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Candice Livingston

C. Tang

History 1428

10 November 2016

The Fight: Women, Equality, and Recognition

Throughout history, men and women have been at different social standings than each

other. Men have always been seen as the bread winner, the stronger sex, and the most educated of

the two, and they have been given more important jobs than women. Women have always been

seen as the homemakers, and the ones to obey mens orders. As women became tired of being

oppressed they began to write in protest. Women also wrote, in their protests, how they should be

treated. During the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries, women began to gain more

rights but were still being oppressed.

Looking at America, women got gipped out of their rights. In 1776, the American

colonies grew tired of British rule, and decided to fight for their independence.1 When writing

the Declaration of Independence, it was written that all men are created equal. However,

women were still not given the right to vote.2 However, this was very unfair to women, because

they took over, and managed farms and businesses while men fought during the war.3 The real

question here is why promise something you will not follow through on?

Women in America still had a hard time being recognized in the 1900s: however, in the 1920s,

women were granted the right to vote. From that point on, some more women felt it was okay to

1Elizabeth Pollard, Clifford Rosenberg, Robert Tignor, et al., Worlds Together Worlds Apart:
Volume Two: From 1000 CE to the Present, Concise Edition, (New York: W.W. Norton &
Company, 2015.), 553.

2 Pollard et al., Worlds Together Worlds Apart: Vol 2, 556.


3 Pollard et al., Worlds Together Worlds Apart: Vol 2, 556.
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write as if to call women to action on how they should see themselves. Margaret Sanger was a

women who endorsed birth control, she even opened the first birth control clinic.4 Sanger

believed that girls should be healthy and should choose a man who is healthy as well when it

came to motherhood. She also believed that even though women are mothers, they should be

their own person.5

In the 1920s, women were seen as independent more than before. In a Ford advertisement, a

women is seen in the woods enjoying her free time.6 The ad is showing that women are

independent enough to buy a car. However, the ad also oppresses the women who cannot afford

the car. Not only that, but the ad states women may recharge the batteriesfor the days

work.7 The wording is calling women weak. In the second ad, women are being completely

oppressed: the ad is called Often a bridesmaid but never a bride.8 Already, with this wording,

this advertisement states that women are only good for marriage. It also basically calls women

sex slaves by saying that friends and family do not matter when it comes to telling someone their

breath stinks, and only the man you marry matters.9

4 Margaret Sanger, Birth Control and Eugenics (1921) In Worlds Together Worlds Apart, A
Companion Reader: Volume 2. Second Edition. Eds. Elizabeth Pollard and Clifford Rosenberg.
(New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2016), 285.

5 Margaret Sanger, Birth Control and Eugenics (1921), 286-287.

6 Advertising (1924, 1936) In Worlds Together Worlds Apart, A Companion Reader: Volume
2. Second Edition. Eds. Elizabeth Pollard and Clifford Rosenberg. (New York: W.W. Norton &
Company, 2016), 294.

7 Advertising (1924, 1936), 294.

8 Advertising (1924, 1936), 295.

9 Advertising (1924, 1936), 295.


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As the French revolution comes to an end, many women think that one proves they have rights

only when they help with the revolution, they do not have natural rights.10 In response to this,

Olympe de Gouges writes out a Declaration of Rights for women. In her declaration she

proposes for divorce rights, property in marriage, education, and allowance of public careers.11

Gouges states that women have the power to free themselves, but that they have to want it.12

Gouges is right, women should want to have more rights. However, it was unclear if women

wanted to have more rights.

In the early nineteenth century, a revolution from Senegal to Nigeria broke out. It was mostly due

to increase trade and religious ideas circulating across the Sahara Desert. Usman dan Fodio, a

Fulani Muslim, created a vast Islamic empire and lead this revolution.13 The women of the Fulani

people helped the revolution efforts, and ultimately helped the success happen. However, women

were still expected to follow Sharia, or Islamic law. Women were expected to dress and act

modestly.14 This being said, Fulani women who were of the upper society were allowed to be a

10 Elizabeth Pollard, Clifford Rosenberg, Robert Tignor, et al., Worlds Together Worlds Apart:
Volume Two: From 1000 CE to the Present, Concise Edition, (New York: W.W. Norton &
Company, 2015.), 538.

11 Elizabeth Pollard, Clifford Rosenberg, Robert Tignor, et al., Worlds Together Worlds Apart:
Volume Two: From 1000 CE to the Present, Concise Edition, (New York: W.W. Norton &
Company, 2015.), 538.

12 Olympe de Gouges, Declaration of the Rights of Women and the Female Citizen
(September 1791) In Worlds Together Worlds Apart, A Companion Reader: Volume 2. Second
Edition. Eds. Elizabeth Pollard and Clifford Rosenberg. (New York: W.W. Norton & Company,
2016), 173.

13 Elizabeth Pollard, Clifford Rosenberg, Robert Tignor, et al., Worlds Together Worlds Apart:
Volume Two: From 1000 CE to the Present, Concise Edition, New York: W.W. Norton &
Company, 2015., 573-575.
14 Elizabeth Pollard, Clifford Rosenberg, Robert Tignor, et al., Worlds Together Worlds Apart:
Volume Two: From 1000 CE to the Present, Concise Edition, (New York: W.W. Norton &
Company, 2015.), 577.
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part of education and hold some type of office. One such woman was Nana Asmau, Dan Fodios

daughter. However, these women who were in power were still oppressed.15

In the 1930s, India was still under British rule. Child marriage was commonly practiced at the

time, as was widows not being allowed to remarry.16 Widows were to live in poverty at the time

and had to become prostitutes to keep their homes afloat.17 Widows also had to shave their hair

off and live with other widows. These widows were also expected to worship God. If these

widows remarried, it was believed that the rest of the widows would be damned.18

In the 1980s, women finally were able to get jobs that did not include cleaning or taking care of

children. However, new problems emerged. The main problem was the lack of equality in the job

.19 After the 1980s, there were still little amounts of women in corporate jobs, as well as college

graduates.20 As women go to work, the issues of who will help their children arise, and this

causes a lot of women to migrate to Canada and Australia to become nannies. A Feminist

15 Elizabeth Pollard, Clifford Rosenberg, Robert Tignor, et al., Worlds Together Worlds Apart:
Volume Two: From 1000 CE to the Present, Concise Edition, (New York: W.W. Norton &
Company, 2015.), 577.

16 Water, directed by Deepa Mehta,, (2005, India and Canada: B.R. Films and Mongrel Media),
DVD.

17 Water, DVD.

18 Water, DVD.

19 Elizabeth Pollard, Clifford Rosenberg, Robert Tignor, et al., Worlds Together Worlds Apart:
Volume Two: From 1000 CE to the Present, Concise Edition, (New York: W.W. Norton &
Company, 2015.), 785

20 Elizabeth Pollard, Clifford Rosenberg, Robert Tignor, et al., Worlds Together Worlds Apart:
Volume Two: From 1000 CE to the Present, Concise Edition, (New York: W.W. Norton &
Company, 2015.), 785.
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movement arise because of the outrage of all the inequality between men and women. The

movement became global in the 1970s. 21

Women have always been seen as the home makers, sex objects, cleaners, and the ones

that raise the children. At the same time, men have always been seen as the bread winners and

the fighters. Men were always seen as being stronger than women. Men have always been given

the more powerful positions instead of women. Men were given jobs like president or solider,

and women were given jobs like cleaning and being the secretary. Throughout the years women

have constantly struggled for rights. Once women finally gained some rights, they were still

oppressed. Some women may have gained some type of political standing or some type of

recognition, but they were still treated as fragile beings. This began the protest movements that

called for equal treatment of men and women. From that point on, women gained more positions,

but the fight for equality is still on.

21 Elizabeth Pollard, Clifford Rosenberg, Robert Tignor, et al., Worlds Together Worlds Apart:
Volume Two: From 1000 CE to the Present, Concise Edition, (New York: W.W. Norton &
Company, 2015.), 785.
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Works Cited

Advertising (1924, 1936) In Worlds Together Worlds Apart, A Companion Reader: Volume 2.

Second Edition. Eds. Elizabeth Pollard and Clifford Rosenberg. New York: W.W. Norton &

Company, 2016: 293-295.

Margaret Sanger, Birth Control and Eugenics (1921) In Worlds Together Worlds Apart, A

Companion Reader: Volume 2. Second Edition. Eds. Elizabeth Pollard and

Clifford Rosenberg. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2016: 285-287.

Olympe de Gouges, Declaration of the Rights of Women and the Female Citizen (September

1791) In Worlds Together Worlds Apart, A Companion Reader: Volume 2. Second

Edition. Eds. Elizabeth Pollard and Clifford Rosenberg. New York: W.W. Norton &

Company, 2016: 171-175.

Pollard, Elizabeth, Clifford Rosenberg, Robert Tignor et al. Worlds Together Worlds Apart:

Volume Two: From 1000 CE to the Present. Concise Edition. New York: W.W Norton &

Company, 2015.

Water, directed by Deepa Mehta,, (2005, India and Canada: B.R. Films and Mongrel Media),

DVD.