jump in Id like one student to read the days learning target.
Part 3: Parallel Teaching in Small Groups (3min)
Candidate narrates we are going to work on finding the theme of the text. Narrate Who can
articulate or tell us what I mean by theme? (Students should be able to respond central idea, big or
major idea from the text.)
Q2: What are some literary elements that can help you identify theme in a text? [Students should
be able to articulate: language, plot, etc.]
Q3: What are some strategies used by strategic readers to find the theme or main idea of a text?

Part 2: Review of Instructional Material Activation of Prior Knowledge/Directions (6


minutes)
Teacher narrates: We have been reviewing Julia Alvarezs text, Name/Nombres, for a few days
now. We know she is detailing a very specific part of her American experience. Today we are going
to work on how language impacts the theme of the text.
One teacher will facilitate providing whole class directions with this activity: ACT Text
Structure. T announces the follow:
The class will work in their group clusters to complete this activity. Students are
encouraged to speak to one another, while finding language in the text.
Teacher Announces In your bin there are enough colored pencils for everyone. You are
going to choose 3 colors, to annotate your text for: C= comparison (metaphor /similie),
S.L= specific language, R=repetition
Teacher will direct students attention to the PowerPoint, where a sample annotation
example is displayed. For example, I chose the colors pink, green, and blue. Every
time you see a comparison I am going to underline in pink. Every time I see specific
language I am going to use blue. Every time I see repetition I am going to use green.
Let us know which color you choose by circling the words that match up with that
color in the direction box. [Check for understanding of directions: who can explain
what I mean?]

Now lets listen carefully, and read along with the text in front of you this time focusing on the
figurative language. Listen again - underline and label when figurative language is used. Label
what type of language the author uses and note what this literally means in the margin.
Students should be actively underlining. Students may identify the following from the text:
Part 3: Move to small (flexible) groups for Language analysis (2 minutes)
Teacher A will ask a student why are we moving into smaller groups? [Students should be
able to respond for individualized attention based on learning needs.] T will emphasize the
need to complete a comprehensive analysis of language to help us understand the text.

40
Part 4: Leap Frog Reading During Leap Frog reading candidate and
Teacher A and Teacher B will tag Teacher B model how to analyze for theme
team facilitate T will begin reading using the think aloud protocol with the
with Paragraph 3 the super questions to guide the reading:
called my father Mister Alberase,
and the neighbors who became mothers So far, I've learned
friends pronounced her name Jewlee-ah This made me think of
instead of Hoo-lee-ah. I, her namesake, was
That didn't make sense.
known as Hoo-lee-tah at home. But at school
I was Judy or Judith, and once an English I think ___ will happen next.
teacher mistook me for Juliet. I reread that part because
And will model fluent reading for students. I was confused by
I think the most important part was
Ts will think aloud as they read the text
That is interesting because
and model fluent reading for teachers. [Ts
working in pairs should tag team read this I wonder why
section.] I just thought of
Question to guide think aloud: Shes using her
childhood memories to help us understand her
point of view. She is writing a lot about the
mispronunciation of names, does having your
name mispronounced take away from who you
are?

Paragraph: 5
Question to guide think aloud: What role do
her different names play in her life? Why do
different people refer to her differently? Does this
happen to you?

Paragraph: 6
Question to guide think aloud: What does the
authors view of being American relate to the
identity of ones name(Evaluate)
Part 5: Student Assessment Write Statement, Evidence, Analysis
Students will work independently and answer the following prompt What is the theme of,
Names/Nombres and how is literal language used to convey theme?
SEEA Model. Teachers circulate and observe how students are doing as they complete the work.
Students will use the S-E-E-A
Statement - state your answer
Example evidence from the text
Explanation the main idea
Analysis continue to analyze the main idea

Part 6: Class Closure Teachers will tell the students that it takes a long time to become a good
reader and an even better writer. That tomorrow they will have the class period to use all their
aggregated materials to write an essay.
All students prepare quickly for class dismissal and to head to lunch.
Teachers will collect the theme short response and workbook text pages for grading and feedback.

41


Lesson 19
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus:.
Planning
Learning Objective: I will be able to begin creating an outline that identifies how, Julia Alvarez,
uses the literary element language to convey theme. (2) I will be able to use details from the text to
support my response.
Language Objective: Using sentence stems, students will create a written framework for an
essay on the theme of Names/Nombres.

7.2 a . Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and
information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and
cause/effect.
W.7.1b Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible
sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.
W.7.1c Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among
claim(s), reasons, and evidence
Materials Needed: Binders, Sentence Stems, Analysis Resource sheets

New (Revised) Vocabulary: Figurative Language, Repetition, Word Choice, Accountable talk
sentence stems
Grouping: Independent Activity

23. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Visual Aid (picture, movie, chart, table,
etc); Explicit review of procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential
seating; 1:1 check in with students with IEPs that have a language-specific need
Assessment
Summative: A written outline.

Learning/Teaching Experiences:
School wide class entry procedures: Teacher A: Makes sure that the all supporting
Teachers will welcome students and elements are prepared (PowerPoint, bins in
reinforce entry procedures during three- student materials, etc.) Support entry
minute transitional period. procedures and behavior expectations.
1. Coats/hoods off. Teacher B: Completes attendance, support
2. Supplies out. entry procedures and behavior expectations.
3. Homework out for collection Collects homework from students, and places
4. Volume level, etc. on the back table.
5. Place new sections of unit work book in
their ELA binder.

42
Part I: Do Now (3 min)
Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/ Do Now activity.
Teacher will call on a student will read aloud Do Now for students.
As teachers circulate the classroom checking for correct response direct students
who finish early to turn to page X in their unit workbook to please review the textual
annotations, and begin to examine how is language used to convey the theme?

Part 2: Learning Target (12 minute)


Teacher A will ask for a student volunteer to read the days learning and language targets
out loud.
T narrates: In order to become stronger readers we need to be able to recognize the
different ways authors use language in a text? We need to ask ourselves why did the author
choose this language, or this language pattern in a text? Today we are going to read and
record examples of figurative language, repetition, or interesting word choice in
Names/Nombres.

Before we begin lets have an all class review of Language and its use in the text.

Teacher B continues to narrate something we learned earlier this year, and we especially went
over during mention a text that they used to learn language as a literary device was the idea
of literal and figurative language.
Q1. What is literal language? What is figurative language? (Students should be able to articulate
that literal language is used to say exactly what you mean. Figurative language uses
comparisons.)
Q2. Application Now lets apply what we just reviewed about literal and figurative language. In
this paired text set we examined Names/Nombres, and the article written about the author. Tell
me was there a text that was more literal? Was there one that was more figurative?
(Students should apply their knowledge and be able to respond that N/N has more figurative
language, and the article uses literal.)

Discuss: Ok, knowing this take three minutes to Turn and Talk at your tables and talk through how
would you compare and contrast these texts and their use of language to convey theme. Think
about that as you complete your pre-seminar work as a table.
Part 3: Move to small (flexible) groups for Language analysis (2 minutes): Following turn-
and-talk direct students to prepare to move into small groups.
Teacher B will Ask a student why are we moving into smaller groups? [Students should be able
to respond for individualized attention based on learning needs.] T will emphasize the need to
complete a comprehensive analysis of language to help us understand the text.

All students need:
- pen or pencil
- planner
- binder

Part 4: Partner Work (8 min)
In small groups students will work with a partner to find examples of literal and figurative

43
language in the text set.
Students will be asked to highlight material that they want to use to eventually write an essay.
Part 5: Summative Assessment (12 min)
Teachers will direct students to split up from their partners and begin to individually formulated
their outlines.

Expectations:
- No speaking.
- Before asking a teacher for help use your resources.
- Use your Check-in with me flashcard or raise your hand to get the teachers attention.
- Challenge yourself: Ask, Is my writing at my highest possible level? Am I trying my best? If the
answer is no, readjust your mindset.





Lesson 20
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus:
Planning
Learning Objective: Using Julia Alvarezs text Names/Nombres IWBAT to write an essay using
several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly, and make
inferences drawn from the text.
Language Objective: Using specific details and evidence IWBAT will be able to construct a written
analysis that identifies the theme of the text and supports my claim.

State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.1


Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text.

Materials Needed: Binders; ACT Day Two: Analyzing Literary Elements and Theme Text
Structure Partner/Independent Practice worksheets; PPT

New (Revised) Vocabulary: Figurative Language, Repetition, Word Choice

Grouping: Independent activity

24. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Explicit review of


procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential seating; 1:1 check in with
students with IEPs.
Assessment
Summative: Written 4-5 paragraph essay that includes an introduction, and conclusion.

Learning/Teaching Experiences:
Part I: Do Now (3 min)

44
Following transition students will be provided with three minutes to complete a warm-
up/Do Now activity.
- Teacher will call on a student will read aloud Do Now for students.
Part 2: Essay Writing (35 min)
A teacher will announce that students have the remainder of the period to complete an essay on
Julia Alvarezs use of language in the text. Students are expected to provide a (1) Thesis/Claim (2)
Use topic sentences (3) Complete a three-part analysis.

- Teacher will call on a student to explain to the class the expectations for the essay.

Students will also receive a rubric/checklist which outlines the following grading criteria:
2. Planning, Organization, and Structure
a. Ideas
b. Sentence Fluency and Word Choice
c. Language

Part 4: Closing

Students who do not complete the assignment will be provided with 15 minutes at lunch to finish.
Students who need extended time may take the entire lunch period.



Lesson 21
Grade Level: 7th Grade
Unit/Subject: English Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus:
Planning
Learning Objective: In small group discussion, students will be able to compare and contrast the
different ways the various Julia Alvarez readings use language to impact the text.

Language Objective: Using sentence stems, students will be able to orally compare and contrast
the viewpoints of the various Julia Alvarez readings use language to impact the text, and respond
to peer ideas during a small group discussion.
State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative
discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts,
and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1.A: Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material
under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or
issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
Materials Needed: Binders; Socratic Seminar, Sentence Stems

New (Revised) Vocabulary: Figurative Language, Repetition, Word Choice, Accountable talk
sentence stems
Grouping: Groups were created based on instructional reading levels because this task is focused
on reading comprehension.
25. Modifications and Accommodations: Graphic Organizer; Visual Aid (picture, movie, chart, table,

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etc); Explicit review of procedures/directions/checklist; Sentence starters/frames; Preferential
seating; Small group work; 1:1 check in with students with IEPs.

Assessment
Summative: Participation in Socratic Seminar where students are provided with the opportunity
to verbally demonstrate understanding and application of analysis of how language is used to
impact and advance the meaning of the text.

Learning/Teaching Experiences:
School wide class entry procedures: Teacher As Role: Makes sure that the all
Teachers will welcome students and supporting elements are prepared
reinforce entry procedures during three- (PowerPoint, bins in student materials, etc.)
minute transitional period. Support entry procedures and behavior
expectations.
1. Coats/hoods off.
2. Supplies out. Teacher B Role: Completes attendance,
3. Homework out for collection support entry procedures and behavior
4. Volume level, etc. expectations.
5. Place new sections of unit work book in
their ELA binder. General Educator role: Collects homework
from students, and places on the back table.
Part I: Introduction

Following 3 min transition:



Candidate will read Do Now - to be completed in student binder.
Do Now: Underline the appositive phrase(s) in the following sentences. Add commas where
As teachers circulate the classroom checking for correct response direct students who finish
early to turn to page X in their unit workbook to please review their annotations.

Part 2: Learning Target (12 minute)


Teacher will ask for a student volunteer to read the days learning and language targets out
loud.
Teacher will then narrate that today we will be having a Socratic Seminar using out text set,
or to or more types of readings or media that have similar ideas/gists/or themes. All the
work we have been completing this week is so that we can participate in this seminar about
the language used in a variety of the readings.
Seminar Pre-work:
1. Students will fill in the table located in the unit packet with evidence they want to use to
describe the types of language used in the text set.

2. Discuss at your table. Ok, knowing this take five minutes to Turn and Talk at your tables

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and talk through how would you compare and contrast these texts and their use of
language to convey theme. Think about that as you complete your pre-seminar work as a
table.

Part 3: Move to small (flexible) groups for Language analysis (2 minutes): Following turn-
and-talk direct students to prepare to move into small groups.
Teacher A will Ask a student why are we moving into smaller groups? [Students should be able
to respond for individualized attention based on learning needs.] T will emphasize the need to
complete a comprehensive analysis of language to help us understand the text.
Part 4: Seminar
Teacher A and Teacher B will tag team facilitate T re-introduces the Focus Question for the
Socratic Seminar: How is language used in the various text, and how does it impact or influence
the meaning of the text?
Students will be using TALK, the school-wide discussion protocol.
T: Tie ideas together
A: Always respect others
L: Listen openly and actively
K: Keep everyone in the discussion

One teacher will act as the primary facilitator of the Socratic Seminar during the small group. The
following questions will help facilitate the discussion among the students. As the discussion
progresses teachers will pose questions that guide, analyze, and allow students to deeply evaluate
the topic.
(The students are expected to use their notes to provide evidence for the discussion. Students will
also be held accountable for using discussion stems.)
o Q1. What type of language is used in Name/Nombres? Did the language have its
intended impact?
o Q2. How did audio help you understand the theme?
o Q3. How is language used differently in news article text? How does that difference
impact how you feel or relate to the text?
o Q3. All the texts discuss immigration- How does being an immigrant affect or play a
role in Alvarezs view of being American? How does Alvarezs description of
childhood affect her view of Americanism and how she writes about it.
o Q4. The Name/Nombres text uses Spanish words. What was the authors
intended impact? Is it American to write in Spanish? Why or why not?
o Q5. Analysis: What are some examples of literal and figurative language from the
different texts?

Part 5: Student Assessment/ Reflection

Teachers will direct students to complete their Socratic Seminar Self-assessment. Students will
provide themselves with a grade out of a total of 30 possible points based on the following criteria:
1. My pre-discussion writing in the form of homework, and classwork is complete. It also
makes use of academic language and text evidence where appropriate.
2. I cited at least 2 pieces of specific text evidence during the discussion to support my claims.
3. I demonstrated professional conduct during the discussion and used at least two of the
targeted sentence starters effectively.

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4. I listened effectively to my classmates.
5. My Socratic Seminar reflection is complete and clearly explains how my thinking stayed
the same or changed after the discussion.

Students will also:


1. Explain why you graded yourself this way.
2. What is one thing you did well during the discussion?
3. What is one thing you can improve upon for next time?


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