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Table of Contents

MODULE TITLE: WORKING WITH MICROSOFT WORD 2010 ................................. VII

MODULE INTRODUCTION: .............................................................................................................. VII

EXPECTED OUTCOME:...................................................................................................................... VII

PRE-TEST ................................................................................................................................................. VIII

LESSON 1 EXPLORE MICROSOFT WORD 2010 APPLICATION ................................... 1

Description: ............................................................................................................................................................. 1

Activity Sheet 1.1 ................................................................................................................................................. 2


Key Answers................................................................................................................................................................. 3

Information Sheet 1.1.......................................................................................................................................... 4

Activity Sheet 1.2 ................................................................................................................................................. 7


Key Answers................................................................................................................................................................. 8

Information Sheet 1.2.......................................................................................................................................... 9

Activity Sheet 1.3 ............................................................................................................................................... 13


Key Answers ............................................................................................................................................................. 14

LESSON 2 CREATE AND EDIT DOCUMENT ........................................................................... 15

Description: ........................................................................................................................................................... 15

Activity Sheet 2.1 ............................................................................................................................................... 16

Activity Sheet 2.2 ............................................................................................................................................... 17


Assessment Rubric ................................................................................................................................................ 18

Information Sheet 2.1........................................................................................................................................ 19

Activity Sheet 2.3 ............................................................................................................................................... 22


Answer Key ............................................................................................................................................................... 23

Information Sheet 2.2........................................................................................................................................ 24

Activity Sheet 2.4 ............................................................................................................................................... 28


Assessment Rubric ................................................................................................................................................ 29

Activity Sheet 2.5 ............................................................................................................................................... 30


Assessment Rubric ................................................................................................................................................ 32

Activity Sheet 2.6 ............................................................................................................................................... 33


Assessment Rubric ................................................................................................................................................ 35

Information Sheet 2.3........................................................................................................................................ 36

Internet and Computing Fundamentals II Working with Microsoft Word 2010 i


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Activity Sheet 2.7 ................................................................................................................................................ 40
Assessment Rubric ................................................................................................................................................ 41

Assessment Test ................................................................................................................................................... 42


Assessment Rubric ................................................................................................................................................ 43

LESSON 3 EDITING DOCUMENT USING OTHER TOOLS ............................................... 44

Description: ............................................................................................................................................................ 44

Information Sheet 3.1 ........................................................................................................................................ 45

Activity 31 .............................................................................................................................................................. 49
Assessment Rubric ................................................................................................................................................ 50

Information Sheet 3.2 ........................................................................................................................................ 51

Activity Sheet 3.2 ................................................................................................................................................ 55


Assessment Rubric ................................................................................................................................................ 56

Assessment Test ................................................................................................................................................... 57


Assessment Rubric ................................................................................................................................................ 58

LESSON 4 FORMAT TEXT AND PARAGRAPHS .................................................................... 59

Description: ............................................................................................................................................................ 59

Information Sheet 4.1 ........................................................................................................................................ 60

Activity Sheet 4.1 ................................................................................................................................................ 64


Assessment Rubric ................................................................................................................................................ 65

Information Sheet 4.2 ........................................................................................................................................ 66

Activity Sheet 4.2 ................................................................................................................................................ 72


Assessment Rubric ................................................................................................................................................ 73

Information Sheet 4.3 ........................................................................................................................................ 74

Activity Sheet 4.3 ................................................................................................................................................ 77


Assessment Rubric ................................................................................................................................................ 78

Information Sheet 4.4 ........................................................................................................................................ 79

Activity Sheet 4.4 ................................................................................................................................................ 84


Assessment Rubric ................................................................................................................................................ 85

Information Sheet 4.5 ........................................................................................................................................ 86

Activity Sheet 4.5 ................................................................................................................................................ 95


Assessment Rubric ................................................................................................................................................ 96

Assessment Test ................................................................................................................................................... 97


Assessment Rubric ................................................................................................................................................ 99

ii Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | Internet and Computing Fundamentals- II


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LESSON 5 INSERTING COLUMNS, PAGE BREAK AND SECTION BREAK ......... 100

Description: ......................................................................................................................................................... 100

Information Sheet 5.1...................................................................................................................................... 101


For Further Reading: .......................................................................................................................................... 105

Activity Sheet 5.1 ............................................................................................................................................. 106


Key Answer: ............................................................................................................................................................ 107

Assessment Test ................................................................................................................................................ 108


Key Answer: ............................................................................................................................................................ 109

LESSON 6 FAMILIARIZING ONESELF WITH INSERTING OF PAGE NUMBERS,


HEADERS AND FOOTERS .............................................................................................................. 110

Description: ......................................................................................................................................................... 110

Information Sheet 6.1...................................................................................................................................... 111


For Further Reading: .......................................................................................................................................... 115

Activity 6.1 .......................................................................................................................................................... 116


Answer Key ............................................................................................................................................................. 117

LESSON 7 FAMILIARIZING ONESELF WITH THE USE OF BOOKMARKS,


FOOTNOTES, AND ENDNOTES ................................................................................................... 118

Description: ......................................................................................................................................................... 118

Information Sheet 7.1...................................................................................................................................... 119


Further Reading: .................................................................................................................................................. 122

Information Sheet 7.2...................................................................................................................................... 124


Further Reading: .................................................................................................................................................. 126

Assessment Test ................................................................................................................................................ 127


Answer Key ............................................................................................................................................................. 128

LESSON 8 BEING FAMILIAR WITH THE INSERTING AND DELETING OF


TABLES, COLUMNS, AND ROWS................................................................................................ 129

Information Sheet 8.1...................................................................................................................................... 130


Further Reading: .................................................................................................................................................. 135

Activity 8.1 .......................................................................................................................................................... 136


Acceptable Answer: ............................................................................................................................................. 137

LESSON 9 BEING FAMILIAR WITH THE FORMATTING OF TABLE CELLS,


COLUMNS AND ROWS ...................................................................................................................... 138

Description: ......................................................................................................................................................... 138

Internet and Computing Fundamentals II Working with Microsoft Word 2010 iii
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Information Sheet 9.1 ...................................................................................................................................... 139

Activity 9.1........................................................................................................................................................... 144


Acceptable Answers: ........................................................................................................................................... 145

Information Sheet 9.2 ...................................................................................................................................... 146


Customers Name................................................................................................................................................... 171
Fast Food Restaurant ......................................................................................................................................... 171
Order .......................................................................................................................................................................... 171
Customers Name................................................................................................................................................... 173
Fast Food Restaurant ......................................................................................................................................... 173
Order .......................................................................................................................................................................... 173

Activity Sheet 9.2 .............................................................................................................................................. 180

Activity Sheet 9.3 .............................................................................................................................................. 214

Information Sheet 9.3 ...................................................................................................................................... 215

Activity Sheet 9.4 ............................................................................................................................................. 221

Information Sheet 9.4 ...................................................................................................................................... 222

Activity Sheet 9.5 .............................................................................................................................................. 228

Information Sheet 9.5 ...................................................................................................................................... 229

Activity Sheet 7.4 .............................................................................................................................................. 239

Assessment Sheet .............................................................................................................................................. 240

Pre-test Answer Key .......................................................................................................................................... 241

MODULE 3 ............................................................................................................................................... 243

MODULE TITLE: WORKING WITH MICROSOFT WORD 2010 ............................... 245

MODULE INTRODUCTION: ............................................................................................................ 245

EXPECTED OUTCOME:.................................................................................................................... 245

PRE-TEST ................................................................................................................................................ 246

LESSON 1 FAMILIARIZE THEMSELVES WITH THE NETWORKING CONCEPTS


....................................................................................................................................................................... 249

Description: .......................................................................................................................................................... 249

Information Sheet 1.1 ...................................................................................................................................... 250

Activity Sheet 1.1 .............................................................................................................................................. 255


Key Answer ............................................................................................................................................................. 256

iv Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | Internet and Computing Fundamentals- II


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Information Sheet 1.2...................................................................................................................................... 257

Activity Sheet 1.2 ............................................................................................................................................. 265


Key Answer ............................................................................................................................................................. 266

Activity Sheet 1.2 ............................................................................................................................................. 266

Information Sheet 1.3...................................................................................................................................... 267

Activity 1.3 .......................................................................................................................................................... 270


Key Answer ............................................................................................................................................................. 271

Activity 1.3 .......................................................................................................................................................... 271

ASSESSMENT: ....................................................................................................................................... 272

Key Answer .......................................................................................................................................................... 273

LESSON 2 UNDERSTAND WEB BROWSER .......................................................................... 274

Description: ......................................................................................................................................................... 274

Information 2.1 .................................................................................................................................................. 275

Activity Sheet 2.1 ............................................................................................................................................. 283


Assessment Rubric .............................................................................................................................................. 285

LESSON 3 ELEMENTS OF A WEBSITE ................................................................................... 286

Description: ......................................................................................................................................................... 286

Information Sheet 3.1...................................................................................................................................... 287

Activity Sheet 3.1 ............................................................................................................................................. 291

Elements of a Web Browser ............................................................................................................................ 291


Key Answer ............................................................................................................................................................. 292

LESSON 4 NAVIGATE AND MODIFY WEBSITE ................................................................. 293

Description: ......................................................................................................................................................... 293

Activity Sheet 4.1 ............................................................................................................................................. 294


Assessment Rubric .............................................................................................................................................. 296

Activity Sheet 4.2 ............................................................................................................................................. 297


Assessment Rubric .............................................................................................................................................. 298

Activity Sheet 4.3 ............................................................................................................................................. 299


Assessment Rubric .............................................................................................................................................. 300

Activity Sheet 4.4 ............................................................................................................................................. 301

Internet and Computing Fundamentals II Working with Microsoft Word 2010 v


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Assessment Rubric .............................................................................................................................................. 302

LESSON 5 SEARCH THE WEB FOR INFORMATION USING A SEARCH ENGINE


....................................................................................................................................................................... 303

Description: .......................................................................................................................................................... 303

Information Sheet 5.1 ...................................................................................................................................... 304

Activity Sheet 5.1 .............................................................................................................................................. 311

Information Sheet 5.2 ...................................................................................................................................... 312

Activity Sheet 5.2 .............................................................................................................................................. 316

ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................................................ 317

Key Answer ........................................................................................................................................................... 319

LESSON 6 CREATE AND USE E-MAIL .................................................................................... 320

Description: .......................................................................................................................................................... 320

Information Sheet 6.1 ...................................................................................................................................... 321

Activity Sheet 6.1 ............................................................................................................................................... 322

Activity Sheet 6.2 ............................................................................................................................................... 324

Activity Sheet 6.3 ............................................................................................................................................... 325

Activity Sheet 6.4 ............................................................................................................................................... 327

Activity Sheet 6.5 ............................................................................................................................................... 329

Activity Sheet 6.6 ............................................................................................................................................... 330

Activity Sheet 6.7 ............................................................................................................................................... 331

Activity Sheet 6.8 ............................................................................................................................................... 333

Activity Sheet 6.9 ............................................................................................................................................... 334

Information Sheet 6.2 ....................................................................................................................................... 336

Activity Sheet 6.10............................................................................................................................................. 339

Activity Sheet 6.11............................................................................................................................................. 340

Activity Sheet 6.12............................................................................................................................................. 341

Activity Sheet 6.13............................................................................................................................................. 342

Information Sheet 6.3 ....................................................................................................................................... 343

vi Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | Internet and Computing Fundamentals- II


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ASSESSMENT......................................................................................................................................... 346

Key Answer: ......................................................................................................................................................... 347

LESSON 7 IMPACT OF COMPUTING AND THE INTERNET ON SOCIETY.......... 348

Description: ......................................................................................................................................................... 348

Information Sheet 7.1...................................................................................................................................... 349

Information Sheet 7.2...................................................................................................................................... 352

Information Sheet 7.3...................................................................................................................................... 358

Information Sheet 7.4...................................................................................................................................... 361

Information Sheet 7.5...................................................................................................................................... 364

Information Sheet 7.6...................................................................................................................................... 367

ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................................................ 368

Answer Key .......................................................................................................................................................... 370

APPENDIX A ........................................................................................................................................... 371

ACKNOWLEDGMENT ......................................................................................................................... 373

....................................................................................................................................................................... 374

Internet and Computing Fundamentals II Working with Microsoft Word 2010 vii
Table of Contents

Internet and Computing Fundamentals - II | Working with Microsoft Word 2010 i


Module 2

Module Title: Working with Microsoft Word 2010

Module Introduction:

This module contains information and suggested learning activities on Internet and
Computing Fundamentals (ICF). It includes instructional materials and activities for you
to complete.

This module covers the knowledge and skills required in performing basic word
processing using Microsoft Word 2010 application such as making letters; enhancing
documents with pictures, charts or tables; and making personal or business documents
and other tasks which can be efficiently done in this application.

This module consists of seven (7) learning outcomes. Each learning outcome
contains learning activities supported by each information sheets. Read the information
sheets and answer the activity sheets provided to measure whether you have mastered the
knowledge or perform the activities for each learning outcome.

Upon completion of this module, report to your teacher for assessment to check
your mastery of the skills. If you pass the assessment, you will be ready for the next
module.

Expected Outcome:

Upon completion of this module, you will learn how to

LO 1. explore Microsoft Word 2010 application;


LO 2. create and edit a document;
LO 3. format text and paragraphs;
LO 4. format a document;
LO 5. create and format tables;
LO 6. insert and format objects; and
LO 7. utilize other Microsoft Word 2010 features.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals - II | Working with Microsoft Word 2010 vii
Pre-Test
Pre-Test
Directions: Choose the letter of the correct answer/s. Write your answer/s on a
separate sheet of paper.

1. A block of text is selected and now you wish to center align them. Which of the
following command will let you do it?
a. font command from Home Tab
b. Paragraph command from Home Tab
c. Character command from Home Tab
d. Page Setup command from the Page Layout

2. Accidently you happened to make a mistake while working with your document.
What short-cut key you will use to revert the action?
a. Ctrl+Z
b. Ctrl+A
c. Ctrl+X
d. Ctrl+Y

3. MS Word supports horizontal alignment and vertical alignment. Which of the


following options is suitable to set the vertical alignment?
a. Font command from Home Tab
b. Paragraph command from Home Tab
c. Character command from Home Tab
d. Page Setup command from the Page Layout

4. Which of the following short-cut keys inserts current date in document?


a. Ctrl+D
b. Ctrl+Shift+D
c. Alt+Shift+D
d. There is no short-cut key defined for insert current date

5. To remove the page number you need to access


a. Header and footer command on Insert Tab
b. Page number command on Insert Tab
c. Options command
d. All of the above

viii Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | Internet and Computing Fundamentals- II
Pre-Test

6. Where you can insert the page number


a. Page number command from Insert Tab
b. Header and Footers command from View Tab
c. Page Setup command from File Tab
d. Both a & b

7. If you require to number each line in document


a. Page Number command from File Tab
b. Page Setup command from File Tab
c. Print Layout from View Tab
d. All of the above

8. When work on Microsoft Word, the spelling and grammar tool could not check the
error, how can you correct the spelling and grammar error?
a. Spelling and grammar command from Review Tab
b. Options command
c. Press F7
d. All of the above

9. The word processing task associated with changing the appearance of a document
a. editing
b. writing
c. formatting
d. all of the above

10. Which of the following is word processor in MS Office?


a. Wordstar
b. Wordpad
c. Word
d. WordPerfect

11. You can change the font, font size, font style etc. is
a. Font command from Home Tab
b. Hanging Formatting Toolbar
c. All of the above
d. None of the above

12. Which of the following command is not available in View Tab?


a. Autotext
b. Document Views
c. Window
d. Macro

Internet and Computing Fundamentals - II | Working with Microsoft Word 2010 ix


Pre-Test
13. Which option in File Tab pull down menu is used to close a file in MS Word?
a. New
b. Quit
c. Close
d. Exit

14. You can set vertical alignment of text


a. Page Setup from Page Layout Tab
b. Paragraph from Home Tab
c. View Tab
d. Font from Home Tab

15. Which element of a Window is usually located at the left side of the title bar
provides categorized options?
a. Quick Access Toolbar
b. Status Bar
c. Tabs
d. All of the above

x Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | Internet and Computing Fundamentals- II


Introduction

Lesson 1 Explore Microsoft Word 2010 Application

Description:

This lesson covers one of the performances required in exploring Microsoft 2010
application.

In this lesson, you will learn how to

describe Microsoft Word 2010 application;


demonstrate how to open, close and exit the Microsoft Word 2010
application; and
describe and identify the different elements of Microsoft Word 2010
application.

For you to satisfactory complete this lesson, you are expected to

get a score of at least four (4) points in activity Opening, Closing , or


Exiting Word 2010 Application;
get a score of at least fifteen (15) points in activity Working with Microsoft
Word 2010 Elements; and
pass the assessment of this lesson.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO1: Explore Microsoft Word 2010 Application 1
Activity Sheet

Activity Sheet 1.1


Identifying Microsoft Word 2010 Application

This lesson will show you how to open, close or exit the MS Word program
and update you with its new features.

But before you can go deeper into this lesson, let us first define MS Word.
MS Word 2010 is a word processing application used for creating, editing,
formatting and producing printable materials such as resumes, business letters,
reports, memorandums, birthday cards, calling cards and other documents.

Before you learn more about the lesson, let us first explore what you already
know by performing the activity and answering the guide questions below.

1. Have you ever had a chance of opening MS Word 2010? If yes, compare and
contrast it with other word processing software.

Microsoft Word 2010 Other Word processing


software

2. Ask your peer some of the products that can be produced from MS Word
2010. Ask them the importance of these products and where they usually
see them.

Products that can be produced from Importance


Microsoft Word 2010

2 LO1: Explore Microsoft Word 2010 Application | Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Key Answer
Key Answers
Identifying Microsoft Word 2010 Application

1. Have you ever had a chance of opening MS Word 2010? If yes, compare and
contrast it with other word processing software.

Microsoft Word 2010 Other Word processing


software
Answers may vary depending on
what other word processing
software is available.

3. Ask your peer some of the products that can be produced from MS Word
2010. Ask them the importance of these products and were they usually see
them.

Products that can be produced from Importance


Microsoft Word 2010
1. Brochure (answers may vary)
2. Letter
3. Blogpost
4. Agendas
5. Newsletters
6. Envelopes
7. Flyers
8. Invitations
9. Labels
10. planner

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO1: Explore Microsoft Word 2010 Application 3
Information Sheet

Information Sheet 1.1


Opening, Closing, or Exiting Microsoft Word 2010 Application

There are several ways to open Microsoft Word 2010 application depending on how
it is installed on your computer.

To start Microsoft Word


1. On your desktop, click the start button found on the lower left corner of your
screen. The start menu appears as shown in Figure 1.
2. Click All programs.

Figure 1.1
All Programs menu

3. Then select Microsoft Office.


4. Then finally click Microsoft Word 2010. (See figure below)

Figure 1.2

4 LO1: Explore Microsoft Word 2010 Application | Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
If the Microsoft Word 2010 application is in the list, just look through the options
from the All Programs menu. You can also check if there is a Microsoft Word 2010
application icon on the desktop.

Desktop shortcut icon

Microsoft Word 2010 in All


Programs list

Figure 1.3

Note:

To place Microsoft Word 2010 application icon on your Windows desktop, right-click
the application name under the Start>All Programs>Microsoft Office menu and choose
Send To> Desktop(create shortcut).

After clicking the Microsoft Word 2010 application, it will automatically open, and
its environment with its new feature.

Whenever you finish working with Microsoft Word 2010, you exit the program to
release the program from the computers memory or just close it.

To exit Microsoft Word 2010 application

1. Click on File and select Exit. (See figure 4)

To close Microsoft Word 2010 application

1. Click on File and select Close.

Or

1. Click the Close button at the upper-right corner of the document. (See figure 5)

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO1: Explore Microsoft Word 2010 Application 5
Information Sheet

Figure 1.4

Close command from File


Tab. Closebutton

i
Figure 1.5

6 LO1: Explore Microsoft Word 2010 Application | Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Activity Sheet

Activity Sheet 1.2


Opening, Exiting, or Closing a Microsoft Word 2010 Document
Instruction: Based on what you have learned previously, answer the following questions.
You need at least four (4) correct answers before you can proceed to the next
activity.

1. What are the different ways of opening a Microsoft Word 2010 application?

2. What are the two ways that you can close a document?

3. What happens when you click the button labeled with an X in the upper-right
corner of the Microsoft Word 2010 window?

4. What is the Start button used for?

5. How do you create a shortcut icon of Microsoft Word 2010 in the desktop?

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO1: Explore Microsoft Word 2010 Application 7
Key Answer
Key Answers
Opening, Exiting or Closig Microsoft Word 2010 Document
1. What are the different ways of opening a Microsoft Word 2010 application?
1. from start button
2. from desktop shortcut icon
3. from the All Program list

2. What are the two ways that you can close a document?
1. Click File> Close.
2. Click Close button at the upper-right corner of the document.

3. What happens when you click the button labeled with an X in the upper-right
corner of the Microsoft Word 2010 window?
The document window will be closed.

4. What is the Start button used for?


The Start button is used for opening programs, folders and files. (answers may
vary)

5. How do you create a shortcut icon of Microsoft Word 2010 in the desktop?
To create Microsoft Word 2010 application icon on your Windows desktop,
right-click the application name under the Start>All Programs>Microsoft Office
menu and choose Send To> Desktop(create shortcut).

8 LO1: : Explore Microsoft Word 2010 Application | Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 1.2

Working with Microsoft Word 2010 Elements


Designed to adjust to the way you work, instead of the traditional windows of
Microsoft Word 2003, menu bar and the standard toolbars, Microsoft Word 2007 and
Microsoft Word 2010 use Ribbon. The 2007 version differs from 2010 in that the 2007
version has Office button while the 2010 version replaced it with a File Tab. These
features contain many of the functions that were in the menu of previous versions of
Word. Look carefully at the figure below to find out the newest features of MS Word 2010:

View Button
Status Bar

Figure 1.6
Quick Access Toolbar

The Office Quick Access Toolbar provides fast


and easy access to the basic file functions. It is a
customizable toolbar that contains commands that
you may want to use. You can place the quick access
toolbar above or below the ribbon. To change the
location of the quick access toolbar, click on the arrow
at the end of the menu and click Show below the
Ribbon.
Figure 1.7

Ribbon

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO1: Explore Microsoft Word 2010 Application 9
Information Sheet
Figure 1.8

The Ribbon includes tabs that reflect the various tasks you perform within each of
the applications, and each tab contains tool groups offering the tools you need as you
work with the files you create. Every application has the same look and feel, which
enables you to learn the Ribbon once in your favorite or most often used Office program
and then easily find your way around any other Office program. The Ribbon was
introduced in Office 2007 and has been improved in Office 2010 to include some new
tools and provide more flexibility. You can use the Minimize The Ribbon button to hide the
Ribbon so that you have more room to work on-screen, and you can customize the Ribbon
to create your own tabs and tool groups specific to your needs.

The simple design of the Ribbon enables you to find the tools you need in the tab
that reflects the task you want to perform.

The Ribbon simplifies the way you find and work with tools and options in Office.
With a simple, easy-to-understand layout for your commands, the Ribbon helps you find
the tools you need:

A. Ribbon Tabs
Each of the tabs contains the following tools:

TABS TOOLS/ GROUPS


Home Clipboard, Fonts, Paragraph, Styles, and Editing
Insert Pages, Tables, Illustrations, Links, Header & Footer,
Text, and Symbols
Page Layout Themes, Page Setup, Page Background, Paragraph,
Arrange
References Table of Contents, Footnote, Citation &
Bibliography, Captions, Index, and Table of
Authorities
Mailings Create, Start Mail Merge, Write & Insert Fields,
Preview Results, Finish

Review Proofing, Comments, Tracking, Changes, Compare,


Protect
View Document Views, Show/Hide, Zoom, Window,
Macros

The File tab takes you to Microsoft Office Backstage view, which gives you a central
place to work with the files you create in Office 2010 applications.

One of the major improvements in Office 2010 is Microsoft Office Backstage view, a
kind of one-stop shop for all tasks related to managing the files you create in Office 2010
applications.

The round and colorful Microsoft Office Button in Office 2007 has been replaced by
the File tab. When you click it, you are taken to a screen outside the document where you
can manage file information and save, share, print, protect, and work with version
information for the document. (See figure 9.)

Backstage view is organized in three panels. The left panel includes the commands
youll use to work with the files you create. The center panel offers related options, and

10 LO1: : Explore Microsoft Word 2010 Application | Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
the third panel displays a preview image of the selection or additional options. For
example, when you click Print, the center panel shows print options, and the right panel
displays a preview of your document as it will appear in print. This streamlines the print
process so that you can preview and print your document in one step.

Figure 1.9. Backstage view helps you prepare, manage, and share the files you create.

In addition to the tabs, groups, and tools shown in the Ribbon during normal use,
contextual tabs appear when you perform specific actions in a file. The fact that they
appear only when you need them is part of the beauty of the Office 2010 interfacethis
keeps the number of commands on-screen at any one time at a minimum and easy to
navigate through. For example, when you click a photo in a Word document, the Picture
Tools contextual tab appears, providing options related to picture editing. (See figure 10.)

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO1: Explore Microsoft Word 2010 Application 11
Information Sheet
Figure1.10. The contextual tab provides options related to the task you are performing.

B. Ribbon Groups

Within each tab are groups that help


organize common commands to help you quickly
find what you need for a specific task. For
example, on the Insert tab in Word 2010, youll
find Picture, Clip Art, Shapes, SmartArt, Chart,
and Screenshot in the Illustrations group.
Figure 1.11

C. Galleries

A down-arrow appears to the right of some options in groups. Clicking the down-
arrow displays a gallery of options you can select or a list of additional choices.

Figure 1.12

D. Dialog Box Launcher

Many options include an icon at the bottom right-edge of the group option. Office calls this
the Dialog Box Launcher, and clicking it opens a related dialog box. In Figure 13, the Font dialog
box opens.

Dialog Box Launcher

Opened Font Dialog Box

Figure 1.12
12 LO1: : Explore Microsoft Word 2010 Application | Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Introduction
Activity Sheet 1.3
Working with Microsoft Word 2010 Elements

Instructions: Based on what you have learned in the past lesson, identify the different
elements of Microsoft Word 2010 application and encircle those elements on
the word bank below.
1.
2. 3. 4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

1O.

V Q U I T M Y J O B F O R D E P E D A V R F
I A M A C O M P U T E R W I S H A I D I E E
E Q U I C K A C C E S S T O O L B A R L Y R
W S O B E G L O R C Y D A P I S E L E L E R
B F O R T H E A O H B F G W A G H O N A S E
U G G L O R B Y S V F I R E M I V G A S R R
T H O F M E A R S O D L O R I O V B L A O S
T J Y C L I M E R C C E U T R P V O I M L H
O Y O T A B S L E J C T P H V L S X N I A E
N H I T M A N L F T C A F H I J D L W R N R
S T A T U S B A R B S B C J L H E A S D D N
A T T A I N S G E B A F C K Q G D U B R O A
S H I N E U P O N T H E W A T E R N H I L
M I M I N I M I Z E R E S T O R E C L O S E
Z Q R L K M F G V I C F R T Y U I H Y H N N
X W I S H E I Q W E R T T Y Y U F E H J K B

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO2: Create and Edit a Document 13
Key Answer
C F E D D F D V F H I U N O B B I R Y S S A

Key Answers
Working with Microsoft Word 2010 Elements

1.Quick Access
Toolbar 4. Minimize, Maximize
2.Tabs 3.Title Bar and Close Button

5. Groups

6. Dialog Box Launcher

7. File Tab

8. Ribbons

9. Status Bar

10. View Button

V Q U I T M Y J O B F O R D E P E D A V R F
I A M A C O M P U T E R W I S H A I D I E E
E Q U I C K A C C E S S T O O L B A R L Y R
W S O B E G L O R C Y D A P I S E L E L E R
B F O R T H E A O H B F G W A G H O N A S E
U G G L O R B Y S V F I R E M I V G A S R R
T H O F M E A R S O D L O R I O V B L A O S
T J Y C L I M E R C C E U T R P V O I M L H
O Y O T A B S L E J C T P H V L S X N I A E
N H I T M A N L F T C A F H I J D L W R N R
S T A T U S B A R B S B C J L H E A S D D N
A T T A I N S G E B A F C K Q G D U B R O A
S H I N E U P O N T H E W A T E R N H I L
M I M I N I M I Z E R E S T O R E C L O S E
Z Q R L K M F G V I C F R T Y U I H Y H N N
X W I S H E I Q W E R T T Y Y U F E H J K B
C F E D D F D V F H I U N O B B I R Y S S A

14 LO1: : Explore Microsoft Word 2010 Application | Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Introduction
Lesson 2 Create and Edit Document

Description:

This lesson covers one of the performances required in creating a document in


Microsoft Word 2010 application.

In this lesson, you will learn how to

open blank document;


open a Microsoft 2010 template;
enter text and save a document; and
rename, copy, paste, and delete a document.
For you to satisfactory complete this lesson, you are expected to
get a score of at least fifteen (15) points in activity Opening Blank
Document and Microsoft Word Template;
get a score of at least fifteen (15) points in activity Entering Text;
get a score of at least fifteen (15) points in activity Entering Text and
Saving document;
create and save a document;
completed at least twenty five (25) points in activity Opening, Renaming
and Deleting an Existing Document;
completed at least twenty five (25) points in activity- Inserting Field;
completed at least thirty (30 ) points in activity- Moving, Copying and
Pasting Text; and
pass the assessment of this lesson.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO2: Create and Edit a Document 15
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 2.1
Opening a Blank Document

This lesson will show you how to open and exit a blank document.

Before you learn more about the lesson let us first explore what you already
know by performing the activity.

A. Open a Blank Document


1. Click on Start button.
2. Click All Programs.
3. Click Microsoft Office, and then click on Microsoft Word 2010. Microsoft Word
2010 opens.
4. Click on File Tab.
5. Select New. The New tab displays (see Figure 2.1 below).
6. Under Available Templates, select Blank document
7. Click the Create button at the right side of the Microsoft Word 2010 Backstage
View.
8. A new blank document opens in a new window.
9. Exit your opened document

Figure 2.1 New Tab of Backstage View

16 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 2.2
Opening a Microsoft Word 2010 Template

This activity will show you how to open and close Microsoft Word 2010
template.

Template1 is a preformatted file type that can be used to quickly create a specific
file. In the Template, everything such as Font, Size, Color, Background pictures are
preformatted but users can also edit them.

Before you learn more about the lesson, let us first explore what you
already know by performing the activity.

B. Opening and Closing Microsoft Word template


1. From your previous activity, the Microsoft Word 2010 window which is still open
click the File tab.
2. Click New.
3. Under Available Templates, do one of the following:
To use one of the built-in templates, click Sample Templates, click the
template that you want, and then click Create.
To reuse a template that youve recently used, click Recent Templates,
click the template that you want, and then click Create.
To use your own template that you previously created, click My
Templates, click the template that you want, and then click OK.
To find a template on Office.com, under Office.com Templates, click
the template category that you want, click the template that you want,
and click Download to download the template from Office.com to your
computer.

4. Close your opened document.

1 http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/document+template
Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO2: Create and Edit a Document 17
Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric

Opening Blank Document and Microsoft Word Template

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed
the criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and
then turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open a blank document Perform the skill easily
4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Exit an open document Perform the skill with
3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Open a Microsoft Word Perform the skill slowly,
Template 2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Close opened document Perform the skill with
1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

TOTAL SCORE
Teachers Signature

18 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 2.1

Entering Text

You begin creating a document by simply typing text. When you enter text into a
document, you dont have to press Enter at the end of each line. Words word wrap
automatically wraps text from one line to the next each time the insertion point reaches
the right margin. Word wrap breaks lines of text so that they stay within margin
boundaries; you dont have to enter hard returns. You press Enter only when you want to
begin a new paragraph or insert a blank line. Word uses left and right page margins of
1.25 inches and top and bottom margins of 1 inch by default; however, you can reset the
page margins. Youll learn more about resetting margins in Lesson 8, Page Layout.

As you type text, the insertion point moves, indicating the location for the next
character. If you make a mistake, press Backspace to delete characters to the left of the
insertion point or press Delete to delete characters to the right of the insertion point.

Inserting Symbols and Special Characters

When creating documents, you may need to use a symbol or special character that
does not appear on the keyboard. These symbols and special characters can be accessed
through the Symbol dialog box.

Inserting Symbols
Inserting Special Characters

Inserting Symbols

Use the Symbol dialog box to locate symbols, characters from other languages,
arrows, and other characters. Symbols inserted into documents can then be formatted as
regular text.

Place the insertion point where the symbol will be


inserted.

1. From the Insert tab, in the Symbols group, click


SYMBOL

2. Select one of the symbol options Word provides


OR Select More Symbols... The Symbol dialog
box appears.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO2: Create and Edit a Document 19
Information Sheet
Figure 2.2 Common symbols
c
a
n

b
e

s
e
l
e
c
t
e
d

from this gallery.

Figure 2.3 To insert a symbol that isn't in the Symbol gallery or one from a different font,
use the Symbol dialog box.

3. Select the Symbols tab.


4. Select the desired symbol

NOTE:

If you do not see the desired symbol, from the Font pull-down list, select another font.

5. Click INSERT. The symbol appears in your document.


6. Repeat steps 4-5 until you insert all symbols you want and Click CLOSE.

Inserting Special Characters

Special characters, like symbols, do not appear on the keyboard; however, some
have more functionality than symbols. For example, the nonbreaking hyphen appears like
any other hyphen, but the words it separates will always remain on the same line (i.e.,
they will not be broken apart).
1. Place the insertion point where the special character will be inserted
2. From the Insert command tab, in the Symbols group, click SYMBOL select More
Symbols... The Symbol dialog box appears.

20 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet

Figure 2.4 To insert Special Characters


that do not appear on the keyboard use
the Symbol dialog box.

3. Select the Special Characters tab


4. From the Character scroll box, select the desired character
5. Click INSERT
The special character appears in your document.
6. Repeat steps 4-5 until you insert all the characters you want and Click CLOSE

TIPS:

When inserting a character, Word uses the font at the text insertion mark. To
use a different font (Webdings, for example, contains unusual characters not
found in other fonts), choose it from the Font drop-down menu in the Symbol
dialog box.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO2: Create and Edit a Document 21
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 2.3

Entering Text
Instruction: Answer the following questions.

I. MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose only the letter of the correct answer.

1. It is a feature of Microsoft Word 2010 application that breaks lines of text so that
they stay within margin boundaries.
a. Indention c. Word wrap
b. Margins d. Multilevel list
2. A keyboard key that is used to create a new paragraph.
a. Backspace c. Delete
b. Caps Lock d. Enter
3. It deletes characters to the left of the insertion point.
a. Backspace c. Delete
b. Caps Lock d. Enter
4. It deletes characters from the right of the insertion point.
a. Backspace c. Delete
b. Caps Lock d. Enter
5. It is used to locate symbols, characters from other languages, arrows, and other
characters.
a. Clip Art c. SmartArt
b. Picture d. Symbol
II. ENUMERATION
1. What are the steps in inserting symbols?
_________________________________________
_________________________________________
_________________________________________
_________________________________________
_________________________________________
_________________________________________

2. What are the steps in inserting special characters?


_________________________________________
_________________________________________
_________________________________________
_________________________________________
_________________________________________

22 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Key Answer
Answer Key

Entering Text
I. MULTIPLE CHOICE.
1. c
2. d
3. c
4. a
5. d
II. ENUMERATION
1. What are the steps in inserting symbols?
a. From the Insert tab, in the Symbols group, click SYMBOL
b. Select one of the symbol options Word provides OR Select More Symbols...
The Symbol dialog box appears.
c. Select the Symbols tab.
d. Select the desired symbol.
e. Click INSERT. The symbol appears in your document.
f. Click CLOSE.

2. What are the steps in inserting special characters?


a. Place the insertion point where the special character will be inserted
b. From the Insert command tab, in the Symbols group, click SYMBOL select
More Symbols... The Symbol dialog box appears.
c. Select the Special Characters tab
d. From the Character scroll box, select the desired character
e. Click INSERT
f. Click CLOSE

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO2: Create and Edit a Document 23
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 2.2

Saving a File

While typing up the text on Microsoft Word 2010 and also on other formats, you
should make sure you save the document regularly.

Remember to save your work on a regular basis. It's not a pleasant experience to
have worked on a document for some time only for your computer to break down. When
you finally get your computer to work again, if you haven't saved regularly you'll find all
that hard work lost forever, with no way to get it back!

Save or Save As

Microsoft Word (like many programs) has two different save options. These options
are Save and Save As. The Save As option works as you would expect with your selecting
the filename to save the current document in and then having the program save the
document in that file.

The Save option (on the other hand) may not be functioning as you expect because
the default action is not to save a completely new copy of the file over the top of the
existing file. Word actually keeps track of the changes that you make to the file and when
the save option is selected the default action is to save information about the changes on
the end of the existing file rather than saving the entire file again. This makes for faster
saves but means that each time you save a file, the file will be made bigger.

This is how you can save your Microsoft Word 2010 document which is shown in
the MS Word screen shot below.

In Word 2010, click the File tab at the top of Word and click Save.

Figure 2.5 File tab

The Save As dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 2.6.

24 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
Libraries New Folder button Save in Folder

File name

File type

Figure 2.6 Saving a file for future reference

There are three main areas to the Save dialogue box: Where do you want to save
your document? What do you want to call it? What type of document do you want to save
it as?

We'll take the three areas in turn, starting with "Where do you want to save your
document?"

The "Where" is set right at the top. The default location is in the Documents folder
on your computer. You can see where this is by clicking the arrow in the top left:

Figure 2.7 List of locations of the computer

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO2: Create and Edit a Document 25
Information Sheet
The drop-down menu is a list of locations on your computer. The image shows that
we are in the Documents folder. By default files are saved in Documents folder.

Inside the Libraries folder is another one called Documents. We're saving it to this
folder. The larger area of the Save As dialogue box shows you the folders that are already
in the Documents folder:

Figure 2.8 Documents Library

File Names

We now need to come up with a name for this particular document that we're
saving. If you have a look at the bottom of the Save As dialogue box you'll see two areas:
one called File Name, and the other called Save as Type (see Figure2.6). The File Name
area is where you type a name for your document. The Save as Type means which type of
document is will be. Microsoft Word documents from 2007 onwards end with the letters
docx. Previously, the letters were just doc. If you sent someone a Word document with the
ending docx, somebody with version 2003 of the software would not be able to open your
file simply because previous Office versions don't know how to handle the newer format.
The reverse is not true, though: they could send you a file that ended with the letters doc
and you would be able to open it up in Word 2007 or Word 2010.

Microsoft Word allows you to save documents in a wide range of different formats.
Click anywhere inside of the Save as Type area to see a list of the different formats:

Figure 2.9 Different filename extensions


that can be used in Microsoft Word 2010

26 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
The image shows that we have Word 97 - 2003 Document in the Save as Type area.
The three letter extension shows .doc. The first one on the list, however, is Word
Document .docx, which is the one we want. Make sure this one is selected in your Save As
dialogue box.

If you clicked the Save button now, your file will be called "Doc1". That's not a very
descriptive name for a document, change it to something else. To give document a
different name, simply click inside the File Name text box. Delete everything in the text
box. Type in a new name, something like Library Letter.

Your Save As dialog box should now look like the one below. When it does, click the
Save button:

Figure 2.10 A New Folder environment in Save As dialog box

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO2: Create and Edit a Document 27
Assessment Rubric
Activity Sheet 2.4

Entering Text and Saving Document

Instruction: Based on what you have learned from the previous lessons,
accomplish the instruction below. After you have mastered this activity,
inform your teacher so that you can proceed to your next activity.

1. Open a blank document.


2. Type the following text:

Sales Team Monthly Report

AdWorks received the Triangle Business of the Year award for


its role in developing local awareness advertisements for the
Local Disaster Releif Fund and the Fight the Drought awarenes
campaign. President Pete Moss accepted the award on Behalf of
the creative team at AdWorks.

January 2010 has been a proftable month and the company has
shown growth in many arenas. Ad sales are up by 23% and
capital expinditures have decreased since 4th quarter in the Sales
Department.

The sales team hired a new design specialist, the role of VP of


sales was filled, a new sales cheif position was created, and the
sales team accrued 24 new clients, including one national chain.

Additionally, online adsales doubled sinced July of last year.


Statistics indicate that sales in most markets increases with the
use of online ads and our clients are reading those statistics and
responding to them.

3. Save it as AdWorks Performance.doc in your own folder from the desktop.

28 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Activity Sheet

Assessment Rubric

Entering Text and Saving Document

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed the
criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and then
turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open a blank document Perform the skill easily
4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Enter text in the document Perform the skill with
3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Save document in different Perform the skill slowly,
format 2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Close opened document Perform the skill with
1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

TOTAL SCORE

Teachers Signature

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO2: Create and Edit a Document 29
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 2.5
Opening, Renaming and Deleting an Existing Document

After youve worked on and saved a Word document, you can reopen it later to
review its contents or make changes. Youll need to navigate to the folder containing the
document and then open the document itself.

Word keeps track of the last documents that you opened. Word displays the names
of these files at the Recent button of the File tab so that you can open them with only a
couple of mouse clicks. To open a file that is not listed at the Recent button of the File
tab, you use the Open dialog box.

In this activity, you open an existing file.

1. Open a new document.


2. Choose File tab, click Open. An Open dialog box similar the one seen in Figure 2.11
appears.

Figure 2.11 Open a previously saved file

TIP:

Optionally, press CTRL + O to display the Open dialog box.

3. Locate your saved file from Activity Entering Text and Saving Document.
4. Choose Organize and select Copy ( See Figure 2.12) and paste the copied file on the
same folder by just choosing again the Organize button and select Paste. A new
copied file is created.

30 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Activity Sheet
5. Rename the copied file by clicking Organize and select Rename. The original file
name becomes highlighted.
6. Type the new file name (Activity_1_<your name>), and press Enter when you
finished typing.
7. Again locate your saved file from Activity Entering Text and Saving Document.
8. Choose Organize and select Delete. A dialog box appears like you see in Figure 3.3.
9. Choose Yes to delete the file.
10. Click the Cancel button or press the Escape key to close the dialog box.

Figure 2.12 Copy a new file

Figure 2.13 Delete unwanted files

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO2: Create and Edit a Document 31
Activity Sheet
Assessment Rubric
Opening, Renaming and Deleting an Existing Document

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed the
criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and then
return the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open a new blank Perform the skill easily
document 4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Locate a save file Perform the skill with
3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Copy a file Perform the skill slowly,
2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Paste a file Perform the skill with
1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

Rename a file

Delete a file

Close open dialog box

TOTAL SCORE

Teachers Signature

32 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 2.6
Insert Field

You can use a field code to enter field in a document, and it will continue to update
as you add more to the document.

Here's an activity of how to make fields work.

1. Open Activity_1_<your name> document.


2. Enter a Word count on this document., make sure the cursor is under the title of
the document.
3. Then click the Insert tab on the Ribbon.
4. Then in the Text group click on Quick Parts then Field.

5. Now in the Field dialog box browse through the available fields you can add to your
document. There are quite a few including Table of Contents, Bibliography, Time &
Dateetc. Starting with a simple word count, will get you started with the basics
and allow you to explore more field codes in the future.
6. For this activity insert a word count so under Field Names scroll down and select
NumWords

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO2: Create and Edit a Document 33
Activity Sheet

7. Now you can choose the field properties and numeric format. Select the first option
(0).
8. You must have a word count of 151. Keep in mind you can put this anywhere in your
document that you want. Here we put it under the title for instance because our
Editor wants to know how many words are included. Then you can take it out easily
with a highlight and delete.
9. Save your work.

34 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Activity Sheet
Assessment Rubric

Inserting Field

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed the
criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and then
turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open an existing document Perform the skill easily
4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Insert the mouse cursor in Perform the skill with
proper position 3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Click the Insert Tab Perform the skill slowly,
2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Open the Field dialog box Perform the skill with
1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

Select NumWords

Select the proper number


format

Save the document.

TOTAL SCORE

Teachers Signature

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO2: Create and Edit a Document 35
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 2.3
Selecting, Moving and Copying Text

Before moving, copying, deleting or formatting of existing text, the text must be
selected. When the text is selected or highlighted, it appears on your screen as light type
with sky-blue background the reverse of unselected text.

Word allows you to select sequential or non-sequential text for editing. The
following list shows different selection techniques.

Selecting Text Using a Mouse

To select a single word, double-click the word.


To select an entire paragraph, triple-click anywhere in the paragraph.
To select a single line of text, click one on the left margin with the mouse arrow
pointing to the line you want to select,
or
move your cursor at the start of the line, hold down Shift key and press the Home
key
To select a text / an area by dragging, click the left mouse button at the start of the
text you want to select (keep your left mouse button held down), drag your mouse
pointer in any direction you like to be highlighted.
To select a block of text, click at the start of the block of text you want to highlight,
hold down Shift key and click at the end of the block of text you want to select.
To select different text areas, select the first area you want to select, hold down
Control key and use other techniques to highlight other text areas.

Selecting Text Using a Keyboard

To select one letter at a time, move the cursor before or after a letter, hold down
Shift key and press Left or Right arrows.
To select one word at a time, move the cursor before or after a word, hold down
Shift and Control keys and press Left or Right arrows.
To select an entire document, hold down Control key and press the letter A.
To select a paragraph, move your cursor at the start or end of the paragraph you
want to highlight, then hold down Shift and Control keys and press the Up or
Down arrows.

Moving Text

A. Using Cut and Paste Option

When you want to remove text from one place


to another location, you cut and paste the text. With
cut and paste, Word deletes the selected text, holds
it, and then places it into a new location.

Optionally, press CTRL + X or right click and Figure 2.14 Clipboard group

36 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
choose Cut to cut the selected text to the Clipboard.

B. Using Drag and Drop Option

Another method to move text from one location to another is to use the drag and
drop editing function. The drag and drop feature works best for moving a relatively small
amount of text a short distance. The following steps show you how to use drag and drop.

1. Select first the text you want to


move.
New position for text
2. Position the mouse pointer on
top of the highlighted text. The
mouse arrow should point to
the left.
3. Hold down the mouse button
and drag the mouse pointer to
the desired location. As you
drag, a small box appears at
the bottom of the mouse arrow
and a gray line indicates the
text position (see Figure 3.2).

Figure 2.1.16 Select and drag text to a new location

Copying Text

The Copy (CTRL + C) and Paste features of Word leave the selected text at its
existing location and duplicate it into a new location. Working similarly to the Cut and
Paste functions, Copy and Paste use the Windows Clipboard to temporarily store the text.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO2: Create and Edit a Document 37
Information Sheet

Figure 2.1.17 Duplicate text without retyping

Understanding Paste Options

By default, pasting text includes any formatting contained in the original text along
with the text ( CTRL + P). For example if the text is underlined, the pasted text is
underlined also.

If the pasted text has different format than the text near where you pasted, youll
see the Paste Options button, which provides the option to paste text with or without
formatting.

List of Paste Options

Keep Source Formatting: Leaves the


pasted text formatted the same as the
original text.

Merge Formatting: Modifies the pasted


text so its format is matched to the
closest existing file.

Keep Text Only: Modifies the pasted


Figure 2.1.18 Select paste options
text with the default document font.

38 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet

REMEMBER:

If you make unnecessary changes to your document, use Undo or Redo


function form Quick Access Toolbar. You can use Undo to restore text that you
deleted, to delete text you just typed, or to reverse a recently taken action.

Be aware that once you save or close your document, you cannot use to
unsave it.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO2: Create and Edit a Document 39
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 2.7

Moving, Copying and Pasting Text

Instruction: Based on what you have learned from the previous lessons,
accomplish the instruction below. After you have mastered this activity,
inform your teacher so that you can proceed to your next activity.

1. Open your saved document from the previous activity.


2. Cut the first paragraph.
3. Click the mouse cursor after the word them of the fourth paragraph.
4. Hit the Enter key once.
5. Paste the cut paragraph.
6. Copy the second paragraph.
7. Paste it as Text Only.
8. Save your activity as Activity_Move.pdf.

40 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric

Moving, Copying and Pasting Text


Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed the
criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and then
turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity sheet.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open an saved document Perform the skill easily
4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Cut the first paragraph Perform the skill with
3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Insert the mouse cursor on its Perform the skill slowly,
position 2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Create a new paragraph Perform the skill with
1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

Cut a selected paragraph

Paste the cut selected


paragraph

Copy selected paragraph

Paste the copied paragraph as


Text Only

Save the document.

TOTAL SCORE

Teachers Signature

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO2: Create and Edit a Document| 41
Activity Sheet
Assessment Test
Create and Edit Document

Assessment Criteria:

In order to satisfactorily pass this assessment, you are required to

open an existing document;


insert text and field;
cut, copy and paste text;
save document in other format; and
print the WordPad document.

Instruction:

1. You have 45 minutes to complete this test.


2. Open a document named Philippine Construction.
3. In your opened document, insert your name, section and date on the space
provided for.
4. Insert trademark character after the word Philippine Constructions.
5. Cut all the tables and delete the captions for each table.
6. Edit your document by deleting the word Table 1-2.
7. Delete the paragraph under the title Growth Years.
8. Place the insertion point after Last printed on at the beginning of the document.
9. Insert Field and select PrintDate.
10. Select the date.
11. Under Date formats, select the sixth format in the list. Click OK.
12. Save your file as Philippine Construction.pdf.
13. Print the document.

42 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open the document Perform the skill easily
Philippine Construction 4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Insert the name, section, and Perform the skill with
date 3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Insert trademark character Perform the skill slowly,
after the word Philippine 2 with minimal error and
Constructions little assistance.
Cut all the tables Perform the skill with
1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

Delete the captions for each


table

Delete the paragraph under


the title Growth Years

Place the insertion point after


Last printed on at the
beginning of the document

Insert Field and select


PrintDate

Save your file as Philippine


Construction.pdf

Print the document

TOTAL SCORE

Teachers Signature

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO2: Create and Edit a Document| 43
Introduction
Lesson 3 Editing Document Using other Tools

Description:

This lesson covers one of the performances required in creating a document in


Microsoft Word 2010 application.

In this lesson the student should be able to

open an existing document;


know how to use the Find and Replace tools of Microsoft Word 201; and
check the spelling and grammar of the document.

For you to satisfactory complete this lesson, you are expected to

get a score of at least thirty five (35) points in activity Find and Replace;
get a score of at least ten (10) points in activity - Checked the Spelling and
Grammar of the Document; and
pass the assessment of this lesson.

44 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 3.1
Find & Replace

While working on editing a document you come across a situation very frequently
when you want to search a particular word in your document and many times you will be
willing to replace this word with another word at all the few or all the places throughout of
the document. This lesson teaches you how to find a word or phrase in a word document
and how to replace existing word with any other word using simple steps.

Find Command

The Find command enables you to locate specific text in your document. Following
are the steps to find a word and replace it.

1. Click the Find option in the Editing group on the Home tab or press Ctrl + F to
launch the Navigation pane shown in Figure 3.2.

Figure 3.1 Find option button in Microsoft Word 20102

2. Enter a word which you want to search in the search box, as soon as you finish
typing, Word searches for the text you entered and displays the results in the
navigation pane and highlight the word in the document as well as follows:

2
Screenshot of different images courtesy of
http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/word_find_replace.html
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Information Sheet

Figure 3.2 Highlighted searched words

3. You can click clear button (X) to clear the search and results and perform another
search.
4. You can use further options while searching for a word. Click option button to
display options menu and then click Options which will display a list of options.
You can select options like match case to perform case sensitive search.

Figure 3.3 Other options in searching words

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Information Sheet

5. Finally if you are done with searching operation, you can click close button (X) to
close the Navigation Pane.

Find & Replace Operation

You have learned how to search a word or phrase in a word document. Now this
section will teach you how you can replace existing word in your document. Following are
the simple steps:

1. Click the Replace option in the Editing group on the Home tab or press Ctrl + H to
launch the Find and Replace dialog box.

Figure 3.4 Find and Replace button

2. Type a word which you want to search and a word which you would like to replace
within the Find and Replace dialog box as follows:

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Information Sheet

Figure 3.5 Find and Replace dialog box

3. Click Replace button available on Find and Replace dialog box and you will see
first occurrence of the searched word would be replaced with the replace with word.
Clicking again on Replace button would replace next occurrence of the searched
word. If you will click Replace All button then it would replace all the found words
in one go. You can also use Find Next button just to search the next occurrence
and later you can use Replace button to replace the found word.
4. You can use More >> button available on the dialog box to use more options and to
make your search more specific like case sensitive search or searching for whole
word only etc.
5. Finally if you are done with finding and replacing operation, you can click Close (X)
or Cancel button of the dialog box to close the box.

48 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Activity Sheet
Activity 31

Find and Replace

Instruction: Based on what you have learned from the previous lessons, accomplish
the instruction below. After you have mastered this activity, inform your
teacher so that you can proceed on your next activity.

1. Open Activity_1_<your name>.


2. Click Find what button and when the navigation pane opens type in the Find Button
the word AdWorks.
3. Count the highlighted words. You must have four (4) for that word.
4. Click Find and Replace button.
5. At Find what bar, type AdWorks.
6. At the Replace with bar, type PhilWorks.
7. Hit the Replace All button and the number of replaced words must be four (4).
8. Save your work as Activity_Replace.docx.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO2: Create and Edit a Document| 49
Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric

Find and Replace


Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed the
criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and then
return the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open a document Perform the skill easily
4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Click Find button Perform the skill with
3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Open Find Navigation Pane Perform the skill slowly,
2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Type the word to Find what Perform the skill with
box 1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

Count the highlighted words

Locate Find and Replace


button
Enter the correct word To
Find box
Enter the correct word to
replace

Replace all words


Save the document properly

TOTAL SCORE

Teachers Signature

50 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 3.2

Checking Spelling and Grammar

In computing, a spell checker (or spell check) is an application program that


flags words in a document that may not be spelled correctly. Spell checkers may be stand-
alone capable of operating on a block of text, or as part of a larger application, such as a
word processor, email client, electronic dictionary, or search engine.

To Run a Spelling & Grammar Check

1. Go to the Review tab.


2. Click on the Spelling & Grammar command.

Figure 3.6 The Spelling & Grammar command

3. The Spelling and Grammar dialog box will open. For each error in your document,
Word will try to offer one or more suggestions. You can select a suggestion and
then click Change to correct the error.

Figure 3.7 Correcting a spelling error

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Information Sheet
4. If no suggestions are given, you can manually type in the correct spelling.

Figure 3.8 Typing a correction3

Ignoring "Errors"

The spelling and grammar check is not always correct. Particularly with
grammar, there are many errors that Word will not notice. There are also times when the
spelling and grammar check will say that something's an error when it's actually not. This
often happens with people's names, which may not be in the dictionary.

If Word says that something is an error, you can choose not to change it.
Depending on whether it's a spelling or grammar error, you can choose from several
options:

For spelling "errors"

Ignore Once: This will skip the word without changing it.
Ignore All: This will skip the word without changing it, and it will also skip all other
instances of this word in the document.
Add to Dictionary: This adds the word to the dictionary so that it will never come
up as an error. Make sure that the word is spelled correctly before choosing this
option.

For grammar "errors"

Ignore Once: This will skip the "error" without changing it.
Ignore Rule: This will skip this "error" as well as all other instances that relate to
this grammar rule.

3
Screenshots courtesy of http://www.gcflearnfree.org
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Information Sheet
Next Sentence: This skips the sentence without changing it, and leaves it marked
as an error. That means it will still show up if you do another Spelling and
Grammar check later on.

NOTE:

If you're not sure about a grammar error, you can click Explain to see why Word thinks
it's an error. This can help you determine whether you want to change it or not.

Automatic Spelling and Grammar Checking

By default, Word automatically checks your document for spelling and


grammar errors, so you may not even need to run a separate Spelling and Grammar
check. These errors are indicated by colored, wavy lines.

The red line indicates a misspelled word.


The green line indicates a grammar error.
The blue line indicates a contextual spelling error. This feature is turned off by
default.

Figure 3.9 Spelling and grammar errors

A contextual spelling error is when a wrong word is used, but the word is spelled
correctly. For example, if I write "Deer Mr. Theodore," at the beginning of a letter, deer is
a contextual spelling error because I should have used dear. Deer is spelled correctly,
but it is used incorrectly in this letter.

To Use the Spelling Check Feature

1. Right-click the underlined word. A menu will appear.


2. Click on the correct spelling of the word from the listed suggestions.

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Information Sheet
3. The corrected word will appear in the document.

Figure 3.10 Correcting a spelling error

You can choose to Ignore an underlined word, add it to the dictionary, or go to


the Spelling dialog box for more options.

To Use the Grammar Check Feature

1. Right-click the underlined word or phrase. A menu will appear.


2. Click on the correct phrase from the listed suggestions.
3. The corrected phrase will appear in the document.

Figure 3.11 Correcting a grammar error

You can also choose to Ignore an underlined phrase, go to the Grammar dialog box,
or click About This Sentence for information about the grammar rule.

54 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 3.2

Checking Spelling and Grammar

Instruction: Based on what you have learned from the previous lessons, accomplish the
instruction below. After you have mastered this activity, inform your teacher
so that you can proceed to your next activity.

1. Open Activity_Replace.docx.
2. Check the spelling and grammar errors of the document.
3. Save it as Activity_Spell.docx on your folder.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO2: Create and Edit a Document| 55
Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric

Checking Spelling and Grammar

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed the
criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and then
turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity sheet.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open a document Perform the skill easily
4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Check the spelling and Perform the skill with
grammar of the document 3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Save document in different Perform the skill slowly,
filename 2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
TOTAL SCORE Perform the skill with
1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

Teachers Signature

56 | LO2: Create and Edit a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Activity Sheet
Assessment Test
Editing Document Using Other Tool
Assessment Criteria

In order to satisfactorily pass this assessment, you are required to

edit the document using find and replace and


edit document using spell check.

Instruction:

1. You have 45 minutes to complete this test.


2. Open a document named Philippine Construction.
3. In your opened document, insert your name, section and date on the space
provided for.
4. Find and replace the word Smith to Sminth.
5. Check the spelling and grammar of the document.
6. Save your file as Philippine Construction.pdf.
7. Print the document

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO2: Create and Edit a Document| 57
Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric

Checking Spelling and Grammar

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed the
criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and then
turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open a document named Perform the skill easily
Philippine Construction 4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Insert your name, section and Perform the skill with
date 3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Find and replace the word Perform the skill slowly,
Smith to Sminth 2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Check the spelling and Perform the skill with
grammar of the document 1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

Save your file as Philippine


Construction.pdf

Print the document

TOTAL SCORE

Teachers Signature

58 | LO3: Format Text and Paragraph Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Introduction
Lesson 4 Format Text and Paragraphs

Description:

This lesson covers one of the performances required in formatting text and paragraph.

In this lesson, you will learn how to

format text and paragraph;


use indents and tabs;
apply line and paragraph spacing; and
save a document using the modified styles and themes.

For you to satisfactorily complete this lesson, you are expected to

get a score of at least thirty (30) points in activity Formatting Text;


get a score of at least ten (10) points in activity Using Indents and Tabs;
get a score of ten (10) points in activity Line and Paragraph Spacing:
get a score of fifteen (15) points in activity Styles and Theme; and
pass the assessment of this lesson.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO3: Format Text and Paragraph 59
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 4.1

Formatting Text

To create and design effective documents, you need to know how to format text. In
addition to making your document more appealing, formatted text can draw the reader's
attention to specific parts of the document and help communicate your message.

In this lesson you will learn to format the font size, style, and color; highlight the
text; and use the Bold, Italic, Underline, and Change Case commands.

To Change the Font Size

1. Select the text you wish to modify.


2. Click the drop-down arrow next to the Font Size box on the Home tab. A drop-down
menu appears.
3. Move the mouse pointer over the various font sizes. A live preview of the font size
will appear in the document.

Figure 4.1 Changing the font size

4. Select the font size you wish to use.

You can also use the Grow Font and Shrink Font commands to change the size.

Figure 4.2 The Grow Font and Shrink Font commands

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To Change the Font

1. Select the text you wish to modify.


2. Click the drop-down arrow next to the Font box on the Home tab. The Font drop-
down menu appears.
3. Move the mouse pointer over the various fonts. A live preview of the font will appear
in the document.

Figure 4.3 Changing the font

4. Select the font you wish to use. The font will change in the document.

To Change the Font Color

1. Select the text you wish to modify.


2. Click the Font Color drop-down arrow on the Home tab. The Font Color menu
appears.
3. Move the mouse pointer over the various font colors. A live preview of the color will
appear in the document.

Figure 4.4 Changing the font color

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Information Sheet
4. Select the font color you wish to use. The font color will change in the document.

Your color choices aren't limited to the drop-down menu that appears. Select More
Colors at the bottom of the list to access the Colors dialog box. Choose the color that you
want and click OK.

To Highlight Text

1. From the Home tab, click the Text Highlight Color drop-down arrow. The Highlight
Color menu appears.

Figure 4.5 Choosing a highlight color

2. Select the desired highlight color.


3. Select the text you wish to modify. It will then be highlighted.

Figure 4.6 Highlighting text

4. To switch back to the normal cursor, click the Text Highlight Color command.
5. To Use the Bold, Italic, and Underline Commands:
6. Select the text you wish to modify.

Click the Bold (B), Italic (I), or Underline (U) command in the Font group on the Home tab.

Figure 4.7 Making text bold

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Information Sheet
To Change the Text Case

1. Select the text you wish to modify.


2. Click the Change Case command in the Font group on the Home tab.
3. Select the desired case option from the list.

Figure 4.8 Changing the text case

To Change Text Alignment

1. Select the text you wish to modify.


2. Select one of the four alignment options from the Paragraph group on
the Home tab.
Align Text Left: Aligns all the selected text to the left margin.
Center: Aligns text an equal distance from the left and right margins.
Align Text Right: Aligns all the selected text to the right margin.
Justify: Justified text is equal on both sides and lines up equally to the right
and left margins. Many newspapers and magazines use full-justification.

Figure 4.9 The four alignment options

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Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 4.1

Formatting Text

Instruction: Based on what you have learned from the previous lessons,
accomplish the instruction below. After you have mastered this activity,
inform your teacher so that you can proceed to your next activity.

1. Open an existing Word document named letter.docx from the Practice File folder.
2. Change the font size of some text.
3. Change the font style of some text.
4. Change the font color of some text.
5. Try various cases using the Change Case command.
6. Try the four alignment commands.
7. Save as Activity_letter.docx the document.

64 | LO3: Format Text and Paragraph Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric

Formatting Text

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed the
criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and then
turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open an existing document Perform the skill easily
4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Insert your name, section and Perform the skill with
date 3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Change the font size Perform the skill slowly,
2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Change the font style Perform the skill with
1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

Change the font color

Change the case

Change the alignment

Save the document

TOTAL SCORE

Teachers Signature

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO3: Format Text and Paragraph 65
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 4.2

Using Indents and Tabs

Figure 4.10 Indenting a line

There are several ways in Word that you can indent text; however, its important to
use these tools appropriately in order to indent correctly each time. This helps the editing
process go smoothly, thus saving you time.

In this lesson, you will learn how to use the tab selector and the horizontal ruler to
set tabs and indents, and how to use the Increase and Decrease Indent commands.

Indenting Text

In many types of documents, you may wish to indent only the first line of each
paragraph. This helps to visually separate paragraphs from one another. It's also possible
to indent every line except the first line, which is known as a hanging indent.

Figure 4.11 First Line Indent

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Information Sheet

Figure 4.12 Hanging Indent

To Indent Using the Tab Key

A quick way to indent is to use the Tab key. This will create a first line indent of 1/2 inch.

1. Place the insertion point at the very beginning of the paragraph you wish to indent.

Figure 4.13 Placing the insertion point

2. Press the Tab key. You should see the First Line Indent marker move to the right
by 1/2 inch.

Figure 4.14 Pressing the Tab key

To Create or Adjust a First Line Indent or Hanging Indent

1. Place the insertion point anywhere in the paragraph you wish to indent, or select
one or more paragraphs.
2. To adjust the first line indent, drag the First Line Indent marker on the ruler.
3. To adjust the hanging indent, drag the Hanging Indent marker.
4. To move both markers at the same time, drag the Left Indent marker. This will
indent all of the lines in the paragraph.

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Information Sheet

Figure 4.14 The three indent markers

To Use the Indent Commands

If you want to indent all of the lines in a paragraph, you can use the Indent
commands on the Home tab.

1. Select the text you wish to indent.


2. Make sure you are on the Home tab.
3. Click the Increase Indent command to increase the indent by increments of 1/4
inch.

Figure 4.15 Increasing the indent

4. Click the Decrease Indent command to decrease the indent by increments of 1/2
inch.

If you would prefer to type in your indent amounts, you can use the Indent fields on
the Page Layout tab.

Figure 4.16 Typing an indent amount

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Information Sheet
Tabs

Using tabs is often the best way to control exactly where text is placed. By default, every
time you press the tab key, the insertion point will move 1/2 inch to the right. By
adding tab stops to the Ruler, you can change the size of the tabs, and you can even have
more than one type of alignment in a single line. For example, you could Left Align the
beginning of the line and Right Align the end of the line by simply adding a Right Tab.

Figure 4.17 Using two types of alignment

Pressing the tab key can either add a tab or create a first line indent depending on
where the insertion point is. Generally, if the insertion point is at the beginning of an
existing paragraph, it will create a first line indent; otherwise, it will create a tab.

The Tab Selector

The tab selector is above the vertical ruler on the left. Hover over the tab selector to
see the name of the type of tab stop that is active.

Figure 4.18 The tab selector

The types of tab stops include

Left Tab : Left-aligns the text at the tab stop.


Center Tab : Centers the text around the tab stop.
Right Tab : Right-aligns the text at the tab stop.

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Information Sheet
Decimal Tab : Aligns decimal numbers using the decimal point.
Bar Tab : Draws a vertical line on the document.
First Line Indent : Inserts the indent marker on the ruler and indents the first
line of text in a paragraph.
Hanging Indent : Inserts the hanging indent marker and indents all lines other
than the first line.

Although Bar Tab, First Line Indent, and Hanging Indent appear on the tab selector,
they're not technically tabs.

To Add Tab Stops

1. Select the paragraph or paragraphs that you want to add tab stops to. If you don't
select any paragraphs, the tab stops will apply to the current paragraph and
any new paragraphs that you type below it.
2. Click the tab selector until the tab stop you wish to use appears.
3. Click the location on the horizontal ruler where you want your text to appear (it
helps to click on the bottom edge of the ruler). You can add as many tab stops as
you want.

Figure 4.19 Adding a Decimal tab stop

4. Place the insertion point where you want to add the tab, and press the Tab key.
The text will jump to the next tab stop.

Figure 4.20 Using the Tab key to move the text to each tab stop

70 | LO3: Format Text and Paragraph Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet

5. To remove a tab stop, just drag it off of the Ruler.

Click the Show/Hide command on the Home tab (in the Paragraph group). This will
allow you to see the nonprinting characters such as the spacebar, paragraph (), and Tab
key markings.

Figure 4.21 The Show/Hide command

Figure 4.22 Tab markings

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO3: Format Text and Paragraph 71
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 4.2

Using Indents and Tabs

Instruction: Based on what you have learned from the previous lessons,
accomplish the instruction below. After you have mastered this activity,
inform your teacher so that you can proceed to your next activity.

1. Open Resume.docx from the Practice Files folder.


2. Practice using the Tab key to indent the first line of a paragraph.
3. Select some text and use the Increase and Decrease Indent commands to see how
they change the text.
4. Explore the tab selector and all the tab stops. Practice using each one.
5. If you're using the example, add tab stops and tabs in the Work History section so
that all of the jobs line up with the most recent one.

72 | LO3: Format Text and Paragraph Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric

Using Indents and Tabs

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed the
criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and then
turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open an existing document Perform the skill easily
4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Indent the first line of the Perform the skill with
paragraph 3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Increase the indents of the Perform the skill slowly,
selected word 2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Decrease the indent of the Perform the skill with
selected word 1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

Save the document

TOTAL SCORE

Teachers Signature

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO3: Format Text and Paragraph 73
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 4.3

Line and Paragraph Spacing

An important part of creating effective documents lies in the document design.


When designing your document and making formatting decisions, you will need to know
how to modify the spacing. In this lesson, you will learn how to modify
the line and paragraph spacing in various ways.

Line Spacing

Line spacing can either be measured in lines or points. For example, when text
is double-spaced, the line spacing is two lines high. On the other hand, you might set 12-
point text with something like 15-point spacing, which gives enough height for the text
plus a little extra space. You can reduce the line spacing to fit more lines on the page, or
you can increase it to improve readability.

Line spacing is also known as leading (pronounced to rhyme with "wedding").

To Format Line Spacing

1. Select the text you want to format.


2. Click the Line and Paragraph Spacing command in the Paragraph group on
the Home tab.
3. Select the desired spacing option from the drop-down menu.

Figure 4.23 Changing the line spacing

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4. From the drop-down menu, you can also select Line Spacing Options to open
the Paragraph dialog box. From here, you can adjust the line spacing with even
more precision.

Figure 4.24 Fine-tuning the line spacing

5. If you select At least or Exactly in the Paragraph dialog box, the line spacing will be
measured in points. Otherwise, it will be measured in lines.

Paragraph Spacing

Just as you can format spacing between lines in your document, you can also
choose spacing options between each paragraph. Typically, extra spaces are added
between paragraphs, headings, or subheadings. Extra spacing between paragraphs helps
to make a document easier to read.

To Format Paragraph Spacing

1. Click the Line and Paragraph Spacing command on the Home tab.
2. Select Add Space Before Paragraph or Remove Space After Paragraph from the
drop-down menu.

Figure 4.25 Adding space before a paragraph

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Information Sheet
3. From the drop-down menu, you can also select Line Spacing Options to open the
Paragraph dialog box. From here, you can control exactly how much space there
is before and after the paragraph.

Figure 4.26 Fine-tuning the paragraph spacing

76 | LO3: Format Text and Paragraph Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 4.3

Line and Paragraph Spacing

Instruction: Based on what you have learned from the previous lessons,
accomplish the instruction below. After you have mastered this activity,
inform your teacher so that you can proceed to your next activity.

1. Open an existing Word document named Resume.docx.


2. Change the line spacing of a paragraph of text.
3. Change the paragraph spacing between body text and a heading.
4. If you are using the example, change the line and paragraph spacing so that the
entire resume fits on one page.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO3: Format Text and Paragraph 77
Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric
Line and Paragraph Spacing

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed the
criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and then
turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open an existing document Perform the skill easily
4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Change the line spacing Perform the skill with
3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Change the paragraph spacing Perform the skill slowly,
2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Fit the resume in one page Perform the skill with
1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

Save the document

TOTAL SCORE

Teachers Signature

78 | LO3: Format Text and Paragraph Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 4.4
Working with Lists

Bulleted and numbered lists can be used in your documents to format, arrange and
emphasize text. In this lesson, you will learn how to modify existing bullets, insert
new bulleted and numbered lists, select symbols as bullets, and format multilevel lists.

To Create a List:

1. Select the text that you want to format as a list.


2. Click the Bullets or Numbering drop-down arrow on the Home tab.

Figure 4.27 The Bullets and Numbering commands and drop-down arrows

3. Select the bullet or numbering style you would like to use, and it will appear in the
document.

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Information Sheet
To remove numbers or bullets from a list, select the list and click
the Bullets or Numbering commands.

When you're editing a list, you can press Enter to start a new line, and the new line
will automatically have a bullet or number. When you've reached the end of your list,
press Enter twice to return to normal formatting.

Bullet Options

To Use a Symbol as a Bullet:

1. Select an existing list.


2. Click the Bullets drop-down arrow.
3. Select Define New Bullet from the drop-down menu. The Define New
Bullet dialog box appears.

Figure 4.28 The Define New Bullet dialog box

4. Click the Symbol button. The Symbol dialog box appears.


5. Click the Font drop-down box and select a font.
The Wingdings and Symbol fonts are good choices as they have a large
number of useful symbols.

Figure 4.29 Choosing a symbol

6. Select the desired symbol.

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Information Sheet
7. Click OK. The symbol will now appear in the Preview section of the Define
New Bullet dialog box.

Figure 4.30 Preview of the new bullets

8. Click OK to apply the symbol to the list in the document.

You can use a picture as a bullet. Click the Picture button in the Define New Bullet
dialog box, and then locate the image file on your computer.

To Change the Bullet Color:

1. Select an existing list.


2. Click the Bullets drop-down arrow.
3. Select Define New Bullet from the
list. The Define New Bullet dialog
box appears.
4. Click the Font button. The Font
dialog box appears.
5. Click the Font Color drop-down
box.
6. Click on the desired color to select
it.
7. Click OK. The bullet color will now
appear in the Preview section of
the Define New Bullet dialog box.

Figure 4.31Choosing a bullet color

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO3: Format Text and Paragraph 81
Information Sheet

Figure 4.32 Preview of the new bullet color

8. Click OK to apply the bullet color to the list in the document.

Figure 4.33 The finished bullets

Multilevel Lists

Multilevel lists allow you to create


an outline with multiple levels. In fact, you can turn
any bulleted or numbered list into a multilevel list by
simply placing the insertion point at the beginning of a
line and pressing the Tab key to change the level for
that line. You can then use the Multilevel
List command to choose the types of bullets or
numbering that are used.

To Create a Multilevel List:

1. Select the text that you want to format as a


multilevel list.
2. Click the Multilevel List command on the Home
tab.

Figure 4.34 A multilevel list

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Information Sheet

Figure 4.35 The Multilevel List command

3. Click the bullet or numbering style you would like to use. It will appear in the
document.
4. Position your cursor at the end of a list item and press the Enter key to add an
item to the list.

To remove numbers or bullets from a list, select the list and click
the Bullets or Numbering commands.

To Change the Level of a Line:

1. Place the insertion point at the beginning of the line.

2. Press the Tab key to increase the level.

3. Pressing the Tab key to increase the level of a line

4. Hold Shift and press Tab to decrease the level.

Figure 4.36 Placing the insertion point at the beginning of a line and the
increased level of a line

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO3: Format Text and Paragraph 83
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 4.4

Bullets and Numbering


1. Open an existing Word document named Report.docx.
2. Format the text as a bulleted or numbered list use the list of New Clients on page
2.
3. Insert a new numbered list into the document.
4. Modify the color of a bullet.
5. Use the Tab key to change the levels of some of the lines.
6. Save the document.

84 | LO3: Format Text and Paragraph Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric

Formatting Text

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed the
criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and then
turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open an existing document Perform the skill easily
4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Format the text as bulleted or Perform the skill with
numbered list 3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Insert a numbered list in the Perform the skill slowly,
document 2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Modify the color of the bullet Perform the skill with
1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

Change the level of the lines


using the tab key

Save the document

TOTAL SCORE

Teachers Signature

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO3: Format Text and Paragraph 85
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 4.5

Styles and Themes

Styles and themes are powerful tools in Word that can help you easily create
professional looking documents. A style is a predefined combination of font style, color,
and size of text that can be applied to selected text. A theme is a set of formatting choices
that can be applied to an entire document and includes theme colors, fonts, and effects.

In this lesson you will learn how to apply, modify and create a style, use style sets,
apply a document theme, and create a custom theme.

To Select a Style

1. Select the text that you want to format.

Figure 4.37 Selecting text

2. In the Style group on the Home tab, hover over each style to see a live preview in
the document. Click the More drop-down arrow to see additional styles.

Figure 4.38 Viewing the Text Styles


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Information Sheet
3. Select the style you desire. Now the selected text appears formatted in the style.

Figure 4.39 Selecting a Style

To Apply a Style Set

Style Sets include a combination of title, heading, and paragraph styles. Style sets
allow you to format all the elements of your document at once, rather than formatting
your title and headings separately.

1. Click the Change Styles command on the Ribbon. A drop-down menu will appear.
2. From the drop-down menu, select Style Set.

Figure 4.40 Selecting a Style Set

3. Select the Style Set you desire and the change will be reflected in the entire
document.

Figure 4.41 Elegant Style Set

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO3: Format Text and Paragraph 87
Information Sheet

Figure 4.42 Formal Style Set

To Modify a Style

1. Locate the style you wish to change in the Styles group.


2. Right-click the style. A drop-down menu will appear.
3. Click Modify and the Modify Style dialog box appears.

Figure 4.43 Modifying a Style

4. Make the desired changes to the formatting. If you want, you can also change the
name of the style.

Figure 4.44 The Formatting options for the Style

5. Click OK to apply the modifications to the style.

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Information Sheet
To Create a New Style

1. Click the arrow in the bottom-right corner of the Styles group. This opens
the Styles task pane.

Figure 4.45 The Styles task pane

2. Select the New Style button at the bottom. A dialog box will appear.
3. Enter a name for the style, and set the text formatting the way you want.

Figure 4.46 Formatting options for the new Style

4. Click OK, and the new style will appear in the task pane.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO3: Format Text and Paragraph 89
Information Sheet
What is a Theme?

A theme is a set of colors, fonts and effects that applies to the entire document to
give it a consistent, professional look.

You've already been using a theme, even if you didn't know it: the
default Office theme. Every theme, including the Office theme, has its own theme
elements:

Theme Colors (available from every Color menu)

Figure 4.47 Theme Colors

Theme Fonts (available from the Font menu)

Figure 4.48 Theme Fonts

Shape Styles (available in the Format tab when you click on a shape)

Figure 4.49 Shape Styles

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Information Sheet
Why Should You Use Theme Elements?

If you're using theme elements, you'll probably find that your document looks
pretty good and all of the colors work well together, which means you don't have to spend
as much time tweaking the document. But there's another great reason to use theme
elements: When you switch to a different theme, all of those elements will update to reflect
the new theme. You can drastically change the look of the document in a couple of clicks,
and it will usually still look good.

Figure 4.50 Oriel Theme

Figure 4.51 Tradeshow Theme

Remember, the colors and fonts will only update if you're using Theme Fonts or Theme
Colors. If you choose one of the Standard Colors or any of the Fonts that are not Theme
Fonts, then your text will not change when you change the theme. That can be useful if
you're creating a logo or title that always needs to look the same.

Figure 4.52 Selecting a non-theme font

If you're using built-in styles, you may notice that the fonts for those styles change
when you select a different theme. That's because all of the built-in styles are based on

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO3: Format Text and Paragraph 91
Information Sheet
the Theme Fonts. If you don't want the styles to change, you'll need to create custom
styles.

To Change the Theme

1. Select the Page Layout tab.


2. Click the Themes command. A drop-down menu will appear.

Figure 4.53 Selecting a Theme

3. Navigate the mouse over a theme to see a live preview of it.


4. Select the desired theme.

Customizing a Theme

Suppose you really like the fonts from one theme, but you'd like to experiment with
different color schemes. That's not a problem: you can mix and match the colors, fonts,
and effects from different themes to create a unique look for your document. If it still
doesn't look exactly right, you can customize the Theme Colors and Theme Fonts.

To Change the Theme Colors

1. From the Page Layout tab, click the Theme


Colors command. A drop-down menu will appear.
2. Navigate the mouse over the different sets of Theme
Colors to see a live preview.
3. Select the set of Theme Colors you desire, or select Create
New Theme Colors to customize each color individually.

When setting Theme Colors, try to find a part of your


document that uses several colors, so that you get the best
idea of what the color scheme looks like.

To Change the Theme Fonts

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Information Sheet
1. From the Page Layout tab, click the Theme
Fonts command. A drop-down menu will appear.

Changing the Theme Fonts

2. Navigate the mouse over the different sets of Theme


Fonts to see a live preview.
3. Select the set of Theme Fonts you desire, or select Create
New Theme Fonts to customize each font individually.

To Change the Theme Effects

1. From the Page Layout tab, click the Theme


Effects command. A drop-down menu will appear.

2. Scroll the mouse over the different sets of Theme


Effects to see a live preview.
3. Select the set of Theme Effects you desire.

Some themes can add a Picture Fill to shapes,


depending on which Shape Styles are used. For example,
the Paper theme can add a paper-like texture to shapes.
Try exploring some of the different Shape Styles after
changing the theme.

To Save Your Theme

Once you've found settings that you like, you may


want to save the theme so that you can use it in other
documents.

1. From the Page Layout tab, click


the Themes command. A drop-down menu will
appear.
2. Select Save Current Theme.

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Information Sheet

3. The Save dialog box

4. Type a file name for your theme and the click Save.

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Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 4.5

Styles and Themes

Instruction: Based on what you have learned from the previous lessons,
accomplish the instruction below. After you have mastered this activity,
inform your teacher so that you can proceed on your next activity.

1. Open an existing Word document named Report.docx.


2. Apply several different styles to different parts of your document.
3. Apply a style set to your entire document.
4. Modify an existing style.
5. Apply a theme.
6. Saved the document.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO3: Format Text and Paragraph 95
Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric

Styles and Themes

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed the
criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and then
turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open an existing document Perform the skill easily
4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Apply styles in different part Perform the skill with
of the document 3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Apply styles to whole Perform the skill slowly,
document 2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Apply theme to the document Perform the skill with
1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

Save the document as a style

TOTAL SCORE

Teachers Signature

96 | LO3: Format Text and Paragraph Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Assessment

Assessment Test
Formatting Text and Paragraph
Assessment Criteria:

In order to satisfactorily pass this assessment, you are required to

type in text;
select font, font size, alignment and add shading and borders;
create bulleted list;
change default bullet; and
print
Instruction:

1. Start with a blank Word document

2. Type in all the words and the blank line as shown above.
3. Format the following:
line 1 with Font = Impact; Size = 28, Center, Shadow with
Line 2: Font = Impact; Size = 20, Center
Line 4: Font = Impact; Size = 22, Center, Space After = 24 pt
Lines 5 - 8: Font = Calibri; Size = 18
Lines 9 -11: Font =Calibri; Size = 14
Line 12 (last line of text): Font = Calibri; Size = 28, Bold, Italics;
center, Space Before = 18 pt.
Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO3: Format Text and Paragraph 97
Assessment
4. Select lines 1 and 2 and apply shading of White, Background 1, Darker 15%
applied to the paragraph. Apply an Outside Border with the default settings.
5. Select line 4 and apply a shading of White, Background 1, Darker 15%
applied to the paragraph. Apply an Outside Border with the default settings.
6. Make lines 5 - 8 a bulleted list with a checkmark for the bullet shape.
Double-space the list.
7. Select the list and click the Indent button twice to indent the list two tab
stops.
8. Spell check.
9. Check the Print Preview and make any necessary changes to keep the
document as 1 page.
10. Save as flyer-CitySoccerLeague-Lastname-Firstname.docx.
11. Print.
12. Close the document once you have checked that it printed successfully.

98 | LO3: Format Text and Paragraph Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric

Formatting Text and Paragraph

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed the
criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and then
turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open an existing document Perform the skill easily and quickly
without error or any assistance.
Type all the words and the 4
blank line according to the
guide
Format all the lines Perform the skill with ease, and at
3 moderate speed without asking for any
Font size
assistance
Font color
Perform the skill slowly, with minimal
2
Alignment error and little assistance

Line spacing
Perform the skill with difficulty,
1
Shading and background several errors and major assistance

Add bulleted and numbered


list

Apply Border

Use indention

Check spelling and grammar

Check Print Preview

Save the document

Print the document

Close the document

TOTAL SCORE

Teachers Signature

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO3: Format Text and Paragraph 99


Introduction
Lesson 5 Inserting Columns, Page Break and Section Break

Description:

This lesson covers one of the performances required in formatting a document.

In this lesson, you will learn how to

insert column; and


insert page break and section break.

For you too satisfactorily complete this lesson, you are expected to

become familiar with inserting columns and breaks;


get score at least seven (7) points in Activity Sheet- Familiarizing oneself with
the use of inserting columns and breaks; and
pass the assessment.

100 | LO4: Format a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 5.1

Inserting Columns
All the text you write in Word 2010 is already formatted in columns -if it's only one
column of text per page, it still counts as a column. Clicking Word's Columns command
button (in the Page Setup Group on the Page Layout tab) displays a menu of handy
column-formatting options. Splitting your text into columns is as easy as choosing a
column format from that list.

Adding Columns to Word Document

Select the paragraphs and hit the Columns option located under the Page Layout
menu. Then choose the number of columns that you wish to create.

Figure 5.1 Column options

Here is how the document looks like when you formatted it into two columns.

If you need more than three columns, select the More Columns option at the bottom
of the Columns menu.
Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 4: Format a Document 101
Information Sheet

Figure 5. 1: Columns dialog box

The column options give you the choice of one, two, three, left and right columns.
One to three is self-explanatory but the left and right options might appear confusing.
They will simply present your text in two columns with either the left or right one being
narrower than the other.

Inserting Page Breaks

Microsoft Word 2010 has several different


types of breaks that you can add to your document to
change the layout and pagination. Each type of
break serves a different purpose and will affect the
document in different ways. Page breaks move text to
a new page before reaching the end of a page,
while section breaks create a barrier between parts of
the document for formatting purposes.

Word automatically inserts a page break Figure 5.2: Inserting Page Breaks
when you reach the end of a page. If you want the
page to break in a different place, you can insert a manual page break. Or you can set up
rules for Word to follow so that the automatic page breaks are placed where you want
them. This is especially helpful if you are working on a long document.

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Information Sheet
To Insert a Break:

1. Place the insertion point where you want the break to appear.
2. Select the Page Layout tab.
3. Click the Breaks command. A menu appears.
4. Click the desired break option to create a break in the document.

Figure 5. 3: Selecting type of Breaks


To Delete a Break:

Breaks are hidden by default. If you want to delete a break, then you'll probably want
Word to show the breaks so you can find them for editing.
1. From the Home tab, click the Show/Hide command.

Figure 5 4: Show/Hide Break command

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 4: Format a Document 103


Information Sheet
2. Double-click the break to select it.

Figure 5.5: Deleting Break

3. Press the Backspace or Delete key to delete the break.

Insert a Section Break


You can use section breaks to change the layout or formatting of a page or pages in
your document. You can separate the chapters in your document so that the page
numbering for each chapter begins at 1.

1. On the Page Layout tab, in the Page Setup group, click Breaks.

Fi gur e 5. 6: Choosi ng Br eaks

2. Click the type of section break that you want to use.

Types of Section Break

1. The Next Page command inserts a section break and starts the new section on the
next page. This type of section break is especially useful for starting new chapters
in a document.

Fi gur e 5. 7: Next Page Br eak

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Information Sheet
2. The Continuous command inserts a section break and starts the new section on
the same page. A continuous section break is useful for creating a formatting
change, such as a different number of columns, on a page.

Fi gur e 5. 8: Cont i nuous


Br eak

3. The Even Page or Odd Page command inserts a section break and starts the new
section on the next even-numbered or odd-numbered page. If you want document
chapters always to begin on an odd page or on an even page, use the Odd page
or Even page section break option.

Fi gur e 5. 9: Even or Odd Page


Br eak

Removing Section Break

1. Select the section break that you want to delete.


2. Press DELETE.

For Further Reading:

http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-insert-columns-in-a-word-2010-
document.html
http://www.addictivetips.com/windows-tips/microsoft-office-word-2010-format-
formatting/
Columns Of Text In Word 2010 http://www.word-2010.com/columns-of-text-in-word-
2010/#ixzz1eMt4Wb54
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-help/insert-a-page-break-HA010368779.aspx

http://www.gcflearnfree.org/word2010/11

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-help/insert-a-section-break-HA010031073.aspx

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 4: Format a Document 105


Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 5.1

Familiarizing oneself with the use of Columns and Breaks

Directions: Based on what you learned previously, perform the task of inserting
columns and breaks by following the given procedure below. You must get
at least seven (7) points to pass this activity.

1. Create a new blank document.


2. Type and center the word Sales Team Monthly Report at the top of the
document.
3. From the Page Layout tab, choose Break and select Continuous section break.
4. Choose the Columns button from the page setup group and click
5. Select three columns.
6. Type the following sentence in the first column using the given example below.

January 2010 has been a profitable month and the company has
shown growth in many arenas. Ad sales are up by 23% and capital
expenditures have decreased since 4th quarter in the Sales
Department.
7. The text you type should fill up the first column before moving to the second. To
move to the second column, on page layout tab, click break and select column
breaks. Encode the data below
The sales team hired a new design specialist, the role of VP of
sales was filled, a new sales chief position was created, and the
sales team accrued 24 new clients, including one national chain.

8. For the third column do the same procedure in number 7 and type the given data.

Additionally, online ad sales doubled since July of last year.


Statistics indicate that sales in most markets increase with the use
of online ads and our clients are reading those statistics and
responding to them.

9. At the end of the text, insert another Continuous Section break.


10. Change the column number from three to one.
11. Then type the following sentence.

AdWorks received the Triangle Business of the Year award for its
role in developing local awareness advertisements for the Local
Disaster Relief Fund and the Fight the Drought awareness
campaign. President Pete Moss accepted the award on behalf of the
creative team at AdWorks.
12. Save your activity to your folder using the filename given by your teacher.

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Key Answer
Key Answer:

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 4: Format a Document 107


Assessment
Assessment Test

Instruction:

You have 30 minutes to complete the test.


Follow the instruction below to satisfactorily pass the assessment.
Given the example document, apply the necessary columns and break needed
based on the given procedure.

Procedure:

1. Open a new MS Word 2010 blank document.


2. Encode the given example of document.
3. The title should be at the center applying necessary font attributes.
4. Use three columns
5. Encode the first paragraph to the first column and do the same in the remaining
paragraph and column.
6. After the you completed the last column, insert one column and type the last
paragraph.
7. Inform your teacher after completing the task for initial checking.
8. Show the break using the Show/Hide command.
9. Delete the break.
10. Inform your teacher for final checking.

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Key Answer
Key Answer:

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 4: Format a Document 109


Introduction
Lesson 6 Familiarizing oneself with Inserting of Page Numbers, Headers and
Footers

Description:

This lesson covers one of the performances required in formatting a document.

In this lesson, you will learn how to

insert headers and footers; and


insert page numbers.

For you to satisfactorily complete this lesson, you are expected to

familiarize yourself with the header, footer and page number; and
get score of six (6) to pass this activity sheet.

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Information Sheet
Information Sheet 6.1

Header and Footer


You can make your document look professional and polished by utilizing the
header and footer sections. The header is a section of the document that appears in the
top margin, while the footer is a section of the document that appears in the bottom
margin. Headers and footers generally contain information such as page number, date,
document name, etc.

To insert a Header and Footer:

1. To Select the Insert tab.


2. Click either the Header or Footer command. A drop-down menu will appear.
3. From the drop-down menu, select blank to insert a blank header or footer, or
choose one of the built-in options.

Figure 6 1: Header or Footer options


4. The Design tab will appear on the Ribbon, and the header or footer will appear in
the document.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 4: Format a Document 111


Information Sheet
5. Type the desired information into the header or footer.

Figure 6. 2: Editing Header

6. When you're finished, click Close Header and Footer in the Design tab, or hit
the Esc key.

Tips:

After you close the header or footer, it will still be visible, but it will be
locked. To edit it again, just double-click anywhere on the header or
footer, and it will become unlocked.

Page Number
Word can automatically label each page with a page number and place it in
a header, a footer or in the side margin. You can add page numbers to an existing header
or footer, or you can insert page numbers into a new header or footer.

Insert Page Number in Header

1. Navigate to Insert tab and from Page Number drop-down list, you will see list
of positions, i.e, Top, Bottom, Page margin, and Current
position. Choose Top of Page position and from its sub menu, select the
desired style from the list.

Figure 6.3: Page number options

2. It will insert page number at the top-right corner of the page.

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Information Sheet

Insert Page Number in Footer

1. For inserting page numbers in footer, select style from Page Number >> Bottom of the
page.

Figure 6. 5: Inserting page number in footer

Format Page Number

1. Select the header or footer that contains the page number.


2. From the Design tab, select the Page Number command.
3. Click Format Page Numbers.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 4: Format a Document 113


Information Sheet

Figure 6.6: Format Page Number

4. From the dialog box, Select the desired Number format.

Figure 6. 7: Page Format dialog box

5. Next to Start at, enter the number that you want the page numbers to start with.

Figure 6.8 Page numbering option

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Information Sheet
For Further Reading:

http://www.addictivetips.com/microsoft-office/insert-page-numbers-in-word-
2010-document/

http://www.gcflearnfree.org/word2010/19.4

http://www.gcflearnfree.org/word2010/19.2
http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_insert_header.png
http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_type_header.png
http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/138/wd10_insert_page_number_new.png
http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/138/wd10_page_number_format.png
http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/138/wd10_page_numbering_start_at.png

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 4: Format a Document 115


Activity Sheet
Activity 6.1

Header and Footer


Instruction: Based on what you have learned from the previous lesson, you will perform
the task given in this activity.

You have 20 minutes to complete this activity.


Get a score at least six (6) points to pass this activity.
Inform your teacher after completing the procedure for checking and
discussion.

Procedure:

1) Open the previous file/activity that you used in columns and breaks.

2) From the Insert tab, click Header then select blank header.

3) Make sure your insertion point is at the left of the page header.

4) Type Microsoft Word 2010 and at the right side insert any logo or picture available in
your computer.

5) Click the Footer from the Header and Footer group. You will be taken to the footer at
the bottom of the page.

6) Click align right to move the cursor to the right section of the footer.

7) Click Insert tab and select page number. Under page number, choose bottom of page
and click Accent Bar 2.

8) Click the close button of header and footer to apply.

9) Click save to update your activity.

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Key Answer
Answer Key

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 4: Format a Document 117


Introduction
Lesson 7 Familiarizing oneself with the use of Bookmarks, Footnotes, and
Endnotes

Description:

This lesson covers one of the performances required in formatting a document.

In this lesson, you will learn how to

insert a footnote and endnote; and


add a bookmark.

For you to satisfactorily complete this lesson, you are expected to

familiarize yourself with the use bookmark, footnotes, and endnotes; and
get a score of at least seven (7) points for this activity sheet.

118 | LO4: Format a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 7.1

Inserting Footnotes and Endnotes

Footnotes and endnotes are used in printed documents to explain, comment on,
or provide references for text in a document. You might use footnotes for detailed
comments and endnotes for citation of sources.

A footnote or an endnote consists of two linked parts the note reference mark and the
corresponding note text.

Figure 7.1 Footnotes and Endnotes


parts

Footnote and endnote reference marks

Separator line

Footnote text

Endnote text

To create footnote and endnote:

1. Place the cursor in the location from which you want to reference the footnote or
endnote.

2. On the References tab, in the Footnotes group, click the Insert Footnote button or the
Insert Endnote button.

3. In the linked area at the bottom of the page or end of the document or section, enter
the note text.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 4: Format a Document 119


Information Sheet

Figure 7.2 Footnote and Endnote dialog box

To delete a footnote or endnote

In the document text, select the reference mark of the footnote or endnote you
want to delete, and then press Delete.

Adding Bookmark

A bookmark in Word 2010 identifies a location or selection of text in your document. You
might bookmark text for a variety of reasons:

To quickly navigate to the text.


To mark text out for your own purposes. For example, you might want to bookmark
content you think you should revise later.
To link to other locations in your document. You can add a hyperlink to a
bookmark.

How to use Bookmark

1. Open the Word document to which you want to add a bookmark.


2. Select the desired text you want to bookmark.

120 | LO4: Format a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet

Figure 7.3 Selecting for bookmarking

3. On the Insert tab, in the Links group, click Bookmark.

Figure 7.4 Bookmark icon in Link group

4. The Bookmark dialog box is displayed. In the Bookmark name text box, enter a
name (No Spaces) for your bookmark and click Add.

Figure 7.5 Bookmark dialog box

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 4: Format a Document 121


Information Sheet
5. Save the document (Ctrl+S) after adding the bookmark, else you wont find the
bookmark when you re-open the document.
6. And youve just created your bookmark. The next time you want to resume working
on your document from the bookmarked point, simply press Ctrl+G. This will
display the Find and Replace dialog box.
7. On the Go To tab, select Bookmark and choose the bookmark you wish to go to
from the Enter bookmark name drop-down list.

Figure 7.6 Find and Replace dialog box

Further Reading:

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-help/insert-or-create-footnotes-and-endnotes-
HA101854833.aspx
http://www.technicalcommunicationcenter.com/wp-
content/uploads/2011/01/MS-Word-2010-Footnote-and-Endnote-DIALOG-
BOX.jpg
http://www.word-2010.com/add-a-bookmark-in-word-2010/

http://theapptimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Select-Text-to-
bookmark.png

http://theapptimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Bookmark.png

http://theapptimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Bookmark-dialog-
box.png

http://theapptimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Find-and-Replace.png

122 | LO4: Format a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Activity Sheet
Activity 7.1

Inserting Footnotes and Endnotes

Instruction:

Based on what you have learned from the previous lesson, you will perform
the task given in this activity.
You have 15 minutes to complete this activity.
Get a score at least seven (7) points to pass this activity.
Inform your teacher after completing the procedure for checking and
discussion.

Procedure:

1) Open the previous file/activity that you used in header and footer.
2) Insert footnotes to the following words:
a. Adworks
b. Relief
3) From the Reference tab, click insert footnotes and type the footnotes text for
Adworks:

Adworks is about getting to know you, your brand and your customers.

For Relief:

Relief is giving money, food, or other help given to those in poverty or need.

4) From the Reference tab, insert endnotes after the word campaign and type this:

"Source:
http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_Report_lesson10.docx
5) Save your work.

6) Open the Practice File #2 located at Word 2010 folder under Practice File Folder.

7) Select and bookmark the following text below.


a. pathological processes from page 4
b. Basic overview of energy and human life from page 7

8) Inform your teacher to check your bookmarking.

9) Save your file.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 4: Format a Document. 123


Information Sheet
Information Sheet 7.2
Controlling Page Settings

Word gives you control of the layout of the pages in a document. You can change the page
size, margins, and orientation by clicking the buttons in the Page Setup group on the Page
Layout tab. All pages of a document have the same margins and are oriented the same
way unless you divide the document into sections. Then each section can have
independent margin and orientation settings.

To change Page Orientation:

1. Select the Page Layout tab.


2. Click the Orientation command in the Page Setup group.

Figure 7.7 Page orientation options

3. Click either Portrait or Landscape to change the page orientation.

Note:

Landscape format means that the page is oriented horizontally,


and portrait format is oriented vertically.

To change Paper Size:

1. Select the Page Layout tab.


2. Click the Size command and a drop-down menu will appear. The current page size
is highlighted.

124 | LO4: Format a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet

Figure 7.8 Quick paper size options

3. Click the size option you desire. The page size of the document changes.

To change Page Margins:

1. Select the Page Layout tab.


2. Click the Margins command. A menu of options appears. Normal is selected by
default.
3. Click the predefined margin size you desire.

Figure 7.9 Quick page margins options


To Custom Page Margins:

1. From the Page Layout tab, click Margins.


2. Select Custom Margins. This will take you to the Page Setup dialog box.
3. Adjust the margin sizes for each side of the page and click OK.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 4: Format a Document. 125


Information Sheet

Figure 7.10 Page setup dialog box

Further Reading:

http://www.gcflearnfree.org/word2010/5
http://images.hpathy.com/tips.gif
http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_page_size.png
http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_page_orientation.png
http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_page_margins.png
http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_page_setup_dialog_box.png

126 | LO4: Format a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Assessment
Assessment Test

Controlling Page Settings

Instruction:

You have 30 minutes to complete the test.


Follow the instruction below to satisfactorily pass the assessment.
Given the example document, apply the necessary tools needed based on the given
instruction.
Inform your teacher after completing the procedure for checking.

Procedure:

1. Open Practice File # 3 located at Word 2010 folder under Practice Files folder.
2. Change the page setup
a. Margin
Top: 1.1 Bottom: 1.5
Left: 1.25 Right: 1.25
b. Paper size: A4 or 8.27 X 11.69
c. Page Orientation: Portrait

3. Apply the desired format given below to accomplish this assessment.


a. Use this Header and Footer blank type for this document.
1. Header Name of your school , School logo and DepEd Logo
2. Footer Internet and Computing Fundamental Align left
3. Page Number Bottom of Page Bold Number 3
b. Use two columns for the first page. Make sure that the title should be at the
center of the document. The following pages will be set to one column.
c. Type this footnote text for mantelpiece from page 2.
Mantelpiece - the projecting shelf of a mantel, or this shelf and the side
elements framing the fireplace in front.
d. Type this endnote text for attention from page 3.
Sources: http://www.gcflearnfree.org/word2010/12.4.
e. Bookmark the following:
a. My remark appeared to nettle him from page 2
b. trees of Cremona from page 3

4. Save your work using the filename given by your teacher.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 4: Format a Document 127


Key Answer
Answer Key

128 | LO4: Format a Document Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
Lesson 8 Being familiar with the Inserting and Deleting of Tables, Columns,
and Rows

Description:

This lesson covers one of the performances required in creating and formatting
table.

In this lesson, you will learn how to

insert tables, columns, and rows and


deleting tables, columns, and rows.

To satisfactorily complete this lesson, you are expected to

become familiar with the inserting and deleting of tables, columns and rows;
and
get a score of at least eight (8) points in the activity sheet.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO5: Create and Edit Tables 129
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 8.1

Using Tables

A table is a grid of cells arranged in rows and columns. Tables can be customized
and are useful for various tasks such as presenting text information and numerical data.
Each entry in a table, called a cell, is independent of all other entries .
Tables allow you to divide a portion of a page into rows and columns that create
cells at their intersections. Tables can be used to systematically arrange information in
rows and columns, or they can be used to lay out text and graphics in a document.

Figure 8.1: Typical Parts of Table

Inserting a Table Quickly

1. Place your insertion point in the document where you want the table to appear.
2. Select the Insert tab.
3. Click the Table command.
4. Hover your mouse over the diagram squares to select the number of columns and
rows in the table.

130 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet

5. Click your mouse, and the table appears in the document.


6. You can now place the insertion point anywhere in the table to add text.

Insert a Table from a Dialog Box

The Insert Table dialog box provides several options


when initially setting up a table.

1. In the Insert tab Tables group, click the Table


down arrow. In the drop-down menu that
opens, click Insert Table. The Insert Table dialog
box appears.

a. Under Table Size, click the respective


spinners or enter a value to determine
the number of rows and columns in
the table.

b. Under AutoFit Behavior, choose a fixed


column width by clicking the spinner or entering a value (Auto, the default,
sizes the columns equally so that they fill the available width of the table),
have Word set each columns width to fit the contents in each column, or
have Word size the columns to fit the window the table is in.

2. If you want the size settings you choose to apply to future tables you create, select the
remember dimensions for new tables check box.

3. Click OK to display the table in your document.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO5: Create and Edit Tables 131
Information Sheet

Tips:

If you want to insert a table that is larger than the 8 rows by 10 columns
shown in the Table drop-down menu, you can easily add rows or columns
to an initial table that you create from the menu.

Draw a Table

1. With the document open in Word, scroll to the location where you want to
draw a table.
2. In the Insert tab Tables group, click the Table down arrow. In the drop-down
menu that opens, click Draw Table. The mouse pointer turns into a pencil.

3. Place the pencil-shaped pointer where you want the


upper-left corner of the table, and drag it diagonally
across and down the page, creating a table outline that
is the height and width of the outer border of the table
you want.

4. Place the pencil-shaped pointer on the top border at the


location of the right edge of the leftmost column you
want, and drag down to the bottom border. Repeat that
for the other columns you want.
5. Place the pencil-shaped pointer on the left border at the
location of the bottom of the topmost row you want, and
drag to the rightmost edge where you want the row to
end. Repeat that for the other rows you want.
6. When you are done drawing, press ESC to return the
pencil-shaped pointer to the I-beam pointer.
7. If you want to adjust the location of any of the outer
borders or the row or column borders, point at the
border you want to adjust. The mouse pointer will turn
into a double-headed resize arrow. Drag the selected line
to the location you want it.
8. Enter the information you want in the table, pressing
TAB as needed to move from cell to cell.

To Add a Row

1. Place the insertion point in a row below the location where you wish to add a
row.

132 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet

2. Right-click the mouse. A menu appears.


3. Select Insert tab. Insert Rows above.

4. A new row appears above the insertion point.

5. You can also add rows below the insertion point. Follow the same steps, but
select Insert Rows Below from the menu.

To Add a Column

1. Place the insertion point in a column adjacent to the location you wish the new
column to appear.
2. Right-click the mouse. A menu will appear.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO5: Create and Edit Tables 133
Information Sheet

3. Select Insert. Insert Columns to the Left or Insert Columns to the Right. A new
column appears.

To Remove Table
1. Place the insertion point in the table you want to
remove.
2. In the Layout tab Rows & Columns group, click
Delete and click Delete Table.

To Delete a Row or Column

1. Select the row or column.


2. Right-click your mouse. A menu will appear.
3. Select Delete Cells.

134 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
4. Select Delete entire row or Delete entire column and click OK.

Further Reading:

http://www.gcflearnfree.org/word2010/21.6

http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/word_create_table.htm

http://books.google.com.ph/books?id=ozVYefk42ckC&pg=PT146&lpg=PT146&dq=sorting
+data+in+table++in+word+2010&source=bl&ots=T_WHft-ZwR&sig=4z-
2oZcvLtS6O_qWur9I5bOP4Ng&hl=tl&ei=ROvOTrSaE4GziQfKlZ3ODg&sa=X&oi=book_resul
t&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CG0Q6AEwCTgK#v=onepage&q=sorting%20data%20in%2
0table%20%20in%20word%202010&f=false

Resources:

http://officeimg.vo.msecnd.net/en-us/files/898/377/AF102264638.pdf

http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_insert_table.png

http://www.electricteacher.com/images/insert-table-window.gif

http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_insertion_point_in_table.png

http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_insert_rows_above.png

http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_insert_rows_above_example.png
http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_insert_columns_to_the_right.png

http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_insert_columns_to_the_right_example
.png

http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_delete_cells_menu.png
http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_delete_cells_dialog.png

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO5: Create and Edit Tables 135
Information Sheet
Activity 8.1

Using Tables

Instruction: Based on what you have learned from the previous lesson, you will
perform the task given in this activity.

You have 15 minutes to complete this activity.


Inform your teacher after completing the procedure for checking and
discussion.

Procedure:

1. Select the Insert tab on the ribbon.


2. Locate the Table icon on the ribbon and click on it. A grid of squares appears.
This allows you to choose how many rows and columns your table will have.
3. Drag through the grid until it shows 5 x 4 tables.
4. Release your mouse and a table, 5 columns wide and 4 rows high will be
created.
5. Click below the table so we can create a second table (if Word wont let you click
below the table because there are no more paragraphs under it, try double-
clicking. You can double click on any place in a document to place the insertion
point there).
6. Press [Enter] to make sure there is at least one blank paragraph before you
create the second table. Otherwise, Word may join the two tables together.
7. From the Insert tab on the ribbon click the Table icon again.
8. This time when the menu appears, select to display the Insert Table dialog.
9. Enter 3 for the number of columns and 2 for the number of rows.
10. Click OK to create the table.
11. From the Insert tab on the ribbon click the Table icon again.
12. From the menu select. When it is selected, your mouse pointer will turn into a
pencil shape.
13. With the Draw Table icon selected, draw a rectangle shape under the second
table.
14. When you have created the rectangle outline for the table, drag a line down the
middle of the table to divide it into two columns.
15. Now drag a horizontal line across the table to split it into two rows.
16. Continue to add lines to divide the table into four columns. You can use undo if
you make any mistakes.
17. You will notice while you are drawing the table, there are additional tabs on the
ribbon. The Table Tools ribbon tabs will appear automatically when you are
working with tables.
18. Under the design tab, you will see some table drawing tabs on the right end. We
will use some of them later. While you are drawing the table, the Draw Table
icon should be highlighted. Click it to turn off table drawing mode.
19. Save the document as Creating Table # 1 as filename.

136 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Key Answer
Acceptable Answer:

1.

2.

3.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO5: Create and Edit Tables 137
Introduction
Lesson 9 Being familiar with the Formatting of Table Cells, Columns and
Rows

Description:

This lesson covers one of the performances required in creating and formatting
table.

In this lesson, you will learn how to

format table cells, columns and rows using the following commands:
change table size;
split a table;
merge cells;
apply table style; and
use borders and shading.

To satisfactorily complete this lesson, you are expected to

become familiar with changing Table Size, splitting and merging cells;
get a score of at least eight (8) points in Activity # 1;
become familiar with applying table styles, borders and shading; and
get a score of at least ten (10) points in Activity # 2.
.

138 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 9.1

Change the Table Size

Rows, columns, and cells can be added to a table using the Layout tab Rows &
Columns group or the context menus. You can also change a tables size by removing
elements, splitting a table, or resizing the overall dimensions.

Change Column Width and Row Height

By default, tables are created with equal column widths spanning the width of the
table unless you manually draw them. You can change each column to a specific width
you set or use AutoFit to adjust the width to fit the longest entry in the column. Row
heights change vertically as needed to accommodate lines of text or larger font sizes.

Change Column Width and Row Height by Dragging

1. Place the mouse pointer on the right border of the column


whose width you want to change or on the bottom border of the
row height you want to change. The mouse pointer changes to
a resize pointer, showing the opposing directions in which you
can drag.
2. Drag the border to increase or decrease the size.

CHANGE COLUMN WIDTH PRECISELY

1. Right-click the table that contains the columns whose


width you want to change, and click Table Properties
on the context menu.
2. In the Table Properties dialog box, click the Column
tab.
3. Click Previous Column or Next Column to select the
initial column you want to set.
4. Click the preferred width check box, and set a width in
inches or as a percentage of the table width.
5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 to change the width of other
columns.
6. Click ok.

Change Column Width to Fit Contents

1. Right-click the table whose columns you want to


adjust to fit their content.
2. Click AutoFit.
3. Click Autofit to contents

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO5: Create and Edit Tables 139
Information Sheet
Note:

You can also adjust or change the height of selected rows using
commands that apply to the column width.

SPLIT A TABLE

You can divide a table along any of its rows to split it into segments. Word will
divide longer tables when it creates automatic page breaks, although you might find it
handy to be able to control exactly where the break occurs in the table.

1. Click a cell in the row below where you want the split to occur.

2. In the Table Tools Layout tab Merge Group, click Split Table. A blank paragraph is
inserted between the two tables

140 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
Split a Cell

1. Bring your mouse pointer position inside a cell that you want to divide into
multiple cells.

2. Now click the Layout tab and then click Split Cells Button which will display a
dialog box asking for number of rows and columns to be created from the selected
cell.

3. Select the desired number of rows and columns which you would like to have in
resultant cell and finally click OK button to apply the result.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO5: Create and Edit Tables 141
Information Sheet

Merging Cells

1. Bring your mouse pointer position inside the first cell you want to merge.
2. Now press Shift key and click the cells around the cell which you want to merge
into the first cell. This will highlight the cells which you click and they will be ready
to be merged.

3. Now click the Layout tab and then click Merge Cells Button which will merge all the
selected cells.

142 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet

4. After merging the cells, all the content of the cells will be scrambled which you can
fix later as you like. For example, you can convert the merged cells text into title or
some other description.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO5: Create and Edit Tables 143
Activity Sheet
Activity 9.1
Change the Table Size

Instruction: Based on what you have learned from the previous lesson, you will perform
the task given in this activity.
You have 20 minutes to complete this activity.
You must get a score of at least eight (8) points to pass this activity.
Inform your teacher after completing the procedure for checking and discussion.

Procedure:

1. Make sure the Creating the Table# 1 file is open.


2. Set the column width to 1 inch and row height to .2 inch.
3. Drag to select the first three cells in the table.
4. Select the Table Tools Layout tab on the ribbon.
5. Click the Merge Cells icon. The cells will now become a single cell spanning
three columns.
6. Click in the last cell on the second row.
7. Click the Split Cells icon.
8. When the Split Cells dialog appears enter 2 for the number of rows and
columns. Click OK when done. The cell will be split in to 4 cells.
9. Click the Eraser icon on the toolbar. Your mouse pointer will change to an
eraser shape.
10. Drag your mouse over a line between two cells of second and third column in
third row to remove that line.
11. Click the Erase icon again to turn it off if necessary.
12. Save your work as Creating Table # 2 as your filename.

144 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
Acceptable Answers:

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO5: Create and Edit Tables 145
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 9.2
Apply Table Style
1. Click anywhere on the table. The Design tab will appear on the Ribbon.
2. Select the Design tab and locate the Table Styles.
3. Click the More drop-down arrow to see all of the table styles.

4. Hover the mouse over the various styles to see a live preview.
5. Select the desired style. The table style will appear in the document.

To Change the Table Style Options:

Once you've chosen a table style, you can turn various options on or off to change
the appearance of the table. There are six options: Header Row, Total Row,
Banded Rows, First Column, Last Column, and Banded Columns.

1. Click anywhere on the table. The Design tab will appear.


2. From the Design tab, check or uncheck the desired options in the Table
Style Options group.

146 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Further Reading

3. Depending on which Table Style you're using, certain Table Style


Options may have a somewhat different effect. You may need to
experiment to get the exact look you want.

BORDERS AND SHADING

Add Borders to Table

1. Select the table to which you want to add border. To select a table, click over the
table anywhere which will make Cross Icon visible at the top-left corner of the
table. Just click this cross icon to select the table.

2. Click the Border Button to display a list of options to put a border around the
selected table. You can select any of the option available by simply clicking over it.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 5: Create and Format Tables 147


Information Sheet
3. Try to add and remove different borders like left, right top or bottom by selecting
different options from the border options.

4. You can apply border to any of the selected row or column. You can try it yourself.
5. To delete the existing border, simply select no border option from the border
options.

Use Border Options

1. Click the Border Button to display a list of options to put a border. Select Border
and Shading option available at the bottom of list of the options. This will display a
Border and Shading dialog box. This dialog box can be used to set borders and
shading around a selected table.

148 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Further Reading
2. Click Border tab which will display a list of border settings, styles and options
whether this border should be applied to the table or text or paragraph.
3. You can use preview section to disable or enable left, right, top or bottom borders of
the selected table or row or column. Follow the given instruction in preview section
itself to design the border you like.
4. You can customize your border by setting its color, width by using different width
thickness available under style section.

To add Shades to Table

1. Select a row or column where you want to apply shade of your choice.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 5: Create and Format Tables 149


Information Sheet
2. Click the Border Button to display a list of options to put a border. Select
Border and Shading option available at the bottom of list of the options. This
will display a Border and Shading dialog box. This dialog box can be used to
set borders and shading around selected row(s) or column(s).

3. Click Shading tab which will display options to select fill, color and style and
whether this border should be applied to cell or table or selected text.
4. You can use Preview section to have an idea about the expected result. Once
you are done, click OK button to apply the result.

150 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Further Reading
For Further Reading:

http://officeimg.vo.msecnd.net/en-us/files/898/377/AF102264638.pdf

http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/table_borders_shades.htm

http://www.gcflearnfree.org/word2010/21.3

Resources:

http://office.blogs.webucator.com/files/2010/09/091510_1716_TableRowBre1.png

http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/selected_row.jpg

http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/split_table.jpg

http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/selected_cells.jpg
http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/merged_cells.jpg

http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/table_header.jpg
http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/selected_cell.jpg
http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/cell_dialog_box.jpg

http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/split_cell.jpg
http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_table_styles_more.png

http://cloud.addictivetips.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/tablestyle.jpg
http://assets.gcflearnfree.org/topics/174/wd10_table_style_options.png
http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/table_border.jpg
http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/table_border2.jpg

http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/table_borders_options.jpg
http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/stylish_table_border.jpg
http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/selected_table_row.jpg
http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/table_shading.jpg
http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/table_shades.jpg

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 5: Create and Format Tables 151


Activity Sheet
Activity # 2

Instruction:

Based on what you have learned from the previous lesson, you will perform the task given
in this activity.

You have 20 minutes to complete this activity.


You must get a score of at least ten (10) points to pass this activity.
Inform your teacher after completing the procedure for checking and discussion.

Procedure:

Formatting Border:

1. Open the Creating Table # 2 and delete the first and third table. Use the remaining
table to input the content below.

Student Year Mark Exam Total


Alfeo, S 24 29
Hazel, C Z 37 40
Myra, M 23 27
Brigino, D 45 42
Reyes, A 24 22
San Antonio, M 28 35
Valderama, F 36 27
Pascua, M 38 42
Cruz, R 30 34
Nilo, N 28 32
Dela Cruz, B 46 48
Boringot, J 38 41
Doloque, J 31 29
Average

2. You can add columns or rows if necessary. You can also adjust the column width
and format the text.
3. Select the entire table. Remember you can use the table selection icon.
4. From the Design tab, apply table styles using Medium Shading 1 Accent 5.
5. And also from the Table Tools Design tab, choose Borders.
6. Click the arrow next to the Borders icon to show the Borders menu.
7. From the bottom of the menu select the Borders and Shading option.
8. Setting should be changed to Grid. Width should be changed to 1 pt. and color
should be changed to a color of your choosing.
9. Click OK when these options are selected.
10. You can also use the tools on the Table Tools Design tab to draw formatted borders.
Well start by choosing how the line were going to draw will be formatted. Click the
Line Style icon under Draw Borders group. A list of line styles will appear.
11. Choose the dashed line from the list.

152 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Activity Sheet
12. Select a color from the Pen Color icon.
13. From the Line Weight icon, select the option.
14. Click the Draw Table icon.
15. Draw down the right edge of the first, second, and third column.
16. Click the Draw Table icon again to turn it off.
17. Save your work as Formatting Table #1

Formatting Shading:

1. Open the Formatting Table # 1 and remove the table styles applied.
2. Select the first row of the table.
3. Hold down [Ctrl] and select the cells in the first column so that they are also
selected.
4. Locate the Shading Color icon on the Table Tools Design tab.
5. Click the arrow next to the icon so that a selection of colors appears. You can see a
wider range of colors by clicking the More Colors option at the bottom.
6. Click on a light color to set that color as the background for the cells.
7. Select the rest of the cells in the table.
8. Click the Borders icon and then select the option at the bottom.
9. Click the Shading tab to change to the shading options.
10. Select a light fill color from the fill option.
11. In the Patterns section at the bottom, click on the Style list.
12. Select the Lt Trellis option.
13. Under the Style list, choose your preferred foreground color from the Color list.
14. Click Ok when done.
15. Save the file as Formatting Table # 2.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 5: Create and Format Tables 153


Key Answer
Acceptable Answers:

Formatting Borders:

Student Year Mark Exam Total


Alfeo, S 24 29
Hazel, C Z 37 40
Myra, M 23 27
Brigino, D 45 42
Reyes, A 24 22
San Antonio, M 28 35
Valderama, F 36 27
Pascua, M 38 42
Cruz, R 30 34
Nilo, N 28 32
Dela Cruz, B 46 48
Boringot, J 38 41
Doloque, J 31 29
Average

Formatting Shading:

Student Year Mark Exam Total


Alfeo, S 24 29
Hazel, C Z 37 40
Myra, M 23 27
Brigino, D 45 42
Reyes, A 24 22
San Antonio, M 28 35
Valderama, F 36 27
Pascua, M 38 42
Cruz, R 30 34
Nilo, N 28 32
Dela Cruz, B 46 48
Boringot, J 38 41
Doloque, J 31 29
Average

Lesson 3: Being familiar with the use of Formula, Sorting Data, Converting
Text to Table and Table to Text

154 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet

Description:

This lesson covers one of the performances required in creating and formatting
table.

In this lesson, you will learn how to

sort data;
calculate values using formula; and
convert text to table and table to text.

To satisfactorily complete this lesson, you are expected to

become familiar with the use sorting data;


get a score of at least five (5) points in Activity # 1;
become familiar with calculating data using formula;
get a score of at least ten (10) points in Activity # 2;
become familiar with converting table to text or text to table; and
pass the Assessment of this learning outcome.

Sort Data

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 5: Create and Format Tables 155


Key Answer
You can sort information in ascending or descending order according to the values in one
or more columns. You can sort an entire table or selected cells (all data in the table or
range is realigned so that the data in each row remains the same, even though the row
might be placed in a different order than it was originally) or just a column (data in
columns outside the sorted column does not change order).

Sorting a Table

1. Click in the table to select it.


2. Under Table Tools, on the Layout tab, in the Data group, choose the Sort button.

3. In the Sort dialog box:


In the Sort by area, set up the first sort.

Choose the appropriate column heading in the left drop-down list. If the
table doesn't have column headings, the drop-down list shows Column 1,
Column 2, and so on.
In the type drop-down list, choose the type of sort:
o Text to sort normally.
o Number to sort by numbers.
o Date to sort by dates and times.
In the Using drop-down list, make sure Paragraphs is selected.

156 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
On the right side:
o Select the Ascending option button if you want an ascending sort
(A to Z, low numbers to high, early dates and times to later ones)
o Select the Descending option button if you want a reverse sort.
In the upper Then by area, set up the second sort using the same
techniques.
In the lower Then by area, set up the third sort using the same
techniques.
In the My list has area, make sure the Header row option button is
selected if your table has a header row. If not, select the No header row
option button.
If you need to make the sort case-sensitive, so that lowercase letters
appear before their uppercase equivalents, click the Options button to
display the Sort Options dialog window.

4. Select the Case sensitive check box, and then click the Ok button to close the
dialog window.

Sort a Single Column

You can sort a single column,


independent of the rest of the table, but
make sure that is what you want,
because there is no way to return the
table to the way it was originally.

1. Select the column you want to sort


(see the Quick Steps Selecting
Tables, Rows, Columns, or Cells).
2. In the Layout tab Data group, click
Sort.
3. In the Sort dialog box, click Options.
4. In the Sort Options dialog box, click
the Sort Column Only check box.
5. Click Ok twice.
Sort by more than One Field in a Column

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 5: Create and Format Tables 157


Key Answer

1. Place your insertion point in the table.


2. In the Layout tab Data group, click sort.
3. In the Sort dialog box, click Options. In the
Sort Options dialog box, under Separate
Fields At, click the character used to
separate the fields in a single column, or
click other and type the separator
character. Click OK to close the Sort
Options dialog box.

4. In the Sort dialog box, click the


Sort By down arrow, and click the
primary column that contains
multiple fields. Click the Type down
arrow, click an information type, and
click Ascending or Descending. Click
the using down arrow, and click the
record group, such as paragraphs, or
Field 1, Field 2, etc.
5. Use the Then by sections if you
want to sort by additional columns or
fields.
6. Click Ok when finished.

158 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
Activity # 1

Instruction:

Based on what you have learned from the previous lesson, you will perform the task given
in this activity.

You have 15 minutes to complete this activity.


Get a score of at least five (5) to pass this activity.
Inform your teacher after completing the procedure for checking and discussion.

Procedure:

1) Select the entire table except for the average row at the bottom.
2) From the Table Tools Layout tab on the ribbon click the Sort icon. The sort dialog
will appear.
3) Click OK. The list will now be sorted in order of the Student column.
4) Repeat the above steps to sort the list by the Total column in Descending order.
5) Save the file as Formatting Table # 3.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 5: Create and Format Tables 159


Key Answer
Acceptable Answers:

Student Year Mark Exam Total


Alfeo, S 24 29
Boringot, J 38 41
Brigino, D 45 42
Cruz, R 30 34
Dela Cruz, B 46 48
Doloque, J 31 29
Hazel, C Z 37 40
Myra, M 23 27
Nilo, N 28 32
Pascua, M 38 42
Reyes, A 24 22
San Antonio, M 28 35
Valderama, F 36 27
Average

160 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
Calculate Values using Formula

Cell Formulas

The Formula dialog box provides following important functions to be used as formula in a
cell. Word formulas use a reference system to refer to individual table cells. Each column
is identified by a letter, starting with A for the first column, B for the second column, and
so on. After the letter comes the row number. Thus, the first cell in the first row is A1, the
third cell in the fourth row is C4, and so on.

Common Formulas used in Calculating Values

Formula Description

AVERAGE ( ) The average of a list of cells

COUNT ( ) The number of items in a list of cells

MAX ( ) The largest value in a list of cells

MIN ( ) The smallest value in a list of cells

PRODUCT ( ) The multiplication of a list of cells

SUM ( ) The sum of a list of cells

Tips:

Following are useful points to help you in constructing word cell formula.

Cell References and Description

1. A single cell reference, such as B3 or F7


2. A range of cells, such as A4:A9 or C5:C13
3. A series of individual cells, such as A3,B4,C5
4. ABOVE, referring to all cells in the column above the current cell.
5. BELOW, referring to all cells in the column below the current cell.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 5: Create and Format Tables 161


Key Answer
Using Formula in the Table

1. Consider the following table where we will have total of the rows. Click in a cell
that should contain the sum of a row.

2. Now click the Layout tab and then click Formula button which will display a
Formula Dialog Box which will suggest a default formula, which is
=SUM(LEFT) in our case. You can select a number format using Number
Format List Box to display the result, or you can change the formula using
Formula List Box.

3. Click the Number Format down arrow, and click the style you want applied to
the result.

162 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet

4. Now click OK to apply the formula and you will see that left cells have been
added and its sum has been put in the total cell where we wanted to have it.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO 5: Create and Format Tables 163


Activity Sheet
Activity # 2

Instruction:

Based on what you have learned from the previous lesson, you will perform the task given
in this activity.

You have 20 minutes to complete this activity.


Get a score of at least ten (10) to pass this activity.
Inform your teacher after completing the procedure for checking and discussion.

Procedure:

1) Use the Formatting Table # 3 file to complete this activity.


2) In your list of students, add a formula to calculate their total mark. Click in the
Total column next to the first student (Alfeo, S).
3) From the Table Tools Layout tab click the Formula icon (on the end of the
ribbon). We will need to create a formula that adds together this students year
mark and exam mark which in the table cells B2 and C2 are. Word will fill in the
formula box with =SUM (LEFT). This formula will add all the cells to the left of
the current one together.
4) Click OK when done and the result will appear.
5) Repeat steps 3 and 4 so that each student has a total mark.
6) Click in the first cell for the Average row (this should be the average year mark).
7) Add a formula. Delete the SUM (ABOVE), click paste function arrow and then
select AVERAGE. Type ABOVE inside the parenthesis and click Ok.
8) Repeat step 7 for the average of exam and total
9) Save the file as Formatting Table # 5.

164 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Key Answer
Acceptable Answers:

Student Year Mark Exam Total


Alfeo, S 24 29 53
Boringot, J 38 41 79
Brigino, D 45 42 87
Cruz, R 30 34 64
Dela Cruz, B 46 48 94
Doloque, J 31 29 60
Hazel, C Z 37 40 77
Myra, M 23 27 50
Nilo, N 28 32 60
Pascua, M 38 42 80
Reyes, A 24 22 46
San Antonio, M 28 35 63
Valderama, F 36 27 63
Average 32.92 34.46 67.38

Internet and Computing Fundamentals | LO5: Create and Edit Tables 165
Further Reading
Convert Tables to Text and Text to Tables
Word can convert it to a table and similarly convert information in a table to ordinary text.

Convert Table to Text


Converting a table to text converts the contents of each cell to normal text separated by a
character you choose, with each row becoming a separate paragraph.

1. Click anywhere in your table. Look for the small move icon on the top left of your
table to ensure youve selected it.

2. Click the Layout Tab on the Word 2010 Ribbon and Click Convert to text.

166 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet
3. In the newly appeared window you can choose with what to delimit your text. The
three default options are Paragraph marks, Tabs and Semicolons, but you can
delimit your table contents with a custom symbol of yours using the Other option.
So choose whatever you like and click the OK button.

4. The table is now converted to text.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO 5: Create and Format Tables 167
Further Reading
Convert Text to a Table

Converting text to a table requires that the text be appropriately formatted with tabs,
commas, or another character between columns and a separate character, like a
paragraph mark, between rows.

1. Drag to select the text you want to convert to a table. In the Insert tab Tables
group, click Table and click Convert Text To Table.

2. The Convert Text to Table dialog box appears.

168 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Information Sheet

3. In the Convert Text to Table dialog box, under Separate text at, click the option for
the separator character that is in your text.

4. In the Number of columns box, check the number of columns.

5. Click OK when finished.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO 5: Create and Format Tables 169
Further Reading
For Further Reading:

http://officeimg.vo.msecnd.net/en-us/files/898/377/AF102264638.pdf

http://cache7.groovypost.com/wp-
content/uploads/2011/01/SNAGHTML2005183.png
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-help/convert-text-to-a-table-or-
vice-versa-HA010034311.aspx#BM1

http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/word_add_formula.htm

Acknowledgement:

http://www.officetooltips.com/word/tips/sorting_a_table.html
http://www.officetooltips.com/images/tips/289_3/1.png

http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/salary_table.jpg
http://www.tutorialspoint.com/word_2010/screens/formula_dialog_box.jpg
http://www.groovypost.com/howto/howto/convert-word-2010-tables-to-
text/ http://cache8.groovypost.com/wp-
content/uploads/2011/01/SNAGHTML1f6e27c.png
http://cache7.groovypost.com/wp-
content/uploads/2011/01/image201.png
http://cache6.groovypost.com/wp-
content/uploads/2011/01/SNAGHTML1fba0cb4.png

170 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Assessment
Let us test what you have learned in this Learning Outcome

Instruction:

You have 30 minutes to complete the test.

Follow the instruction below to satisfactorily pass the assessment.

Inform your teacher after completing the task for checking.

Procedure:

1. Type the following data in your table:

Customers Name Fast Food Restaurant Order


Mavy MC Donald hamburger

Roland KFC fried chicken

August Greenwich lasagna

Amir Chowking lauriat

Sheryl Jollibee chicken joy

Reyes Shakeys pizza

Cayabyab Pizza Hut pizza

Villas Cindys ice cream

Ferrer Kennys roasted beef

2. Insert two (2) rows between customers name and Mavy.


Type the following data:

Erick Chowking Lauriat

Jenny Mang Inasal Halo-halo

3. Insert three (3) columns after Order column.


Type the following data in the previously inserted columns:

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO 5: Create and Format Tables 171
Assessment
Price/Unit Number of Total
(Pesos) Pieces

42 6

112 4

39 2

50 7

55 2

109 3

61 9

65 10

66 7

29 3

79 6

4. Insert a row after Ferrer and type TOTAL in the first row.
5. Change the rows height of the tables to 0.25 inch and column width to .8
inch.
6. Highlight the heading, in the Design Tab, choose Borders icon and select
Borders and Shading.
7. Under Borders tab, Choose your preferred color and select 1 width.
Click Shading tab, select color for fill option. In the patterns, choose Dk
Grid and select your foreground color.
8. For the rest of the cells, use Borders and Shading options, then click
Shading Tab. Use dark blue: lighter 60% and 60% pattern style.
9. Create a formula to calculate the Total Cost from the Price/Unit and # of
pcs. Use PRODUCT function.
10. Calculate the total number of pieces and average the Total Cost.
11. Sort the data based on the TOTAL COST in descending order.
12.Copy the whole table and paste it on the next page.
13.Convert the copied table to text separated by tabs except the heading
part of the table.
14. Save your work as Assessment_your name file.

172 | LO5: Create and Format Tables Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Activity Sheet
Acceptable Answers:

Price/Unit Number Total


Customers Fast Food Order (Pesos) of Cost
Name Restaurant Pieces

Reyes Shakeys pizza 65 10 650

Sheryl Jollibee chicken joy 61 9 549

Ferrer Kennys roasted 79 6 474


beef

Cayabyab Pizza Hut pizza 66 7 462

Jenny Mang Inasal halo-halo 112 4 448

Roland KFC fries 50 7 350

Amir Chowking lauriat 109 3 327

Erick Chowking lauriat 42 6 252

August Greenwich lasagna 55 2 110

Villas Cindys ice cream 29 3 87

Mavy MC hamburger 39 2 78
Donalds

TOTAL 59 344.27

Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | LO5: Create and Format Tables 173
Introduction
Lesson 6: Using Microsoft Word 2010 Objects

Description:

This lesson covers the performances required in inserting and formatting objects.

In this lesson, you will learn how to

insert objects according to the activity guide;


use drawing tools based activity guide; and
format objects according to the activity guide.

For you to satisfactorily complete this lesson, you are expected to

get at least ten (10) points in Activity 6.1 - Inserting Picture or ClipArt;
get at least seven (7) points in Activity 6.2 - Using Word Art;
get at least ten (10) points in Activity 6.3 - Inserting Drawing Tools and Auto
shapes;
get at least seven (7) points in Activity 6.4 - Text Boxes;
get at least fifteen (15) points in Activity 6.5 - SmartArt and Charts;
get at least fifteen (15) points in Activity 6.6 - Grouped and Ungrouped Objects;
and
pass the assessment of this lesson.

174 LO6: Insert and Format Objects | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet
Information 6.1

Inserting Picture or Clip Art

Pictures and clip art can be inserted or copied into a document from many
different sources, including those downloaded from a clip art Web site provider, copied
from a Web page, or inserted from a folder where you save pictures.

You can also change how a picture or clip art is positioned with text within a
document by using the Position and Wrap Text commands.

TIP: To insert a picture from your scanner or camera, use the


software that came with your scanner or camera to transfer the
picture to your computer. Save the picture, and then insert it by
following the instructions for inserting a picture from a file.

Insert Clip Art

1. On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click Clip Art.

NOTE: Some commands shown are not available in Word Starter.

2. In the Clip Art task pane, in the Search for text box, type a word or phrase that
describes the clip art that you want, or type in all or some of the file name of the
clip art.

3. To modify your search, do one or both of the following:

To expand your search to include clip art on the Web, click the Include
Office.com content checkbox.

To limit the search results to a specific media type, click the arrow in the
Results should be box and select the check box next to Illustrations,
Photographs, Videos, or Audio.

4. Click Go.

5. In the list of results, click the clip art to insert it.


To resize clip art, select the clip art you've inserted in the document. To
increase or decrease the size in one or more directions, drag a sizing handle away
from or toward the center, while you do one of the following:

Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | LO6: Insert and Format Objects 175
`
Information Sheet

To keep the center of an object in the same location, press and hold CTRL
while you drag the sizing handle.

To maintain the object's proportions, press and hold SHIFT while you drag the
sizing handle.

To both maintain the object's proportions and keep its center in the same
location, press and hold both CTRL and SHIFT while you drag the sizing
handle.

Insert a picture from a file

To insert a picture from your scanner or camera, use the software that came with
your scanner or camera to transfer the picture to your computer. Save the picture, and
then insert it by following these steps.

1. Click where you want to insert the picture in your document.

2. On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click Picture.

3. Locate the picture that you want to insert. For example, you might have a picture
file located in My Documents.

4. Double-click the picture that you want to insert.

By default, Microsoft Word embeds (embed: To insert information created in


one program, such as a chart or an equation, into another program. After the
object is embedded, the information becomes part of the document. Any changes
you make to the object are reflected in the document.) pictures in a document. You
can reduce the size of a file by linking (link: Used to insert a copy of information
created in one program into a Microsoft Word document while maintaining a
connection between the two files. When the information changes in the source file,
the changes are reflected in the destination document.) to a picture. In the Insert
Picture dialog box, click the arrow next to Insert, and then click Link to File.

To resize a picture, select the picture you've inserted in the document. To


increase or decrease the size in one or more directions, drag a sizing handle away
from or toward the center, while you do one of the following:

To keep the center of an object in the same location, press and hold CTRL
while you drag the sizing handle.

To maintain the object's proportions, press and hold SHIFT while you drag the
sizing handle.

176 LO6: Insert and Format Objects | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet
To both maintain the object's proportions and keep its center in the same
location, press and hold both CTRL and SHIFT while you drag the sizing
handle.

Insert a picture from a Web page

1. Open the document.

2. From the Web page, drag the picture that you want into the Word document.

Make sure the picture that you choose is not a link to another Web page. If you
drag a picture that is linked, it will be inserted in your document as a link instead of an
image.

Insert a picture that includes a hyperlink from a Web page

1. Open the Word document.

2. On the Web page, right-click the picture you want, and then click Copy.

3. In the Word document, right-click where you want to insert the picture, and then
click Paste.

Insert Screenshot

The screenshot tool in Microsoft Word 2010 allows you to capture an image of a
particular screen and then insert it into your document. Note that this facility will not be
available to you if you are working on a document in compatibility mode, as it is new to
Word 2010.

Inserting Already Existing Screenshots

If you are working on a Word 2010 document, click Insert > Illustrations >
Screenshot. A list of available screenshots is displayed in a gallery. This gallery consists of
a selection of the last screenshots taken by you.

Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | LO6: Insert and Format Objects 177
`
Information Sheet
Click on a screenshot to insert it into your document. Because the image is then
selected, the Picture Tools contextual tab is displayed to enable you to perform picture
related tasks.

If you havent yet taken the screenshot you need, follow these steps.

Taking a Screenshot In Word 2010

To take a new screenshot and insert it into your Word 2010 document, you first
need to go to the screen you want to capture and then press the print screen button on
your keyboard. If you then go back to your Word document and click Insert > Illustrations
> Screenshot, the screenshot will appear in the gallery in the first position. Click on it to
insert it.

Taking A Screen Clipping In Word 2010

This is the good bit. If you only need to insert a portion of your screenshot and not
the whole thing, click Insert > Illustrations > Screenshot > Screen Clipping. The last
screen you displayed is redisplayed (but faded) with some crosshairs for you to drag a
selection. The area of the screen you select with the crosshairs is cut and pasted into
your Word document. Again, the Picture Tools tab is displayed to help you manipulate
your new image.

To perform this kind of cropping task, ordinarily you would have to import your
screenshot into an image editor like Photoshop or Fireworks and then export the finished
article for use in your document. Now, however, the screen clipping function makes those
extra steps redundant and speeds up your workflow. A point to note is that you cant
adjust your selection, so if you get it wrong you must undo the action and try again.

Keep a picture next to the text that goes with it or at a spot on the page

An inline picture keeps its position relative to a portion of the text. Pictures are
inserted as inline pictures by default in Word.

A floating picture keeps its position relative to the page, and floats in that position
as text flows around it. For example, if you position the picture halfway down on the left
side of the page, and then you add two paragraphs at the top of the page, the picture will
stay halfway down on the left side of the page.

To make sure that the picture stays with text that references it for example, a
description above the picture, position the picture as an inline picture. If you add two
paragraphs above the description, the picture will move down the page together with the
description.

1. If the picture is not on a drawing canvas, select the picture. If the picture is on a
drawing canvas, select the canvas.

2. Under Picture Tools, on the Format tab, in the Arrange group, click Position.

178 LO6: Insert and Format Objects | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet

If you don't see Position, click Arrange, and then click Position.

3. Do one of the following:

To change an inline picture to a floating picture, select any one of the With
Text Wrapping page position options.

To change a floating picture to an inline picture, select In Line with Text.

Keep a picture with a callout or a text box

To keep a callout or text box with a picture, you must make the picture and the
text box or shape floating, and group the picture with the callout or other shape.

(Source: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-
help/results.aspx?qu=inserting+clipart+in+ms+word+2010&ex=1)

Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | LO6: Insert and Format Objects 179
`
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 9.2

Inserting Picture or ClipArt

Instruction: Apply the knowledge learned about inserting picture and clipart.
1. Open the document ict.docx in the Word Practice Files folder (2 pts.)

2. Insert one (1) Clip Art (2 pts.)

3. Insert one (1) picture from a file (2 pts.)

4. Keep one (1) picture next to the text that goes with it or at a spot on the page
(2 pts.)

5. Keep one (1) picture with a callout or a text box (2 pts.)

6. Save the enhanced document using the filename clipArt.docx (5 pts.)

NOTE: Be sure to insert different pictures of different sizes and formats.

Your document may look like the document below:

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

Information and communications technology is


dramatically and rapidly transforming secondary
and post-secondary education in developed
nations to a degree scarcely imaginable only one
generation ago. High schools, colleges, vocational
schools, universities, and advanced research
Computer peripherals institutions are being profoundly affected, at all
levels and in myriad respects.

In particular, ICT has affected distance learning (DL) or distance education


(DE), allowing school calendars to be designed to accommodate the needs of
individual students on one hand and faculty on the other, thus moving many
elements of the educational process into the virtual world. This hugely
increases the market of potential learners. Such technology-mediated
instruction can be accessed 24 hours a day, 7
days a week from almost any location, opening
opportunities for working students, parents of
young children, and those with disabilities to
reach their educational goals. Moore (2001)
relates that the advent of interactive media and
flexible scheduling has brought forth a
new generation of distance faculty, who are now
able to teach while pursuing other interests.
Moore (2001) and Brown (1999) report that reaching a wider audience is a
strong motivator for translating coursework into electronic formats.
Faculties, often apprehensive that a class may be cancelled due to lack of
enrollment, are seeking ways to cast a wider net.

180 LO6: Insert and Format Objects | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 6.2

Using WordArt

WordArt is a gallery of text styles that you can add to your Office documents to
create decorative effects, such as shadowed or mirrored (reflected) text. In PowerPoint, you
can also convert existing text into WordArt.

Overview of WordArt

You can use WordArt to add special text effects to your document. For example,
you can stretch a title, skew text, make text fit a preset shape, or apply a gradient fill.

This WordArt becomes an object that you can move or position in your document to
add decoration or emphasis. You can modify or add to the text in an existing WordArt
object whenever you want.

Add WordArt

1. On the Insert tab, in the Text group, click WordArt, and then click the WordArt
style that you want.

Example of the Text group on the Insert tab in Excel 2010.

2. Enter your text.

If you have a chart in your Office 2010 document, you can replace the chart
title with WordArt to give the title additional emphasis.

Remove the WordArt style

When you remove the WordArt style from your text, the text remains and changes
to plain text.

1. Select the WordArt text that you want to remove the WordArt style from.

2. Under Drawing Tools, on the Format tab, in the WordArt Styles group, click
Quick Styles or the More button , and then click Clear WordArt.

To remove the WordArt style from part of your text, select the text that you
want to remove the WordArt style from, and then follow the steps above.

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Delete the WordArt

Select the WordArt that you want to remove, and then press DELETE.

(Source: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-
help/results.aspx?qu=wordart+in+ms+word+2010&ex=1)

182 LO6: Insert and Format Objects | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.2

Using WordArt

Instruction: Completely perform what is asked.

1. Open the clipArt.docx

2. Apply the knowledge learned about WordArt by changing the title of the article into
five (5) WordArt styles (5 pts.).

3. Save the enhanced document with the filename wordArt.docx (5 pts.)

Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | LO6: Insert and Format Objects 183
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Information Sheet
Information Sheet 6.3

Inserting Drawing Tools and AutoShapes

Drawing objects such as shapes, diagrams, flowcharts, curves, and lines can be
changed and enhanced with colors, patterns, borders, and other effects.

Add a drawing to a document

1. Click in your document where you want to create the drawing.

2. On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click Shapes.

3. You can do any of the following on the Format tab, which appears after you insert
a drawing shape:

Insert a shape. On the Format tab, in the Insert Shapes group, click a
shape, and then click somewhere in the document.

Change a shape. Click the shape you want to change. On the Format tab, in
the Insert Shapes group, click Edit Shape, point to Change Shape, and then
choose a different shape.

Add text to a shape. Click the shape where you want text, and then type.

Group selected shapes. Select several shapes at a time by pressing CTRL on


your keyboard and clicking each shape you want to include in the group. On
the Format tab in the Arrange group, click Group so that all of the shapes
will be treated like a single object.

Draw in the document. On the Format tab, in the Insert Shapes group,
expand the shapes options by clicking the arrow. Under Lines click Freeform
or Scribble.

To stop drawing with the Freeform or Scribble lines, double-click.

Adjust the size of the shapes. Select the shape or shapes you want to resize.
On the Format tab, in the Size group, click the arrows or type new
dimensions in the Height and Width boxes.

Apply a style to a shape. In the Shape Styles group, rest your pointer over a
style to see what your shape will look like when you apply that style. Click the
style to apply it. Or, click Shape Fill or Shape Outline and select the options
that you want.

184 LO6: Insert and Format Objects | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
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If you want to apply a color and gradient that aren't available in the
Shape Styles group, select the color first, and then apply the gradient.

Add flow charts with connectors. Before you create a flow chart, add a
drawing canvas by clicking the Insert tab, clicking Shapes in the
Illustrations group, and then clicking New Drawing Canvas. On the Format
tab, in the Insert Shapes group, click a Flow chart shape. Under Lines,
choose a connector line such as the Curved Arrow Connector.

Use shadow and three-dimensional (3-D) effects to add interest to the


shapes in your drawing. On the Format tab, in the Shape Styles group, click
Shape Effects, and choose an effect.

Align the objects on the canvas. To align the objects, press and hold CTRL
while you select the objects that you want to align. In the Arrange group, click
Align to choose from an assortment of alignment commands.

Delete all or part of a drawing

1. Select the drawing object that you want to delete.

2. Press DELETE.

AutoShapes

You can add one shape to your Microsoft Word 2010 file or combine multiple
shapes to make a drawing or a more complex shape. Available shapes include lines, basic
geometric shapes, arrows, equation shapes, flowchart shapes, stars, banners, and
callouts.

After you add one or more shapes, you can add text, bullets, numbering, and Quick
Styles to them.

Add a shape to your file

1. On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click Shapes.

Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | LO6: Insert and Format Objects 185
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Information Sheet

2. Click the shape that you want, click anywhere in the document, and then drag to
place the shape.

To create a perfect square or circle (or constrain the dimensions of other


shapes), press and hold SHIFT while you drag.

You can add individual shapes to a chart or add shapes on top of a SmartArt
graphic to customize the chart or SmartArt graphic.

Add multiple shapes to your file

Instead of adding individual shapes to create a drawing, you might want to create a
SmartArt graphic. In a SmartArt graphic, the arrangement of the shapes and the font size
in those shapes is updated automatically as you add or remove shapes and edit your text.

1. On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click Shapes. .

2. Right-click the shape that you want to add, and then click Lock Drawing Mode.

3. Click anywhere in the document, and then drag to place the shape. Repeat this for
each shape that you want to add.

To create a perfect square or circle (or constrain the dimensions of other


shapes), press and hold SHIFT while you drag.

4. After you add all the shapes that you want, press ESC.

Add text to a shape

Click the shape that you want to add text to, and then type your text.

The text that you add becomes part of the shape if you rotate or flip the
shape, the text rotates or flips also.

Add a bulleted or numbered list to a shape

1. Select the text in the shape that you want to add bullets or numbering to.

2. Right-click the selected text, and on the shortcut menu, do one of the following:

To add bullets, point to Bullets, and then choose the options that you want.

186 LO6: Insert and Format Objects | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
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To add numbering, point to Numbering, and then choose the options that you
want.

Add a Quick Style to a shape

Quick Styles are combinations of different formatting options that are displayed in
a thumbnail in the Quick Style gallery in the Shape Styles group. When you rest your
pointer over a Quick Style thumbnail, you can see how the Shape Style (or Quick Style)
affects your shape.

1. Click the shape that you want to apply a new or different Quick Style to.

2. Under Drawing Tools, on the Format tab, in the Shape Styles group, click the
Quick Style that you want.

The Format tab under Drawing Tools.

To see more Quick Styles, click the More button .

Change from one shape to another shape

1. Click the shape that you want to change to a different shape.

To change multiple shapes, press CTRL while you click the shapes that you
want to change.

2. Under Drawing Tools, on the Format tab, in the Insert Shapes group, click Edit
Shape , point to Change Shape, and then click the new shape that you want.

Delete a shape from your file

Click the shape that you want to delete, and then press DELETE.

To delete multiple shapes, press CTRL while you click the shapes that you
want to delete, and then press DELETE.

(Source: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-
help/results.aspx?qu=drawing+tools+and+autoshapes+in+ms+word+2010&ex=1)

Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | LO6: Insert and Format Objects 187
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Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.3

Inserting Drawing Tools and AutoShapes

Instruction: Completely do the following:

1. Open the document ict.docx

2. Apply the knowledge learned about drawing tools by adding at least ten (10)
drawings/ shapes (2 pts. per drawing/shape).

3. Save the enhanced document with the filename drawings.docx (5 pts.)

NOTE: Be sure to add different drawings of different sizes and formats.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

Information and communications technology is


dramatically and rapidly transforming secondary and
post-secondary education in developed nations to a degree
scarcely imaginable only one generation
ago. High schools, colleges, vocational schools,
universities, and advanced research institutions

are being profoundly affected, at all levels and in myriad respects.

In particular, ICT has affected distance learning (DL) or distance education (DE),
allowing school calendars to be designed to accommodate the
needs of individual students on one hand and faculty on
the other, thus moving many elements of the educational process
into the virtual world. This hugely increases the market of
potential learners. Such technology-mediated instruction
can be accessed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week from almost any location,
opening opportunities for working students, parents of young children, and
those with disabilities to reach their educational goals. Moore (2001) relates that
the advent of interactive media and flexible scheduling has brought forth a new
generation of distance faculty, who are now able to teach while pursuing other
interests. Moore (2001) and Brown (1999) report that reaching a wider audience
is a strong motivator for translating coursework into electronic formats.
Faculties, often apprehensive that a class may be cancelled due to lack of
enrollment, are seeking ways to cast a wider net.

188 LO6: Insert and Format Objects | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet
Information 6.4

Using Text Boxes

A text box is an object that lets you put and type text anywhere in your Microsoft
Word 2010 document.

Add a text box

1. On the Insert tab, in the Text group, click Text Box, and then click Draw Text
Box.

2. Click in the document, and then drag to draw the text box the size that you want.

3. To add text to a text box, click inside the text box, and then type or paste text.

If you have problems printing text boxes, make sure that the Print drawings
created in Word check box are selected.

To do this, click the File tab, click Word Options, click Display, and then
under Printing Options, select the Print drawings created in Word check box.

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Information Sheet
To format text in the text box, select the text, and then use the
formatting options in the Font group on the Home tab.

To position the text box, click it, and then when the pointer becomes a
, drag the text box to a new location.

You can also change or remove a text box or shape border.

If you have drawn multiple text boxes, you can link them together so that
text will flow from one box to another. Click one of the text boxes and
then under Text Box Tools, on the Format tab, in the Text group, click
Create Link.

Copy a text box

Click the border of the text box that you want to copy.

On the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click Copy .

Make sure that the pointer is not inside the text box, but rather on the border
of the text box. If the pointer is not on the border, pressing Copy will copy the
text inside the text box and not the text box.

On the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click Paste.

Delete a text box

Click the border of the text box that you want to delete, and then press DELETE.

190 LO6: Insert and Format Objects | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet
Make sure that the pointer is not inside the text box, but rather on the
border of the text box. If the pointer is not on the border, pressing DELETE will
delete the text inside the text box and not the text box.

(Source: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-
help/results.aspx?qu=text+boxes+in+ms+word+2010&ex=1)

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Information Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.4

Using Text boxes

Instruction: Completely perform the following:

1. Open the file drawings.docx

2. Apply the knowledge learned about text box by adding labels/names to each of the
ten (10) drawings/ shapes (10 pts.).

3. Save the enhanced document with the filename textboxes.docx (5 pts.)

NOTE: Be sure to have different sizes and formats of the text boxes.

Example:

Computer

192 LO6: Insert and Format Objects | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 6.5

Inserting SmartArt and Charts

Create a SmartArt graphic

A SmartArt graphic is a visual representation of your information that you can


quickly and easily create, choosing from among many different layouts, to effectively
communicate your message or ideas. You can create SmartArt graphics in Excel, Outlook,
PowerPoint, and Word.

Overview of creating a SmartArt graphic

Most content that is created by using Microsoft Office 2010 programs is textual,
even though the use of illustrations improves understanding and memory and encourages
action. Creating designer-quality illustrations can be challenging, especially if you are not
a professional designer or you cannot afford to hire a professional designer. If you use
versions of Microsoft Office earlier than Office 2007, you can spend a lot of time getting
shapes to be the same size and to be aligned properly, getting your text to look right, and
manually formatting the shapes to match the document's overall style. With SmartArt
graphics, you can create designer-quality illustrations with only a few clicks of your
mouse.

You can create a SmartArt graphic in Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, and Word.
Although you cannot create in most other Office 2010 programs, you can copy and paste
SmartArt graphics as images into those programs.

When you create a SmartArt graphic, you are prompted to choose a type of
SmartArt graphic, such as Process, Hierarchy, Cycle, or Relationship. Each type of
SmartArt graphics contains several different layouts. After you choose a layout, it is easy
to switch the layout or type of a SmartArt graphic. Most of your text and other content,
colors, styles, effects, and text formatting are automatically carried over to the new layout.

As you add and edit your content in the Text pane, your SmartArt graphic is
automatically updated shapes are added or removed as needed.

You can also add and remove shapes in your SmartArt graphic to adjust the
structure of the layout. For example, even though the Basic Process layout appears with
three shapes, your process may need only two shapes, or it may need five shapes. As you

Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | LO6: Insert and Format Objects 193
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Information Sheet
add or remove shapes and edit your text, the arrangement of the shapes and the amount
of text within those shapes is updated automatically maintaining the original design
and border of the layout for your SmartArt graphic.

What to consider when you create a SmartArt graphic

Before you create your SmartArt graphic, visualize what type and layout are best
for displaying your data. What do you want to convey with your SmartArt graphic? Do you
want a certain look? Since you can quickly and easily switch layouts, try different layouts
(across types) until you find the one that best illustrates your message. Your graphic
should be clear and easy to follow. Experiment with different types by using the table
below as a starting point. The table is intended to help you get started and is not an
exhaustive list.

Graphic
Purpose of graphic type
Show non-sequential information List
Show steps in a process or timeline Process
Show a continual process Cycle
Show a decision tree Hierarchy
Create an organization chart Hierarchy
Illustrate connections Relationship
Show how parts relate to a whole Matrix
Show proportional relationships with the Pyramid
largest component on the top or bottom
Draw a family tree with pictures Picture

Also, consider the amount of text that you have, because the amount of text often
determines the layout that you use and how many shapes you need in the layout. In
general, SmartArt graphics are most effective when the number of shapes and the amount
of text are limited to key points. Larger amounts of text can distract from the visual
appeal of your SmartArt graphic and make it harder to convey your message visually.
However, some layouts, such as Trapezoid List in the List type, work well with larger
amounts of text.

Some layouts for SmartArt graphics contain a fixed number of shapes. For
example, the Opposing Arrows layout in the Relationship type is designed to show two
opposing ideas or concepts. Only two shapes can correspond to text, and the layout
cannot be changed to display more ideas or concepts.

194 LO6: Insert and Format Objects | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet

The Opposing Arrows layout with two opposing ideas

If you need to convey more than two ideas, switch to another layout that has more
than two shapes for text, such as the Basic Pyramid layout in the Pyramid type. Keep in
mind that changing layouts or types can alter the meaning of your information. For
example, a layout with arrows pointing to the right, such as Basic Process in the Process
type, has a different meaning from a SmartArt graphic with arrows going in a circle, such
as Continuous Cycle in the Cycle type.

Create a SmartArt graphic and add text to it

1. On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click SmartArt.

An example of the Illustration group on the Insert tab, in PowerPoint 2010

2. In the Choose a SmartArt Graphic dialog box, click the type and layout that you
want.

3. Enter your text by doing one of the following:

Click [Text] in the Text pane, and then type your text.

Copy text from another location or program, click [Text] in the Text pane, and
then paste your text.

If the Text pane is not visible, click the control.

Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | LO6: Insert and Format Objects 195
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Information Sheet

To add text in an arbitrary position close to or on top of your SmartArt


graphic, on the Insert tab, in the Text group, click Text Box to insert a text
box (text box: A movable, resizable container for text or graphics. Use text
boxes to position several blocks of text on a page or to give text a different
orientation from other text in the document.). If you want only the text in your
text box to appear, right-click your text box, click Format Shape or Format
Text Box, and then set the text box to have no background color and no
border.

Click in a box in the SmartArt graphic, and then type your text. For best
results, use this option after you add all of the boxes that you want.

Add or delete shapes in your SmartArt graphic

1. Click the SmartArt graphic that you want to add another shape to.

2. Click the existing shape that is located closest to where you want to add the new
shape.

3. Under SmartArt Tools, on the Design tab, in the Create Graphic group, click the
arrow under Add Shape.

If you don't see the SmartArt Tools or Design tabs, make sure that you've
selected the SmartArt graphic. You may have to double-click the SmartArt graphic
to open the Design tab.

4. Do one of the following:

To insert a shape after the selected shape, click Add Shape After.

To insert a shape before the selected shape, click Add Shape Before.

196 LO6: Insert and Format Objects | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet
To add a shape from the Text pane, click an existing shape, move your cursor
before or after the text where you want to add the shape, and then press
ENTER.

To delete a shape from your SmartArt graphic, click the shape you want to
delete, and then press DELETE. To delete your entire SmartArt graphic, click
the border of your SmartArt graphic, and then press DELETE.

Change the colors of an entire SmartArt graphic

You can apply color variations that are derived from the theme colors (theme colors:
A set of colors that is used in a file. Theme colors, theme fonts, and theme effects compose
a theme.) to the shapes in your SmartArt graphic.

1. Click your SmartArt graphic.

2. Under SmartArt Tools, on the Design tab, in the SmartArt Styles group, click
Change Colors.

If you don't see the SmartArt Tools or Design tabs, make sure that you've
selected a SmartArt graphic. You may have to double-click the SmartArt graphic to
open the Design tab.

3. Click the color variation that you want.

Apply a SmartArt Style to a SmartArt graphic

A SmartArt Style is a combination of various effects, such as line style, bevel, or 3-


D that you can apply to the shapes in your SmartArt graphic to create a unique and
professionally designed look.

1. Click your SmartArt graphic.

2. Under SmartArt Tools, on the Design tab, in the SmartArt Styles group, click
the SmartArt Style that you want.
To see more SmartArt Styles, click the More button .

To start with a blank layout, delete all the placeholder text (such as [Text]) in
the Text pane, or press CTRL+A and then press DELETE.

Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | LO6: Insert and Format Objects 197
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Information Sheet
To resize your entire SmartArt graphic, click the border of your SmartArt
graphic, and then drag the sizing handles in or out until your SmartArt graphic
is the size that you want.

If you already have text on a PowerPoint slide, you can convert slide text to a
SmartArt graphic.

If you're using PowerPoint, you can animate your SmartArt graphic to


emphasize each shape or each hierarchical level.

Add a chart to your document

In Microsoft Word 2010, you can insert many kinds of data charts and graphs,
such as column charts, line graphs, pie charts, bar charts, area graphs, scatter graphs,
stock charts, surface charts, doughnut charts, bubble graphs, and radar graphs.

1. On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click Chart.

2. In the Insert Chart dialog box, click the arrows to scroll through the
chart types.
Select the type of chart that you want and then click OK.

When you rest the mouse pointer over any chart type, a Screentip displays its name.

TIP: For more information on chart types, see Available chart types.
3. 3. Edit the data in Excel 2010.

When you are finished editing your data, you can close Excel.

198 LO6: Insert and Format Objects | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet

Sample data in an Excel worksheet

To get a good idea of what you can add to or change in your chart, under
Chart Tools, click the Design, Layout, and Format tabs, and then explore the
groups and options that are provided on each tab.

If you don't see the Chart Tools, make sure that you click anywhere inside
the chart to activate it

To customize the appearance of a chart, see Change the appearance of your


chart.

You can also access design, layout, and formatting features that are available
for specific chart elements (such as chart axes or the legend) by right-clicking
those chart elements.

(Source: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-
help/results.aspx?qu=smartart+in+and+charts+in+ms+word+2010&ex=1)

Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | LO6: Insert and Format Objects 199
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Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.5

Inserting SmartArt and Charts

Instruction: Prepare a document applying knowledge learned about SmartArt and Chart.
The following data should be reflected:

1. For the application of SmartArt: (10 pts.)

The School Name

The Complete Organizational Chart of the School Faculty and Personnel

Save the document with the filename: SmartArt.docx

2. For the application of Chart: (10 pts.)

The School Name

The Name of all School Employees

The School Employees Number of Years in Service

Save the document with the filename: Chart

200 LO6: Insert and Format Objects | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 6.6

Using Grouped and Ungrouped Objects

You can group shapes, pictures, or other objects. Grouping lets you rotate, flip,
move, or resize all shapes or objects at the same time as though they were a single shape
or object. You can also change the attributes of all of the shapes in a group at one time,
by adding a shape fills or shape effect, for example. You can select an item within a group
and apply an attribute without ungrouping the shapes, or you can create groups within
groups to help you build complex drawings.

You can also ungroup a group of shapes at any time and then regroup them later.

Group shapes or objects

1. Hold CTRL and select the shapes or other objects that you want to group.

2. Under Drawing Tools, on the Format tab, in the Arrange group, click , and
then click Group .

If you do not see the Drawing Tools or Format tabs, make sure that you selected a
shape or other object. You might have to double-click the object to open the Format tab.

After you group shapes or other objects, you can continue to select any single
shape or object within the group. Select the group, and then click the individual
shape or object that you want to select.

You cannot group shapes and other objects across multiple programs.

Group pictures

1. Hold CTRL and select the pictures that you want to group.

2. Under Picture Tools, on the Format tab, in the Arrange group, click , and then
click Group .

Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | LO6: Insert and Format Objects 201
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Information Sheet

If you do not see the Picture Tools or Format tabs, make sure that you selected a
shape or other object. You might have to double-click the object to open the Format tab.

After you group pictures or other objects, you can continue to select any single
picture or object within the group. Select the group, and then click the individual
picture or object that you want to select.

All of the pictures or other objects in the group must be in the same program. For
instance, you cant have a group that consists of one picture in Word and another
picture in PowerPoint.

Ungroup shapes, pictures, or objects

To ungroup a group of shapes, pictures, or other objects (for example, if you want
to move a group but leave one shape behind or make extensive changes to one shape
without changing the other shapes), do the following:

1. Select the group that you want to ungroup.

2. Do one of the following:

To ungroup shapes or other objects, under Drawing Tools, on the Format


tab, in the Arrange group, click Group , and then click Ungroup .

To ungroup pictures, under Picture Tools, on the Format tab, in the Arrange
group, click , and then click Ungroup .

202 LO6: Insert and Format Objects | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet
3. If you do not see the Drawing Tools, Picture Tools, or Format tabs, make sure
that you selected a group of shapes, pictures, or other objects. You might have to
double-click the object to open the Format tab.

Regroup shapes or objects

1. Select any one of the shapes or objects that were previously in a group.

If you converted a SmartArt graphic to individual shapes, it is not possible to


convert them back to a SmartArt graphic or to regroup them.

2. Under Drawing Tools, on the Format tab, in the Arrange group, click , and
then click Regroup .

If you do not see the Drawing Tools or Format tabs, make sure that you selected a
shape or other object. You might have to double-click the object to open the Format tab.

NOTE: The Regroup button is not available in Word 2010. To


regroup pictures, select all of the pictures that you want to regroup
and then click Gr oup.

Regroup pictures

1. Select any one of the pictures or objects that were previously in a group.
2. Under Picture Tools, on the Format tab, in the Arrange group, click , and then
click Regroup .

If you do not see the Picture Tools or Format tabs, make sure that you selected a
picture or other object. You might have to double-click the object to open the Format tab.

(Source: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-
help/results.aspx?qu=group+and+ungroup+objects+ms+word+2010&ex=1)

Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | LO6: Insert and Format Objects 203
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Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.6

Using Grouped and Ungrouped Objects

Instruction: Open the following files listed below and apply the knowledge learned about
grouping and ungrouping objects by grouping all objects in in each file. Save the
enhanced document by adding the word grouped before each original filename. Example:
goupedclipArt.docx

1. clipArt.docx (5 pts.)

2. wordArt.docx (5 pts.)

3. drawings.docx (5 pts.)

4. textboxes.docx (5 pts.)

204 LO6: Insert and Format Objects | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Assessment
ASSESSMENT SHEET

Instruction: Applying all the knowledge learned in Inserting and Formatting Objects,
prepare a comprehensive school brochure/ booklet. To pass the assessment you should
follow all the guidelines below:

1. Use at least five (5) pictures or ClipArt


2. Use at least five (5) word Art
3. Use at least five (5) drawings or shapes
4. Use at least five (5) text boxes
5. Use at least one (1) SmartArt
6. Use at least one (1) chart
7. Use at least three (3) grouped objects
8. Save the document with the filename myBrochure.docx.

Working with Microsoft Word 2010 | LO6: Inserting and Formatting Objects 205
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Introduction
Lesson 7.1 Using Other Microsoft Word 2010 Features

Description:

This lesson covers the performances required in inserting and formatting objects.

In this lesson, you will learn how to


insert comments as required;
track changes based on activity guide;
insert hyperlinks according to the activity guide; and
create and use mail merge.

For you to satisfactorily complete this lesson, you are expected to


get at least ten (10) points Activity 7.1 - Tracking Changes and Inserting
Comments;
get at least seven (7) points in Activity 7.2 - Inserting Hyperlink;
get at least seven (7) points in Activity 7.3 - Using Caption and Cross-
reference;
get at least ten (15) points in Activity 7.4 - Utilizing Mail Merge; and
pass the assessment of this lesson.

206 LO7: Utilize other Microsoft Word 2010 Features | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 7.1

Tracking Changes and Inserting Comments

The Track Changes features of Word 2010 allow you to keep a record of formatting
changes, text insertions and deletions, and comments made by multiple editors.

Changes will appear as balloons in the right-hand margin or as a list in a separate


area of the screen, noting the time, date and editor of each change.

A final document can then be created by accepting or rejecting the proposed


changes.

Using Track Changes

1. Click Review | Track Changes icon.

NOTE: You can turn the track changes feature on or off by clicking
on the Track Changes button on the toolbar.

Changing How Tracked Changes Appear

By default, tracked changes will appear as highlighted or colored text within the
document, with balloons in the right-hand margin explaining what change was made. All
persons reviewing the document will have their comments and changes appear in a
different color balloon. To see further details about the time, date and editor of the
change, hold your cursor over a balloon (without clicking).

To display changes as a list:

1. On the Review tab, click Reviewing Pane.

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Information Sheet
By clicking on the Reviewing Pane drop arrow (downward pointing arrow beside
the Reviewing Pane tab), options for either a vertical or horizontal list will appear.

NOTE: From the Track Changes Options window you can select
how you want Insertions, Deletions and Formatting changes to be
displayed within the document. You can also select when you want
Track Balloons to appear through the Use Balloons drop down
menu.

To display changes differently:

1. On the Review tab, click Track Changes | Change Tracking Options... The Track
Changes Options window will pop up.

To display changes by one reviewer only:

1. On the Review Tab, click Show Markup | Reviewers and select the name of the
reviewer whose changes you would like to see

208 LO7: Utilize other Microsoft Word 2010 Features | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet
To display changes by all reviewers:

1. On the Review tab, click Show | Reviewers and select All Reviewers

Changing the Document View:

By default, a document using Track Changes will display the document in a view
called Final Showing Markup. You can change the view of the document to any of the
following options:

Final Showing Markup: the text of the document appears with the changes in
place. Balloons indicate what changes were made, such as what the original text
said.

Final: how the document will look with all proposed changes accepted

Original Showing Markup: the text of the document appears with the original text
in place. The balloons show all the proposed changes

Original: how the document looked originally, before any changes were made

To change the document view:

1. On the Review tab, select the drop down arrow next to the view box that states Final
Showing Markup.

3. Select the view you wish to use.

Hiding Tracked Changes

You can temporarily hide track changes by changing the view. To permanently hide
track changes, you must accept or reject the proposed changes.

To temporarily hide tracked changes:

1. On the Review tab, select the drop down arrow next to the view box that states Final
Showing Markup.

2. Select the Final or Original view, where the properties of these views are as previously
stated.
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Information Sheet

NOTE: If Track Changes has been used on a document then those


changes are automatically revealed when the document is opened,
even if they were previously hidden by changing the view.

To permanently hide tracked changes, you must accept or reject the proposed
changes to prevent them from reappearing when the document is re-opened by you or
another user. See Accepting or rejecting all changes in a document for further
instructions.

If you would like to keep a record of the tracked changes for yourself, but send the
document to another user without the changes being visible, you must make a copy of the
document. Accept or reject the changes in the copy of the document and send that copy to
other users.

Word Security options allow you to hide tracked changes when opening a document
containing them. However, even if you clear this check box, the tracked changes are still
in the document and can be revealed by selecting the type of markup on the Show
Markup menu. These settings affect your machine only; other users opening the
document will automatically see all changes.

For this reason, it is not recommended that you use this option to hide track
changes.

To enable / disable making hidden markup visible when opening or saving:

1. Click on File | Options.

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Information Sheet
2. Click the Trust Center tab | Trust Center Settings... A Trust Center window will pop
up.

3. Click the Privacy Options tab and under the Document-specific settings section,
tick or untick the Make hidden markup visible when opening or saving check box.

Saving, printing or sending a file with track changes

If Track Changes has been used on a document, a warning is displayed before


printing, saving or sending the file:

To enable / disable the warning before printing, saving or sending a file that
contains tracked changes or comments:

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Information Sheet
1. Click on File | Options.

2. Click the Trust Center tab | Trust Center Settings...

3. Click the Privacy Options tab and under the Document-specific settings section, tick
or untick the Warn before printing, saving or sending a file that contains tracked
changes or comments check box.

Accepting or rejecting all changes in a document

It is not possible to hide tracked changes from other people's view - you must either
accept or reject the changes to ensure they aren't visible (see Hiding Tracked Changes
above).

To accept or reject changes on a case-by-case basis:

1. Use the Next or Previous arrows to select a change.

2. Click the Accept or Reject button accordingly.

3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 for all changes in the document.

To accept all changes in the document:

1. Click Accept drop down arrow | Accept All Changes in Document.

212 LO7: Utilize other Microsoft Word 2010 Features | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet
To reject all changes in the document:

1. Click Reject drop down arrow | Reject All Changes in Document.

To save yourself time when accepting and rejecting changes, try the following:

1. Use the Next button to move to the first change in the document you want to reject.

2. Reject this change using the Reject button.

3. Continue through the document, rejecting the changes you don't want to keep and
ignoring the changes you want to accept.

4. When all changes you wish to reject are removed, use the Accept All Changes in
Document option to accept the remaining changes.

Source: http://www.addictivetips.com/microsoft-office/word-2010-track-changes-in-
document

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Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 9.3

Tracking Changes and Inserting Comments

Instruction: Completely perform what is asked.

1. Open computer.docx in the Word Practice Files folder. (2pts.)

2. Change the first paragraph with the paragraph below: (5pts.)

We are all familiar with what a computer is in a specific,


contemporary sense. Personal computers are found in most
aspects of daily life, and for some it is hard to even imagine a
world without them. But the term computer means more
than simply the Macs and PCs we are familiar with. A
computer is, at its most basic, a machine which can take
instructions, and perform computations based on those
instructions.

3. Track changes and add comments. (5pts.)

4. Save the enhanced document with the filename tracked.docx (3pts.)

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Information Sheet

Information Sheet 9.3


Inserting Hyperlink
Open Word 2010 document in which we want to create hyperlinks.

Right-click a desired word or portion of document and select Hyperlink.

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Information Sheet
Link to Existing File or Web Page:

It will bring up Insert Hyperlink dialog, from the left sidebar select Existing File or
Web Page, from right sidebar select the file for which to want to create hyperlink, and
from Text to display enter text you want to display instead of file path. Under Address, for
creating hyperlink for a webpage, enter webpage address. Click OK to continue.

You will see a hyperlink is created, hold Ctrl and click the link to open it.

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Link within Document:

Move to Insert Hyperlink dialog and from the left sidebar select Place in This
Document, from main dialog you can select Headings, Bookmarks to create hyperlink with,
from Text to display enter text you want to display. Click OK to continue.

As we have linked heading in the document, thus upon click, it will lead us to
specified heading.

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Information Sheet

Link to Create New Document:

Move to Insert Hyperlink dialog, from left sidebar select Create New Document, and
from main dialog enter the name of the document, under When to edit select an option
and click OK.

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Information Sheet
This type of link will open a new document with name specified.

Link to Email Address:

For linking content with email address, open Insert Hyperlink dialog, from left
sidebar select E-mail Address, and from main window enter recipient email address,
under Subject write down subject of email message. Click OK to continue.

This Link will open up Outlook compose mail window.

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Information Sheet

(Source: http://www.addictivetips.com/microsoft-office/hyperlinks-in-word-2010/)

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Activity Sheet

Activity Sheet 9.4


Inserting Hyperlink

Instruction: Completely perform what is asked.

1. Open the computer.docx in the Word Practice Files folder. (2pts.)

2. Turn a word or phrase into a hyperlink that links to www.microsoft.com (2pts.)

3. Test the hyperlink by clicking on it. The web page should open in your web
browser. (2pts.)

4. Remove the hyperlink that you just created. (2pts.)

5. Create a hyperlink that links to an email address of a friend. (2pts.)

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Information Sheet
Information Sheet 9.4

Using Caption and Cross-reference

Caption

A caption is a numbered label, such as Figure 1, that you can add to a figure, a
table, an equation, or another object.

1. Label that you select.

2. Number that Microsoft Word inserts for you.

You can vary the caption label and number format for different types of items for
example, Table II and Equation 1-A. You can also add descriptive text to the label.
If you later add, delete, or move captions, you can easily update the caption numbers all
at once.

Add a Captions

You can add captions to figures, equations, or other objects. You can also use those
captions to create a table of the captioned items for example, a table of figures or a table
of equations.

If the objects in your document are formatted as floating objects, follow the
instructions for adding captions to floating objects.

1. Select the object (table, equation, figure, or another object) that you want to add a
caption to.

2. On the References tab, in the Captions group, click Insert Caption.

3. In the Label list, select the label that best describes the object, such as a picture or
equation. If the list doesn't provide the correct label, click New Label, type the new
label in the Label box, and then click OK.

4. Type any text, including punctuation that you want to appear after the label.

5. Select any other options you want.

222 LO7: Utilize other Microsoft Word 2010 Features | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet

Microsoft Office Word inserts captions as text, but it inserts the sequential caption
number as a field. If your caption looks similar to {SEQ Table \* ARABIC}, Word is
displaying field codes instead of field results. To see the field results, press ALT+F9, or
right-click the field code and then click Toggle Field Codes on the shortcut menu.

Add a caption to a floating object

If you want to be able to wrap text around the object and caption, or you want to be
able to move the object and the caption together, you need to insert both the object and
the caption into a text box.

1. On the Insert tab, in the Text group, click Text Box, and then click Draw Text
Box.

2. In your document, drag to draw the text box over the object.

3. On the Drawing Tools Format tab, in the Shape Styles group, click Shape Fill,
and then click No Fill.

4. In the Arrange group, click Text Wrapping, and then click the text wrapping
option that you used for the object.

5. Under Text Box Tools, on the Format tab, in the Arrange group, click Send
Behind Text.

6. Right-click the text box, and then click Format Shape.

7. Click Text Box, and then set the internal margin values to 0.

8. Select the object, and then click Cut in the Clipboard group on the Home tab. Or
press CTRL+X.

9. Click in the text box, and then click Paste in the Clipboard group on the Home
tab. Or press CTRL+V.

10. Select the object, and insert the caption.

Include chapter numbers in captions

To include chapter numbers in captions, you must apply a unique heading style to
chapter headings. For example, if you use the Heading 1 style for chapter headings, do
not use the Heading 1 style for any other text in the document.

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Information Sheet
Apply numbering to the chapter headings in your document

1. Select the first chapter heading in your document.

2. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the arrow next to Multilevel List.

3. Click a chapter-numbering list definition (one that includes the text Heading 1 or
Chapter 1).

The chapter-numbering list definition is applied to the heading styles in your


document.

4. To add the next numbered heading, click to select the heading, and then click the
heading style in the Quick Styles gallery.

Include chapter numbers in captions

1. Select the item that you want to add a caption to.

2. On the References tab, in the Captions group, click Insert Caption.

3. In the Label list, select the item for which you want Microsoft Office Word to insert
a caption.

4. Type any text that you want to appear after the label.

5. Click Numbering.

6. Select the Include chapter number check box.

7. In the Chapter starts with style list, select the heading style that was applied to
the chapter heading.

8. In the Use separator list, select a punctuation mark to separate the chapter
number from the caption number.

224 LO7: Utilize other Microsoft Word 2010 Features | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet
Update caption numbers

If you insert a new caption, Microsoft Word automatically updates the caption
numbers. However, if you delete or move a caption, you must manually update the
captions.

1. Click anywhere in the document and press CTRL+A to select the entire document.

2. Right-click, and then click Update Field on the shortcut menu.

You can also update captions by selecting the entire document and then pressing
F9.

Cross-Reference

Cross-references are commonly used in indexes and within long documents to


direct the reader's attention to another part of the document, such as an image or related
table. Cross-references can appear anywhere within the document. A cross-reference
created in Word can be automatically updated if you later make changes to the document.
You can create a cross-reference to any of the following objects:

Numbered item (created using Word's regular or outline numbering)


Heading (formatted using Styles)
Bookmarked text
Footnote
Endnote
Figure / Table / Equation (marked using Captions)

When a cross-reference is created, a field is inserted into your document identifying


the item you are referencing (e.g. a table, chart, heading). In the example (See Table A),
you would type the brackets and the word See before inserting Table A as a field, as
explained below. Fields are usually updated when a document is opened or printed. In
addition, you can manually update a field by pressing the F9 key.

To update fields:

1. To update a single field, place your cursor within the field and press F9.

2. To update all fields in a document, select all text using CTRL + A, then press F9.

To create a cross-reference:

1. Add any introductory text and brackets required.

2. Place your cursor where the cross-reference should be inserted.

3. Click References | Cross-reference. A Cross-reference dialog box will appear.

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Information Sheet

4. Click the Reference type: drop down and select the type of object you want to provide
a cross-reference to.

5. Click the Insert reference to: drop down and select the information to be
displayed in the cross-reference field.

6. Available headings, captions or footnotes will appear. Select the item you wish to cross-
reference.

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Information Sheet

7. Click Insert.

In the example below, we selected the following options:

Reference type: Table

Insert reference to: Entire Caption (highlighted in grey)

The grey area indicates the field that will update if changes are made to the
document.

When a cross-reference is created, a field is inserted into your document identifying


the item you are referencing (e.g. a table, chart, heading). In the example (See Table A),
you would type the brackets and the word See before inserting Table A as a field, as
explained below. Fields are usually updated when a document is opened or printed. In
addition, you can manually update a field by pressing the F9 key.

To update fields:

1. To update a single field, place your cursor within the field and press F9.

2. To update all fields in a document, select all text using CTRL + A, then press F9.

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Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 9.5

Using Caption and Cross-reference

Instruction: Completely perform what is asked.

1. Open computer.docx in the Practice Files folder. (2pts.)

2. Put a caption in each of the pictures. (3pts.)

3. Put a cross-referencing for at least two (2) words in every paragraph. (2pts.)

4. Save the enhanced document as captionCross-reference.docx (3pts.)

228 LO7: Utilize other Microsoft Word 2010 Features | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 9.5

Utilizing Mail Merge

Mail Merge feature enables user to create documents (Letter, Emails, Fax etc.) that
are essentially the same but contains unique elements such as recipient Name, Address,
Contact No, City, State, etc. It helps user to create a document for multiple recipients
more easily by just selecting recipient names and choosing the document. Personal details
of the respective recipient will be automatically added in the document which prevents
users to write each recipients personal info in every document, eventually saving a lot of
time. This post will cover how to use this feature through a simple wizard.

Launch Word 2010, navigate to Mailings tab, and from Start Mail Merge options,
click Step by Step Mail Merge Wizard.

This will bring up Mail Merge dialog at the side of the Word document window, here
you can specify type of document you want to create, we will select Letters, click Next:
Starting document from the bottom of the dialog.

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Information Sheet
In this step, you will be provided with different options to create Letters, we will
choose a simple procedure by selecting by template. Click Select template.

This will bring up Select template dialog, choose a suitable template. We will be
using Median Letter template. Click OK to continue.

At the left side of the window you can see the template is imported into document,
from right-pane, click Next: Select recipients.

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Information Sheet

In this step, you can choose different options to import recipient list, we will select
an existing list, hit Browse to import desired recipients list.

We will be using recipients list created in Excel 2010. The name of the worksheet is
Mail, which we will import in to Word Mail Merge.

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Information Sheet
Choose an Excel worksheet, click Open to import.

Select Table dialog will appear, now choose the worksheet which contains required
data, if first row contains column headings, then enable First row of data contains column
headers option, and click OK.

You will see the Mail worksheet in the Mail Merge Recipients dialog. Here you can
filter down the recipients on the basis of column headings. If we want to send letters to
the recipients living in city Akron. We will select Akron from City drop-down options.

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Information Sheet

Upon click, it will show only the recipients living in Akron. Here you can also
perform different actions over the list such as; Sort, Filter, Find duplicates, Find recipients,
and validate address. Click OK to proceed further.

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Information Sheet
Now navigate to Mailings tab, and click Address Block.

You will reach Insert Address Block dialog, from Specify address elements, choose
format in which you want to show recipient name. Under Preview you can see the preview
of the changes that affects. Under Correct problems, click Match Fields to insert new field
in the letter, as we want to include address of the recipient.

Match Fields dialog will appear, now from Address 1 options select Street. That will
include the name of the street. You can also include other fields if required. Click OK to
continue.

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Information Sheet

You will see the address is added in to the format as shown the screenshot below.
Click OK to continue.

Now we will customize the greeting message, for that navigate to Mailings tab, and
click Greeting Line.

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Information Sheet
In Insert Greeting Line dialog, you can choose desired greeting format from Greeting
Line format. Under Greeting line for invalid recipient names choose the format for unknown
recipients. Under Preview, it shows the preview of the changes you made. Click OK to
continue.

Now to make Address Block more prominent, navigate to Home and apply color and
font styles over it.

Navigate to Mailings tab, and from Finish & Merge menu, click Edit Individual
Documents.

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Information Sheet

It will bring Merge to New Document dialog, you can choose Current record, and we
will select All to view all the recipients. Click OK to show the letter of each recipient.

Now as you can see in the screenshot below, Mail Merge created letters of each
recipients residing in city Akron with their respective street names.

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Information Sheet

By using Mail Merge, you can also create:

A set of labels or envelopes: The return address is the same on all the labels or
envelopes, but the destination address is unique on each one.

A set of form letters, e-mail messages, or faxes: The basic content is the same in
all the letters, messages, or faxes, but each contains information that is specific to
the individual recipient, such as name, address, or some other piece of personal
data.

A set of numbered coupons: The coupons are identical except that each contains
a unique number.

238 LO7: Utilize other Microsoft Word 2010 Features | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 7.4

Utilizing Mail Merge

Instruction: Completely perform what is asked.

1. Open the tyletter.docx (serves as main document) in the Word Practice Files Folder
(3pts.)

2. Open the data.xlsx (serves as data source) in the Word Practice Files Folder (3pts.)

3. Insert Fields as shown below to have the data about the recipient of each letter
(4pts.)

<FIRST NAME> <LAST NAME>


<ADDRESS>

Dear Mr. / Ms. <LAST NAME>

Thank you for all the help you have given me with my job search.

I especially appreciate the information and advice you have provided, and
the contacts you have shared with me. Your assistance has been invaluable
to me during this process.

Again, thank you so much. I greatly appreciate your generosity.

Best Regards,
Samantha

4. Save each mail merge document for each of the five (5) records in the data
source with the following filenames:
mailmerge1.docx (2pts.)
mailmerge2.docx (2pts.)
mailmerge3.docx (2pts.)
mailmerge4.docx (2pts.)
mailmerge5.docx (2pts.)

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Assessment Sheet
Assessment Sheet

Instruction: Open computer.docx in the Word Practice Files folder. To pass the
assessment you should perform all the tasks as stated in the checklist below:

TASK COMPLETED NOT COMPLETED


1. Tracking Changes
and Inserting
Comments
(You are required
change any part of
the document and
enable the track
changes feature
with the changes
made.)
2. Inserting Hyperlink
(You are required
to insert hyperlink
using any word in
the document.)
3. Using Caption and
Cross-reference
(You are required
to put caption to
any figure in the
document and use
cross-reference to
any word in the
document.)
4. Utilizing Mail
Merge
(Utilize mail merge
having the
computer.docx file
as the main
document and be
able prepare a new
data source file
individually.)

240 LO7: Utilize other Microsoft Word 2010 Features | Working with Microsoft Word 2010
Pre-Test Key Answer
Pre-test Answer Key

1. b
2. a
3. d
4. c
5. a
6. d
7. d
8. a
9. c
10. c
11. c.
12. a
13. c
14. a
15. a

Internet and Computing Fundamentals - I | Learning the Basic Computer Concepts 241
MODULE 3

Internet and Computing Fundamentals - II | Searching the Web and Use E- Mail 243
Module 3
Module Title: Working with Microsoft Word 2010

Module Introduction:

This module contains information and suggested learning activities on Internet and
Computing Fundamentals (ICF). It includes instructional materials and activities for you
to complete.

This module covers the knowledge and skills required in performing basic word
processing using Microsoft Word 2010 application such as making letters; enhancing
documents with pictures, charts or tables; and making personal or business documents
and other tasks which can be efficiently done in this application.

This module consists of seven (7) learning outcomes. Each learning outcome
contains learning activities supported by each information sheets. Read the information
sheets and answer the activity sheets provided to measure whether you have mastered the
knowledge or perform the activities for each learning outcome.

Upon completion of this module, report to your teacher for assessment to check
your mastery of the skills. If you pass the assessment, you will be ready for the next
module.

Expected Outcome:

Upon completion of this module, you will learn how to

LO 1. explore Microsoft Word 2010 application;


LO 2. create and edit a document;
LO 3. format text and paragraphs;
LO 4. format a document;
LO 5. create and format tables;
LO 6. insert and format objects; and
LO 7. utilize other Microsoft Word 2010 features.

Internet and Computing Fundamentals - II | Searching the Web and Use E- Mail 245
Pre-Test
Pre-Test

Direction: Choose the letter of the correct answer/s. Write your answer/s on a separate
sheet of paper.
1. You open a web site with a link about global warming. What will you do to view the
information in the link in a separate window?
a. Click the link for the global warming.
b. Type the keyword global warming in the address bar and then click New Page.
c. Type the keyword global warming in the Search box.
d. Right-click the link, then click the Open in New Window option.

2. Liza is chatting with her cousin living in Europe. What do you call the network that
transfers the messages from Lizas computer to her cousins computer and vice-versa?
a. Ethernet
b. Intranet
c. Internet
d. Local area network (LAN)

3. To access the Internet, which of the following you must use?


a. E-mail Address
b. Search Engine
c. Web browser
d. Web Site

4. Which one of the following URLs is valid?


a. www\\education.com
b. http\\:www.education.com
c. http://com.education.www
d. http://www.education.com
5. Angela Dane wants to chat with his friend over the Internet, which program will allow
her to do that?
a. Microsoft Office Access 2003
b. Microsoft Office PowerPoint 2003
c. Microsoft Office Word 2003
d. Microsoft Windows Messenger
6. In creating an e-mail account, a password is required. Which of the following
passwords is considered a strong password?
a. 123
b. QWERTY
c. RSancso#154
d. stongword
7. A game is to be accessed in website; however you cannot access it because enhanced
content is embedded on it. Which software you must install on your computer to play
the game?
a. Web portal
b. Plug-in
c. Web browser
d. Search engine
8. Four of your friends simultaneously download a large article from the Internet.

If your friends have the connections shown in the table, who will be the first one to
finish downloading the file?

246 Searching the Web and Use E- Mail I Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Pre-Test

Name Connection Type


Angela Dane T1
Daniel Dave Cable
Jig Benette DSL
Mark Angelo Dial-up

a. Angela Dane
b. Daniel Dave
c. Jig Benette
d. Mark Angelo

9. In sending an e-mail to a friend, you must have her _________?


a. Company address
b. E-mail address
c. Home address
d. Telephone number

10. You teacher requires you to research about branches of science. Upon searching on
the net, you have found a website and decided to copy the content but did not include
the source. What type of violation have you demonstrated in this case?
a. Defamation
b. Gambling
c. Libel
d. Plagiarism

11. To avoid virus attacks by an email, you should __________?


a. Avoid opening e-mail attachments from unknown users.
b. Copy attachments to your computer before you open them.
c. Reinstall the e-mail client periodically.
d. Reply to spam e-mail messages.
12. You receive an e-mail message asking you to share your name, age, and bank
account number in order to receive a special price .What should you do?
a. Delete the e-mail message
b. Forward the e-mail message to friends.
c. Send your personal information in order to receive the discount.
d. Use a spyware-fighting program.
13. Which statement is true?
a. You can use e-mail to scan pictures.
b. You can use e-mail to send fax messages.
c. You can use e-mail to send text and picture messages.
d. You can use e-mail to create program.
14. The following are the activities involved in surfing the net. Which of the following
actions displays a copyright violation?
a. Comment on a blog site
b. Quoting a paragraph and not mentioning the source
c. Reading material from a publicly available Web site
d. Sharing a Web site address

Internet and Computing Fundamentals - II | Searching the Web and Use E- Mail 247
Pre-Test
15. Angela accidentally leaves her social account open in a computer shop. After a week,
she sees one of her pictures uploaded in a website without her permission. What
violation has been transpired in this case?
a. Accidental erasure of data
b. Damage to computer because of an earthquake
c. Hardware failure
d. Theft of confidential data

248 Searching the Web and Use E- Mail I Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Introduction
Lesson 1 Familiarize Themselves With The Networking concepts

Description:

This lesson covers one of the performance required in exploring Microsoft 2010
application.

In this lesson the student should be able to

learn about networks;


learn the difference between topologies and other networks;
understand Intranet, Extranet and network security; and
understand Ethernet and wireless network.

For you to satisfactory complete this lesson, you are expected to

get a score of at least twenty (20) points in activity Networking


Fundamentals;
get a score of at least eight (8) points in activity Ethernet and Wireless
Technology;
get a score of at least eight (8) points in activity Intranet, Extranet,
Internet and Network Security; and
pass the assessment of this lesson.

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Information Sheet
Information Sheet 1.1

Networking Fundamentals

In this lesson you will look at what a networks is and how it relates to living online.
You will be familiar on what a network is, the network standards, different type of
networks, what is required to connect to a network and the advantages and disadvantages
of being connected to a network.

What is a Network?

Shared Files
Workstation

Network Interface
Card (NIC)

Shared Files Shared Files


Workstation Workstation
Cable DSL Modem

Network Hub or switch


Peer-To-Peer Network

Ethernet Cables

Shared Files
Server)

Network Software
Installed ( Windows 7)

Workstation
Workstation
Client/Server Network
Figure 1.2 Basic components of network

A network is several computers, printers, and other devices that are connected
together with cables or radio signals. This allows the computers to talk with each other
and share information and resources (usually files and printers). Networks vary in size;

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they can be as small as two computers connected to each other by a cable, or they can
span the entire globethe Internet is actually the worlds largest network.

The collections of interconnected computer networks around the world make up


the Internet. People connected to the network can share resources and information.
Computer programs can be used and accessed simultaneously.

Types of Network

Computer network can be categorized according to range, functional relationship


and topology.

A. Computer Network According to Range.


1. Local Area Network ( LAN) A network that connects computers in the same
geographic area or within a local area, such as, building, room, a home or a
schools computer laboratory. Computers in this kind of network can be
interconnected through cables or wireless links.

2. Metropolitan Area Network (MAN) MAN is larger network than LAN. It usually
covers several offices, buildings or schools, each with their own LAN but
connected to each other in the same locality or place.

3. Wide Area Network (WAN) - A network that connects computers across a large
geographic area using telephone lines or satellites. The Internet is actually a huge
Wide Area Network.

B. Computer Network According to Functional Relationship


1. Peer-to-Peer Network - In a peer-to-peer network, everyone stores their files on
their own computer, and anyone on the network can access files stored on any
other computer. Because you dont need any additional software (Windows 7
includes peer-to-peer networking), peer-to-peer networking is an inexpensive
way to connect computers in a small office or home. The disadvantages of a
peer-to-peer network are that it doesnt offer as much security as client/server
networks, and it can be difficult to find files that are stored on many different
computers. Windows 7 Home is designed for use in small home and office peer-
to-peer networks.

2. Client/Server Network: In a client/server network, everyone stores their files


on a central computer called a server. Everyone on the network can access the
files stored on the server. Client/server networks are more secure, easier to
administer, and much more powerful than peer-to-peer networks. Thats why
they are used to connect computers in most businesses. The types of
computers that can be used as servers include mainframe computers,
minicomputers and powerful PC, Macintosh, or UNIX computers. Clients can
use PCs, Macintosh computers, handheld devices, etc.

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Information Sheet

C. Computer Network According to Topology

Topology refers to the layout or structure of the network in relation with the flow
of data. The most common types of topologies are:

1. Star Topology - The most commonly applied topology. Uses a central device
(hub) with cables extending in all directions.

2. Linear Bus Topology Linear bus topology uses one long cable, referred to
as backbone, to which computers and other devices are attached. A
terminator is placed at each end of the backbone to keep the signals from
bouncing back and being received again by the nodes in the network.

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3. Ring Topology- It is consists of several computers joined together to form a


circle. Data moves from one computer to the next in one direction only. Any
data or messages will pass through adjacent nodes until it reaches the target
node.

4. Hybrid Topology- Hybrid topology is a combination of different types of


topology used in a network system to adapt to the different design of floors
or rooms in a building.

Types of Internet Connections

A. Narrowband
Connection Advantages Disadvantages
Rates
1. Dial-up 24 kbps to inexpensive Slowest connections,
56 kbps you cannot use the
telephone for the
Internet and phone
calls for the same
time.

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2. Integrated Services 128 kbps Better than dial-up ISDN connections
Digital Network are considered still
more or less
outdated.
B. Broadband
1. Cable connections 1.5 Mbps up Very fast and Not available in all
to 7.5 Mbps reliable connection areas
with fixed monthly
fee.
2. Digital Subscriber Line 512 Kbps to Excellent Internet DSL connections is
Broadband 20 Mbps connection. much costlier tan
dial-up.
DSL allows you to
use telephone
normally while
connected to the
Internet.
3. Dedicated Leased Line 1,544,000 DLL allows you to DLL is much more
bps upload and expensive than cable
download large files and DSL
quickly. connections.

High speed Available mostly in


connection that is United States,
directly from ISPs Canada and Japan.
network.

4. Wireless Connections 256 Kbps to Anyone with WiFi You have to stay
as much as ready gadgets and within a WiFi
10+ Mbps devices can be Hotzone.
connected to the
Internet anywhere in
the world without
any cords or wires
for as long as you
are in a WiFi
hotzone.

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Activity Sheet 1.1
Networking Fundamentals

A. Direction: Identify what is asked.


_______ 1. It is consists of several computers joined together to form a circle.
_______ 2. A network that connects computers in the same geographic area or within
a local area, such as, building, room, a home or a schools computer
laboratory.
_______ 3. Uses one long cable, referred to as backbone, to which computers and
other devices are attached.
_______ 4. A network that connects computers across a large geographic area using
telephone lines or satellites.
_______ 5. It is a combination of different types of topology used in a network system
to adapt to the different design of floors or rooms in a building.
B. Direction: Supply the missing information
C. Narrowband
Connection Advantages Disadvantages
Rates
3. Dial-up
4. Integrated Services
Digital Network
D. Broadband
1. Cable connections
2. Digital Subscriber Line
Broadband
3. Dedicated Leased Line
4. Wireless Connections

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Key Answer
Key Answer

Activity Sheet 1.1


Networking Fundamentals

1. Ring Topology
2. Local Area Network
3. Linear bus Topology
4. Wide Area Network
5. Hybrid Topology
B.
A. Narrowband
Connection Advantages Disadvantages
Rates
5. Dial-up 24 kbps to inexpensive Slowest connections,
56 kbps you cannot use the
telephone for the
Internet and phone calls
for the same time.
6. Integrated Services 128 kbps Better than dial-up ISDN connections are
Digital Network considered still more or
less outdated.
B. Broadband
1. Cable connections 1.5 Mbps Very fast and reliable Not available in all
up to 7.5 connection with fixed areas
Mbps monthly fee.
2. Digital Subscriber 512 Kbps to Excellent Internet DSL connections is
Line Broadband 20 Mbps connection. much costlier tan dial-
up.
DSL allows you to use
telephone normally
while connected to the
Internet.
3. Dedicated Leased 1,544,000 DLL allows you to DLL is much more
Line bps upload and download expensive than cable
large files quickly. and DSL connections.

High speed connection Available mostly in


that is directly from United States, Canada
ISPs network. and Japan.

4. Wireless 256 Kbps to Anyone with WiFi ready You have to stay within
Connections as much as gadgets and devices a WiFi Hotzone.
10+ Mbps can be connected to the
Internet anywhere in
the world without any
cords or wires for as
long as you are in a
WiFi hotzone.

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Information Sheet 1.2
Ethernet and Wireless Technology

Ethernet Shopping
List
Network Interface Cards
Server Network Hub or Switch
Workstation Ethernet CAT-5 Cable
Print Server Cable or DSL Modem
Printer

Workstation WiFi Shopping List


Hub or Switch Cable or
DSL Modem WiFi Network Cards
Firewall Wireless Access Point or
Router
Wireless Access Cable or DSL Modem
Workstation
with Wireless
Access

Figure 1.1 The network shown here contains the most common components that you will
find on a small network

To create a network you should decide what kind of network you will make to share
the printer, files and Internet access. The biggest networking decision you will have to
make is if you want an Ethernet-based network or a wireless (WiFi) one. Both have their
own set of advantages and disadvantages.

Ethernet Network

Ethernet is a computer network technology used in a local area network. It is one of


the most widely implemented LAN standards.

Hub/Switch

UTP Cable

Figure 1.2 The figure shows a small Ethernet network using LAN,
Star topology and Peer-To-Peer relationship

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Developed in the early 1970s , (Ethernet is one of the most simple, reliable, and long-
lived networking protocols ever designed. Its high speed, reliability, and simplicity have
made Ethernet easily the most common and popular way to connect computers and devices
in a network.
To get an idea of how Ethernet works, imagine several people trying to talk in an
unmediated meeting. There isnt a schedule of when each person can get a chance to speak;
people can simply stand up and talk whenever there is silence in the room. And, if two or
more people stand up and talk at the same time, a collision occurs. When that happens,
both parties sit back down for a very brief, random amount of time, then one of them will
stand up and try talking againhopefully without any interruptions or collisions this time.
And, obviously the amount of collisions on a network will increase as more computers and
network traffic are added. An Ethernet switch can greatly reduce the number of collisions
on an Ethernet network by intelligently managing network traffic.
Here are some of the basic advantages and disadvantages of going with an Ethernet
network:
Ethernet Advantages
Reliability: Ethernet has been around for a long, long time and nothing beats it for
its dependability.
Support: Most computersdesktops and laptops alikealready have an Ethernet
card built right into them!
Speed: Ethernet is fast; most Ethernet networks can transfer information at up to
100 Mbpsusually more than twice as fast as the best wireless networks. And the
new Gigabit Ethernet standard can handle a jaw-dropping 1,000 Mbps of network
traffic.
Security: Because it doesnt broadcast network information over the airwaves like
WiFi, Ethernet is theoretically more securesomeone would have to tap into the
networks lines in order to access it (something called the Internet).

Ethernet Disadvantages
Wires, wires, wires: The computers in an Ethernet network must be physically
connected by cables that resemble a fat telephone cord. Its not a big deal if you
want to connect two computers that are sitting right next to each other, but it is a
pain to run all that Ethernet cable if you want to connect a computer in your office
upstairs with another computer in the basement.

What You Need to Create an Ethernet Network

Besides the rather obvious and most important part of the network, which are the
actual computers, youll need a few things to create a small Ethernet network, including:

Network Hub or Switch: A


hub is a device where all the
cables on a network
connect, similar to an
electrical surge protector. A
switch is an intelligent hub
that manages network
traffic, ensuring that
information gets to the Figure 1.4 The Switch ( Left) and
correct destination. the Hub (right)

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Ethernet Cable: An Ethernet cable is the wire that


physically connects the computers, printers, and other
equipment on a network. When you buy an Ethernet
cable make sure that its CAT-5.

Ethernet Network Interface Cards: A network interface


card (NIC) is a device that physically connects each
computer to the network and allows your computer to talk
to other computers and devices on the network. Most
computers already come with a network adapter built-in,
but if yours doesnt you can install one; a PCI network
adapter for desktops or a PCMCIA network card adapter for
laptops.

Cable Modem or DSL Modem (Optional): A modem connects


computers to the Internet through an existing phone line or
cable connection. Cable modems and DSL modems are both
very fast and can connect all the computers in a home or
small office network to the Internet. If you subscribe to a
high-speed Internet service they will almost certainly set up
the cable modem or DSL modem for you.

Ethernet devices are available in a number of speeds (although the vast majority
uses the 100 Base-T standard). The following table describes common Ethernet speeds.

Standard Speed Description


10 Base T 10 Mbps Ten years ago, 10 Base-T was the standard speed of
most Ethernet networks, but its all but obsolete now.
You may still find 10 Base-T Ethernet on older network
devices, or on devices that simply dont require any
more bandwidth, like a cable or DSL modem.
1Base T 100 Mbps 100 Base-T Ethernet is by far the most common
( Fast Ethernet) Ethernet
standard in use. Its fastten times faster than 10
Base-T, yet it can still communicate with 10 Base-T
network devices; at only 10 Mbps, however.
Gigabit Ethernet 1,000 Mbps Gigabit Ethernet is a new Ethernet standard that works
just like 10 Base-T Ethernet, only ten times faster.
Gigabit Ethernet can still talk to 100 Base-T and even
10 Base-T network devices. Because its so new, Gigabit
Ethernet devices are still quite expensive.

Connection/Cabling Options

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There is a variety of connection or cabling options available to access
information to or from a network. Newer connection types allow the data to be
transferred between a computer and the network to flow much faster; with the costs of
these connection types dropping significantly, more people are choosing to either set up
or switch to a faster connection method. Some of the more popular connection options
include:
Twisted Pair - It is composed of 4 pairs of copper wires which are intertwined or
twisted in pairs for the purposes of canceling out unwanted signals
which can cause undesired results in the network. This is one of the
mostly widely used communications media because it is inexpensive and
widely unavailable. Many uses the Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) since
the lack of shielding makes it more flexible.

Figure 1.5 Twisted Pair and its parts


Courtesy of http://infocellar.com

Coaxial - This is a wire with a center wire surrounded with insulation and
then a grounded cover of braided wire to minimize electrical and
radio frequency interference. This cable type used to be the main type
of cable used for company networks or television transmission, with
most company networks using Ethernet specifications in their
network configuration.

Figure 1.6 Coaxial cable and its components


Courtesy of http://national-tech.com

Fiber Optics - A fiber optic cable is made up of bundled glass or plastic fibers
(threads) to transmit data. This option is generally faster than
coaxial cable as it has a much larger bandwidth for transmitting
data and is much less susceptible to interference that occurs with
metal cables.

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Figure 1.6 Fiber Optic cable and its components

Wireless - This is quickly becoming the connection option of choice as it does


not require any cables to be set in your home or office. There currently
are three types of connections available for a specific use: cell phone,
home, and office. In order to be connected in a wireless environment,
each computer must have a network card with a wireless
interface and an access point. Wireless devices work with radio
frequencies for data transmission.

Infrared - This wireless option works with infrared light waves in order to
transmit data. Some newer devices such as printers have an infrared
device installed which then allows you to print a document to that
printer provided you have an infrared wireless network card
installed on your notebook. The one downside to using infrared is that
the amount of distance between the two devices is less than using a
wireless device that works with radio frequencies.
Wireless Network

One of the hottest new technologies in the computer world is wireless networking or
WiFi,which lets you connect computers without any wires. Wireless networks allow
computers to talk to each other by broadcasting and receiving radio waves. Wireless
networks are often simply part of a larger, Ethernet network.

Figure 1.1 Some of the Wireless connection

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WiFi networking has its own set of advantages and disadvantages:

Wireless Networking Advantages

Simplicity: Wireless networks are often very simple to set up because there arent
any messy wires involved.
Public Availability: If you have a laptop with WiFi capability you can browse the
Internet and check your e-mail from thousands of wireless hotspots in coffee shops,
airports, and hotels.
Convenience: Wireless networks are downright coolnothing is more amazing than
browsing the Web on your laptop while youre sitting in the living room in front of
the television or outside on the porch.

Wireless Networking Disadvantages

Security: or lack thereof. WiFi broadcasts information just like a radio


transmitter, so it can be easy for an unauthorized computer to listen in and gain
access to your network.

There are a number of ways to secure a wireless network; the problem is


that many people simply dont know how to do it.

Interference: A wireless network shares the same crowded frequency as other


wireless networksand cordless phones too! All those devices can cause a lot of
interference and as a result many wireless networks are quite unreliable.

Hotspots and Access Points

You can find wireless network hotspots that let you browse the Internet and check
your e-mail in many places outside the home or office. A hotspot is a place where you can
connect to a wireless network. There are many wireless hotspots now available in such
places as restaurants, hotels, coffee shops and airports.

Wireless Security

Wireless network hotspots can be open or secure. If a hotspot is open, then anyone with a
wireless network card can access the hotspot. If the hotspot is secure, then the user will
usually need to know the WEP key to connect to it. WEP stands for Wired Equivalent
Privacy, and it is a way to encrypt the information that a wireless network sends through
the air. There are two variations of WEP: 64-bit encryption (really 40-bit) and 128-bit
encryption (really 104-bit). 40-bit encryption was the original standard but it was easily
broken. 128-bit encryption is more secure and is what most wireless networks use.

What You Need to Add a Wireless Hotspot to an Existing Network

If you already have several computers connected by an Ethernet network you can
easily add a WiFi hotspot to the mix. Heres what youll need:

Wireless Access Point: A wireless access point normally


plugs into a wired Ethernet network and acts as the
networks radio station, broadcasting and receiving
information to and from WiFi-enabled computers and
devices on the network. Try to get an access point that
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uses the 802.11g wireless standard, described in Table 1-5: WiFi Network
Standards.

Wireless Network (WiFi) Cards: Any computers you want


to connect to a wireless network must have a wireless
network or WiFi card. WiFi is already built in to many
newer laptops. If your laptop doesnt have WiFi you can
buy a PCMCIA card or an external USB port adapter.
For desktop computers, youll need a PCI card that you
install inside the machine, or a external USB port
adapter. Try to get cards that use the 802.11g wireless
standard, described in Table 1-5: WiFi Network
Standards.

In a typical home or office, your new hotspot will cover about 100 feet in all
directions, although walls and floors do dramatically reduce this range.

What You Need to Create a Wireless Network from Scratch

Even if youre starting at the very beginning, theres no need to get discouraged.
Heres what youll need:

Wireless Access Point or Wireless Router: If youre building a network from scratch
you will probably want to use a wireless router instead of a wireless access point. A
wireless router is a single device that contains: 1) A port to connect to a cable or
DSL modem, 2) a firewall, 3) an Ethernet hub, 4) a router, and of course, 5) a
wireless access point.
Wireless Network (WiFi) Cards: Once again, any computers you want to connect toa
wireless network must have WiFi networking cards or adapters installed.
Cable Modem or DSL Modem (Optional): A modem connects computers to the
Internet through an existing phone line or cable connection. Cable modems and
DSL modems are both very fast and can connect all the computers in a home or
small office network to the Internet. If you subscribe to a high-speed Internet
service they will almost certainly set up the cable modem or DSL modem for you.

If wireless networking wasnt complicated enough, there are several different


wireless standards out there that you have to be aware of. Table 1-5: WiFi Network
Standards briefly describes these standards.

Standard Speed Range Description


802.11b 10Mbps 150 feet 802.11b was the first version to reach the
market. It is the most common, inexpensive,
and, at only 10 Mbps, the slowest of all wireless
standards.
802.11a 54Mbps 100 feet 802.11a was a short-lived standard that was
much faster (54 Mbps) than 802.11b but had a
shorter range. 802.11a is incompatible with the
802.11b standard, so dont expect to find it in
your local coffee shop.
802.11g 54 Mbps 150 feet 802.11g combines the best of both worlds: It has
the range of 802.11b and the speed of 802.11a.
Best of all, 802.11g is fully compatible with the

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Information Sheet
very common 802.11b standard. If you get any
wireless network equipment make sure it
conforms to the 802.11g wireless standard.

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Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 1.2
Ethernet and Wireless Technology

Direction: Supply lacking information


A. WiFi networks standards

Standard Speed Range


802.11b
802.11a
802.11g

B. Ethernet Devices

Standard Speed

10 Base T

1Base T ( Fast
Ethernet)

Gigabit Ethernet

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Activity Sheet
Key Answer

Activity Sheet 1.2


Ethernet and Wireless Technology

Direction: Supply lacking information


A. WiFi networks standards
Standard Speed Range
802.11b 10Mbps 150 feet
802.11a 54Mbps 100 feet
802.11g 54 Mbps 150 feet

B. Ethernet Devices
Standard Speed
10 Base T 10 Mbps
1Base T 100 Mbps
( Fast Ethernet)
Gigabit Ethernet 1,000 Mbps

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Information Sheet 1.3
Intranets, Extranets, Internet and Security in a Network

An Intranet is a miniature version of the Internet that works within a company or


organization. Web sites on an Intranet look and act just like any other Web sites, but can
only be viewed by users within the company or organization. A firewall surrounds the
Intranet and fends off unauthorized access.

An Extranet is similar to an Intranet, but while an Intranet is generally only


accessible to users within same company or organization, an Extranet is accessible by
authorized outside users. Business partners use Extranets to share information.

Like the Internet itself, Intranets and Extranets are used to share information.
Secure Intranets are now the fastest-growing segment of the Internet because they are
much less expensive to build and manage than private networks based on proprietary
protocols.

So what are the advantages of Intranets and Extranets? Both Intranets and
Extranets can:

Share Information: Intranets and Extranets offer a very simple and inexpensive way
to make internal company documents, such as a phone directory, available to
employees.
Connect Documents: Documents on an Intranet or Extranet can be connected by
hyperlinks, so users can easily jump from one related document to another.
Use Special Software: Some software can only be used on an Intranet or Extranet,
such as Web based e-mail programs.

Working in a network environment isnt always fun and games, however; there are
some important risks you need to consider and be aware of:

Potential loss of autonomy, privacy, and security: The costs of connecting to a


network are much greater than a standalone system.
Potential of network-wide systems failure: This can result in a loss of access to
network resources, such as network drives or modems.
Vulnerability to a network virus attack: Because of the vast amounts of information
being sent back and forth on a network, your chances for suffering a virus or
hacking attack are much greater.

The risks of networks are managed through careful procedures performed by


network administrators and other security personnel. A new user will be granted access to
the network only after a network administrator has set up and authorized a login and
password account.

When a user properly logs on to the network, their login and password is
authenticated against a list of known users.

Authorization of new users by a network administrator: In order to be granted


access to a network, every user must be authorized and assigned an account by a
network administrator.

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Authentication of users through proper login procedures: When a user properly
logs on to the network, their username and password are authenticated against a
list of known users.
Protection from external threats using protective technology: Networks are
protected from unauthorized access using hardware and software security systems
such as firewalls.
Regular monitoring of the network: Network administrators and security personnel
monitor activity on a network to protect against unauthorized access or other
security violations.

The Internet is the largest computer network in the world. It is often referred to as
a super network, consisting of millions of computers all over the planet, all connected to
each other.

The Internet was born in the 1960s when the United States military worried that a
nuclear bomb could destroy its computer systems (there werent many of them back then).
So it placed several computers far apart from each other and connected them with some
super-fast telephone lines so that the computers could talk to each other. If a nuclear
bomb blew up one computer, another computer could instantly take over; thus, the
computer network wouldnt go down. Years passed and other organizations, such as
colleges and universities, started connecting their computers to this growing network to
share information.

Although the Internet has been around a long time, it wasnt until 1989 that Tim
Berners-Lee thought of a wonderful idea called the World Wide Web. Many people use the
terms Internet and World Wide Web or Web interchangeably, but in fact the terms are two
separate, but related, things. The Internet is a massive network of networks that connects
millions of computers to one another. A good analogy would be the cables that provide
cable television. The World Wide Web is simply one way to communicate and share
information over the Internet. Using our cable television analogy, the World Wide Web
would simply be a single channel that is broadcast over the cable system.

The World Wide Web consists of millions of documents that are stored on hundreds
of thousands of computers that are always connected to the Internet. These documents
are called Web pages, and you can find Web pages on every subject imaginablefrom
your local newspaper to online catalogs to airline schedules, and much, much more.

Web pages are stored on Web servers. A Web server is a computer, not unlike your
own computer, only bigger and faster. There are hundreds of thousands of Web servers
located all over the world. Web servers are always connected to the Internet so that people
can view their Web pages 24 hours a day.

In order to connect to the Internet, you must first make sure you have all the
necessary hardware and software. First and foremost, you must have a machine that has
the ability to connect to the Internet. Computers, handheld devices (such as PDAs), and
wireless devices (such as cell phones) all have the ability to connect to the Internet.

Various types of hardware and software required to connect to the Internet include:

A modem for accessing a network via telephone lines.


Ethernet connectors and cables for direct network connection, or wireless
connection devices for wireless network connection.

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Telecommunication software and network operating system software that allows
client devices and telecommunication devices (such as modems) to communicate
with a network.

Once all necessary components are installed, a computer can connect to the
Internet via the onramp of a smaller computer network. For example, a computer user at
a small company could gain access to the Internet via the company LAN.

Another way to gain access to the Internet is via an Internet Service Provider. ISPs
provide an onramp to the Internet by maintaining hardware and software and a
constant connection to the Internet. The responsibility of an ISP includes maintaining and
supporting equipment, providing customer service and support, and protecting the
network from threats and unauthorized access.
So what can you do once youre connected to the Internet? Plenty. Table 1-3: What
Can I do on the Internet? shows just a few of the many things there are to do on the
Internet.

Task Description
Send and Exchanging electronic mail (or e-mail) is the most used and most
Receive E-mail popular feature on the Internet. Just like regular paper mail, you can
send and receive e-mail with people around the world, as long as they
have access to a computer and the Internet. Unlike regular paper mail,
e-mail is usually delivered to its destination almost instantly.
Browse the The World Wide Web is what most people think of when they think of
World Wide Web the Internetalthough its really only a part of the Internet. The World
Wide Web is an enormous collection of interconnected documents
stored on Web servers all over the world. The World Wide Web has
information on every subject imaginable.
Join online Newsgroups are discussion groups on the Internet that you can join to
discussions with read and post messages to and from people with similar interests.
newsgroups There are thousands of newsgroups on topics such as computers,
education, romance, hobbies, politics, religion, and more.
Chat with other Chatting lets you communicate with people on the Internet instantly
online no matter how far away they are! Most chats are text-based, meaning
users you have to type when you converse with people on the Internet. A
growing number of chats have voice and even video capabilitiesall
without having to pay long distance changes.
Download You can download pictures, demo programs, patches and drivers for
software your computer, and many other types of files and save them to your
computer.
Listen to music You can listen to sound on the Web, such as radio stations, or music
and watch videos by your favorite artists.

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Activity Sheet
Activity 1.3
Intranet, Extranet, Internet and Network Security

Direction: Answer the following questions.


1. Differentiate Intranet from Internet and Extranet.
2. What are the advantages of Intranet and Internet?
3. What are the different hardware and software required to connect to the Internet?

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Key Answer
Key Answer
Activity 1.3
Intranet, Extranet, Internet and Network Security

Direction: Answer the following questions.


1. Differentiate Intranet from Internet and Extranet.
a. An Intranet is a miniature version of the Internet that works within a
company or organization. Web sites on an Intranet look and act just like
any other Web sites, but can only be viewed by users within the company
or organization. A firewall surrounds the Intranet and fends off
unauthorized access.
b. An Extranet is similar to an Intranet, but while an Intranet is generally
only accessible to users within same company or organization, an
Extranet is accessible by authorized outside users. Business partners
use Extranets to share information.
c. Like the Internet itself, Intranets and Extranets are used to share
information. Secure Intranets are now the fastest-growing segment of the
Internet because they are much less expensive to build and manage than
private networks based on proprietary protocols.

2. What are the advantages of Intranet and Internet?


Share Information: Intranets and Extranets offer a very simple and
inexpensive way to make internal company documents, such as a phone
directory, available to employees.
Connect Documents: Documents on an Intranet or Extranet can be
connected by hyperlinks, so users can easily jump from one related
document to another.
Use Special Software: Some software can only be used on an Intranet or
Extranet, such as Web based e-mail programs.

3. What are the different hardware and software required to connect to the Internet?
A modem for accessing a network via telephone lines.
Ethernet connectors and cables for direct network connection, or wireless
connection devices for wireless network connection.
Telecommunication software and network operating system software that
allows client devices and telecommunication devices (such as modems) to
communicate with a network.

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Assessment
Assessment:
Familiarize themselves with the Networking Concepts

1. Which of the following is NOT a benefit of networking?


a. The ability to share equipment.
b. The ability to broadcast information over the Internet.
c. The ability to use network software.
d. The ability to share information.

2. A WAN connects computers in the same building or facility. (True or False?)

3. What does LAN stand for?


a. Linked Area Network
b. Lots of Anarchy and Nonsense
c. Local Area Network
d. Linked Applications Node

4. An Intranet is a miniature version of the Internet that works on a network


within a company or organization. (True or False?)

5. The following are all types of computers that can be used as servers, except:
a. Minicomputers
b. UNIX computers
c. Mainframe computers
d. Handheld computers

6. Which of the following modems is the slowest?


a. ISDN
b. DSL
c. Cable
d. Telephone

7. All users on a network must be authorized by a network administrator.


(True or False?)

8. Which one of the following is NOT used to measure data transmission rates?
a. MPH
b. Kbps
c. Mbps
d. Bits per second

9. The Internet is a relatively small computer network, consisting of hundreds


of smaller computer networks. (True or False?)

10. Which of the following are examples of high bandwidth Internet connections?
a. Cable modem
b. Telephone
c. T1
d. DSL

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Assessment
Key Answer

Assessment:

Familiarize themselves with the Networking Concepts

1. C
2. False
3. C
4. D
5. True
6. A
7. True
8. A
9. False
10. C

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Introduction
Lesson 2 Understand Web Browser

Description:

This lesson covers one of the performances required in exploring Microsoft 2010
application.

In this lesson the student should be able to

Understand Web browsers and addresses;


Display a specific web page, and;
identify the different elements of Web browser.

For you to satisfactory complete this lesson, you are expected to

get a score of at least ten (10) points in activity Opening and Closing Web
Browser;
pass the assessment of this lesson.

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Information Sheet
Information 2.1
Using the Internet

In this lesson explains the ins and outs of Internet. If you have ever spent a
sleepless night wondering what the Internet is and how to get started youll finally learn it
all. But before we go through with this module, there are some key terms that should
familiarize yourself with. These key terms will help you to acquainted with frequently used
World Wide Web terminologies.

Term Definition

HTTP HTTP stands for Hypertext Transfer Protocol. It is a set of rules for
transferring files on the World Wide Web. HTTP files can be text,
graphics, sound, video, or any other multimedia file type. HTTP
works like this: your browser (for example, Microsoft Internet
Explorer) sends an HTTP request to a server for a certain group of
Web pages. The server receives this request and sends the page(s)
back to your computer.

HTML HTML stands for Hypertext Markup Language. It is a set of special


codes referred to as tags, that describe the general structure of
various kinds of documents that are linked together on the World
Wide Web.

URL URL stands for Uniform Resource Locator. This is an address for a
file that is located somewhere on the Internet. Each URL is unique
to the Web page that it links to. URLs are structured so that they
contain a protocol, domain name, resource, and extension.

Hyperlink A hyperlink is a link from one word or image to another. Most


commonly, a hyperlink will appear on a page as a blue underlined
word or phrase (as seen in Figure 3-1), but they can also be images
or animations. To use a hyperlink, you simply click on it with your
mouse and it will instantly take you to the destination.

ISP ISP stands for Internet Service Provider. An ISP is a lot like a phone
company, except instead of letting you make telephone calls to other
people, an Internet Service Provider lets your computer connect to
the Internet. Just like your telephone company, Internet Service
Providers charge for their services -currently, the average rate seems
to be about $20 per month for unlimited usage. Youve probably
already heard of the most famous Internet Service Provider -
America Online, or AOL.

Plug-in A plug-in is a small piece of software that enriches a larger piece of


software by adding features or functions. For example, a plug-in
extends the capabilities of a Web browser, such as Microsoft
Internet Explorer, by allowing the browser to run multimedia files.

FTP FTP stands for File Transfer Protocol. Much like HTTP, FTP is a set
of rules for transferring files on the World Wide Web. FTP is
commonly used to transfer Web page files from the Web page
developers computer to the Web server. FTP is also used to
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Information Sheet
download files to your computer from another server.

Cookie A cookie consists of one or more pieces of information that are


stored as text files on your computer. A Web server sends the cookie
and the browser stores it. Each time the page is referenced, the
browser resends the cookie to the original server. Cookies are most
commonly used to store frequently used information, such as user
ID numbers. They are not harmful, as their rotten reputation
implies. They cannot transmit viruses, nor can they take any
information from your computer back to the server. In fact, cookies
can be helpful because they allow a server to recall any user-specific
information.

Cache You automatically request files when you look at a Web page. These
files are stored in a cache. A cache is simply a temporary storage
place that is located in a subdirectory beneath the main directory
for your browser. Caches are created so that when you return to a
page that you have recently visited, the browser can get the page
from the cache, rather than going back to the server. This saves
time and reduces the amount of Internet traffic. Most Web browsers
will allow you to manipulate the size of your cache.

Encryption When you encrypt something, you are putting it into a code that
only authorized people can understand. This prevents unauthorized
users from accessing personal or confidential information.

Firewall A firewall is a group of related programs that protect a private


network from users from other networks. Basically, a firewall
screens all incoming information before sending it off to its intended
destination so the network stays secure -free from hackers, viruses,
and any other types of security breaches.

Understanding Web Browsers

A Web browser is a software application that allows your computer to connect with,
view, and navigate the World Wide Web. The Web browser is what finds, displays, and
allows you to interact with and look at Web pages. Most Web browsers are graphical in
nature, which means that they have the capability to show both text and images.

Why cant I see certain images with my browser?

Some browsers may have trouble showing certain images or text. Most of the time,
this has to do with an out-of-date browser. For example, if you have an older version of
Netscape Navigator, you may not be able to see graphics and animations created using
Macromedia Flash. This is because the browser does not understand what these graphics
are.

Why do annoying advertisements keep popping up while I am using my browser?

Pop-ups are annoying advertisements windows that disrupt your browsing on the
Web. Depending on the security settings, these annoying pop-ups may or may not show
up while you are browsing the Web. Newer versions of Web browsers contain a handy-
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dandy program called a pop-up blocker that does just that: blocks unwanted pop-up ads
from cluttering your computer screen. Make sure your computer security settings are up
to date, and, if you dont have a pop-up blocker, it would be in your best interest to install
one.

What are some commonly used browsers?

Two of the most commonly used browsers are Internet Explorer (owned by
Microsoft) and Netscape Navigator (owned by AOL). There are several other reputable
browsers available for use. Take a look at Table 3-2: Commonly Used Web Browsers for
more information.

Web Browser Description

Internet Explorer Owned by Microsoft, the most popular browser on the market.

Netscape Navigator Owned by AOL, Netscape comes in at a close second to Microsofts


Internet Explorer.

Opera Opera is an international Web browser that comes from Norway. It


is new to the market and causing quite a stir with its popularity.

MSN Explorer Microsoft combined features from Internet Explorer, Outlook


Express, MSN Messenger, and Windows Media Player into one
application.

Basic general information of other known browsers: creator/company.

Browser Creator Browser Creator


Amaya W3C, INRIA GNU IceCat GNU
AOL Explorer America Online, Inc iCab Alexander Clauss
Arora Benjamin C. Meyer Microsoft,
Internet Explorer
Avant Avant Force Spyglass

Camino The Camino Project Internet Explorer


for Microsoft
Chromium Google Mac(Terminated)
Jorge Arellano Cid, K-Meleon Dorian, KKO, et al.
Dillo
Geerken, Rota, et al.
Konqueror KDE
DocZilla CiTEC
Links Patocka, et al.
Dooble Dooble Team
Lunascape
ELinks Baudis, Fonseca, et al. Lunascape
Corporation
Epiphany Marco Pesenti Gritti Montulli, Grobe,
Lynx
Flock Flock Inc Rezac, et al.
Galeon Marco Pesenti Gritti Maxthon International
Maxthon
Limited
Google Chrome Google
Midori Christian Dywan, et

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Information Sheet
Browser Creator
al.
Marc
Mosaic Andreessen and Eric
Bina,NCSA
Mozilla Mozilla Foundation
Mozilla Firefox Mozilla Foundation
Netscape
Netscape (v.6-7) Communications
Corporation, AOL
Mercurial
Netscape
Communications for A
Browser(v.8)
OL
Netscape Netscape
Communicator(v.4) Communications
Netscape Netscape
Navigator (v.1-4) Communications
Netscape
Netscape Navigator
Communications
9
(division of AOL)
The NetSurf
NetSurf
Developers
OmniWeb The Omni Group
Opera Opera Software
Opera Mobile Opera Software
Origyn Web
Sand-labs
Browser
Safari Apple Inc.
SeaMonkey SeaMonkey Council
Happy Macintosh
Shiira
Developing Team
Sleipnir Fenrir Inc.
SlimBrowser FlashPeak Inc.
WorldWideWeb (Lat
Tim Berners-Lee
er renamed Nexus)
w3m Akinori Ito

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Understanding Web Addresses

Web addresses, also called URLs (Uniform Resource Locators), are the unique
addresses for documents, Web sites, and other resources available for browsing and
downloading on the World Wide Web. Once a Web page has been requested using a Web
address, a Web server (a computer that contains the Web site or other resource) sends the
pages back to the computer that made the request. Figure 3-3 is an example of what a
typical Web address looks like.

Web addresses consist of four parts: a protocol, a domain name, a resource to be


located, and an extension.

Protocol: The protocol tells the server which type of resource you are trying to
locate.

The most common protocol is http://, or HyperText Transfer Protocol, as


seen in Figure 3-3. This protocol tells the server that you are looking for a Web site.
Most browsers assume that you are searching for a Web site, so when you type in
the address you can usually leave the http:// out.

Domain Name: The domain name is the address of the main Web page. The domain
name indicates the company or individual that maintains the Web site. In our
example, www.customguide.com indicates that CustomGuide, Inc. is the host of
the site. Take a look at Table 3-4: Commonly Used Domain Name Extensions to
familiarize yourself with the most common domain name extensions and the
purposes for which they serve.

Resource: A resource can be almost any computer-related item. You could be


searching for a file, program, printer, disk drive, data, or memory. In Figure 3-3,
the resource is computer training. This indicates that this address belongs to the
About Us portion of the Custom Guide, Inc. Web site.

Extension: The extension indicates what type of code or program is running the
Web site. In Figure 3-3, the extension is .htm. This is a standard extension that
indicates the site is running on UNIX machines or on a PC using Microsoft
Windows. Addresses with an .htm extension run only static pages - meaning the
content cannot be manipulated.

Thats all there is to a Web address. Pretty simple stuff, huh? Go ahead and take a
look at the following table for some other examples of commonly used extensions.

Examples of Commonly Used Extensions

Extension Description

.html This site is run on UNIX machines, or PCs using Microsoft


Windows. Addresses with an .html extension run only static pages
- the content cannot be manipulated.

.shtml These sites are more flexible than .htm or .html sites. They contain
tags that enable quick and easy changes to the content. In other

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Information Sheet
words, these sites are not static.

Different types of Web sites can be identified simply by looking at their extension.
Take a look at the following table to familiarize yourself with the most common ones.

TLD Description
.biz Reserved for businesses only
.com This is the most common Top Level Domain and it is reserved for
commercial enterprises.
.edu Reserved for educational institutions and universities
.gov Reserved for United States government agencies
.mil Reserved for the United States military
.net This is most often used by Internet Service Providers (ISPs), but it
is reserved for any network group.
.org Reserved for non-profit organizations
.uk or .jp Web sites located outside of the U.S. will include a country code,
such as .uk for the United Kingdom and .jp for Japan
.info Used in all types of domains

Understanding Secure Websites and Information Quality

A secure Web site is basically any site that contains information that is not for
general public use. Either the information is confidential, or the user is simply a member
of the sites organization or a customer of the sites company. For example, you may want
to shop at a department store online. When you start your online shopping trip, you will
most likely be asked to enter a user name and a password - and maybe some additional
personal information. This is so that the next time you visit the Web site, you will have an
ID and will be able to access the product in no time. Also, no one else will be able to shop
under your user name or password, which provides you with an added sense of online
security.

In order to gain access to the information provided on a protected Web site, one is
required to enter both a user name and a password. You may be familiar with these
terms, because most people employ a user name and password when they log onto their
computers, or attempt to gain access to a private network. Read on for a more detailed
description of each term.

User Name

A user name is an assigned name, or a name that you choose for yourself, that you
must enter in order to gain access to a secure Web site, network, or computer. Usually, a
user name is an abbreviation of the users full name. For example, if your name is John
Doe, the abbreviation might be something like JDoe. A user name may also be an alias,
or nickname.

A user name isnt enough to gain access to a secure Web site. You must use the
name in conjunction with a password.

Password

A password is a group of characters (letters, numbers, and/or symbols). Passwords are


usually 4-16 characters long, depending on the Web site that you are trying to gain access
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Information Sheet
to. They are used to determine whether or not the user that is requesting admittance to
the secure Web site is actually the person they claim to be. Passwords generally do not
have spaces. When you enter your password into the text box, it is usually replaced with
bullets or another symbol so that no one else could read it off of your screen.

Take a look below for some tips on creating unbreakable passwords:

Do not pick a password that could easily be guessed by someone who knows you
well. Many people like to use the names of their pets, social security number, or
birth date.

This is not a good idea.

Do not use a word that directly relates to current affairs. Chances are, if its on
your mind, it will be on someone elses too.

Do use a mixture of letters and numbers. This makes the amount of combinations
almost endless!
Do use a word that youll remember. You dont want to keep yourself from
accessing the secured information!

Do change your password often, and when you do, dont make your new password
similar to the old one. Chances are, over time you will have told at least one person
what your password is. Constantly changing things around ensures that your
password remains secure.

Thats about all there is to know about user names, passwords, and using secure
Web sites, but there is one more thing we need to cover before we move on to the next
lesson.

Unfortunately, the ease of publishing information on the Internet translates to a


medium with no oversight or quality control, leaving it up to the user to determine the
value of online resources.

Criteria for evaluating the quality of information found on the Internet include:
Relevance: Does the information relate to specified needs?)

Reliability: Does the information come from a source that can be trusted to provide
true and accurate content?

Validity: Can information be verified from more than one source?

Potential bias: Could there be a potential commercial or political bias on behalf of


the sites owner?

Sufficiency: Is the information sufficient enough for a specific purpose? Ways to


determine the quality of information on a Web site include:

Analyzing the source of a site

Communicating with the creator of a site

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Information Sheet

Analyzing internal links within a site

Evaluating search engine ranking results

Comparing information found on the Internet with other offline sources, such as
professional journals found at the library, to clarify ambiguous or incomplete
information

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Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 2.1

Opening and Closing a Web Browser

There are three things youll need to connect to the Internet:

An Internet Service Provider (ISP): An Internet Service Provider is a lot like a phone
company, except instead of letting you make telephone calls to other people, an
Internet Service Provider lets your computer connect to the Internet. Just like your
telephone company, Internet Service Providers charge for their servicescurrently
the average rate seems to be about $20 a month for unlimited usage. Youve
probably already heard of the most famous Internet Service ProviderAmerica
Online, or AOL.

A Web Browser: A Web browser is a program that lets your computer view and
navigates the World Wide Web. One of the most popular Web browsers is
Microsofts own Internet Explorer. Another Web browsing program that is very
popular is Netscape Navigator.

A Phone Line and Modem or Other Connection: A modem is your computers very
own telephone that lets it talk to other computers over the telephone line. Your
existing phone line will work just fine with your modem, although it will be tied up
whenever youre connected to the Internet. If you or someone in your home is a
heavy Internet user, you might consider getting a second phone line for your
computer. An increasingly popular type of connection is DSL (Digital Subscriber
Line) which is much faster than a dial-up connection, and is connected 24-hours a
day. This type of connection is similar to what most workplaces have.

Do the following instructions:

1. Click the Windows Start button and then select Internet Explorer to start Microsoft
Internet Explorer.

If this is the first time youve ever tried connecting to the Internet, you
may be greeted by the Internet Connection Wizard. Microsoft included the
Internet Connection Wizard to help you get connected to the Internet and find an
Internet Service Provider. If you want, you can follow the step-by-step
instructions and let the Internet Connection Wizard help find you an Internet
Service Provider (ISP) or, you can find your own.

2. Enter your user name and password, if necessary, and click Connect.

If you have previously entered your user name and password and checked
the Save password option, the user name and password characters will already
appear in their respective text boxes. (Your password will appear masked by
asterisks or bullets.)

NOTE: If youre connected to the Internet through a network at work, an ISDN or


DSL line, or a cable modem, you wont hear anything at all, since these
are all digital connections. Actually, it would probably pay off if you
checked to see if the Internet is available in your area by cable or DSL
connections.

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Activity Sheet

After a connection to the Internet has been established, Internet Explorer


appears on screen and displays your home page.

Once youre finished with the Internet Explorer program, close it.

3. Click the Close button on the Microsoft Internet Explorer title bar.

The program closes and you are back at the Windows desktop.

It is important to note the difference between a browsers home page and a


Web sites home page. A home page for a browser is the Web page that your Web
browser displays when it first connects to the Internet. The default start page for
Microsoft Internet Explorer is MSN (what else did you think it would be?), but
you can easily change your home pagemore about that in another lesson. Move
on to the next lesson to learn more about the home page for a Web site.

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Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric
Opening and Closing a Web Browser

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed
the criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and
then turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open Internet Explorer Perform the skill easily
4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Enter username and Perform the skill with
password 3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Close the Microsoft Internet Perform the skill slowly,
explorer 2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Perform the skill with
1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

TOTAL SCORE
Teachers Signature

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Introduction
Lesson 3 Elements of a Website

Description:

This lesson covers one of the performances required in exploring Microsoft 2010
application.

In this lesson the student should be able to

identify the different elements of Web browser.

get a score of seven (7) points in activity Elements of Web browser.

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Information Sheet
Information Sheet 3.1
Elements of a Website

Just like other windows, a website has a title bar, menu bar and other toolbars
that we can use in navigating the windows.

The following illustration shows a homepage. In this case the MSN Philippines is the
homepage for Internet Explorer.

Internet Explorer is a popular web browser that comes standard on many PCs.
Once you know the basic parts of the Internet Explorer window, you'll be ready for web
navigation, bookmarking and searching. Once you open it, the Internet Explorer 9 window
should look similar to the screenshot above: one with very few buttons and elements and
lots of things for web-pages to be loaded.

One thing to note here is that the color of the Internet Explorer 9 window changes
with the Windows 7 theme you apply, depending on the color used by each theme.

The Buttons on the Top Left

Lets start with the buttons on the top-left side. The big arrows, as you might have
guessed already, are for navigating Back and Forward between the web-pages you visited
during the current session. If you have visited only one website, well... those buttons will
be grayed out and wont do anything.
Next is the Address bar. There you type the addresses of the websites you want to
visit (like www.7tutorials.com). As with any other modern browsers, you can use it as a
search box too. If you type any word and press Enter it will automatically search on Bing
for that word and return you a page with search results.

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Information Sheet

Included in the Address bar, are a few symbols which function like buttons. Lets
take them in order, from left to right:

The magnifier button is obviously for searching. If Bing Suggestions are


turned on, it will return to you suggestions from the search engine as you
type. If you click on any of the suggestions, it will open a page with search
results from Bing.

Next is an arrow, oriented downward. If you click on it, you will access a list
with the most recent sites you visited plus some of your Favorites.

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The third button is to Refresh the web-page you currently have open.
The X button is used to Stop a web-page from being loaded or refreshed.

Opening New Tabs

Immediately after the Address bar, you will find the open tabs. If you are like me,
you might consider this ugly and a bit too crowded. However, Microsoft wanted to offer
as much screen space as possible for viewing web-sites.

If you want to open a new tab, simply click the small New Tab icon, highlighted
below.

When a new tab is opened, you will see a list with your most popular sites. You can
simply click on one of them, if thats what you want to view or simply type the address in
the Address bar.

Top Right Buttons: Home, Favorites, Tools

Lets talk about the last three buttons, found on the top-right side of the Internet
Explorer 9 window.

When pressing the first button, it takes you to your Home page, if you have one set.
If you dont, it will simply open a blank page.

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Information Sheet

The second button, in the shape of a star, is about viewing your Favorites, Feeds
and History. If you click on it, a menu shows up, with three tabs, each with its specific
type of content.

Last but not least, there is a wheel like button. If you click on it, you will access
the Tools menu. It provides access to lots of features and configuration menus: it allows
you to print, save a web page, zoom, access safety features, view your downloads, manage
your add-ons, access developer tools and configure tons of Internet options.

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Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 3.1

Elements of a Web Browser

Direction: Label the Web browser window. Put your answer on the number provided for.

A.

1 2 3

1. _____________________
2. _____________________
3. _____________________

1 2 3 4

B.
1.______________________
2. _____________________
3. _____________________
4. _____________________

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Key Answer
Key Answer

A.
1. Back
2. Forward
3. Address Bar
B.
1. Search
2. History
3. Refresh
4. Stop

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Introduction
Lesson 4 Navigate and Modify Website

Description:

This lesson covers one of the performance required in exploring Microsoft 2010
application.

In this lesson the student should be able to

navigate and modify a Website;


display and delete history of visited Webpages;
add and delete Webpage to Favorites; and
save a Webpage.

For you to satisfactory complete this lesson, you are expected to

get a score of at least fifteen (15) points in activity Navigating and


Modifying a Website;
get a score of at least twenty (20) points in activity Displaying and Deleting
a History of Visited Web Pages;
get a score of at least eighteen (18) points in activity - Adding and Deleting
Web Page to Favorites;
get a score of at least ten (10) points in activity Saving a Web Page;
pass the assessment of this lesson.

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Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 4.1
Navigating and Modifying Website

The World Wide Web is remarkably easy to navigate. Its so easy, in fact that most
users seem to have the uncanny ability to browse through Web pages without any
previous training, even if they have difficulty with other computer programs. This chapter
explains how to find your way through the millions of Web pages that are on the Internet.
Even if you already think you have browsing down, you should read this chapteryou
might learn a trick or two you didnt already know.

In addition to covering the navigation techniques involved in browsing the Web, you
will also learn how to use a hyperlink. Lets get started!

1. Go to the www.yahoo.com home page by clicking the Address bar, typing


www.yahoo.com, and pressing <Enter>.

The Yahoo home page fills the screen. Many of the underlined words and
pictures you see on the page are actually hyperlinks. When you position the
pointer over a hyperlink, it changes to a . Clicking a hyperlink will
automatically:

Take you to a different page within the same Web site.


Take you to a different page in a different Web site.
Take you to a different part of the same Web site.
Allow you to download a file.
Send an e-mail to a specified e-mail address.
Play a video or sound.

2. Position the pointer over the Copyright and Intellectual Property Policy
hyperlink at the bottom of the Yahoo home page.

The pointer changes into a any time it is positioned over a link.


Remember, links can be either text or images (as in this example), but most
often they appear as blue underlined text.

3. Click the Copyright and Intellectual Property Policy hyperlink text.

The Copyright and Intellectual Property Policy Web page appears. Notice the
address bar displays the address of the new Web page,
http://info.yahoo.com/copyright/us/details.html. You can easily move back to
the previous Web page.

4. Click the Back button on the toolbar.

Youre back at the Yahoo home page. The Forward button moves forward
through the Web pages you have viewed.

5. Click the Forward button on the toolbar.

You return to the Copyright and Intellectual Property Policy Web page.
Sometimes it may take a bit of practice in a Web site to find the exact

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information that you need. Be patientits most likely there somewhere! Thats
all there is to navigating Web sites!

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Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric

Navigating and Modifying Website

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed
the criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and
then turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open Internet Explorer Perform the skill easily
4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Go to www.yahoo.com Perform the skill with
website 3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Click the copyright button Perform the skill slowly,
of yahoo website 2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Click the back button Perform the skill with
1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

Click the forward button

TOTAL SCORE
Teachers Signature

296 LO2: Access the Web| Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 4.2
Displaying and Deleting a History of Visited Web Pages

Cant find your way back to that that really well-ordered Web site you were looking
at yesterday? Dont worryInternet Explorer keeps track of the Web pages youve visited
during the past 20 days. You can use Internet Explorers history feature to easily return to
any of these sites.

To view your visited Web pages do the following:

1. Make sure your Web browser is open and youre connected to the Internet.
2. Click the star icon at the upper-right portion of the Internet Explorer Window.
3. Click the History tab to display a list of the Web pages you have recently visited.

A history of all the Web pages youve visited recently appears in the right-
hand side of the Internet Explorer window. The history is grouped chronologically
all you have to do is to click the day or week you last viewed the Web page that you
want to view again.

Other way of viewing recently visited Web pages, click the down arrow between the
search and refresh button.

To delete visited Web pages

1. Click the Tools icon and select Internet Options from the pop-up menu. If
necessary, click the General tab.

The Internet Options dialog box appears with the General tab in front. You
can clear you History folder and change the number of days that you would like
pages kept in the folder. The default number of days is 20.

2. In the browsing History portion, click on the box Delete History button.

3. Click Apply and then click OK to tally delete all the visited Web pages.

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Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric

Displaying and Deleting a History of Visited Web Pages

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed
the criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and
then turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open Internet Explorer Perform the skill easily
4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Click the star icon Perform the skill with
3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Click the history tab Perform the skill slowly,
2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Click the tools icon Perform the skill with
1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

Select the Internet Options


from the pop-up menu

Delete the history of the


webpage

TOTAL SCORE
Teachers Signature

298 LO2: Access the Web| Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 4.3
Adding and Deleting Web Page to Favorites

You have finally found a Web page about your favorite music, and you want to return
back on it later. What should you do? Well, you dont have to write the Web address and
post it in your monitor - you can add the Web page to Internet Explorers Favorites so you
can always quickly return back to any Web page in the list.

Do the following instruction to bookmark your favorite Web sites using Internet Explorer.

1. Open Internet Explorer.


2. In this activity navigate to Department of Education Web portal..

Type www.deped.gov.ph in the address bar.

3. Select Favorite icon and click Add to Favorites.


4. An Add a Favorite dialog box appears.
5. In Name bar, type DepEd.
6. Click New Folder to create a folder for DepEd. A create a Folder Dialog box appears.
7. Type DepEd as folder name and create it in Favorites.
8. Click Add

To delete a Web page from your Favorites list:

1. Click Internet Explorer.


2. Click Favorite icon, and select Favorite tab.
3. Click the folder you just added to the Favorites list.
4. Click the Web page that you want to delete from your Favorites list to select it. At
this time, click DepEd.
5. Right-click on the selected Web page and select delete.
6. The Web page is now deleted.

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Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric
Adding and Deleting Web Page to Favorites

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed
the criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and
then turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open Internet Explorer Perform the skill easily
4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Go to department of Perform the skill with
Education portal 3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Add Deped to Favorites Perform the skill slowly,
2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Go to Favorite tab Perform the skill with
1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

Delete DepEd as favorite

TOTAL SCORE
Teachers Signature

300 LO2: Access the Web| Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 4.4
Saving a Web Page

If you have found an incredibly useful Web page, but it contains more information
than you have time to look at in one sitting, you may want to save the Web page to a
location on your computers hard disk. This way, you can access the pages content
without having to be connected to the Internet.

In this activity, youll learn how to save a Web page. Do the following to save
DepEd web page.

1. Open Internet Explorer web browser.


2. Navigate to Department of Education Web site by typing www.deped.gov.ph into the
address bar.
3. Select File > Save As from the menu.

If you cannot see menu bar, right click on the upper blank space of the
window and check menu bar.

A Save Webpage dialog box appears. This is where you give the Web page a
name so that you can return to it later.

4. Click on the folder where you want to save your web page.
5. Click the Save as type list arrow.

You have several options here:


Web page, complete: This option will save every file that is needed to display
the current web page. This includes style sheets, frames, graphics, and
animations. This can be a very large file.
Web Archive, single file: The file will be saved in *. mht format (Multipurpose
Internet Mail Extension HTML / MHTML / MHT).
Web page, HTML only: This option will save just the information contained in
the Web page. It will not save graphics, animations, sounds, videos, etc. All
of the text will maintain its original formatting and placement.
Text Only: This option will save just the information contained in the Web
page, much like the HTML only option. However, the Text only option will
save the file in straight text format.

6. Choose the Web page, HTML Only option


7. Click the Save button.

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Assessment Rubric
Assessment Rubric
Saving a Web Page

Directions: After you have finished your work, determine whether you have completed
the criteria listed in the left column. Fill in the shaded column below and
then turn the rubric to your teacher along with your activity.

Name: Year & Section:


Skill Score Scoring Rubric
Open Internet Explorer Perform the skill easily
4 and quickly without error
or any assistance.
Go to department of Perform the skill with
Education portal 3 ease, and at moderate
speed without asking for
any assistance
Save webpage as HTML Perform the skill slowly,
Only 2 with minimal error and
little assistance.
Perform the skill with
1 difficulty, several errors
and major assistance

TOTAL SCORE
Teachers Signature

302 LO2: Access the Web| Searching the Web and Use E-Mail
Introduction
Lesson 5 Search the Web for Information Using a Search Engine

Description:

This lesson covers one of the performances required in exploring Microsoft 2010
application.

In this lesson the student should be able to

identify search engine;


save a Web picture, copy and print from the web, and;
identify the different elements of Microsoft Word 2010 application.

For you to satisfactory complete this lesson, you are expected to

get a score of at least ten (10) points in activity Search the Web for
Information Using a Search Engine;
pass the assessment of this lesson.

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Information Sheet
Information Sheet 5.1
Search Engine

Search engines are one of the primary ways that Internet users find Web sites.
That's why a Web site with good search engine listings may see a dramatic increase in
traffic.

On the Internet, a search engine is a coordinated set of programs that includes:

A spider (also called a "crawler" or a "bot") that goes to every page or representative
pages on every Web site that wants to be searchable and reads it, using hypertext
links on each page to discover and read a site's other pages.

A program that creates a huge index (sometimes called a "catalog") from the pages
that have been read.

A program that receives your search request, compares it to the entries in the
index, and returns results to you.

An alternative in using a search engine is to explore a structured directory of


topics. Yahoo, which also lets you use its search engine, is the most widely-used directory
on the Web. A number of Web portal sites offer both the search engine and directory
approaches to finding information.

Different Search Engine Approaches

There are some approaches the search engine do to search the different information
found in the Internet. Some of them are the following:

Major search engines such as Google, Yahoo (which uses Google), Baidu,
Bing, Ask and AOL index the content of a large portion of the Web and
provide results that can run for pages - and consequently overwhelm the
user.

Specialized content search engines are selective about what part of the Web
is crawled and indexed.

Ask Jeeves (http://www.ask.com) provides a general search of the Web but


allows you to enter a search request in natural language, such as "What's
the weather in Manila today?"

Special tools and some major Web sites such as Yahoo let you use a number
of search engines at the same time and compile results for you in a single
list.

Individual Web sites, especially larger corporate sites, may use a search
engine to index and retrieve the content of just their own site. Some of the
major search engine companies license or sell their search engines for use
on individual sites.

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Where to Search First

Market Share of Different Search Engine


May 2011

Google 82.80%

Yahoo! 6.42%

Baidu 4.89%

Bing 3.91%

Ask 0.52%

AOL 0.36%

0.00% 20.00% 40.00% 60.00% 80.00% 100.00%

Data based from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_search_engine

There are about ten major search engines, each with its own anchor Web site
(although some have an arrangement to use another site's search engine or license their
own search engine for use by other Web sites). Some sites, such as Yahoo, search not only
using their search engine but also give you the results from simultaneous searches of
other search indexes. Sites that let you search multiple indexes simultaneously include:
Google (http://www.google.com)
Yahoo (http://www.yahoo.com)
search.com (http://search.com)
EasySearcher (http://www.easysearcher.com)

Yahoo first searches its own hierarchically-structured subject directory and gives
you those entries. Then, it provides a few entries from the AltaVista search engine. It also
launches a concurrent search for entries matching your search argument with six or
seven other major search engines. You can link to each of them from Yahoo (at the bottom
of the search result page) to see what the results were from each of these search engines.

A significant advantage of a Yahoo search is that if you locate an entry in Yahoo,


it's likely to lead you to a Web site or entire categories of sites related to your search
argument.

A search.com search primarily searches the Infoseek index first but also lets you
search the other major search engines as well.

EasySearcher lets you choose from either the popular search engines or a very
comprehensive list of specialized search engine/databases in a number of fields.

Yahoo, search.com, and EasySearcher all provide help with entering your search
phrase. Most Web portal sites offer a quickly-located search entry box that connects you
to the major search engines.

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How to Search

For tips on entering your search argument, see each search engine, including
Yahoo's . It's good to read the information at least once.

By "How to Search," we mean a general approach to searching: what to try first,


how many search engines to try when to quit. It's difficult to generalize, but this is the
general approach to use:

1. If you know of a specialized search engine that matches your subject (for example,
Networking), you'll save time by using that search engine.
2. If there isn't a specialized search engine, try Yahoo. Sometimes you'll find a
matching subject category or two and that's all you'll need.
3. If Yahoo doesn't turn up anything, try AltaVista, Google, Hotbot, Lycos, and
perhaps other search engines for their results. Depending on how important the
search is, you usually don't need to go below the first 20 entries on each.
4. If you haven't found what you need, consider using the subject directory approach
to searching. Look at Yahoo or someone else's structured organization of subject
categories and see if you can narrow down a category your term or phrase is likely
to be in. If nothing else, this may give you ideas for new search phrases.
5. If you feel it's necessary, also search the Usenet newsgroups as well as the Web.
6. As you continue to search, keep rethinking your search arguments. What new
approaches could you use? What are some related subjects to search for that might
lead you to the one you really want?
7. Consider whether your subject is so new that not much is available on it yet. If so,
you may want to go out and check the very latest computer and Internet magazines
or locate companies that you think may be involved in research or development
related to the subject.

Different strategies for boosting search engine performance:

1. Identify keywords

When conducting a search, break down the topic into key concepts. For example, to
find information on what the DepEd has said about the TechVoc curriculum, the
keywords might be:

DepEd TechVoc curriculum

2. Boolean string

a. AND

Connecting search terms with AND tells the search engine to retrieve
web pages containing all the keywords.

DepEd and TechVoc and curriculum

The search engine will not return pages with just the word DepEd.
Neither will it return pages with the word DepEd and TechVoc. The serach
engine will only return pages where the words DepEd, TechVoc and curriculum

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all appear somewhere on the page. Thus, AND helps to narrow search results as
it limits results to pages where all the keywords appear.

b. OR

Linking search terms with OR tells the search engine to retrieve web
pages containing any and all keywords.

DepEd or TechVoc or curriculum

When OR is used, the search engine returns pages with a single


keyword, several keywords, and all keywords. Thus, OR expands your search
results. Use OR when you have common synonyms for a keyword. Surround OR
statements with parentheses for best results. To narrow results as much as
possible, combine OR statements with AND statements.

For example, the following search statement locates information on


purchasing a used car:

(car or automobile or vehicle) and (buy or purchase) and used

c. AND NOT

AND NOT tells the search engine to retrieve web pages containing one
keyword but not the other.

dolphins and not Miami

The above example instructs the search engine to return web pages
about dolphins but not web pages about the "Miami Dolphins" football team. Use
AND NOT when you have a keyword that has multiple meanings. The need for
AND NOT often becomes apparent after you perform an initial search. If your
search results contain irrelevant results (e.g., Saturn the car rather than Saturn
the planet), consider using AND NOT to filter out the undesired websites.

3. Implied Boolean String

a. PLUS & MINUS

In many search engines, the plus and minus symbols can be used as
alternatives to full Boolean AND and AND NOT. The plus sign (+) is the
equivalent of AND, and the minus sign (-) is the equivalent of AND NOT. There is
no space between the plus or minus sign and the keyword.

+welding +process
+Saturn -car

couch sofa

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4. Phrase Searching

Surrounding a group of words with double quotes tells the search engine to only
retrieve documents in which those words appear side-by-side. Phrase searching is a
powerful search technique for significantly narrowing your search results, and it should
be used as often as possible.

"Gloria Macapagal Arroto"

"Development Academy Philippines"

"global warming"

For best results, combine phrase searching with implied Boolean (+/-) or full
Boolean (AND, OR, and AND NOT) logic.

+"heart disease" +cause

"heart disease" and cause

The above example tells the search engine to retrieve pages where the words heart
disease appear side-by-side and the word cause appears somewhere else on the page.

NOTE ON IMPLIED BOOLEAN LOGIC (+/-): When a phrase search is combined with
additional keywords using implied Boolean logic (+/-), you must put a plus or minus sign
before the phrase as well as the other keywords. If the search involves a phrase with no
additional keywords (e.g., "Walt Disney World"), the plus sign before the quotes is
optional.

5. Plural Forms, capital letters, and alternate spellings

Most search engines interpret lower case letters as either upper or lower case.
Thus, if you want both upper and lower case occurrences returned, type your keywords in
all lower case letters. However, if you want to limit your results to initial capital letters
(e.g., "Gloria Arroyo") or all upper case letters, type your keywords that way.

Like capitalization, most search engines interpret singular keywords as singular or


plural. If you want plural forms only, make your keywords plural.

A few search engines support truncation or wildcard features that allow variations
in spelling or word forms. The asterisk (*) symbol tells the search engine to return
alternate spellings for a word at the point that the asterisk appears. For example, capital*
returns web pages with capital, capitals, capitalize, and capitalization.

6. Title search

Field searching is one of the most effective techniques for narrowing results and
getting the most relevant websites listed at the top of the results page. A web page is
composed of a number of fields, such as title, domain, host, URL, and link. Searching
effectiveness increases as you combine field searches with phrase searches and Boolean
logic. For example, if you wanted to find information about Gloria Arroyo and her
husband Mike, you could try the following search:

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+title:"Gloria Arroyo" +President +Mike

title:"Gloria Arroyo" and President and Mike

The above TITLE SEARCH example instructs the search engine to return web pages
where the phrase George Washington appears in the title and the words President and
Martha appear somewhere on the page. Like plus and minus, there is no space between
the colon (:) and the keyword.

7. Domain search

In addition to the title search, other helpful field searching strategies include the
domain search, the host search, the link search, and the URL search. The DOMAIN
SEARCH allows you to limit results to certain domains such as websites from the
Philippines (.ph), educational institutions (.edu), or government sites (.gov).

+domain:ph +title:"Manny Pacquiao"


domain:ph and title:"Manny Pacquiao"

+domain:edu +"lung cancer" +smok*

domain:edu and "lung cancer" and smok*

The current domains are the following:

.com = a commercial business


.edu = an educational institution
.gov = a governmental institution
.org = a non-profit organization
.mil = a military site
.net = a network site

Most websites originating outside the U.S. have a country domain indicating the
country of origin. See Appendix A Country Domain

8. Host search

The HOST SEARCH comes in handy when you need to find something located at a
large site that does not have an internal search engine. With this search technique, you
can search all the pages at a website (contained in the engine's database) for keywords or
phrases of interest.

NOTE: Because the major search engines do not always log an entire website, use an
internal search engine, if the website has one, for best results.

+host:www.dap.edu.ph +"special offer"

host:www.dap.edu.ph and "special offer"

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9. URL search

The URL SEARCH limits search results to web pages where the keyword appears in
the URL or website address. A URL search can narrow very broad results to web pages
devoted to the keyword topic.

+url:christmas +title:stories

url:christmas and title:stories

10. Link search

Use the LINK SEARCH when you want to know what websites are linked to a
particular site of interest. For example, if you have a home page and you are wondering if
anyone has put a link to your page on their website, use the Link search. Researchers use
link searches for conducting backward citations.

link:www.deped.gov.ph

link:www.deped.gov.ph/downloads

310 LO3: Search the Web for Information using a Search Engine | Searching the
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Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 5.1
Search the Web for Information Using a Search Engine

Instructions: Based on what you have learned in the past lesson about searching in the
Internet, answer the following questions by searching them from the
Internet using different search strategies.

1. U.S. President who was born in a town named Caldwell.


2. What are the two species of elephants?
3. Who played in the 1979 World Series?
4. From what place did the Ebola virus get its name?
5. What is the address of the Empire State Building?
6. What is North Carolina's state bird?
7. When did Dr. Seuss win the Pulitzer Prize?
8. Who invented the paper clip?
9. What was "Lady Bird" Johnson's maiden name?
10. What country had the largest recorded earthquake?

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Information Sheet
Information Sheet 5.2
Saving a Web picture, copying, and printing from the Web

When you visit a web page, you might like an image (graphic) or picture on it so
much that you want to save a copy of it for yourself for whatever reason. It is easy to
capture an image from the web. But before I tell you how, let me warn you that most
items (that includes text and graphics) on a web page are generally copyrighted and it is
illegal to grab somebody else's copyrighted products without the owner's previous written
permission.

Read the little note about copyright. The note below is by no means complete legal
information about copyright. This is very basic information to give you a sense of what it
is so that you are not sued for copyright infringement by anybody.

Copyright

The creator of anything, whether it is a drawing, photo, painting, text, poetry,


music, movie, video or anything, as soon as he/she has recorded it or saved it (called
fixation) on paper, film, or electronic media becomes the legal owner of it, irrespective of
the fact whether he/she attaches a copyright notice on it. Nobody can copy and use
somebody else's creation without the lawful owner's prior written consent. However, it is
usually tolerable to copy something from the Internet for one's own personal use (such as
copying a photo from the Internet to make wallpaper on your computer's desktop). But
please remember it is not acceptable to copy a picture from one site and put it up on your
own web site without the permission of the rightful owner of the picture. Always e-mail
the person first to seek permission before you use somebody else's creations. And never
download music or video from commercial sites even for your own use. These are almost
invariably copyrighted products, and if caught you may be sued for damages.

Not all things in the Internet are always copyrighted. Some of the things are in
public domain, meaning nobody has copyright to them. These are usually old things -
nobody knows who created them - and going on forever. Copyright owners may
intentionally release some of the things to public domain. And 75 years after the copyright
owner's death, things go in the public domain.

Now that you know about copyrighted products, you can now copy, save or print
some information from the Internet.

Capturing an image from a web page

Here are the steps in capturing an image or picture from a web page.

1. Right-click on the image you want to capture.


2. A small menu will open up. Find and click on "Save Image As ..."

Figure 6.1 This menu will appear when you right-click on the image.

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3. A "Save Picture" dialog box will open up.

b
c

Figure 6.2 Save as dialog box

4. In this dialog box,


a. you need to specify the location where you want to save the file (i.e., name
of the folder in the Save in box)
b. give a short but descriptive File name (a name of the file will already be
there, but you may want to change it to something of your own choosing),
c. select Save as type, that is .jpg or .gif or .bmp, .png etc.
5. Now click on "Save". The image will be saved in your computer in the folder you
have specified under the file name you have given or accepted.

As you can see from the above screen shot, the menu also gives you the options
to copy it so that you can paste it to any application such as your word processor. Just
click on the option you want.

Copying text from the web

You have already known how to copy an image from a web page. To copy text:

1. Highlight the part you want to copy.


2. Right-click on the selected text or press Ctrl+C.
3. Open a word processor such as Notepad, Word Pad or Word and paste the copied
text.

If you are copying a large amount of text, the easiest way to highlight the text is to
click where you want the highlighting to begin and then press the Shift key and while
pressing down the Shift key, click where you want the highlighting to end. The entire
chunk of the text will then become highlighted which you can now copy by pressing the
Ctrl and C keys simultaneously.

Printing from the web

Printing a page or part of a page from the web can sometimes be a little tricky.
Many web pages have special formatting, and they contain a lot of undesirable graphics,
advertisements etc. which you may not want to print. Luckily, many such pages also give

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an option (often in the form of a button) for a "Printer friendly version" or something
similar. Just click on that option. You will see the page changes to a simple looking page
with most of the unwanted things gone, just the main substance remaining.

To print the whole document:

1. Click on the browser's printer icon. Or right-click on the document and then click
on Print.

To print a part of the document:

1. Highlight the portion you want to print.


2. Right-click on the highlighted portion, click on Print, choose Selection and then hit
OK.

To print certain pages of the document:

1. Click on the browser's printer icon.


2. Click print.
3. Instead of choosing Print Selection, you can choose Print Pages from x to y in this
dialog box and then hit OK. The desired pages will be printed out.

To print the page in black and white:

Most printers will give you an option of printing in grayscale, meaning the colored
parts of the page will be printed in various shades of gray. This is a useful option as it lets
you save the colored ink in your printer which is more expensive than black ink.

1. On Print dialog box, click on Properties.


2. Another dialog box will open up. In that dialog box select Print in Grayscale by
putting a check mark in the box next to it.
3. Click on OK. Needless to say, if you want to be thrifty and want to economize on
the printing ink, you can always choose "EconoFast" or "Draft" or something similar
in this dialog box for print quality. Choose this mode whenever printing something
for your own use, and not for presenting it to others.

Figure 6.3 Printer dialog box in printing web page

Use this dialog box to print the entire document or to print certain
specific page(s) or selected text. You can specify here the number
of copies desired. You can also tell the printer in this dialog box
how to print frames or which frame to print.

314 LO3: Search the Web for Information using a Search Engine | Searching the
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Information Sheet
If you click on the Properties button of the above dialog box, another dialog box will
open up as shown below.

Figure 6.4 Printer Preferences dialog box

In this box you can choose whether you want color print or print in grayscale.
Unless you choose print in grayscale, color will be chosen automatically. You can also
choose the print quality in this dialog box. Always leave the printing to automatic setting.
After making your selections, don't forget to hit the OK button.

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a Search Engine
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 5.2
Copying and Printing Information from the Web Page

Instructions: Based on what you have learned previously, do the following instructions
below. After you have mastered this activity, inform your teacher so that
you can proceed to your next activity.

1. Open Microsoft Internet Explorer.


2. Go to the Yahoo Web site (www.yahoo.com).
3. Add the Yahoo Web site to Favorites.
4. In Favorites, create a folder named Search Engines.
5. Move the Yahoo Web site to the new folder.
6. Change Internet Explorers home page to the Yahoo Web site.
7. Choose a search engine and navigate to its home page.
8. Perform a basic search by entering the words chocolate bars into the Search the
Web text box and press <Enter>.
9. Select the URL that appears in the address bar and copy it.
10. Open a word-processing program and paste the copied Web address into a blank
document.
11. Close the word-processing program without saving any changes.
12. Save the Web page as an HTML only file.
13. Change the Web pages orientation to Landscape and the paper size to Legal.
14. Print the Web page.
15. Close the Internet Explorer program.

316 LO3: Search the Web for Information using a Search Engine | Searching the
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Assessment
Assessment

1. When referring to the Internet, what is a cookie?


a. A small piece of software that enriches a larger piece of software by adding
features or functions.
b. One or more pieces of information that are stored as text files on your
computer.
c. A tasty piece of computer hardware.
d. A temporary storage place.

2. A Web browser is:


a. The worlds largest supercomputer that contains and runs the Internet.
b. A spider at the shopping mall.
c. A software application that helps you search for information on the World
Wide Web.
d. A software application that allows you to connect with the Internet.
3. Which of the following is NOT a part of a Web address?
a. Resource
b. Extension
c. Domain Name
d. Connection Site

4. What does the extension .uk stand for?


a. Ukulele
b. University of Kentucky
c. United Kingdom
d. Ukraine

5. A secure Web site contains information available to everyone. (True or False?)

6. It is recommended that you use your social security number or birth date as your
password. (True or False?)

7. The easiest way to display a specific Web page is to:


a. Send a letter to the Web address.
b. Type the Web address in the Address bar and press <Enter>.
c. Type the Web address in the Navigation Pane and press <Enter>.
d. Select File Address bar from the menu.

8. A Home page is the first Web page you see when you connect to the Internet. (True
or False?)

9. Which button on Internet Explorers toolbar brings you back to the page you last
viewed?
a. Home
b. Stop
c. Refresh
d. Back

10. Which of the following statements is NOT true?


a. You can add a Web page to Favorites by right-clicking anywhere on the Web
page and selecting Add to Favorites from the shortcut menu.

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a Search Engine
Assessment
b. You can add a Web page to Favorites by navigating to the page and selecting
Favorites Add to Favorites from the menu.
c. You can view your Favorite Web pages by selecting Edit Favorites from the
menu.
d. You can view your Favorite Web pages by clicking the Favorites button on
the toolbar.

11. When you add a Web page to Favorites, you must keep the original name of the
site. (True or False?)

12. All of the following are file types that are available when saving a Web page, except:
a. Web Page, complete
b. Web Page, images only
c. Web Page, HTML only
d. Text Only

13. All of the following are ways to paste text, images, or URLs into a document, except:
a. Click the Paste button on the Standard toolbar.
b. Select Edit Paste from the menu.
c. Right-click the document and select Paste from the shortcut menu.
d. Press <Ctrl> + <P>.
14. There are very few search engines available on the World Wide Web. (True or
False?)

15. Which of the following is NOT an advantage of conducting an advanced search?


a. The results of an advanced search cost less than those of a standard search.
b. The results of the search will contain more specific information.
c. You can incorporate multiple types of selection criteria into one search.
d. There will be fewer results to sort through to find the information that you
are searching for.

318 LO3: Search the Web for Information using a Search Engine | Searching the
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Key Answer
Key Answer

1. B. A cookie is one or more pieces of information that are stored as text files on your
computer.
2. D. A Web browser is a software application that enables you to connect to the Internet.
3. D. A connection site is not part of a Web address.
4. C. The extension .uk stands for United Kingdom.
5. False. A secure Web site contains information not available to everyone.
6. False. You should never use information that could be easily guessed by someone that
you know as your password.
7. B. The fastest way to display a specific Web page is to type the Web address in the
Address bar and press <Enter>.
8. True. A home page is the first page you see when you log onto the Internet.
9. C. The Back button returns you to the Web page you just left.
10. C. There is no Favorites option under the Edit menu.
11. False. You can change the name of the site so that it is more meaningful, if you would
like.
12. B. It is not an option to save only the images that are contained within a Web page.
13. D. Pressing <Ctrl> + <P> would make the Web page print. The shortcut keystroke for
pasting text, images, or URLs into a document is <Ctrl> + <V>.
14. False. There are lots of good search engines available on the World Wide Web.
15. A. Using a search engine does not cost anything, regardless of the type of search you
are conducting.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail | LO 3:Search the Web for Information using 319
a Search Engine
Introduction
Lesson 6 Create and Use E-mail

Description:

This activity covers one of the performances required in exploring Microsoft 2010
application.

In this activity, the student should be able to

understand E-mail and E-mail Address;


create an E-mail account;
compose and send e-mail message;
open and close an E-mail message;
reply, forward a message;
find and sort messages;
attach and delete a file to a message; and;
manage E-mail messages.

For you to satisfactory complete this activity, you are expected to

create E-mail account;


create and send E-mail messages;
open and close an E-mail message;
reply, forward a message;
find and sort messages;
attach and delete a file to a message;
manage E-mail messages
pass the assessment of this activity.

320 Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO6: Utilize Common Application Program
Introduction
Information Sheet 6.1
Understanding E-mail and E-mail Address

User Name Domain Name Top Level Country


Domain Level
Domain
Figure 6.1 An example of E-mail address

Electronic mail, E-mail or email is the transmission of messages over electronic


networks.

Electronic mail can be accessed in many ways, including:


electronic mail software such as Microsoft E-mail, Eudora, or America Online;
web-based systems such as Hotmail;
integrated applications such as Lotus Notes; and
cell phone or other wireless device.

Microsoft E-mail is a messaging and personal information manager, or PIM. E-mail


lets you send and receive E-mail messages, schedule appointments, and organize your
contacts and addresses. It also reminds you of tasks you need to complete. For many
people, E-mail is often the least-used Microsoft Office applicationunless youre part of a
large organization, in which case E-mail may be your most-frequently used application.

Within an organizations internal network, electronic mail messages are routed


from one user to another user via network servers. In order to send mail to the correct
recipient, the local electronic mail software must know who is and who on the network.
For example, just like you need to know a persons street address if you want to send
them a letter, you need to know a persons E-mail address if you want to send that person
an E-mail message. Figure 6.1 is an example of what a typical E-mail address looks like.

E-mail addresses consist of three parts or in other countries, four : a User Name, a
Domain Name, and a Top Level Domain (TLD), Country Level Domain (CLD).
User Name: The User Name refers to the name of the persons E-mail
account. It is similar to the persons name on an envelope.
Domain Name: The Domain Name, also known as the Host Name, refers to
the location of the persons account on the Internet. It is similar to the
address on an envelope. The User Name and Domain name are separated by
the @ symbol.
Top Level Domain (TLD): The TLD falls at the end of some E-mail address
and is preceded by a period, or dot. This refers to the type of organization
where the persons E-mail account is located. It is similar to the state or
country on an envelope. See Activity 5 for the different Top Level Domain.
Country Level Domain (CLD): The CLD falls at the end of E-mail address
and preceded by a period or dot like the TLD. This refers to the country
where the persons email account is located. See Appendix A for different
Country Level Domain.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail |LO4: Create and Use E-Mail 321
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.1
Creating an E-mail Account

Personal electronic mail can be created into different sites who offered free services.
One of these is Yahoo site, which is the best website to create personal E-mail account
because of its user-friendly interface and its popular services.

Instruction: Follow the instructions below to create a personal E-mail account.


1. Open the site, http://www.yahoo.com.
2. Click Sign up, since you dont have personal yahoo ID and password.
3. Yahoo mail registration form will appear. Supply your personal information. It
includes your name, gender, yahoo ID and password.

322 Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO6: Utilize Common Application Program
Activity Sheet
Please remember that password is case sensitive. A good password starts with
a base word phrase. This means: choose a memorable catchphrase, quotation, or easy-to-
remember saying, and take the first letter from each word. Choose a phrase that is
memorable to you.

4. Type the code as shown in the box before clicking the Create My Account button.

If there is unsupplied information, another form will appear. Supply again the
needed data and information and then click again the Create My Account button.
5. After successful registration, congratulations page will appear, specifying your yahoo
ID and password. Remember your yahoo ID and password and never give it to anyone
because this is your key in transacting with yahoo services.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail |LO4: Create and Use E-Mail 323
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.2
Signing In and Signing-Out to Yahoo
Instruction: Follow the instructions below to sign in to yahoo using your personal E-mail
account you have created in Activity 6.3.
1. Open the site http://www.yahoo.com.
2. Click Sign-In at the top-right portion of yahoo homepage.
3. A sign in form appears requesting to enter your yahoo ID and password. Enter your
yahoo ID and password.
4. Click Sign-In to open your E-mail account.
5. Click Sign Out to close your E-mail account from yahoo. Always sign out every time
you log- off from the yahoo mail.

324 Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO6: Utilize Common Application Program
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.3
Composing and Sending E-mail Message

This activity explains the most basic E-mail task of all: how to compose and send an
E-mail message.
Before you begin, however, it is important to take note of the fact that sometimes
other forms of correspondence are more appropriate than E-mail. Some communication,
such as the transmission of legal documents that require a signature, should be sent via
traditional delivery methods rather than electronically.

1. Open your E-mail account program and make sure you are in the Inbox folder -
click the Inbox button on account if youre not. The Inbox appears.
2. Click the Compose New Message button. An Untitled - Message form appears,
ready for you to enter a new message. First, you need to specify the recipients E-
mail address in the To field.
There are two ways to do this:
If you know the E-mail address, you can type it into the To: box.
If you dont know the address, you can click the To: button and
select the address from your list of contacts.
In this activity, you will send the same message to two people, using both
methods.
First lets enter a name directly into the To box
3. Type your E-mail address into the To text box.
If you need to send a message to more than one person, simply place a comma (,)
between the recipients E-mail addressesfor example: amvillas@deped.gov.ph,
amvillas@yahoo.com. Lets send this message to another person, this time using
the address book to address the message.
4. Click the To button.
The Select Names dialog box appears.
5. Click the Show Names from the: arrow and select Contacts if necessary.
This will display the names and addresses in the Contacts folder.
6. Click the name of any recipient in the Name list and then click the To button.
If you need to send a message to more than one person, you can repeat Step 6 to
add the other recipients. When youre finished, move on to the next step.
7. Click OK.
The Select Recipients dialog box closes, and the recipient(s) appear in the To field.
8. (Optional) To send a copy of a message to someone, click in the Cc field and/or the
Bcc field and Repeat Steps 3-7 to enter their E-mail addresses, only click the Cc or
Bcc button instead of the To button.
Table 2-2: Ways to Address an E-mail Message describes carbon copies (Cc) and
Blind Carbon Copies (Bcc). Next, enter the subject of the message so your

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail |LO4: Create and Use E-Mail 325
Activity Sheet
recipient(s) will know what your message is about. The subject will appear in the
heading of the message in the recipients inbox.
9. Click the Subject field and type Greetings from Lubang Island!
Now you can type an actual E-mail message.
10. Click anywhere in the body of the message (in the lower pane) and type:
Hi everyone - just wanted you to know that my vacation in Lubang Island is
going great!
Type the message as you would in a word processor. All the generic Windows
commands such as cutting, copying, and pasting text work in your E-mail
account..
11. When youre finished with the message, click the Send Message button on the
toolbar.
The message is sent to the Outbox folder and will be sent the next time that you
click the Send and Receive button.
12. Click the Send and Receive button on the toolbar.
Your E-mail account program sends all the messages that are stored in the
Outbox folder and retrieves any new E-mail messages it finds on the E-mail
server.

Table 2-2: Ways to Address an E-mail Message


Address Description
To Sends the message to the recipient you specify (required).
Carbon Copy (Cc) Sends a copy of the message to a recipient who is not directly involved,
but might be interested in the message.

Blind Carbon Copy Sends a copy of the message to a recipient without anyone else
(Bcc) knowing that he or she received the message. You need to select View
Bcc Field from the menu to use the Bcc Field.

326 Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO6: Utilize Common Application Program
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.4
Opening and Closing an E-mail Message
This activity explains how to receive and read your E-mail messages and then what
you can do to your messages after reading them. Youll find its a lot easier to retrieve and
read E-mail messages than it is to sort through and read postal mail - no envelopes to tear
open, and no scribbled handwriting to decipher. Lets get started!
1. Open your E-mail account. If necessary, click the Inbox button.

The contents of the Inbox folder appear in the upper-right pane of the window, as
shown in Figure 2-6. Lets check and see if you have any new E-mail. Normally, your
E-mail account automatically checks your mail server for new messages every
minute. If it finds any new messages on your mail server, it downloads them and
saves them to your E-mail account.

Your new messages are saved in the Inbox folder. Any new, unread messages appear
in bold and have an unopened message icon next to them. Heres how to open and
read a message.
2. Click the Greetings from Lubang Island! message you sent yourself earlier.
The contents of the message appear in the lower right-hand pane of the E-mail
program screen, and the From and Subject information appear at the top of this
pane. You can also open a message in its own window - this is especially helpful
when you want to read a long message. Simply double-click the message you want to
read.
3. Double-click the Greetings from Lubang Island! message.
The message appears in its own window. You can close the message window when
youre finished reading it by clicking the windows close button.
4. Close the message window by clicking its Close button.
The message window closes and you return to the Inbox.
Once you have received a message, there are several things that you can do with it.
You can select the message and do one or more of the following:
Reply to the Message: When you reply to a message, E-mail opens a
Message form that contains the E-mail address, subject, and body of the
message you are responding to. To reply to a message, click the Reply button
on the toolbar.
Forward the Message: When you forward a message to another recipient, E-
mail opens a Message form that contains the subject and body of the message
you are forwarding. You must specify to whom you want to forward the
message in the To box. To forward a message, click the Forward button on the
toolbar.
View or Download any Attachments: Messages with a paperclip icon have
one or more files attached to them. To view and/or download these files, click
the paperclip icon on the message header and select the files you want to
open or view.
Print the Message: To print a message, click the Print button on the toolbar.
Delete the Message: To delete a message, press the <Delete> key.
Move the Message to a Different Folder: If youre the type of person who
has your desk and filing cabinets neatly organized, you can create your own
set of folders and move important messages that you want to save to those

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Activity Sheet
folders.
We will discuss creating and working with your own folders later.
Ignore the Message: Most people dont do anything with their messages,
and let them fill their inbox like a stack of unpaid bills. Having lots of old
E-mail messages in your Inbox makes it more difficult to find important
messages.
Check out Table 2-4: Message Icons for explanation of the icons that appear with your E-
mail messages and then move on to the next activity to learn how to Reply to an E-mail
message!
Table 2-4: Message Icons
Icon Description
Unopened This message has not yet been read or opened.
Message

Opened Message This message has been read (or at least opened).

Reply You have replied to this message.

Forward This is a forwarded E-mail message.


Attachment This message has one or more files attached to it.
! Urgent This message is marked as urgentyou better look at it fast!

Flagged This message has been flagged to remind you about something.

328 Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO6: Utilize Common Application Program
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.5
Replying to a Message
You can reply to an E-mail message just like you would answer a letter. Replying to
an E-mail message is incredibly easyyou dont even need to know the persons E-mail
address; just click the Reply button, write your response, and E-mail takes care of the rest.
Read on to find out how!
1. Select the Greetings from Lubang Island! message you sent to yourself earlier.
Next, you need to decide who you want to respond to. You have two choices:
Reply: Sends the reply only to the author of the message.
Reply to All: Sends the reply to everyone who received the message.
NOTE: Sometimes Reply to All can lead to people being sent inappropriate or irrelevant
mail messages that can embarrass the sender or inconvenience the recipient(s). If you select
this option, make sure everyone is applicable.
2. Click the Reply button on the toolbar.
A new Message form appears where you can type your reply. E-mail automatically fills
in the recipients E-mail address and subject line in the new Message formalthough
you can change this information if you want.
Notice that E-mail also includes a copy, or quote, of the original message in order to
help the reader know which message you are replying to (see Figure 2-8). This helps
track the history of the E-mail message, and comes in handy when you are
answering a question and want to include the original question in your reply. Most E-
mail programs will automatically copy selected information from one E-mail message
to the other, but if you dont want to include this information, its easy to delete it.
3. Select all of the original message text and press the <Delete> key.
The copy of the original message is deleted. You now have a blank Message form.
After what we talked about, however, its probably a good idea to include the
originalmessage. Lets undo your last action.
4. Press <Ctrl> + <Z>.
The original message reappears.
Now all you have to do it enter a response to the message.
5. Press <Ctrl> + <Home> to go to the beginning of the message and type
Glad to hear youre having such a great time. By the way, you left your wallet
here at the office.
Youre ready to send the message.
6. Click the Send button on the toolbar.
The message is sent to the Outbox folder, and will be sent the next time that you clic
the Send and Receive button.
Actually, some people think replying to an E-mail message is too easy. If you dont
respond to your E-mail messages, no one will buy your I received your message but I
havent had time to write back and Im sorry, I somehow misplaced your address
excuses.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail |LO4: Create and Use E-Mail 329
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.6
Forwarding a Message
After youve read a message, you can add your own comments and forward it to
someone else. Forwarding a message is very similar to replying to a message, except that you
send the message on to someone else instead of back to the original sender. Besides the
typical business correspondence, many people like to forward E-mails, called forwards, that
contain jokes, inspirational (but almost always untrue) stories, and urban legends.
This activity explains how to forward a message.
1. Select the Greetings from Lubang Island! message you created earlier.
Heres how to forward the message to another recipient:
2. Click the Forward button on the toolbar.
A new Message form appears with the message you are forwarding. You need to
specify the recipient to whom you want to send, or forward, the message.
3. Click the To button.
The Select Names dialog box appears.
4. Click the Show Names from the arrow and select Contacts, if necessary.
This will display the names and addresses in the Contacts folder.
5. Click the name of any recipient in the Name list, click the To button, and then click
OK.
The Select Recipients dialog box closes and the recipient(s) appear in the To: field.
You can also add your own comments about the message you are forwarding.
6. Click the message body area and type Can you take care of this?
Send this E-mail, to your teachers email address.
7. Close the message window and click No when asked if you want to save your
changes.

330 Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO6: Utilize Common Application Program
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.7
Finding and Sorting Messages
The longer you use E-mail, the more cluttered your Inbox becomes, and the more
difficult it becomes to find a specific E-mail message. Luckily, E-mail comes with a great
Find feature, which can search for and track down your lost E-mails. Find searches the
From field, Subject field, and message text of your E-mails for a specified word or phrase.
Even if you can only remember a little bit about an E-mail message, the Find feature can
probably retrieve it.
In this activity, you will learn how to use E-mails Find feature to search for E-mail
messages in your Inbox.
1. Click the Find button from the toolbar.
The Find pane appears at the top of the message window. Normally, all you have to do
is type the word or phrase youre looking for in the Look for box and click the Find
Now button.
2. Type Lubang Island in the Look for box and make sure the Search all text in the
message box is checked.
The Search all text in the message box ensures that E-mail looks in the actual text
of the messages for the specified word or phrase. Lets see how many E-mail messages
contain the word, Lubang Island.
3. Click the Find Now button.
E-mail searches the Inbox for messages that contain the word and displays the
results at the bottom of the screen. You can close the Find pane when youre finished
using it.
4. Click the Close button, located in the upper right-hand corner of the Find pane.
The Find pane closes and E-mail once again displays all the messages in your Inbox.
The Find feature is a lot more advanced than it looks. By clicking the Advanced Find
button, you can search for messages specifically by date, subject, importance, and
more.

Oftentimes, you will want to view a message thats buried in your Inbox. You can
quickly sort your messages by clicking any of the column headings in your Inbox. Clicking
the Received column, for example, sorts the Inbox by when the messages were received.
Do some of the sorting options available in your Inbox.
5. Make sure you are in Inbox view.
First, lets try sorting the E-mail messages in your Inbox by subject. Remember that
all you have to do to sort your E-mail messages in Microsoft E-mail is to click any of
the column headings in your Inbox.
6. Click the From column heading.
The messages in your Inbox are sorted by the senders name and listed in ascending
alphabetical order. Lets see what happens if you click the From column heading
again.
7. Click the From column heading again.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail |LO4: Create and Use E-Mail 331
Activity Sheet
The list of E-mail messages changes order. The messages are sorted according to their
senders names, but now they are listed in descending alphabetical order, rather than
ascending alphabetical order.
Next, go ahead and see what the Received column heading does.
8. Click the Received column heading.
This time the messages are sorted chronologically according to the date that they
were received.
Take some time and try out some of the other column headings. Try and determine
which column heading is most useful for sorting your Inbox.
Although there are many types of fields available for sorting your Inbox, take a look at
the following table for a description of some of the most common Inbox column
headings.
Table 6.3 Commonly Used Inbox Column Headings
Sort Description
Importance Sorts messages according to importance.
Icon Sorts messages according to icon type.
Flag Status Sorts messages according to flag status
Attachment Separates messages that contain attachments from those who dont.
From Sorts messages according to the senders name.
Received Sorts messages chronologically according to the date that they were
received.
Subject Sorts messages according to the subject.

332 Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO6: Utilize Common Application Program
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.8
Attaching and Deleting a File
One of the most powerful and useful features of E-mail is the ability to supplement an
E-mail message with additional information, including attaching one or more files to a
message. Such files are called attachments and can be pictures, documents, and more.
Attachments allow the immediate sharing of files with other users. The recipient of an
attachment opens the attached file in the program in which it was created.
In this activity, you will learn how to attach a file to an E-mail message.
1. Click the Compose New Message button on the toolbar.
First well compose another E-mail message to ourselves
2. Create the following E-mail message:
TO: (Enter your own E-mail address here.) Subject: Assault Suspect
Subject: Assault Suspect
Body: Chief, I received these files in my E-mail this morning. I thought you might
want to take a look at them.
Its a good idea to leave some space between your message and any attachments.
3. Press <Enter>.
Now youre ready to attach a file to this E-mail message. Heres how:
4. Click the Insert File button on the toolbar.
The Insert File dialog box appears. Now you have to find the file you want to attach.
5. Navigate to your Practice folder.
If you do not know where your practice files are located, ask your teacher for
assistance.
You use the Look in list and Up One Level button to navigate to the various drives
and folders on your computer.
6. Find and double-click the Lineup Letter file.
An icon representing the Lineup Letter appears at the bottom of the E-mail. You can
attach more than one file to an E-mailjust repeat the procedures in Steps 4-6.
7. Repeat Steps 4-6 and attach the Suspect file.
Its just as easy to delete an attachment. All you have to do is select the attachment
and press the <Delete> key.
8. Click the Suspect file to select it and then press the <Delete> key.
The attachment is deleted. Were going to need that attachment for the next activity,
so undo your last action.
9. Press <Ctrl> + <Z> to undelete the Suspect attachment.
Youre ready to send this E-mail.
10. Send the E-mail by clicking the Send button on the toolbar.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail |LO4: Create and Use E-Mail 333
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.9
Opening and Saving an Attachment
In the previous activity, you learned how to attach a file to an E-mail message. In this
activity, you will learn how to view an E-mail attachment and save it to your hard disk. Lets
get started!

1. Click the Send/Receive button on the toolbar.


You should receive the message you sent yourself in the previous activity. Notice the
message has a paper clip icon next to it, indicating the message contains an
attachment.
2. Select the Assault Suspect message.
A paperclip icon appears on the message header in the Preview pane. To view the
messages attachment(s), simply click this icon and select the file you want to view.
3. Click the paper clip icon.
A list of the attachments appears.
4. Select the Lineup Letter file from the attachment list.
E-mail opens the Lineup Letter in Microsoft Word.

NOTE: Not all recipients may be able to open and view certain attachments.
Oftentimes it is difficult to receive large attachments, and some recipients may not be
able to display embedded URLs, graphics, or media. It is important to know what
types of attachments your recipients E-mail application can handle before sending
out loads of critical information.
5. Close Microsoft Word.
Sometimes E-mail will ask you what you want to do with an attachment. Lets try
opening the suspect file.
6. Click the paper clip icon and select the Suspect file from the attachment list.
The Opening Mail Attachment dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 2-15. E-mail
displays the Opening Mail Attachment dialog box when its not sure what to do with
an attachment. You have two choices:
Open it: Opens the file in the program that created it (if its installed on your
computer). Since some files can contain viruses, it is recommended that you
use the Save it to disk option to save files to your hard disk and scan them
using an anti-virus program before opening them.
Save it to disk: Saves the file to your hard disk. Make sure you keep track of
where you save the file or you may not be able to find it later.
For this activity youll open the Suspect file.
7. Select the Open it option and click OK.
E-mail opens the Suspect file in a graphics program (provided you have one installed
on your computer).

334 Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO6: Utilize Common Application Program
Activity Sheet
8. Close the Suspect window.
Youre back in Microsoft E-mail.
Attachments are sometimes easier to work with when the E-mail is opened in its own
form.
9. Double-click the Assault Suspect message.
The Assault Suspect message opens in its own window, and the two attachments
appear at the bottom of the screen. You can easily save any attachment to your hard
disk.
10. Right-click the Suspect attachment and select Save As from the shortcut menu.
The Save Attachment dialog box appears. Make sure that you keep track of the folder
where you save the attachment. You dont need to save the Suspect attachment to the
hard disk, so you can close the Save Attachment dialog box.
11. Click Cancel to close the Save Attachment dialog box and then close the Assault
Suspect message window.
One final note on attachments: If youve been paying attention to the news the past
few years, youve undoubtedly heard about computer viruses and the havoc they can cause.
Many computer viruses are spread as E-mail attachments. For example, the dreaded
Melissa and I Love You viruses that shut down thousands of computers a few years ago
were both E-mail attachments. So how do you avoid such viruses? First, never open an
attachment that looks suspicious or that is from someone you dont know. Second, make
sure you have a good anti-virus program installed on your computer and that you save files
to your hard disk before opening them.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail |LO4: Create and Use E-Mail 335
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 6.2
Managing E-mail

Many people prefer to use E-mail as their primary form of communication. In fact,
many regard their personal computer E-mail application as their most important program.
In recent years, the uses for E-mail have expanded rapidly. At first, E-mail was only used as
a quick, easy, and inexpensive form of communication that offered instantaneous results. E-
mail applications have developed rapidly and are now used to conduct business
transactions; carry on extended conversations or contract negotiations; manage daily,
weekly, or even monthly tasks; and many other types of activities. The result of this E-mail
revolution is that users can end up sending and/or receiving hundreds of E-mail messages
every single day, and that can be a lot to handle!
There are multiple types of E-mail messages that may be received in a given day, such
as online newsletters, business E-mails, personal E-mails, Web order forms, invoices, and
the list goes on and on. That certainly is a lot of messages to have to deal with on a daily
basis!
This lesson is an overview of the basic Inbox management tasks covered in this
chapter. Take a look at the suggestions below on managing your E-mail messages effectively
and then move on to the subsequent lessons to for a more detailed description of each one.
Use Folders to Organize Your Inbox
A filing cabinet organizes information into related folders; similarly, E-mail application
programs store items in their own separate folders. You may be used to folders in Microsoft
Windows, where they are used to organize files and programs. In E-mail, each module stores
its information in its own folder, which you can view using the Folder List.
Just like the folders in a filing cabinet or in Microsoft Windows, sometimes you may
find that one of your E-mail folders is getting too big to manage and you will need to organize
and move its information into several new folders or subfolders. For example, you could
create a Personal folder to store all of your personal E-mail messages. Remember that once
you have created these folders, it is important that you move messages to the appropriate
folders right away so you do not end up with a cluttered Inbox.
Many people dont use the Folder List because the E-mail Bar includes the folder
choices that people use frequently. If you dont send and/or receive much E-mail, you
probably wont need to work with the Folder List. On the other hand, if youre having
difficulty sorting through the deluge of E-mail you receive on a daily basis, you will definitely
want to read on into this chapter to learn how you can use folders to organize your Inbox.
Delete Unimportant E-mails Immediately
This may seem fairly obvious, but sometimes this step can be overlooked. When you
receive an E-mail message, take a second and decide what to do with it. If it is important, or
relevant to something that you are doing, move the message to an appropriate folder. If the
E-mail is not important, delete the message immediately. Deleting unimportant E-mails
keeps your Inbox neat and tidy, thus preventing Inbox Overflow. If you do not delete
unimportant E-mails right away, your Inbox can become overrun and cluttered, making it
difficult to find E-mails that are truly important.
Dont be afraid to delete E-mail messages. Most applications offer you at least one
chance to retrieve the message before it is permanently deleted. E-mail, for example, moves
deleted E-mail messages to the Deleted Items Folder. This folder must be emptied for the

336 Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO6: Utilize Common Application Program
Information Sheet
contents to be deleted permanently. If you are familiar with Microsoft Windows, this folder is
similar to the Recycle Bin that is found on your desktop.
Use the Address Book and Distribution Lists
An address book is similar to a phone directory, except it can also store E-mail
addresses, departments at work, mailing addresses, job titles, and much more! You can use
an address book both to look up individual addresses and phone numbers and to address E-
mail messages. Unless you only correspond with two or three people, its almost impossible
to memorize the phone numbers, mailing addresses, and E-mail addresses of everyone that
you know. Fortunately, if you use the address book, you wont have to.
A distribution list, or group, is an entry contained within the address book that is
comprised of several names. You should use distribution lists to send an E-mail message to
every member of a group in a single mailing. These groups may include employee groups
that work in the same department, members working on the same project or committee, or
groups of friends.
Distribution lists show up as items in your address book, much as any other
individual entry would. You use a distribution list to address an E-mail message just as you
would with any other contact. Again, these topics will be covered more extensively in lessons
to come.
Managing your E-mail messages may sound complicated now, but when you are
finished with this chapter, your messages will be neat and tidy. We have a lot of ground to
cover in this chapter, so lets quit reading and start doing.
Table 6.4 E-mail Folders
Folder Description
Inbox Stores the messages youve received.
Outbox Temporarily stores any messages that youve composed but have not
been sent.
Sent Items Stores copies of messages you have sent.
Deleted Items Stores messages that you have deleted.
Drafts Stores draft messages that you havent completed yet.

Using Folders to Organize Information


A filing cabinet organizes information into related folders; similarly, E-mail stores its
various items in their own separate folders. You may be used to folders which are used to
organize your files and programs. You can copy, move, and delete files to and from the
folders on your hard drive. E-mail has its own set of folders for storing the items you create
in various modules: appointments, contacts, E-mail messages, and so on. Each module
stores its information in its own folder, which you can view in the Folders List.
Just like the folders in a filing cabinet or in Windows, sometimes you may find that
one of your E-mail folders is getting too big to manage and you will need to organize and
move its information into several new folders or subfolders. For example, you could create a
Personal folder to store your personal E-mail.
Many people dont use the Folder List because the E-mail Bar includes the folder
choices that people normally use. If you dont receive and/or send much E-mail, you
probably dont need to work with the Folder List, either. On the other hand, if youre having
Searching the Web and Use E-Mail |LO4: Create and Use E-Mail 337
Information Sheet
difficulty sorting through the deluge of E-mail you seem to receive on a daily basis, you will
definitely want to review the next few lessons, which explain how you can use folders to
organize your E-mail information.

338 Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO6: Utilize Common Application Program
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.10
Selecting One or More Mail Messages
The advantage of selecting E-mail items is that you can move, copy, and/or delete
many items at once instead of individually. For example, you could select all the E-mail
messages pertaining to a particular project and move them to a Project folder instead of
having to move each E-mail message individually.
In this activity, you will learn how to select more than one E-mail item at a time so
that you can move, copy, or delete a group of items at the same time.
1. Make sure the Folder List is open.
2. Click the Inbox folder.
Your Inbox may contain several messages that pertain to one subject. You can
select random, or non-adjacent, items by holding down the <Ctrl> key and then
clicking each item you want to select.
3. Hold down the <Ctrl> key as you click each E-mail message that contains the
subject.
Now you can move, copy, or delete any the selected items all at once.
4. With the E-mail messages still selected, click and drag any of the selected
messages to the folder that you created in the last lesson.
If the folder you created earlier isnt visible, click the plus symbol beside the
Inbox Folder.
If the items you want to select are adjacent to one another, you can click the first
item you want to select and then hold down the <Shift> key as you click the last
item of the group of you want to select.
5. Click the first E-mail message, hold down the <Shift> key, and click the last
message.
Youve selected the first message, the last message, and all the messages in
between.
6. Click anywhere outside the selected messages to deselect them.
Move on to the next step and close the Folder List.
7. Close the Folder List.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail |LO4: Create and Use E-Mail 339
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.11
Deleting Messages
When you delete E-mail messages, E-mail places it in the Deleted Items folder. Like
the Windows Recycle Bin, the Deleted Items folder contains deleted E-mail items. If you
change your mind and decide you need a deleted message, its easy to find and retrieve it.
This lesson will show you how to open the Deleted Items folder, restore a deleted message,
and empty the Deleted Items folder.

1. Select the Assault Suspect message in your Inbox and press <Delete>.
E-mail removes the Assault Suspect message from the Inbox and places it in the
Deleted Items folder.
2. Switch to the Deleted Items folder by clicking the Deleted Items button on the E-mail
Bar.
The Deleted Items folder displays all the messages you have recently deleted. If you
accidentally delete a message, you can easily retrieve it.
3. Find and select the Assault Suspect message, click the Move to Folder button on the
toolbar, and select the Move to Folder option. Select Inbox from the folder list and
click OK.
E-mail moves the Assault Suspect message back to the Inbox. Occasionally, you will
want to empty the Deleted Items folder. Heres how:
4. Right-click the Deleted Items button on the E-mail Bar, select the Empty "Deleted
Items" Folder option from the shortcut menu, and click Yes to confirm the deletion.
E-mail permanently deletes the contents of the Deleted Items folder.
You can also have E-mail automatically empty the Deleted Items folder every time you
quit E-mail. Simply select Tools Options from the menu, click the Other tab, and check
the Empty the Deleted Items folder upon exiting box. Be very careful when deleting all
messages in the Deleted Items folder, however, because once you do so there is no way to
retrieve them.

340 Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO6: Utilize Common Application Program
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.12
Marking Messages as Read or Unread
Sometimes, after you have read an E-mail message, you may want to mark the
message as unread. You may also want to mark an unread E-mail message as having been
read. Doing this will change the status of your Inbox.
To mark an E-mail message as read or unread, you must first open the Edit menu.
There are several E-mail message status choices here:
Mark as Read: Marks an unread E-mail message as having been read.
Mark as Unread: Marks an already viewed E-mail message as not having been
read.
Mark All as Read: Marks all messages in the Inbox as Read so that it appears
that there are no new E-mail messages waiting to be read.
1. Select the Help from Timbuktu! message you created earlier.
All you have to do to select a message is to click on it. You have already read this
message, so you want to mark it as not having been read.
2. Select Edit Mark as Unread from the menu.
The message is now marked as unread, as seen in Figure 2-27. You know that the
status has changed, because the envelope icon that appears to the left of the message
has changed from being open to being closed. Also, the message text appears in bold
face. All new messages appear in bold.
Go ahead and mark all of the messages in your Inbox as having been read. 3. Select
Edit Mark All as Read from the menu.
All of the messages are now shown as having been read. They each have an open
envelope icon next to the message text and they do not appear in bold.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail |LO4: Create and Use E-Mail 341
Activity Sheet
Activity Sheet 6.13
Adding New Address Book Entries

If you use the E-mail Address Book, you dont have to memorize lots of confusing
phone numbers and E-mail addresses. Simply enter the names and E-mail addresses of the
people to whom you regularly send messages, and youll never have to remember another
obscure E-mail address again. This lesson will show you how to add an E-mail address to
the E-mail Address Book.
1. Click the Address Book button on the toolbar.
The Address Book window appears.
2. Click the New Entry button on the toolbar.
The New Entry dialog box appears. First, you need to specify where you want to save
the new Address Book entry. Most of the time, you will want to save entries in the
Contacts list.
3. In the Put this entry panel, click the In the list arrow and select Contacts.
Because there are many different types of E-mail and messaging systems, the
Address Book can create several different types of entries.
4. Select Internet Address and click OK.
The New Internet Address Properties dialog box appears.
5. Type your name in the Display name field.
Next, specify your E-mail address.
6. Enter your E-mail address in the E-mail address text box.
To add additional information about the recipient, such as a mailing address or
phone number, click the appropriate sheet tabs and enter the information.
7. Click OK to close the New Internet Address Properties dialog box.
You return to the Address Book window. If you arent in the Personal Address Book
view, select it from the Show Names from the text box. In your Personal Address
Book, you will see the entry you just made.
8. Close the Address Book window.
When you add entries to the Address Book, you can add as much or as little
information as you want. For example, you could enter a persons department,
mailing address, and phone numbersor, you could just enter their name and E-
mail address.

342 Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO6: Utilize Common Application Program
Information Sheet
Information Sheet 6.3
Understanding the Advantages of Web-based E-mail and Network Etiquette

There are tons of advantages to using E-mail. In fact, there are too many to list in a
single lesson. However, there are three key advantages that every Web-based E-mail user
should be aware of: speed of delivery, low cost, and accessibility.
Speed of Delivery
When compared to other methods of communication, such as postal mail, E-mail is
much faster! In fact, when you send an E-mail, it reaches its destination almost
instantaneously. Whether youre sending an E-mail to the co-worker in the cubical next to
yours, or to your sister who is vacationing in Australia, the time of delivery will be the same.
Low Cost
If you are concerned about having to pay for an E-mail program in order to send and
receive E-mail messages, set those feelings aside. If youre connected to the Internet and
have a Web browser, you dont even need an E-mail application to send and receive
messages - you can do it right from the Web! Web-based E-mail is usually free, and it allows
you to compose, send, and receive E-mail messages using a Web page instead of an E-mail
program.
Accessibility
Your E-mail is easy to access if youre using Web-based E-mail. In fact, many people
prefer to use Web-based E-mail instead of an E-mail program because its free and can be
accessed anywhere that there is a computer with an Internet connection. Hotmail is owned
by Microsoft, is the largest Web-based E-mail program in the world. Other examples of Web-
based E-mail programs include Yahoo!, Fastmail, and Netscape. If youre looking to
purchase an E-mail application, you have lots of choices. Although well be working with
Microsoft Outlook throughout the duration of this chapter, Outlook is by no means the only
program you can use to send and receive E-mail. And remember - there is always the option
of using Web-based E-mail.
So you already know the basics regarding E-mail, but how should an E-mail message
be composed?
E-mail has evolved as a unique communication medium that combines the formality
of a letter and the informality of a telephone call. Despite its informal approach,
communicating via E-mail is no excuse for a lack of professionalism. Messages should follow
the same guidelines as correspondence via written mail, possessing an appropriate level of
formality based on its content.
To show good network etiquette, or netiquette, keep the following in mind as you
write your messages:

Accurate Subject Fields


Subject fields need to be accurate. You want the receiver to know what they are going
to read, and how urgent the message may be, before they even open it. For example, lets
say you are going to send your employees an E-mail regarding tomorrows staff meeting.
There is staff meetings scheduled for Tuesday and Thursday as well. If you just enter
Meeting into the Subject field of your E-mail, the receivers will not be aware that this
particular E-mail is regarding the meeting scheduled for tomorrow. It cant be stressed
Searching the Web and Use E-Mail |LO4: Create and Use E-Mail 343
Information Sheet
enough that being articulate within your Subject fields is important.
Be Brief
When you create or respond to an E-mail, be brief. It is much easier for the receiver to
glance over two sentences versus two pages. For example, if a co-worker sends you a
message asking what time the meeting is scheduled for tomorrow; dont send an annotated
version of your schedule for the week along with wishes for a good day. Simply respond
politely and succinctly with the time and place of the staff meeting. It is also important to be
aware of the tone your messages exude. Using all capitals to emphasize a point should be
avoided, as it appears as SHOUTING to the recipient.
Check Your Spelling
It is imperative that your E-mail messages stay free from spelling errors. Not only is it
unprofessional, but spelling errors could cause confusion as to the actual meaning of your
message. It is also important to remember that while most E-mail applications come with a
spell checker, it will not catch all spelling errors.

Understanding Unsolicited E-mail and Computer Viruses

Isnt it nice when you open your Inbox in the morning and find important E-mail
messages waiting for you? Probably not. These are all examples of Spam. Spam is, quite
easily, one of the most annoying aspects of E-mail.
What is Spam?
If the E-mail meets both of the following criteria, it can be defined as Spam.
The E-mail message was unsolicited: This means that the message was sent to you
even though you never asked for it. Usually, Spams are sent in an effort to get you
to buy a particular product or service. Most, but not all, Spams are commercial
in nature. Not all unsolicited E-mails are Spam. Your long-lost friend from preschool
in Kansas could send you an E-mail trying to get back in touch. You would
certainly not want this e- mail classified as Spam simply because you didnt solicit
it. Therefore, there must be another criterion by which to define Spam.

The E-mail message was sent in bulk and without discrimination: If this message
was sent to a large group of random people, it is most likely Spam. Spammers do
not discriminate to whom their junk mail is sent. They will send to anyone and
everyone in an attempt to earn a sale.

Your friend obviously did not send her E-mail to a large group of people. Therefore,
the E-mail message does not meet both criteria and should not be classified as Spam.
How can you prevent Spam?
It is almost impossible to prevent businesses and other organizations from sending
you Spam. However, most E-mail programs on the market nowadays include some sort of
junk mail filter or encryption software. While these filters cannot repel Spam, they can most
certainly keep it away from your Inbox. Unfortunately most of these filters prove to be quite
ineffective, simply because they are based on a limited lexicon. If a Spammer uses different
vocabulary than you might expect to find in a Spam, the filter will allow it into your Inbox.
Luckily, there is another anti-Spam feature in most E-mail applications. They allow

344 Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO6: Utilize Common Application Program
Information Sheet
you to create a junk mail senders list. When you add a name to this list, that person can no
longer send you E-mails, junk or not. Adding a name to a junk mail senders list is like
telling your postal worker, Dont deliver any more mail from Publishers Clearing House.
What is a virus?
The average keyboard has thousands of germs on it, but thats not how computers get
viruses. A computer virus is a small computer program created by a malicious programmer
for the purpose of damaging other computers. When viruses become installed on a
computer, the computer is infected and the virus carries out the damage it is programmed to
do.
There are many different types of viruses. Most viruses attack computer hard drives
by erasing data and damaging system files, but programmers can write the virus to do
anything they want. If your computer isnt working the way it usually does, you have
probably been infected with a virus.
One of the most devastating effects of a virus is that the virus often has the ability to
spread from computer to computer. The most malicious virusessuch as the I Love You
and Melissa viruseshave caused billions of dollars in damage worldwide.
How are viruses spread?
The most damaging computer viruses are programmed with the ability to reproduce
and infect more computers. Many viruses invade computers through E-mail programs by
riding the backs of E-mail messages, or through networks and file sharing. Viruses can also
be found in storage devices like diskettes, CD/DVD-ROMs, or memory cards. The Internet is
a host to many viruses as well.
What can I do to prevent a virus?
Good judgement is the first line of defense against a virus. Installing anti-virus
software on your computer will keep out most viruses, but you can do a lot to prevent
contracting a virus as well. Here are a few guidelines to keep in mind:
Do use an anti-virus program. Installing an anti-virus software program on your
computer is a must if you are going to be working on the Internet.

Dont post your E-mail address in a public place. Once a spammer gets a hold of your
E-mail, its almost impossible to avoid receiving unsolicited E-mails that may or may
not contain a virus.

Dont open messages from unknown senders. Viruses are often sent through E-mail
messages. If you dont know the sender, dont open the message.

Dont open attachments from unknown senders. A virus has to be opened to install
itself on your computer. Even if the sender is familiar, think twice before opening the
attachment.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail |LO4: Create and Use E-Mail 345
Assessment
Assessment

1. Which of the following is NOT a part of an E-mail address?


a. Domain Name
b. Network Name
c. Top Level Domain (TLD)
d. User Name
2. To reply to a message, click the Forward button on the toolbar. (True or False?)
3. Youve just received an E-mail entitled I Love You! from someone you dont know.
The message has an attachment. What do you do?
a. Open the attachment immediately and see what it is!
b. Forward the E-mail to your significant other to show them that at least other
people appreciate you.
c. The E-mail may likely contain a virus, so treat the E-mail and its attachment
with extreme caution. Either delete it or save it to your hard disk but ONLY if
you have an up-to-date anti-virus program installed.
d. Pull the personal ad you posted last month from the Internet.
4. Which of the following does NOT describe a distribution list?
a. You should use a distribution list to send an E-mail message to each member of
a group in a single mailing.
b. You should use a distribution list to send a humorous E-mail to a group of
friends.
c. You should use a distribution list to address an E-mail message just as you
would with an individual contact.
d. You should use a distribution list to send an E-mail to your mother-in-law.
5. Which of the following are ways to find an E-mail message? (Select all that apply.)
a. Click the Find button on the toolbar.
b. Click the New Mail Message button on the toolbar.
c. Select Tools Find from the menu.
d. Select Edit Find Message from the menu.
6. When you receive an unimportant E-mail message, you should:
a. Keep it in your Inbox.
b. Move it to your Important folder.
c. Delete it.
d. Forward it to all of your friends.
7. Which of the following is an advantage of E-mail?
a. Low Cost
b. Accessibility
c. Speed of Delivery
d. All of the above are advantages of E-mail
8. It is not important to use good network etiquette when composing an E-mail. (True or
False?)
9. Most Spams are commercial in nature. (True or False?)
10. Which of the following is a method for marking an E-mail message as read or
unread? (Select all that apply.)
a. Select File Message Status from the menu.
b. Select Edit from the menu and then choose an E-mail message status option.
c. Right-click an E-mail message and choose a status option from the shortcut
menu.
d. Double-click an E-mail message and choose a status option from the shortcut
menu.

346 Searching the Web and Use E-Mail LO6: Utilize Common Application Program
Key Answer
Key Answer:

1. b. Network Name is not part of an E-mail address.


2. False. You reply to a message by clicking the Reply button on the toolbar, of course.
3. c. While an E-mail titled I Love You with an attachment could come from a secret
admirer, its much more likely that it contains virus. Either delete the message or
save the file to your hard disk, but ONLY if you have an up-to-date anti-virus
program installed.
4. d. Distribution lists are meant to be used to send one E-mail message to every
member of a group, not to send an E-mail message to an individual.
5. a and c. To find a message, either click the Find button on the toolbar, or select Tools
Find from the menu.
6. c. Any E-mail message that you do not need should be deleted immediately.
7. d. Speed of delivery, low cost, and accessibility are all advantages of using E-mail.
8. False. It is very important to use good network etiquette when composing and
sending E-mail.
9. True. Most Spams that are sent out are in an attempt to get you to buy a product or
service.
10. b and c. You can mark a message as read or unread either by right-clicking the
message and selecting a status from the shortcut menu, or by selecting Edit from the
menu and then choosing a status option from the menu.

Searching the Web and Use E-Mail |LO4: Create and Use E-Mail 347
Introduction

Lesson 7 Impact of Computing and the Internet on Society

Description:

This activity covers one of the performances required in exploring Microsoft 2010
application.

In this activity, the student should be able to

understand good working conditions;


understand information security (passwords, backing up data, etc);
understand computer viruses ;
understand copyright concepts, Freeware, Shareware, and EULAs; and
understand how computers affect the environment.

For you to satisfactory complete this activity, you are expected to

pass the assessment of this activity.

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Information Sheet 7.1
The E-World

This lesson focuses on how computers and the Internet affect our everyday lives.

The following list acknowledges several of the many activities and services that
computers and the Internet help facilitate:

Collect information: Search the Web and/or conduct interviews via E-mail to
collect information for a school paper.

Organize information: Utilize your banks Web site and/or financial


management software to keep track of all your accounts.

Evaluate information: Search the Web and utilize spreadsheet software to


evaluate potential prices for a new product against those of competing products.

Communicate information: Use E-mail or an Instant Messaging program to


communicate with others no matter what their geographical location.

Increase productivity: Computers allow you to complete things quickly and


easily, thus increasing your productivity in the workplace.

Collaborate with others: Utilize Message boards, chatrooms, and E-mail to keep
in touch with others no matter what their geographical location.

Solve real-world problems: Search the Web to find information regarding


anything you can imagine! Health, finance, relationships, snow shoeingtheres a
Web site for just about everything these days.

Facilitate learning and promote critical thinking: Learn for fun at home or
strive for your college degree via online programs and Computer-based training
(CBT).

Promote creativity: Suffering from Artists Block? Look up your favorite artist
online for inspiration. Need help creating a Web site? Utilize Web-authoring
software.

Over the past few years, a whole new prefix has been added to language, thanks to
computers and technology: e for electronic. There are E-mails, e-commerce, e-books, e-
businesses, and anything else that can now be done electronically. E-mail is probably the
most popular of all of these words. Millions of people across the world communicate using
E-mail, where a message can be sent to another person instantly, to or from anywhere in
the world. Another advantage with E-mail is that files can be sent to others as
attachments to the message.
E-commerce is also growing in popularity. E-commerce is a collection of Internet
features and services that allow individuals and organizations to perform commercial
transactions using the Internet. Companies see the appeal in selling more products and
services with less of an overhead cost, while people are choosing to avoid the crowds at
malls and supermarkets altogether by shopping online. E-commerce also gives individuals
the ability to comparison shop and find the best quality product without having to leave

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home. Individuals can also find rare and discontinued items from sites such as online
vendors and auction sites. Organizations can benefit from e-commerce as well, given that
selling products over the Internet eliminates the need to maintain physical sales locations,
thus allowing organizations to sell more efficiently and cost-effectively.

E-learning is another popular electronic trend. E-learning provides inexpensive


training and learning opportunities for people of all ages, income levels, and backgrounds.
Children now can learn to read by utilizing a computer, and stay-at-home moms can
obtain a college degree or certification through online programs.

Computers and the Internet provide many public services to the community as
well, such as Web cafes and public Internet centers, which allow people looking for work
to take part in online training, resume creation, and online job searches.

People vs. Computers

Science fiction has been predicting how computer technology will someday equal
and even surpass human intelligence for years. Characters such as Lieutenant Data in
Star Trek illustrate an artificial intelligence that surpasses the human mind in storing
information and the ability to learn new things, such as languages and procedures. In
some cases, the possibility of artificial intelligence ultimately overpowering humans is
explored, as seen in the Terminator movies. We do not yet see the limit of technologys
abilities, but science is still a long way from producing a computer that matches the
human minds processing power.

Over the past few decades, we have watched computers advance and grow into
every facet of our daily lives. Today, computers replace many jobs that required human
work in the past. On the other hand, many jobs have been created to help develop and
maintain computer technology. The question of sheer processing superiority of man vs.
computer is still in debate. But in the end, no matter how far technology advances, it will
never have the ability to have feelings, to adapt to our surroundings, or to think creatively
as we do.

Here are a few examples of situations where a computer or a person is most appropriate.

Table 7.1 People vs. Computers


Tasks for People Tasks for Computers
Human Touch: Tasks that deal withDangerous Situations: Tasks that could
emotion, such as discussing jeopardize human safety, such as
personal matters in counseling or at the disposal of hazardous waste or
the hospital. Artificial intelligence space exploration. Computerized
cannot relate to feelings or emotion. machines can perform in places
People naturally desire to speak and conditions that a human body
with other people; not a computer. cannot endure.

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Creativity: Tasks that require imagination Repetition: Tasks that require repetitive
or abstract thought, such as art or actions, such as tasks in factory
problem solving. Computers are assembly lines. Humans can endure
limited; they cannot deviate from physical and mental fatigue from
the information programmed into repetitive tasks, and are not as
their systems. efficient or accurate as computers.

Environment: Tasks that require Calculations: Tasks that require


processing unexpected data from mathematical calculation, such as
the immediate environment, such as accounting. In spreadsheets, a
combat or security enforcement. computer can calculate and
Computers do not have senses or recalculate figures in seconds what
intelligence to process data from might take hours or days to do
their surroundings. manually.
Shape Recognition: Tasks that require Automation: Tasks that can be
shape recognition, such as lab work programmed to deal with anticipated
or research. For example, computers input, such as a telephone
cannot discern pattern differences answering service or Automated
between healthy and cancerous Transaction Machine (ATM).
tissue. Business can save a lot of money by
using computers instead of people
for these tasks.

Computers may eventually be able to do more human things as technology


develops. One reference point for man vs. computer intelligence is in chess, which
compares human strategy and intuition to cold computer calculation. The first man vs.
machine chess contest, grandmaster Garry Kasparov vs. Deep Blue was won by the IBM
supercomputer in 1997. However in February 2003, the first annual FIDE (International
Chess Federation) Official World Chess Championship of Man vs. Machine gave Kasparov
another chance against a computer, the Israeli-programmed Deep Junior. This time the
match ended in a draw, proving that computer intelligence is not yet superior to humans.

Even with time for advancement, Kasparov believes that humans will prevail on the
chessboard. In my view, in 10 years' time, the best human player could beat a machine
one single game on our best day. It proves we are still better, because we cannot
guarantee the same intact performance for six or eight playing games, while a machine
could play for 100 games, he said.

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Information Sheet 7.2
Computers in Our Society

Computing is not about computers anymore. It is about living.


-Nicholas Negroponte

Since the Industrial Revolution, technology continues to change the way we live,
work, and play. The most influential modern technology is the computer, which allows
communication, information processing, and production to occur much faster. For
example, computers have made industrial manufacturing more accurate and efficient and
the disposal of hazardous waste safer.

This part will highlight areas, in which the computer has changed and enhanced
everyday life, and examine how modern technology has changed the quality of life in work,
government, education, homes, and daily life, and discuss instances where computers or
people are appropriate.

Computers in Business

Computers operate behind the scenes in many everyday situations. This day and
age, we rely on computers more than we might realize. Take a step back for a moment and
imagine what an office would be like without computers. How would you communicate
with co-workers? What would you use to present a business proposal or marketing
strategy? How would you keep track of communication with clients? If your working
environment is similar to the majority of businesses today, the tasks mentioned above
seem tedious and nearly impossible without a computer at your fingertips. The table
below elaborates on a few of the specific areas that have changed significantly with the
introduction of computers.

Table 7.2 Computers in Business


Business Areas Changes and Improvements
Banking Automatic Transaction Machines (ATMs) allow clients to do their
banking without a bank teller. Internet banking allows bank
clients to make deposits, transfers, and check on balances.

Transferring or wiring money is possible both nationally and


internationally.

Increased automation in banks decreases employee overhead,


saving banks a lot of money; however, there is a level of
insecurity in online banking.

Stock exchange Buying and trading of stocks is available online.

Checking on the status of stocks and bonds through the


Internet is very popular.
Advertising Web page ad banners, pop-up windows, and mass e-mails add a
new dimension to advertising.

Bidding for top spots on search engines is a popular and


successful way to gain exposure.

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Accounting Spreadsheet programs with capability of automatic calculations
have reduced human error, and make it easier to plan strategy.

Management Software has been produced to help manage productivity and


assessment, such as time clocks.

Project management Software has been produced, such as Microsoft Project, to help
manage and assess project costs, deadlines, and progress.

Group working Programs that facilitate e-mail and project networking help
group
communication and assessment stay up to date.
Office automation Calendars, customer administration, electronic contacts and
production keep office communication efficient and inexpensive.

Transportation/ Many airlines provide the option to purchase tickets online on


Airline travelling their Websites.

Computerized booking systems enable e-tickets (which eliminate


the need for paper tickets) and other features that make air
travel more friendly and convenient for customers.

Insurance Most insurance companies use large-scale computer systems


and specialized software to manage insurance policies and file
insurance claims.

Computer systems owned by schools, businesses, and other organizations are


normally governed by laws or rules of proper use, and every user has an obligation to
know and understand these rules. For example, some computer systems owned by
businesses may have rules or guidelines regarding when information can or cannot be
considered personal, such as who owns data that is stored on the system. While rules
covering employer-employee relations regarding computer use may vary, an individual has
more rights to information created on a computer that they own than they do on
equipment that is owned by someone else. If you are unsure of your companys policies,
make sure to contact your system administrator.

Computers in Education

A college campus is probably the only place where it is acceptable walk around in
public in your pajamas. But with todays technology, students dont even have to leave
their room.

Computers are becoming helpful tools in classrooms of all levels and ages, allowing
educators to teach in new and exciting ways. For example, instead of printing and
evaluating write-in tests, teachers can use specialized software programs to create,
administer, and evaluate tests on a computer. Administrative branches are using software
to improve student registration and class scheduling or timetabling as well.

In some cases, computers are actually replacing the need for an instructor, as in
computer-based training (CBT). In CBT, an individual uses his or her computer to learn a

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subject from a CD or DVD. This is especially popular for individuals who wish to learn
without actually taking a course.

Another growing trend is distance learning, which dissolves the need for a
classroom setting. This can take place through e-mail correspondence, or by the use of
Webcast technology which allows a student to watch and hear a lecture over the Internet
in real-time.

Students are experiencing advantages to using the computer in homework as well.


Word processing makes writing papers and class presentations much easier, while
software programs are available to reinforce and exercise learning outside of the
classroom. The Internet is also a great tool for researching homework assignments.
However, because many informative sites require a user account or fee, its sometimes
easier and cheaper to use library resources.

Currently, most schools have access to basic computer and Internet technology.
However, as technology advances and becomes more prevalent in education, a balance
between some of the advantages and disadvantages of computers should be considered.
Take a look at the following table for some advantages and disadvantages of incorporating
technology into the classroom.

Table 7.3 Pros and Cons of Computers in Education


Advantages Disadvantages
Independent learning: Students learn at Limited feedback: If students are confused
their own pace, at their own pace, at or want more information, the
any time of the day. computer offers limited or no
feedback at all.

Distance learning: Students can take part Peer absence: Students dont experience
in the class that takes place miles the support of peers in their
away from the actual classroom. learning.
One person can also reach more
people this way.
Homework is easier: Computers make it One point-of-view: If students do not
easier to research and finish initially grasp a concept, a computer
assignments, and educational cannot offer an alternative method
software programs make learning or a creative analogy to help
fun. students understand.

Computer systems owned by schools, businesses, and other organizations are


normally governed by laws or rules of proper use, and every user has an obligation to
know and understand these rules. For example, some computer systems owned by
schools may have rules or guidelines regarding when information can or cannot be
considered personal, such as who owns data that is stored on the system. While rules
covering school-student relations regarding computer use may vary, an individual has
more rights to information created on a computer that they own than they do on
equipment that is owned by someone else. If you are unsure of your schools policies,
make sure to contact your system administrator.

Computers in Healthcare

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Computers are helping the healthcare industry take long strides in treating,
diagnosing and preventing almost any ailment. We already know about computers that
monitor the vitals, like pulse, breathing, and blood pressure in hospital rooms, but the
more advanced technology is what is really changing lives. Technology like CAT (Computer
Axial Tomography) scans let us look inside people without making an incision. LASIK
(Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis) eye surgery changes the cornea to correct vision.
Research is even being done for Internet surgery, which would enable a doctor to perform
surgery from a distance through a system of computers, fine-tuned robots and a fast
connection.

Hospitals are using computers increasingly to keep track of appointments for the
day, and to store patient information and records. Electronic files are not only easy to
update and retrieve, they are easy to save and they require less storage space. Electronic
files are also easier to access from other locations. Some doctors even use handheld
computers like Palm Pilots to keep track of their schedule, which can also upload patient
information. However, because it is critical to keep patient information confidential,
system security is very important.

Computers are helping to treat and control emergency situations as well. Global
positioning systems and navigation technology are helping ambulances and emergency
vehicles get to where they need to be faster. Technology used in the ambulance can also
help emergency rooms know exactly what to expect before the ambulance arrives.

Technologies have also been developed to help the physically handicapped to live,
work, and communicate. Voice recognition software for the blind is just one of the many
ways technology has evolved in order to support and provide opportunities for the
disabled and disadvantaged.
Computers at Home

Though we dont have robots to do our work, people are using the computer to help
complete daily tasksall without having to leave home. Individuals and families use the
computer for a number of purposes, such as bill paying, entertainment, or research and
study.

Here are a few ways people use computers in the home:

Entertainment: Computer games have become so advanced that PCs are often
built with their ability to support games in mind. In fact, Sonys PlayStation and
Microsofts Xbox are computer systems made exclusively for playing games.

Banking: Software programs that keep detailed records of finances and budgets
are available. Most banks also offer online banking to perform transactions, pay
bills, or check on balances.

Communication: Computers are useful tools for keeping in touch with family
and friends with e-mail, or to write and print letters.

Internet: The Internet can be used for shopping, entertainment, research, or


communication.

Teleworking: Computers were first brought into the home for entertainment or to
help with household business, but teleworkingalso known as telecommuting or

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working from homeis a growing trend in businesses. Teleworking refers to an
arrangement between a company and employees where employees are allowed to
work from another location via a computer connection. There are many
advantages and disadvantages for both parties in such an arrangement.

Table 7.4 Teleworking Advantages and Disadvantages


Advantages Disadvantages
No commuting time Decreased employee interaction and
camaraderie
Reduced company costs for office or desk Less emphasis on teamwork
space
Flexible schedule High self-discipline is necessary

Computers in Industry

Over the past few decades, industry is an area that has seen substantial change
with the use of new technology. Not only do computers and robots keep humans out of
dangerous areas, they are more efficient and require a fraction of the time and human
personnel to do the same amount of work. For example, computers and robots, not
humans, do most of the manufacturing and assembly work in automobile plants.

Here are some advantages and disadvantages of computers in industry.

Table 7.5 Computers in Industry


Advantages Disadvantages
Efficiency: Computers and robots do not Loss of employment opportunities: Jobs
experience fatigue or injury are being replaced by robots
from repetitive actions. and computers, resulting in
higher unemployment rates.
Accuracy and Speed: Actions are Reaction: Computers cannot react to
consistently performed unforeseen circumstances or
accurately and quickly. process new information.
Re-programming: If changes are Cost: Some tasks are so short that it would
introduced, robots and not be cost-effective to program
computers are easy to re- a robot or computer for that
program to implement changes. task
More employment opportunities:
Computers have replaced some
jobs, but have created many
jobs as well.
Safety: Some tasks, such as hazardous
waste disposal, are much safer
and easier with the use of
technology.

Computers in Government

We all know that governments can be inefficient and bogged down with
bureaucracy and that they sometimes lack the funds to fix their own internal and

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managerial problems. In many cases around the world, governments are learning to use
the computer to their advantage, eliminating some levels of bureaucracy and helping
others to be more efficient and effective.

Here are a few ways governments are using computers and technology to help do their
work.

Table 7.6 Computers in Government


Government Function Description
Public Records Instead of storing files in rooms upon rooms of file cabinets,
public records can be kept electronically, which also makes
them easier to retrieve and search through.

For example:
a. Census: Census results are entered in a database
which makes the information easy to access and
process, such as predicting and researching trends in
the population. Sometimes this information is also
available online.
b. Vehicle registration: All registered vehicles are stored
in a central database, which makes the information
easily accessible for security services, such as the
police and customs.
Revenue Collection Many people choose to file their taxes electronically through
/Taxes the Internet, which is faster and easier to process than paper
and mail. Tax refunds or pay-ins can also be executed
electronically, which eliminates mailing time and is
convenient.
Voting Electronic voting is being tested with hopes to increase voter
participation. Security considerations need to be perfected
before this option is widely available.

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Information Sheet 7.3
Ergonomics and Computer-related Injuries

Weve all heard of ergonomics, but have probably brushed it off as old information:
sit up straight, take breaks, etc. But ergonomics is more than just sitting with both feet
on the floor; it is the application of scientific information concerning humans to the design
of objects, systems and environment for human use. In other words, whenever something
is created or designed, ergonomists want to make sure it is friendly to the way we operate.
And, they want to make sure that people understand the best way to use that equipment.

So why should you care about ergonomics? In the case of computers, good practice of
ergonomics keeps you healthy and injury-free, which makes long hours at the office not
seem very long. Keeping you comfortable will raise your productivity and increase job
satisfaction, which will make you and your boss very happy as well.

In addition to the diagram above, here are a few tips the experts have to say about good
working form.
Work smarter, not harder: Your eyes and body need a break from the computer
just as much as your mind, because we are not designed to sit at such a close
distance for a long period of time. The following is a suggested break schedule to
maximize your eyes and body safety.
Micro-Break: This break is only for about 10 seconds and should be
taken about every 10 minutes. Look far away from your terminal (at
least 20 feet) and breathe and blink easily. Keep your eyes moving
while looking at different distant objects. This should not interfere with
your work or your concentration.
Mini-Break: Take this break about every hour; it should last about five
minutes. Stand up and stretch. Try doing eye exercises during this
break so the eyes can flex and be used in different seeing situations.
Maxi-Break: This could be a coffee break or lunch. The maxi-break is a
get up and move type of break that will allow your blood to start
flowing again and get you more energized. This kind of break should be
taken every few hours.

Lighting: Bright surrounding lights are the source of many eye strain
complications. Dim your work area's lighting to reduce glare, and shield your
eyes from bright light sources. Doing this will reduce competition from
surrounding light sources, so your eyes can focus on light from the computer
screen.

Seating: Chairs should have adjustable features for the chairs height, the
armrests, and the backrest. This should accommodate each individuals
ergonomic needs.

Monitor: The monitor should be viewed at a slight downward angle. A good


reference point is if your eyes are level to the top of the screen or higher. You
may also want to use a monitor filter to reduce the glare on your eyes.

Keyboard: Use a responsive keyboard so that you dont have to pound the keys
to type. Using a keyboard pad will also help reduce the pressure in your wrists.

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Mouse: Mouse mats ease the use of a mouse; mouse pads are also available on
which to rest the wrist to alleviate pressure while using a mouse.

Feet: A footpad or step on which to rest your feet may help individuals with short
legs or in situations where the desk or chair cannot be adjusted.

Environment: In addition to using your computer equipment correctly, the


environment in which you work should be conducive to your human needs. The
work area should be comfortable with a moderate temperature and adequate
ventilation.

Computer-related Injuries

Computers are meant to increase productivity, but not at the expense of our
health. Years of computer use have taught us that some injuries are common for
individuals who use computers. Because most computer use is work-related, many
countries have laws that require employers to pay for the prevention of these injuries,
such as buying ergonomic devices or seminars, and the treatment of these injuries, such
as wrist braces or surgery.

RSI (repetitive strain injury): This type of injury is caused when certain muscles
are used repeatedly over a long period of time, resulting in muscular strain or
damage. The wrists and forearms are especially susceptible. A keyboard or mouse
used at the wrong level, or a poorly placed monitor can also cause these injuries.

Prevention: Take frequent breaks and make sure the workspace is ergonomically
adjusted for individual needs.

Eye strain: Our eyes are not meant to focus on close objects, like monitors, for
long periods of time. Other factors like glare from the screen or reflections from
other objects in the room can further irritate vision.

Prevention: Dont stare at the screen for hours on end; look away and focus on far
distances to exercise your eyes, in addition to taking frequent breaks. You can also
use eye-friendly hardware, like monitor filters, or LCD screens to reduce glare. Also,
monitors with higher resolutions and more pixels per inch (ppi) are better for the
eyes.

Back strain: Prolonged sitting with poor posture can cause a number of back and
shoulder ailments.

Prevention: Good chairs that are adjustable can help correct posture. Again,
taking breaks helps alleviate some of the strain of sitting in the same position for
extended hours.

Maintaining a Safe Working Environment

In addition to practicing good ergonomics, it is essential that you maintain a safe


working environment that complies with legal health and safety rules. Nobody wants to
leave their office with a broken limb or electric burns; thats why keeping a tidy workspace
and office is important.

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Computers are notorious for the jumble of cables and wires that are required to
make them run, and its not unusual for a computer to have ten connections running
from it at one time. Such wires and cables around the desk space are accidents waiting to
happen. Its a good idea to take precautions to prevent tripping or equipment damage that
could result from getting caught in one of these cables or cords by shortening them to the
necessary length and by taping down cables that run along the floor.

The holes and sockets that these many cables connect to should be examined as
well. For example, examine plugs, sockets, and leads for defects and repair any
irregularities. And, if there are a lot of electrical devices plugged into one outlet, have a
professional install another outlet nearby to spread out the power demands evenly. Make
sure to leave proper air circulation around electrical equipment as well, to prevent over-
heating.

Common sense is the simplest and most basic precaution. Leaving clutter around
the office and blocking pathways is not only counter-productive and discourteous to co-
workers; it is also not in compliance with fire and safety codes.

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Information Sheet 7.4
Information Security

Security is a sensitive issue. We hire security officers to protect our workplaces,


analyze national security efforts, and install security systems in our homes. Information
security is another type of security that isnt widely understood, but is just as important
as protecting the valuables in your home.

The U.S. National Information System Security Glossary defines Information security
(INFOSEC) as:
the protection of information systems against unauthorized access to
or modification of information, whether in storage, processing or
transit, and against the denial of service to authorized users or the
provision of service to unauthorized users, including those measures
necessary to detect, document, and counter such threats.

In short, information security is taking measures to protect your computers and


network systems from tampering by hackers or viruses. This includes creating passwords
and security policies, backing up information, and using security features like Firewalls. If
information security is neglected and someone breaks into your system, they can easily
access the sensitive information on your computer and other computers on the network,
such as account numbers, passwords, and e-mails. Once they gain access, not only can
they steal information, but they can also embed a virus or program that damages
information on the entire network, possibly resulting in huge financial loss by the
victimized organization.

Some organizations may restrict access to certain data in order to protect secure or
important data; such as confidential information in a school, hospital, or government
agency; or customer credit card information stored by a business. Such restrictions
include barring access to files, storage devices, computers, networks, the Internet, or
certain Internet sites. The types of tools and strategies used to restrict access to data
include keeping restricted information on secure computers, or keeping information
behind firewalls or other security systems.

Some users may want to restrict access to portions of the Internet as well, such as
parents trying to prevent children from accessing adult Web sites or companies that want
employees to avoid shopping while at work. The types of tools and strategies used to
restrict access to certain Internet sites include installing Internet-blocking software, or
personally supervising computer users.
One of the most important preventative measures that an organization can take is to
adopt an enforced information security policy. Though each organization has different
security requirements, the need for security policies to provide standards and actions is
definite. When a security policy is implemented, everyone using the network handles
information the same way, minimizing the number of loopholes where hackers can bypass
the system. Security policies also make it easier to track individuals who do not adhere to
policy rules. If an information security problem does occur with sensitive information,
having proof that the organization took steps to try and prevent such an incident could
reduce repercussions.

It is also important that everyone knows how to report a security incident. If a


computer is not working correctly, employees should be able to identify that there is a
problem, know who to contact, and know what they should do with their computer so the

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situation doesnt intensify. A standard procedure should also be to document the
situation to prevent future occurrences.

We know what an enforced information security policy can do, but what can you do
to protect your privacy and personal security online?

Understand how Web sites track your activity online using cookies or other
behind-the-scenes systems.
Do not share personal or family information to unknown people or in public places
while online.
Use code names or aliases when communicating in public forums.

In the end, the best defense against a security problem is individual users. If
everyone connected to the network is aware of security risks and how to handle them,
security problems can be avoided and fixed quickly. Users should also be aware of the
consequences if security policies and procedures are not heeded.

Working with Passwords and User IDs

In a network of computers hooked up to one another, ensuring privacy for every


user is a very serious issue. Proper security measures must be taken in order to secure
your computer from hackers, or unauthorized personnel attempting to gain access to
your computer or network. Hackers can wreak havoc on your computer or network by
passing along viruses or even spying on personal files that you assumed were secure.

One precaution that is being taken in order to protect computer systems from
hacker attacks is by assigning user IDs and passwords to each user in the network. User
IDs uniquely identify the user on the network, while the password, known only by the
user, grants access to the individual account. This combination of unique information
opens the account to its individual settings and access rights on the network.

Access rights also control privacy. Access rights determine where you can go in the
network and are different for each individual. For example, the site administrator has
access to just about every computer or printer in a network, but most individuals are
limited to specific folders and printers, as defined by the site administrator. Access rights
are often helpful in managing the information of different departments: individuals in the
engineering department wouldnt have access to human resources files.

Since a password is a main line of defense against attackers, it is important to


adopt a password policy. A password policy sets standards for strong passwords, or
passwords that arent easily compromised or guessed by others. Passwords are generally
4-16 characters long. They are used to determine whether or not the user that is
requesting admittance to the secure Web site is actually the person they claim to be.
Passwords generally do not have spaces. When you enter your password into the text box,
it is usually replaced with bullets or another symbol so that no one else can read it off of
your screen. A good password is a mixture of letters and numbers. This makes it much
more difficult for someone to guess it. Also, dont use a word or number that someone who
knows you well could easily guess (for example, your social security number, pets name,
or birth date). Its also a good idea to change your passwords periodically.

Backing up Data and Preventing Theft

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Everyone who has lost data because of a crashed computer knows how frustrating
it is to redo all of your lost work, and what a relief it is to have a saved backup copy. Now
imagine the agony of an entire organization losing their data because of a security breach.
Taking a few moments to back up data on a storage device could save a lot of time and
money.

Backing up data and software to another storage device makes recovering from a
security incident much easier, but it also protects you from uncontrollable factors, such
as storms, fires, or other natural disasters that could ruin your equipment. Sometimes
multiple copies of backup data are saved in different locations so if one copy is destroyed,
another copy is saved safely elsewhere. Protective storage, such as a fireproof case, is also
a wise investment.

Everyone is responsible for backing up his or her own data, and this should be part
of an information security policy. Usually network administrators back up the data on a
network from a centralized location, but individual users should also back up their own
data on a regular basis. Computers store a lot more information than is usually available
on a storage device, so youll usually only want to backup data, not software. Site
administrators can make backing up software automated by buying software that
automatically backs up files on a computer.

When organizations develop security policies, its easy to get so caught up in


procedures and firewalls that they overlook how to protect their physical property. If a
hacker cant get the information they want electronically, they can do much more damage
by acquiring the actual equipment in which the information is stored.

Theft of a laptop computer, desktop computer, PDA, or mobile phone should always
be reported to your companys technical support department immediately, and your
service provider should also be contacted in case of a missing phone. Computers with
startup passwords have some protection, but determined attackers can still get through
these barriers. Sensitive files with password protection are another crucial line of defense
against theft. The contact information on a PDA or mobile phone is also valuable, and
your professional image could be damaged if the contact information of business
associates or clients is abused.

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Information Sheet
Information Sheet 7.5
Understanding Transactions on the Web

Copyright Concepts

In most countries it is against the law to copy an original work and call it your own.
A copyright is a form of theft protection for the author or authors of an original work.
Most software is copyright protected. Somebody had to sit down and write the software,
just like an author pens a book or an artist molds a sculpture.

The following are examples of works that are typically copyright protected:

Books, magazines and newspapers


Plays and sporting events
Music and movies
Art and architecture
Software
Web sites

In order to receive copyright protection, a work must be available in some


recognized medium. In other words, you cant copyright some idea you have in your head.
You need to write it down or produce it first.

Once a piece of software is copyright-protected, you cannot distribute it or change


it in any way without the permission of the copyright holder, which is usually the author
or the company that wrote the software. It is usually right to copy a piece of software to a
CD or disk for your own backup. It is not right to copy a piece of software to a CD or
diskette in order to hand it out to your friends or colleagues. Just because you own a
piece of software does not mean that you control its copyright.

Most software companies are pretty serious about copyright law. Heres what
Microsoft has to say about Word: Warning: This computer program is protected by
copyright law and international treaties. Unauthorized reproduction or distribution of this
program, or any portions of it, may result in severe civil and criminal penalties, and will
be prosecuted to the maximum extent possible under the law.

It is also important to note that Internet users are not granted permission to copy
or download just anything off of the Web. Most information on the Internet is governed by
laws and other rules which protect information owners and promote the ethical use of
data. Some Web pages are copyrighted, so be careful when you choose to use items from
someone elses Web site. There is such a thing called fair use, whereby copyrighted
material can be used for specific purposes (such as a student research paper) without the
permission of the copyright owner. In most cases, however, it is best to ask the Web
administrator, or site creator, for permission before you copy or download anything from a
Web page.

If you do choose to use information from the Web, especially in an academic


environment, it is absolutely essential that you understand plagiarism, the importance of
citing source material accurately, and libel. Plagiarism occurs when one claims another
persons writing or works as ones own by not providing proper sourcing. This is a very

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serious crime and the consequences are severe. Make sure to cite source material
accurately, no matter how inconsequential it may seem. Libel is the deliberate
communication of incorrect information in a way that causes harm to an individual or
organization, and is also a very serious crime.

Finally, dont confuse a copyright with a patent or a trademark. A patent is used to


protect a discovery or an invention. A trademark is used to protect a word, slogan or
insignia. For more information about copyright law, see the table below.

Table 7.7 Common Misconceptions about Copyright Law


Myth Truth
Only artistic works like Wrong. Copyright laws apply to software and web sites
books, music and movies are too, no less than it applies to books, music or
covered under copyright movies.
laws.
Once you buy a piece of Wrong. Doing so would probably violate the copyright
copyrighted software, you law. Most copyright laws prohibit the
are free to hand it out to unauthorized reproduction or distribution of
your friends or modify the the original copyrighted materials. There are
source code. few exceptions in the case of shareware or
freeware.
Companies dont really care Wrong. While companies dont pursue every violation,
about copyright violations. they certainly go after the most bold scofflaws.
The copyright notices are If you start selling copies of Word in trhe
simply a formality. Internet, youd better be ready to defend
yourself in court. And be forewarned: Microsoft
is a formidable legal opponent.
A copyright is identical to a Wrong. While all three terms relate to intellectual
patent or a trademark. property, they are distinct legal concepts. A
patent is used to protect a discovery or an
invention. A trademark is used to protect a
word, slogan or an insignia.
A company must display a Wrong. Just because you dont see a copy notice doesnt
copyright notice in order to meant that the works is not copyright
be protected under copyright protected. In some countries, like the United
law. States, it is not necessary to include a
copyright notice although most companies do
anyway. Always assume a piece of commercial
software is copyrighted until you learn
otherwise.
Only large, multinational Wrong. In most countries, anyone can receive copyright
corporations can receive protection for any original work, including
copyright protection for individuals.
their work.

Digital Certificate

A digital certificate is like an electronic credit card that holds all of your personal
information and presents it when you are conducting online business or any other online
transaction that requires this type of information. A digital certificate contains the users
name, a serial number, expiration dates, a copy of the holders public key (that when
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Information Sheet
combined with a private key, can be used to encrypt messages), and a digital signature of
the authority that issued the digital certificate.

The Certification Authority (CA) issues digital certificates only after verifying the
users information with the Registration Authority (RA). If, and only if, ALL of the
information is correct, the user will receive their digital certificate.

Encryption

When you encrypt something, you are putting it into a code that only authorized
personnel can understand. This prevents unauthorized individuals or networks from
accessing confidential or case-sensitive information.

Encryption is used most for things like online credit card sales, so that your credit
card information is not read, copied, and abused by a hacker. Other things that might be
encrypted include secret missions or operations, or any other sensitive information that
you do not want anyone, except the intended receiver, to have access to.

Here is a short list of precautions to consider before making purchases online:

Only give out credit card information on secure sites: A secure Web site should
require you to enter a username and password in order for you to be able to access
your personal account information. A secure Web site is often indicated by a tiny
lock icon located in the lower-right corner of the window.
Do not share your credit card or account information: Make sure that you do not
inform others of your credit card information, username, or password. Keep this
information confidential. Refer to Lesson 4-13: Working with Passwords and User
IDs for more information on password creation and protection.
Check your credit card fraud policy: Some Web sites are simply a lure set by
criminals to steal your money or credit. It can be difficult to know if a Web site is
fraudulent however, so be sure that you dont have to pay if you get caught in a
scam.
Check the companys return policy: Most companies are lenient when customers
want to return a purchase, but you might want to check their policy before making
a purchase. Also, if the company is in another country, check the countrys
consumer rights policies.
Check the companys credibility: If the company is one you have not heard of
before, you would do well to research the companys credibility by calling the
companys contact numbers, looking for a client list, or checking customer
references. Web sites that are familiar and have been in business for a long time,
such as amazon.com, already have a solid, respectable reputation established.

Beware that although there are methods available for fighting identity theft and
fraud, it can still happen. Know that the site youre shopping on is protected. Sites with
protective measures will have their policies clearly stated. Make sure that you are well
informed before you start handing out your confidential personal information online.

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Information Sheet 7.6
Computers and the Environment

Computers increase productivity but they also consume a lot of energy and
materials. The entry of computer use has made many aware of how this new technology is
not only changing our lives; it is also making us more aware of the resources we use to
make them run.

In order to keep our environment healthy, we must be responsible computer


users and take action to protect the world around us. Recycling is a very positive and
popular practice that can reduce a lot of waste. Paper recycling is an especially helpful
cause, but other recycling measures are taking hold as well, such as recycling printer
toner cartridges (printing quality may decrease when using recycled cartridges, however).
Research is being done to find ways to salvage and recycle other computer parts, such as
CPUs and monitors or at least parts of them. Another way to recycle is to donate used
equipment to schools or needy organizations. Sharing your own personal knowledge and
experience can help others in your school, place of employment, or community to learn
how to benefit from technology.

In addition, most computer hardware now has features to help reduce the amount
of energy used to keep them running. For example, you can set your monitor to turn off if
it hasnt been used in a certain amount of time. You can turn it on again when it is ready
to be used.

With the Internet and networking technology, the need for paper can be
dramatically decreased. In many cases, correspondence and information sharing can be
done electronically through e-mail or a network instead of paper. This saves a marked
difference in the amount of paper consumed, preserving many more natural resources
and the environment.

In the past, the manufacture of computers was a cause for some environmental
concern. For example, microelectronic companies have used chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs),
which are known to deplete the ozone, to make sure that computer components are free of
dust or residue. Chemical rinses and coatings on parts in the computer also affect the
environment because storage units for these hazardous chemicals can leak into the
ground, contaminating the water wells. These chemicals can also cause problems when
units are thrown away.

Fortunately, most companies are embracing green manufacturing which means


they are mindful of the environments safety when manufacturing electronics. For
example, most companies have found an alternative to CFCs, and there are some
organizations whose sole purpose is to dispose of computers safely.

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Assessment
Assessment

1. Computers and the Internet are used to: (Select all that apply.)
a. Organize information
b. Increase productivity
c. Collect Information
d. All of the above.

2. Computers operate behind the scenes in many everyday situations. (True or


False?)

3. Businesses only use computers for their calculation skills. (True or False?)

4. Computers are changing the health care industry with: (Select all that apply.)
a. LASIK eye surgery
b. Voice recognition software for the blind
c. Free health insurance
d. Electronically-stored patient files

5. Humans do most of the work in industrial factories. (True or False?)

6. What should you do to practice good ergonomics? (Select all that apply.)
a. Take frequent breaks.
b. Use an eye-friendly monitor.
c. Sit at a height appropriate for your wrists and arms while typing.
d. All of the above.

7. RSI stands for:


a. Repetitive Strain Injury
b. Recreational Strain Injury
c. Renewable Source Industry
d. Retroactive Search Investigation
8. You are complying with legal health and safety rules if computer cords and cables
are lying all over your workspace. (True or False?)

9. Which of the following is not a true statement about passwords?


a. They are known only by an individual user.
b. They grant access to an individual account.
c. You should use your social security number as your password.
d. They are generally 4-16 characters long.

10. It is not important to back up your own data on a regular basis because your
network administrator will do it for you. (True or False?)

11. All of the following are advantages of installing a virus-scanning program on your
computer, except:
a. Prevents the loss of valuable information.
b. Saves time and resources in recovering from a virus infection.
c. Prevents you from getting sick.
d. Increases computer efficiency.

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Assessment
12. Make sure to stay up to date on the latest virus threats. (True or False?)

13. Which of the following are examples of works that are typically copyrighted? (Select
all that apply.)
a. Books
b. Software
c. Web sites
d. DVDs
14. Plagiarism is the deliberate communication of incorrect information in a way that
causes harm to an individual or organization. (True or False?)

15. Which of the following is NOT a precaution to consider before making purchases
online?
a. Only give out credit card information on secure sites.
b. Use someone elses credit card instead of your own.
c. Do not share your credit card account information.
d. Check the companys credibility.

16. You can be a responsible user of computers by: (Select all that apply.)
a. Safely disposing of hazardous materials.
b. Not supporting green manufacturing.
c. Providing used equipment to schools or needy organizations.
d. Recycling products such as paper and printer cartridges.

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Key Answer
Answer Key

1. D. Computers and the Internet are used to do all of the above.


2. True. Computers operate behind the scenes in many everyday situations.
3. False. Businesses use computers for many other tasks, such as airline booking,
insurance claims, and administration systems.
4. A, B and D. Unfortunately, computers are not able to provide free health insurance.
5. False. Computers or robots do most of the work in industrial factories.
6. D. All of these things are required for good ergonomics.
7. A. A Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) is sustained when the same muscles are used
over an extended period of time.
8. Computer cords and cables are safety hazards.
9. C. You should never use information for your password that could be easily
guessed by someone that knows you well.
10. False. Although most network administrators do back up the network on a regular
basis, it is still essential that each individual user back up their own personal
data.
11. C. A virus-scanning program protects your computer from getting sick, not you!
12. True. Keeping up to date on the latest virus threats could end up saving you from a
virus attack.
13. A, B, C, and D. All of these are examples of works that are typically copyrighted.
14. False. Plagiarism occurs when one claims another persons work as ones own.
Libel is the deliberate communication of incorrect information in a way that
causes harm to an individual or organization.
15. B. Using someone elses credit card without their prior consent is considered credit
card fraud and is absolutely illegal.
16. A, C, and D. You can also be a responsible user of computers by supporting green
manufacturing, which means you are mindful of the environments safety in the
manufacturing of electronics.

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Appendix
APPENDIX A
COUNTRY DOMAIN

AD Andorra CO Colombia HK Hong Kong


AE United Arab Emirates CR Costa Rica HM Heard Island and
AF Afghanistan CS Serbia and Montenegro McDonald Islands
AG Antigua and Barbuda CU Cuba HN Honduras
AI Anguilla CV Cape Verde HR Croatia (Hrvatska)
AL Albania CX Christmas Island HT Haiti
AM Armenia CY Cyprus HU Hungary
AN Netherlands Antilles CZ Czech Republic ID Indonesia
AO Angola DE Germany IE Ireland
AQ Antarctica DJ Djibouti IL Israel
AR Argentina DK Denmark IN India
AS American Samoa DM Dominica IO British Indian Ocean
AT Austria DO Dominican Republic Territory
AU Australia DZ Algeria IQ Iraq
AW Aruba EC Ecuador IR Iran
AX Aland Islands EE Estonia IS Iceland
AZ Azerbaijan EG Egypt IT Italy
BA Bosnia and Herzegovina EH Western Sahara JM Jamaica
BB Barbados ER Eritrea JO Jordan
BD Bangladesh ES Spain JP Japan
BE Belgium ET Ethiopia KE Kenya
BF Burkina Faso FI Finland KG Kyrgyzstan
BG Bulgaria FJ Fiji KH Cambodia
BH Bahrain FK Falkland Islands KI Kiribati
BI Burundi (Malvinas) KM Comoros
BJ Benin FM Federated States of KN Saint Kitts and Nevis
BM Bermuda Micronesia KP Korea (North)
BN Brunei Darussalam FO Faroe Islands KR Korea (South)
BO Bolivia FR France KW Kuwait
BR Brazil FX France, Metropolitan KY Cayman Islands
BS Bahamas GA Gabon KZ Kazakhstan
BT Bhutan GB Great Britain (UK) LA Laos
BV Bouvet Island GD Grenada LB Lebanon
BW Botswana GE Georgia LC Saint Lucia
BY Belarus GF French Guiana LI Liechtenstein
BZ Belize GH Ghana LK Sri Lanka
CA Canada GI Gibraltar LR Liberia
CC Cocos (Keeling) Islands GL Greenland LS Lesotho
CD Democratic Republic of GM Gambia LT Lithuania
the Congo GN Guinea LU Luxembourg
CF Central African Republic GP Guadeloupe LV Latvia
CG Congo GQ Equatorial Guinea LY Libya
CH Switzerland GR Greece MA Morocco
CI Cote D'Ivoire (Ivory GS S. Georgia and S. MC Monaco
Coast) Sandwich Islands MD Moldova
CK Cook Islands GT Guatemala MG Madagascar
CL Chile GU Guam MH Marshall Islands
CM Cameroon GW Guinea-Bissau MK Macedonia
CN China GY Guyana ML Mali

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Appendix
MM Myanmar SE Sweden WF Wallis and Futuna
MN Mongolia SG Singapore WS Samoa
MO Macao SH Saint Helena YE Yemen
MP Northern Mariana SI Slovenia YT Mayotte
Islands SJ Svalbard and Jan Mayen YU Yugoslavia (former)
MQ Martinique SK Slovakia ZA South Africa
MR Mauritania SL Sierra Leone ZM Zambia
MS Montserrat SM San Marino ZR Zaire (former)
MT Malta SN Senegal ZW Zimbabwe
MU Mauritius SO Somalia BIZ Business
MV Maldives SR Suriname COM Commercial
MW Malawi ST Sao Tome and Principe EDU US Educational
MX Mexico SU USSR (former) GOV US Government
MY Malaysia SV El Salvador INT International
MZ Mozambique SY Syria MIL US Military
NA Namibia SZ Swaziland NET Network
NC New Caledonia TC Turks and Caicos ORG Nonprofit Organization
NE Niger Islands PRO Professional Services
NF Norfolk Island TD Chad AERO Aeronautic
NG Nigeria TF French Southern ARPA Arpanet Technical
NI Nicaragua Territories Infrastructure
NL Netherlands TG Togo COOP Cooperative
NO Norway TH Thailand INFO Info Domain
NP Nepal TJ Tajikistan NAME Personal Name
NR Nauru TK Tokelau NATO North Atlantic Treaty
NU Niue TL Timor-Leste Organization
NZ New Zealand (Aotearoa) TM Turkmenistan
OM Oman TN Tunisia
PA Panama TO Tonga
PE Peru TP East Timor
PF French Polynesia TR Turkey
PG Papua New Guinea TT Trinidad and Tobago
PH Philippines TV Tuvalu
PK Pakistan TW Taiwan
PL Poland TZ Tanzania
PM Saint Pierre and UA Ukraine
Miquelon UG Uganda
PN Pitcairn UK United Kingdom
PR Puerto Rico UM United States Minor
PS Palestinian Territory Outlying Islands
PT Portugal US United States
PW Palau UY Uruguay
PY Paraguay UZ Uzbekistan
QA Qatar VA Vatican City State (Holy
RE Reunion See)
RO Romania VC Saint Vincent and the
RU Russian Federation Grenadines
RW Rwanda VE Venezuela
SA Saudi Arabia VG Virgin Islands (British)
SB Solomon Islands VI Virgin Islands (U.S.)
SC Seychelles VN Viet Nam
SD Sudan VU Vanuatu

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Acknowledgment
ACKNOWLEDGMENT
The Department of Education (DepEd), Central Office, through the
Technical Vocational Task Force, wishes to extend its gratitude and appreciation to the
Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) and all the curriculum
writers for sharing their time and expertise in the development of a Competency-Based
Curriculum for Strengthening Technical Vocational Education Program of the country.

Writers:

AGOSTO V. CAYABYAB ROLANDO B. REYES JR.

Speaker Eugenio Perez National Balagtas National Agricultural High


Agricultural School School
San Carlos City, Pangasinan Balagtas, Bulacan
Region I Region III

SHERNALYN M. FERRER AMIR M. VILLAS

Pangasinan School of Arts and Trades Lubang Vocational High School


Lingayen, Pangasinan Lubang, Occidental Mindoro
Region I Region IV-B MIMAROPA

Resource Persons:

STEPHEN I. CESAR EVELYN D. JUAN


Competency Sandards Division Language Editor (Freelance)
Senior Specialist
TESDA QSO Central Office
Taguig City

Consultant:

CLODUALDO V. PAITON

TECH-VOC Task Force

DR. MILAGROS C. VALLES

Director II -TECH-VOC Task Force

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