You are on page 1of 158

What We Hear All the Time

Heres who we are...


Weve been around for 50 years
Heres what great things people say about us
Send us some moneyand
Well keep doing what we are doing!

A Compelling Story!
Heres who we are...
Weve been around for 50 years
Heres what great things people say about us
_____________________
Did you know this problem exists in our community?
Did you know this is who is affected?
This is how many there are and where they are.
This is how they struggle day-to-day and heres how their children are struggling, and how
our schools are affected, even our neighborhoods, our community and our tax basis.
This is what it looks like now, but if nothing is done, heres what it will look like in 5 years,
10 years, 20 years
_____________________
As a result of our work, here is what these people are able to do now, that they couldnt do
before
Here is how they are living now and how they are empowered
This is how their childrens lives have changed and how the schools, neighborhood, our
community and even our tax basis are different.
Last year we served 50 people, and this year we want to serve 75.
So far this year we have served 30 people.
Wont you make a gift of $X to change the life of the 31st person?

1
IMPACT SPEECH WORKSHEET
Identify the impact:
Name one meaningful and specific change in the life of an individual or the
community that results from your organizations work.

Identify the need/problem:


If you removed that change, what would the individual or community be
experiencing?
o What would be the individuals mental, emotional and/or physical state before
they come to your organization or if they never come to your organization?
o What would be the state of the community without the service you provide or
what if the community never received the benefit of your service?

Identify the program or service:


What activity creates the impact?

Now, flip the above information around and tell your story.

Did you know . . . (state the need/problem)

As a result of (insert name of organization)s work . . . (state the impact)

How do you do that? the listener asks.


(Insert name of organization) . . . (state the name of the program or service)

2
IMPACT SPEECH WORKSHEET
Identify the impact:
Name one meaningful and specific change in the life of an individual or the
community that results from your organizations work.

Identify the need/problem:


If you removed that change, what would the individual or community be
experiencing?
o What would be the individuals mental, emotional and/or physical state before
they come to your organization or if they never come to your organization?
o What would be the state of the community without the service you provide or
what if the community never received the benefit of your service?

Identify the program or service:


What activity creates the impact?

Now, flip the above information around and tell your story.

Did you know . . . (state the need/problem)

As a result of (insert name of organization)s work . . . (state the impact)

How do you do that? the listener asks.


(Insert name of organization) . . . (state the name of the program or service)

3
LOGIC MODELS
Definition
A systematic, visual way to present a planned program with its underlying assumptions & theoretical
framework
A picture of why and how you believe a program will work
A top-level depiction of the flow of materials & processes to produce the results desired

Purpose
Program development:
Program planning, management & evaluation
Describes sequence of events for bringing about change
Relates activities to outcomes
Can verify mission creep
Can verify mission misalignment
Is a shortcut process to the most compelling statements about the change/impact that results
from organizations work
Fund development:
Is a quick study
Clarifies outputs & outcomes
Clarifies intuitive understandings which are difficult for staff & board to verbalize
Can be created for each program and/or overall for organization
Lift sections for proposals & applications
Beginning of outline for case statement
Prospects & Donors
Places focus on the impact that prospect/donor is most interested in, not what the
organization does
Clarifies the change donors want to invest in making happen!
They are the basis of the compelling elevator speech the hook
Board Members
One-page tutorial
In-depth understanding of how programs work
Common language for discussing program systems & outcomes
Language to talk about programs & impact

Creation
Include organizational & programmatic information
Create for recurring themes/ programs, not one-time activities
Limit to one or two pages
Provide enough detail to grasp major components
There is no one right model
Find what works for your programs
Be consistent about use of terms
Situation Inputs Outcomes
Priorities Outputs Impacts

Page 1 of 2

4
Components
Situation
The state of the client or problem in the community before the organization intervenes
The community need Create a picture of the problem:
Use verbs is and are Who is impacted?
Do not use lack of Where are they? How many?
Priorities (Our mission / vision)
What the organization/project will achieve by addressing the problem described in the
situation
Inputs Investments (What we invest)
Materials the organization/program takes in and processes to create the change
Personnel engaged in Board Facilities
creating the change Volunteers Materials
Resources & Partners Laws & regulations
relationships Technology
Staff Financial
Outputs Activities
Program & Services (What we do)
Tangible results of the major Demonstrates scope of activities
processes/activities of the organization Must be directly associated with achieving
Quantification of service plans benefits for clients
Evaluation of service plans Do not describe the change/impact
Outputs Participation
Key Stakeholders (Who we reach)
Directly impacted External partners
Indirectly impacted Donors
Outcomes & Impacts
The positive impacts on individuals served by the organization
Should tie back to mission
Three categories:
Short term - Learning (awareness)
Distributing information Enhancements to knowledge
Program/organizational outreach Understanding, perception, attitudes
Simple intake of information, without Stance of constituent is passive
any action taken
Medium term - Action taken
Action taken by client Change in attitude or behavior
Results of interaction with Change in capabilities
organization/program
Long term - Condition change (ultimate impact)
The ultimate success for the constituent Lasting change: physical, economic,
or community relational, etc.
The condition realized For constituents directly & indirectly
impacted
Checkpoint
All outcomes and impacts are directly related to & aligned with the Situation and Priorities
Tie the end to the beginning (right side to the left side of model)

Page 2 of 2
5
Perfect Weight Management Program Logic Model 2016
Date: January 1, 2016
Inputs Outputs Outcomes & Impacts
GOES BACK TO MISSION
Investments Activities Participation Short Term Medium Term Long Term
What the What the
Situation Priorities What the medium
What we invest: What we do: Who we reach: short term results ultimate
term results are:
are: impact is:
Community Need Organization Mission Resources & Program Key Learning Action Conditions
Relationships & Services Stakeholders
Overweight To promote healthy Components of a Enroll in Individuals who
Staff
individuals have attitudes toward food Programs that teach Overweight Children healthy diet assessment and appeared to be
32FT; 15PT
distorted and food the psychology of counseling destined for health
understandings of consumption eating and relearning Overweight Eating and weight program complications &
Board of Trustees
food and its use. worldwide. how to eat and Teenagers loss myths early death have
18
exercise Overweight eliminated those
Leads to improper Overweight Adults The role of exercise individuals risks
Volunteers
eating habits, Organization Vision On-call phone in staying healthy attitudes and
685
satisfaction with counselors who Adults with chronic behaviors about Formerly
only starchy & All children and provide support and health issues Awareness of eating change overweight
Partners
sweet foods, eating adults are encouragement assessment and Individuals
American Medical
too much too often. physically fit and through 24,000 calls Referral physicians & counseling Overweight productivity is
Society
healthy. annually health professionals program individuals increased
World Health
Individual is out-of- determine
Organization
breath with little Personal testing and General Public Learn new eating appropriate sizes Formerly
National Institute of
exertion, always consultations for habits for their physiques overweight
Health
hot, tires quickly, 2,500 individuals to Medical Community individuals provide
Surgeon General
sedentary lifestyle, assess current Creation and for their families,
potential for early
National Community eating and exercise have health
Donors implementation of
Health Clinic System
death. habits and create a healthy eating insurance
personalized plan for habits
Technology
Inflates medical reaching the desired Medical expenses
Phone system
costs, complicates size Creation and related to weight
Computer network
minor health implementation of complications
issues,
Fundraising Publication of eating an appropriate decrease
database
exacerbates other and exercise exercise program
health issues. materials (4), tapes Medical resources
Financial (2008)
(2), books on CD (1) Become physically are freed up for
Diverts limited Individuals: active other needs
$750,000
medical resources Follow-up counseling
from other patients
Corporations: and assistance for Frequent
& issues. $830,000 1,600 individuals interaction with
Foundations: working to maintain health counselors
$171,600 healthy habits
Fees: $465,000

Facilities
Office space: 15,000
SF

6
(Name of Organization) Logic Model (Year)
Date:
Inputs Outputs Outcomes & Impacts
GOES BACK TO MISSION
Investments Activities Participation Short Term Medium Term Long Term
Situation Priorities What the What the
What the medium
What we invest: What we do: Who we reach: short term results ultimate
term results are:
are: impact is:
Community Need Organization Mission Resources & Program Key Learning Action Conditions
Relationships & Services Stakeholders

7
Elements of the Case for Support
Mission Statement: A statement about a societal need or value that an organization
proposes to address.
Vision Statement: A statement about what an organization can and should become
at some future time.
Case Statement: A carefully prepared document that sets forth, in detail, the reasons why an
organization needs and merits financial support. In the context of the case is
bigger than the institution, it documents its services, human resources, potential
for greater services, current needs, and future plans.
from Glossary of Fund Raising Terms
a publication of AFP

The Case Statement is an internal document upon which all marketing, communications, program
and development materials are based. The Case presents a compelling rationale based on
responses to the following types of questions:
1. What is the organizations mission?
2. What has the organization accomplished thus far? (its history)
3. What does the organization do and how is it structurally governed?
4. What is unique about your organization?
5. What is the problem? What need does the program for which you are seeking support address?
6. Who is affected?
7. What impact or outcomes does the program/solution generate? How is it unique?
8. What solutions / services / methods will be used to implement the program?
9. What results have been achieved thus far?
10. What resources and funds are required and how will they be used?
11. What endorsements and support have already been provided for the program? How much? From
whom?
12. What is in it for the donor?

It is essential to make your case larger than the institution. Its not enough to tell the story of the
organization, to recite the history. Its equally ineffective to try to convince the prospect that the
organization needs the money to avoid deterioration or collapse.
The case demonstrates how the institution can make a special contribution to building the future.
Prospects must be inspired and challenged to play a part in making it happen. The Raising of
Money by James Gregory Lord

rylander associates

Page 1 of 10
8
Definitions

Root Problem: The circumstances and/or issues that created a negative situation experienced by
clients, constituents, or a community before anyone or any organization intervenes
with a solution. The root problem is not a lack of money, education, time, etc.
Rather, it is descriptive of the clients initial state or situation.

Proof/Justification: Research statistics and sources, anecdotes, and quotes from sources outside the
organization which document the scope and severity of a root problem or the
effectiveness of a solution and viability of its outcomes.

Impact/Outcomes: The changes that occur in a client, constituent, or a community as a result of the
application of a solution. An outcome is the difference between the state of the
client as affected by the root problem and the state of the client after the solution
has had an impact.

Solutions/Services: The activity or program which addresses or solves the root problem. For example,
a summer reading program addresses the problem of elementary-age children not
being motivated and knowing how to read on grade level.

Methods: The manner by which the solution is applied or delivered. For example, method
used in a summer reading program involve forming reading pairs between children
and adults who listen to the children read for one hour a day Monday through
Friday for six weeks.

Results Achieved: The actual or anticipated accomplishments of a program over a period of time.
Results are stated in terms of the programs history, previous year, and current year
and are most useful when compared to a program goal in order to identify the
service gap.

Service gap: The difference between a programs quantitative and qualitative goals for a period
of time and its quantitative and qualitative achievements (or actuals) to date.

Resources: Everything an organization must gather, coordinate, and/or possess to implement a


solution. Resources include the volunteers, facilities, expertise, and partnerships,
as well as cash and in-kind contributions required to provide a solution. Resources
are always expressed as income and expense budgets with overhead allocations as
well as through narrative descriptions.

Endorsements & Those entities that have already bought into the program/solution by providing
Support: significant resources required. Names of corporate, foundation, and organizational
donors may be specifically listed. Individuals names are not listed. Rather, a
lump sum figure for individual contributions is shown with a title of individual
donors.

Donor Benefits: The tangible and intangible items that fulfill donors needs. Tangible items include
goods and services provided in exchange for a donation. Intangible items include
the quantification and packaging of specific services that will be provided to a
client as a result of a donors contribution.

Page 2 of 10
9
Drafting a Case Statement
Using your mission and vision statements and your strategic plan, answer the following questions.
Then use the evaluation questions at the end of each section to assess your draft.

I. Introduction

1. Identify the organizations mission.


2. Describe the organizations history.
3a. Describe what the organization does and any key partners to which it relates.
3b. Describe how is it structurally governed.
4. Describe the organizations market niche and uniqueness.

Evaluation
Yes No
Is the mission stated?

Is there a brief summary of the organizations history including


key accomplishments and transitions since its inception?

Is the purpose as well as key benefits and outcomes clearly


described?
Is the organizations niche in the marketplace described?

Are other organizations with which the organization has


working relationships identified? (i.e. receive referrals, send referrals,
partnerships, collaborations)

What does the organization do that no other organization


does? Are these uniquenessdescribed?

Is the governance structure described, including the number of


staff, board, and volunteers?

Is jargon used to describe the organization?

10
II. Problem/Need Statement

5a. Describe the problem/need the program addresses as it exists before the organization intervenes.
Use statistical information from reputable sources to document the problem/need and it scope.
Because the problem/need exists in the community or world external to your organization, the
organizations name should not be used in this description.
5b. Describe the situation of individuals as they experience the problem/need prior to the intervention
of your organization. Use real or anecdotal stories and quotes. Clearly demonstrate how the initial
problem/need generates other short, mid-range, and long term implications.
5c. Describe the demographics of the individuals who are affected by the problem/need. Describe
where they are located, their ages or age ranges, ethnicity, gender, etc. Also describe what size of
group they are in relation to a larger geographic or demographic group to which they relate. In
addition to the primary client/target group, describe any individuals who are indirectly affected and
state how they are affected.
Evaluation
Yes No
Does the statement describe the root problem that is impacting
individuals and/or communities?

Is the problem described in terms of its negative impact on individuals


(personally)and communities (physically, economically, politically,
culturally) and not in terms of the solution?

Are the individuals & communities affected by the problem clearly


described in terms of their geographic location, ethnicity, gender,
and age or other revealing demographic information?

Are the individuals &communities affected quantified? Are they


quantified in relation to the total number of individuals in a given
geographic or demographic group to which they relate?

Does the statement present the problem prior to the organizations


intervention?

Are statistics from reputable sources used to justify the problem and
quantify its scope?

Are quotes and stories used to further enhance understanding of the


personal impact of the problem?

Does the description delineate the initial problem, but also the short,
mid-range and long-term problems and consequences it generates for
an individual? For a community, city, state, nation, or the world?

Does the description provide a clear understanding of the human


side of the problem?

Are there individuals and/or communities who are indirectly affected


by the problem? If so, who are they and how are they affected?

Is jargon used to describe the problem?


Page 4 of 10
11
III. Impact & Outcomes

7a. For every problem described in #5a & b, describe one or more impacts, outcomes, or changes that
occur as a result of your solution(s).
7b. Describe how the impacts and outcomes are unique.
7c. Include research from reputable sources that proves the solutions/services produce the outcomes
described.
7d. Describe how constituents who benefit from the solution/services have impacted its creation
and/or implementation.
7e. Use quotes and/or anecdotal stories to demonstrate the personal impact of the solution/services
upon constituents and/or a community.
7f. Describe how the solution/services and resulting outcomes are related to the organizations
mission statement.

Evaluation
Yes No
Does this section present one or more outcomes that occur as a result
of the implementation of the solution/services?

Are the outcomes stated in terms of individuals and groups directly


and indirectly related to the problem?

Are the outcomes described in qualifiable and quantifiable terms?

Is it clear how the solution/service is related to and addresses each problem?

Is it clear that the solution/service addresses the short-, mid-range, and


long-term consequences generated by the problem?

Is it clear that constituents benefited by the solution/service have impacted the


creation and/or implementation of the solution?

Page 5 of 10
12
IV. Solutions / Services / Methods

8a. Describe the solutions / services / methods used to provide/deliver the solution.
8b. Identify the staff, volunteers, partners, and/or experts who are involved in providing the solution.
Describe their qualifications & responsibilities.
8c. Describe the time frame within which the solution is provided/delivered.
8d. Describe how constituents benefited by the solution are involved.

Evaluation
Yes No
Are the solutions / services / methods clearly described?

Are the people involved in providing the solution identified along


with their qualifications and responsibilities?

Does the description of how the method is delivered provide a clear


understanding of what takes place on a day-to-day basis to address
the problem?

Are the impacts, outcomes, and/or solutions/services unique? If so, are such
uniquenesses described clearly?

Within what time frame is the solution/service delivered?

Do the described solutions/services fall within the framework of the


organizations mission statement?

Is the solution/service justified by the presentation of research from reputable,


recognized sources?

Is jargon used to describe the solution/service?

Page 6 of 10
13
V. Results Achieved

9a. Describe the results that have been achieved since the program began.
9b. Describe the results that were achieved in the previous calendar or fiscal year.
9c. Describe the programs current annual or fiscal goals and the progress made toward those goals.
9d. Describe the gap between current year progress and the current annual or fiscal goals.
9e. Describe any internal or external factors which have influenced the gap.
9f. Describe the programs mid- or long-term goals.

Evaluation
Yes No
Are the programs cumulative actuals included?

Are the programs service actuals for the past year clearly
demonstrated using quantitative/output, process, and outcome
measures?
Are current annual or fiscal goals stated?

Is progress toward current annual or fiscal goals (service


actuals) included?
Is the gap between current annual or fiscal goals and progress
toward those goal clearly described?
Are any factors that caused the gap to increase or decrease
described?
Are goals for the program over the next 3 5 years described?

Page 7 of 10
14
VI. Resources Required

10.a List/describe the resources (in-kind and financial donations, volunteers, partnerships, staff,
expertise, facilities, etc.) that are required to implement the solution.
10b. Describe how the resources will be used.
10c. Provide a line-item budget for the program that correlates to the line-item budget for the
organization.

Evaluation
Yes No
Are the resources required to provide the solution clearly
described?
Do the resources described include in-kind donations, funds,
materials and supplies, volunteers, partnerships, staff, expertise,
facilities curriculum materials and anything else required to
provide the solution?
Are the funding resources described in terms of the total annual
budget for the program?
Does the total of funding required include both direct program
expenses and indirect administrative support expenses?
Does the description give a clear understanding of how the
resources will be used?
Has a line-item income and expense budget for the program that
correlates to a line-item income and expense budget for the
organization been prepared?

Page 8 of 10
15
VII. Endorsements & Support

11a. List the endorsements and support that have already been provided for the solution. Include how
much has been received and from whom.
11b. Describe any endorsements and/or partnerships that are still needed.
11c. Identify funding that is still needed.

Evaluation
Yes No
Are all endorsements and support that have already been provided
for the program clearly delineated?
Have corporate, foundation, and organizational funding sources
and the amounts of their donations been identified?
Is a total of donations from individuals, but not their names and
amounts of their gifts, included?
Are the gaps between the total of endorsements and support
required and the total currently secured expressed clearly as
resources that are still needed?

Page 9 of 10
16
VIII. Donor Benefits

12a. List all tangible benefits to the donor. These may include tickets, t-shirts, golf games, etc.

12b. Brainstorm as many appealing, fundable items, or giving opportunities, as possible that a donor
can invest in with a donation. These must be items that are in the program budget. They may
be intangible and related to a service, like providing an elementary student one-month of an after-
school program, or equipment and materials, like a computer required for students to use in an
after-school program.

Evaluation
Yes No
Are all tangible benefits to donors identified?

Are realistic dollar values attached to giving opportunities so that


donors may provide a benefit by investing in the program
with a contribution?
Are the dollar values for giving opportunities based on the
programs annual budget?
Are a number of giving opportunities offered at a wide range
of amounts?

IX. Summary Statement

Closing: Describe the challenge in terms of the outcome to be achieved.

Evaluation
Yes No
Does the case statement close with a compelling summary of the
challenges that does not include a request statement?

Page 10 of 10
17
STRUCTURE OF A CASE STATEMENT
(PAGE 1 OF 2) rylander associates

INTRODUC-
PROBLEM/NEED STATEMENT IMPACTS & OUTCOMES
TION
Basic
description The root problem experienced by your constituents;
Changes that occur as a result of the solution
of the not the lack of something
organization
Mission & Constituents
Root Problem Proof/Justification Impact Proof/Justification Solutions/Services
Purpose Affected
What are the Statistics: What Statistics: What
What is happening
organizations research by research by
to individuals, Who is impacted? What does it look
mission, reputable sources reputable sources What program or
Name of the Program

communities, cities, (individuals, like now that the


purpose, key validates the root proves your activity creates the
states, and/or the communities, cities, solution has been
benefits, problem(s) and solution produces impact?
world before you states, the world? applied?
outcomes, & quantifies its(their) the outcomes
intervene?
market niche? scope? youve claimed?

What does it look Anecdotes: What Does the solution


With whom do What can be
like when a person Who or what is stories can you tell fall within the
you have Anecdotes: What accomplished that
and/or community indirectly about constituents framework of the
working stories about previously couldnt
is without your impacted? who have benefited organizations
relationships? constituents be accomplished?
solution? from your solution? mission statement?
experiencing the
root problem can
you tell to enhance What percentage Quotes: What How have
What has the What short, mid- How does the initial
understanding of do those affected quotes by constituents who
organization range & long-term impact cause
the human side of represent in constituents benefit from the
accomplished implications will additional changes
the problem? relation to the total benefited by the solution impacted
thus far in its arise if the root in related or
population of their solution or experts its creation and/or
history? problem persists? different areas?
area? related to the implementation?
solution validate
How is your your outcome?
Quotes: What
organization How can they be How does the
quotes by
governed? described? solution prevent
constituents
(ethnicity, gender, short, mid-range &
experiencing the
age, economic long-term
root problem and/or
What is unique status, geo- consequences
experts related to
about your graphic/demo- generated by the
the root problem
organization? graphic info.) problem?
can you include?

18
STRUCTURE OF A CASE STATEMENT
(PAGE 2 OF 2) rylander associates

RESULTS ENDORSEMENTS SUMMARY


METHODS RESOURCES DONOR BENEFITS
ACHIEVED & SUPPORT STATEMENT

How the solution is Progress toward Funds, expertise & Expertise & funds
Prospect needs The closing
implemented goals materials required already committed

Resources & Designated Giving


Program Delivery The Service Gap The Financial Gap The Challenge
Personnel Opportunities

What in-kind and What endorsements What tangible


How is the solution
What has been financial donations, and/or partnerships benefits are provided
delivered/provided? How can fulfilling the
accomplished by the volunteers, have been secured? to donors?
program thus far in it partnerships, staff, need be presented as
history? and/or facilities are What appealing giving a challenge to which
required? opportunities are the one may respond
Within what time frame What endorsements
presented to prospects with financial support
is the solution and/or partnerships
so they may choose to and involvement?
delivered? What results were How will the resources are still needed?
provide a benefit at a
achieved last year? be used? specific giving level?

Who is involved in Are both direct and How much financial Are the dollar values
providing the solution What are the current indirect expenses support has been for the giving
and what are their annual goals and included in the total secured thus far opportunities based on
qualifications & service actuals? annual budget for the toward the programs the programs annual
responsibilities? program? annual budget? budget?

From what funding


What takes place on a What is the gap sources has the What giving
day-to-day basis? between current Is there a line-item support been secured? opportunities based
annual goals & service budget for the program (For corporations, upon the length of time
actuals? that correlates to the foundations, & a service is provided
How are constituents line-item budget for the organizations list (hours, days, weeks,
who benefit from the organization? amounts given by months, etc.) are
solution involved? What factors are each. For individuals, offered?
influencing the gap? list only one lump sum)

What funding is still


What giving
What are the needed? (the gap
opportunities based
programs mid and between the amount
upon a per client cost
long-term goals? secured and total
are offered?
required)
19
CASE STATEMENT FOR PERFECT WEIGHT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
(SAMPLE - PAGE 1 OF 1) rylander associates

INTRODUC-
PROBLEM/NEED STATEMENT IMPACTS & OUTCOMES
TION
Basic
description The root problem experienced by your constituents;
Changes that occur as a result of the solution
of the not the lack of something
organization
Mission & Constituents
Root Problem Proof/Justification Impact Proof/Justification Solution
Purpose Affected
PERFECT WEIGHT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

Statistics: World Statistics: 95% of


Weight related PWMP changes
Overweight Health Org. states the individuals
medical overweight
Promotes individuals have that per person 75 million served who lost
complications are individuals
weight loss distorted lifetime health overweight people 50+ lbs. 10 years
decreasing, attitudes and
worldwide! understandings of expenses increase in the world ago have not
thereby freeing up behaviors about
food and its use. by $1,000 with regained the weight
medical resources eating
every extra 10 lbs. they lost.
Leads to improper Families, PWMPs program
American Anecdotes: Tom Anecdotes: Mary
eating habits, businesses, Medical expenses is based on years
Medical has carried an lost 75 lbs. 15
satisfaction with medical field, related to weight of research on
Society, World extra 75 lbs. all his years ago and has
only starchy & health insurance complications are weight issues and
Health life & as a result remained the same
sweet foods, eating are indirectly decreasing the monitoring of
Organization developed heart size ever since
too much too often. affected overweight
and blood pressure
Individual is out-of- Individuals who individuals before &
complications. He
Helped 50,000 breath with little The 75 million appeared to be Quotes: Im after their weight
was forced to quit
people shed exertion, always people who are destined for health happier than ever, loss. It deals with
work, lost income &
2.5 million hot, tires quickly, overweight are complications & more physically fit the psychology of
health insurance,
lbs.(50 lbs. sedentary lifestyle, approx. xx% of the early death have and satisfied when eating & relearning
became
Each) potential for early worlds population eliminated those I eat because I eat how to eat &
depressed.
death risks nutritiously. Mary exercise
Diverts limited said.
12 Member Consequently, their
medical resources Quotes: I dont Clients comment
Board, 500 51% women, 49% productivity has
from other patients like what Ive that one of the
staff men, all ethnicities, increased, are able
& issues become. Im most helpful
all ages, all to provide for Formerly
Inflates medical unable to provide aspects of the
Only nonprofit geographic family, get health overweight clients
costs, complicates for my family and I PWMP is how well
in the world locations, all insurance, learned weigh the
minor health cant do anything I its staff understand
focusing on socioeconomic new eating habits, appropriate sizes
issues, used to, Tom what they are going
issues of levels are physically for their physiques.
exacerbates other stated. through.
weight loss active
health issues

20
Summer, 2005

FEEDING THE HUNGRY, A CAMPAIGN TO STRENGTHEN OUR COMMUNITY

The Case for Renovating and Expanding the


North Texas Food Banks Warehouse and Offices

A DISTINCTIVE MISSION

The mission of the North Texas Food Bank is to eliminate hunger by


distributing food and grocery products through a network of nonprofit
organizations while providing education and increasing community
awareness on issues of hunger.

HISTORY

The North Texas Food Bank was established in 1982 to address the critical issue of
hunger in the North Texas area by securing donations of surplus unmarketable, but
wholesome, foods and grocery products for distribution through a network of charitable
organizations dedicated to feeding the hungry. The Food Bank serves 13 North Texas
Counties, including Dallas, Denton, Collin, Fannin, Rockwall, Hunt, Grayson, Kaufman,
Ellis, Navarro, Lamar, Delta and Hopkins. In the first year of operation, the Food Bank
distributed 400,000 pounds of food.
Subsequently, members of the Food Bank's organizing committee became
advocates with members of the Texas Legislature for the passage of the Good Faith Donor
Act, which protects donors from liability of donated product. With the passage of this act
in 1983, donations of food product increased significantly.
The Food Bank is a certified member of America's Second Harvest, the Nations
Food Bank Network. America's Second Harvest, the nation's largest domestic hunger
relief organization, solicits food and grocery products from national suppliers for
distribution through 213 certified Food Banks nationally. America's Second Harvest also
provides Food Banks with operational standards, training, support and inspection, and
educates the public and government officials about the nature and solutions to the problem
of hunger in the U.S.

The Food Bank serves its 13-county area from a 72,000-square-foot food
distribution center on Shilling Way in a warehouse district in Southeast Dallas. The Board
of Directors of the Food Bank recently purchased the building from the Perot Foundation
at a price well below market value.

Page 1 of 7
21
A 28-member Board of Directors meets four times a year to provide leadership for
the Food Bank. The Board is supported by a 15-member Presidents Council and seven
Life Board Members. Four committees: Executive, Management Services, Program
Services, and Resource Development give oversight to the work of the Food Bank. The
Food Bank employs a total of 48 full-time, 2 part-time individuals and three VISTA
volunteers.

GROWTH IN SERVICES

The annual poundage of food distributed by the Food Bank has increased steadily
over the years to reach 28 million pounds in 2004 and will top 32 million pounds in 2005.
In 2004 the Food Bank provided food items to 651,487 families and 1,839,321 individuals
through 400 Member Agencys pantry programs. Additionally, 6,360,789 on-site meals
were supplied to shelters, after-school programs and senior adult centers.

Testament to its effectiveness, the Food Bank leverages each dollar donated to
provide six meals, the equivalent of $11 of food. Ninety-six cents of each dollar donated
is spent on food distribution and only four cents is used for administrative and fund raising
activities.

The Food Banks budget has grown to $5.7 million for the 2004-05 fiscal year. In
addition, 12,000 volunteers will devote more than 56,000 hours to fulfill the Food Banks
mission in 2005.

THE FACES OF HUNGER

The Working Poor

My husband was laid off, Betty explains. We got behind in rent and were
evicted from our apartment. We tried the shelters, but they were full or wouldnt
take a family. My son is almost thirteen and we have two small daughters. Our
son has a tumor and is blind in one eye. We are staying in motels with rent
assistance from churches and other organizations.

The reasons why families need food assistance vary, but Bettys story is all too
common. With rents high and the cost of living constantly rising, thousands of families in
North Texas live two or three paychecks away from homelessness.

We dont have anything to eat right now, Betty continues. I have children and
cant imagine what we would do without the food assistance we receive. We cant get food
stamps because were homeless and dont have a permanent address yet. Its very difficult
right now. This is our first time in this situation. We didnt think we would be on the
streets.

Page 2 of 7
22
Betty and her family were able to turn to the Center of Hope, one of the North
Texas Food Banks 400 Member Agencies, for their daily food supplies. Without this kind
of help, their options would be limited at best.

The Children

I can tell in the morning when the kids havent eaten because theyre tired and
they dont want to participate, comments Leslie Hibbs, Child Development Coordinator
for Trinity River Mission. Leslie says nearly all of the 300 kids at their Kids Cafe site are
from working poor families and dont receive regular meals at home. They get free
lunches at school, but would go hungry during the summer if it werent for Trinity River
Missions summer program where breakfast, lunch and a snack are served every day.

Without a doubt, hunger impacts every aspect of a childs life. Research shows
that youngsters from food insecure and hungry homes have poorer overall health status.
They miss more days of school and are less prepared to learn when they are able to attend.
The relationship between hunger, health and learning are of great importance. At-risk
children are more likely to have poorer mental health, be withdrawn or socially disruptive,
and suffer greater rates of behavioral disorders.

Leslie says the children learn and behave much better when they have full
stomachs. With the help from the Food Bank, our kids are happy and able to learn
because they receive good, quality food.

Seniors

Life hasnt been easy on Eugene. He was married twice, but lost both wives to
cancer. They died right in my arms, he remembers sadly. I dont know if I can take
much more of that. He was recently diagnosed with cancer himself. The doctors seem
to think theyve got it. But if they dont get it cleared up, Ill die. Im so worried.

Eugene worked for a night watchman company, and was once shot in the chest
while on the job. But as he says, I wasnt making much money, so I needed help with
food. Right now, I have no job, and its hard to get hired because Im 70 years old. I
would love to work if I could get hired.

Seniors who experience hunger are at risk for serious health problems. Hunger
increases their risk of stroke, exacerbates pre-existing ill health conditions, limits the
efficacy of many prescription drugs, and may affect brain chemistry increasing the
incidence of depression and isolation.

Nearly every day Eugene goes to the Brady Center, one of the Food Banks
Member Agencies, to take advantage of the hot meals they provide as well as the
fellowship of his peers. Its a crucial alternative to the fate that awaits so many low-
income older adults who have lost their spouses trapped at home with nowhere to go, no
one to talk to, and no one to care for their needs.

Page 3 of 7
23
THE REALITY OF HUNGER

In Our Community

It is a simple and disturbing fact that Texas has more hungry families than all but
one of the 50 states. One in five children in Texas live in poverty. Forty-six percent of
households with hungry children are considered the working poor with at least one adult
having a job, but not earning enough to pay rent and buy food. Additionally, individuals
who benefit from food stamps in Texas receive an average of $81.61 a month, per person.
Specifically, of the more than 4.1 million people who live in the North Texas Food
Banks 13-county service area approximately 538,000 (13%) percent live below the
poverty line. And, more than 231,300 (43%) percent of these individuals living in poverty
are children under age 18. (Data sources: U. S. Census Bureau, Americas Second Harvest and the
Center for Public Policy Priorities.)

Projections by governmental and nonprofit agencies indicate that the number of


individuals living below 100% of the poverty line will increase as a result of a 9.5%
increase in population every five years, despite the poverty rate remaining constant. These
projections are conservative as individuals considered at risk for hunger include all who
live at or below 185% of the poverty level. (100% of poverty level = 2 adults & 2 children with
an annual income of $19,157 or less.)

Consequently, these conservative projections show that to serve the growing


numbers of people living in poverty and increase the current 74-pound per person level of
food distribution to 80 pounds per person the Food Bank will need to receive and distribute
a minimum of 45 million pounds by 2020.

2005 2010 2015 2020

Individuals Living at 100% of the Poverty Level - 13% of 13-county population*


538,000 589,000 644,000 701,000

Projected Minimum Number of Individuals to be Served by the Food Bank (Unduplicated)


432,500 473,500 518,500 568,000

Food Per Person 74 lbs. 80lbs.


(In millions of pounds) 32 38 41 45

*Based on population projections from the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts.

For Our 400 Member Agencies

Because of the North Texas Food Banks scale of operation and visibility in the
community, Member Agencies receive food for an average of $0.06/lb., or 4% of the total

Page 4 of 7
24
cost per pound. Donated product, private donations and federal funding offset the
remaining 96% of the foods cost.

If the Food Banks ability to distribute food were limited at its present capacity of
32 million pounds a year, the Food Banks 400 Member Agencies would have to shoulder
the cost of securing greater quantities of food to meet increased future demand.
Shouldering such a burden could increase Member Agencies cost of purchasing food by
as much as 2000% to $1.50/lb.

Consequently, the annual cost to agencies of 10 million additional pounds of food


that must secured from sources other than the Food Bank would be over $14 million. An
additional 20 million pounds of food would cost over $28 million. In just a few years, if
the Food Bank cannot keep up with the needs of the communities it is charged to serve, its
Member Agencies will face an average budget shortfall of $50,000 or more each year,
forcing them to limit services or find alternative sources of money to purchase food less
efficiently.

THE CURRENT FACILITY

The Food Bank has occupied its 72,000 square foot box warehouse on Shilling
Way in Southwest Dallas since its creation. Located in a warehouse district, the Food
Banks facility looks similar to surrounding warehouses. No significant changes to the
warehouse or office areas have been undertaken.

The main entrance to the warehouse is a single door which opens into a small
reception and waiting area and hallway along which many staff offices are located.
Volunteers and Member Agency representatives who visit the facility must wait in the
reception area or staff break/lunch room. Offices of Food Bank staff who assist Member
Agency representatives are located across the warehouse from these waiting areas.

The facilitys current conference room will seat only 40 individuals. So when large
groups of corporate, faith community, or civic volunteers are present for an entire day,
there is no place other than the warehouse floor for them to work, eat, and take breaks.
Tours of the facility also require guests and volunteers to walk through the main floor,
increasing warehouse safety concerns.

Receiving and distribution docks are side by side on the front of the warehouse.
Food product enters the warehouse, is stored, and taken back to the same side of the
building for loading onto Member Agency trucks. As a result, traffic flows in both
directions down the center and other smaller aisles of the warehouse.

Industrial racking in the main, 6,000 square foot area of the warehouse is
perpendicular to traffic flow entering the warehouse. Food inventory stored on these racks
must be moved laterally to the end of the rack and then toward the distribution docks.
Freezer and refrigerator space are located on opposite sides of the racks.

Page 5 of 7
25
Salvage or USDA commodities arriving at the Food Bank must be moved from the
receiving dock on the front of the building to the rear wall of the warehouse for sorting.
From this area, product is directed to several different areas, but ultimately back to the
distribution docks at the front of the warehouse.

While the warehouse has enabled the Food Bank to increase food receipt and
distribution significantly in recent years, it is not configured appropriately for future
growth. The inefficient movement of product, conflicting warehouse floor traffic patterns,
limited cold storage capabilities, size-restricted areas for volunteers and Member Agency
staff, and potential volunteer safety issues are just a few of the major issues which will
soon limit the Food Banks capacity to get food to hungry individuals in our community.

MEETING THE FUTURE DEMAND FOR FOOD

The Food Bank's Board has been developing a plan over the past year to make
major improvements to the building in order to generate greater food distribution capacity.
Basically, the plan is to convert the warehouse into a center that is designed specially to
operate as a customer friendly food distribution center. The plan will require stripping
large sections of the present facility and rearrangement of various functions to provide for
greater efficiency.

Greater efficiency of operations will enable the Food Bank to increase the
poundage of food distributed by approximately 50 percent to as many as 48 million pounds
a year. Additionally, time required for member agencies to pick up food will be reduced.

The main entrance to the building will be remodeled to resemble a barn with a silo.
An expanded reception lobby will accommodate larger groups, offer information to
educate about hunger issues, and provide recognition for donors. The silo will designate a
special entrance and waiting area for Member Agency representatives. Food Bank staff
who assist Member Agency representatives will office adjacent to this area.

The plan also calls for the addition of a 10,000-square-foot mezzanine level above
present offices. This new construction will include an education center and two conference
rooms that can seat up to 150 people for programs and training, the Executive Director's
office, staff offices, and storage. A viewing terrace along the mezzanine will provide a
safe location where visitors and volunteers can see Food Bank activities.

Receiving docks will be relocated to the back of the warehouse to re-direct the flow
of food product. To create a new truck yard and provide access to the new receiving
docks, a small strip of land behind the building will be purchased. This area will also
provide a new parking area.

Food inventory will be stored on racking which will extend in rows perpendicular
to the receiving dock on the back of the building and distribution docks on the front where

Page 6 of 7
26
Member Agencies trucks are loaded. Alongside the racks will be spacious areas for
agency shopping, food box assembly, quality control (inspection of certain donated food
items), and bulk storage. Freezer capacity will be doubled, refrigerator space increased by
50%, and all cold storage will be grouped along one side of the warehouse.

Reconfiguration of downstairs offices and workstations will allow for future


growth in the Food Banks staff. The existing classroom and Community Kitchen will
remain in their present locations and do not require renovation.

The Amend Group donated initial architectural services for the renovation plan.

The Board of Directors of the North Texas Food Bank has determined that this
renovation and expansion plan most efficiently and economically positions the Food Bank
to significantly increase food receipt and distribution over the next 15 20 years.

FINANCING THE RENOVATION

The Board of Directors of the North Texas Food Bank has authorized a capital
campaign to raise gifts and grants for the renovation from foundations, corporations, and
individuals/families. The campaign will seek $4.2 million in philanthropic support.

Although the renovated facility will accommodate a larger staff, no staff additions
are planned at this time. Almost half of the anticipated $85,000 increase in electrical,
insurance, and landscaping expenses annually will be offset by savings in property taxes
due to the Food Banks purchase of the facility. The remaining portion of these expenses
will be provided for by the annual budget.

A simplified budget for the renovation of the Food Bank's food distribution center
is as follows:

$3,122,000 Construction Costs ($44.68 per square foot)


348,000 Engineering Fees and Contingency
730,000 Land Strip for Access; Paved Parking Area; Telephone
System; Warehouse Racks, Forklifts, and Other Equipment,
_________ and Furniture

$4,200,000 Total Project Costs

RESPONDING TO THE CHALLENGE

In the future, the North Texas Food Bank will simply not be able to fulfill its core mission
of extending the fight against hunger without renovated facilities. However, with
renovated facilities the Food Bank has enormous potential. This is the opportunity and the
challenge before us. Generous support of the renovation campaign will assure that
growing numbers of hungry families and children will have the food they need.

Page 7 of 7
27
February 28, 2006

ABC Foundation, Inc.


c/o Ms. Susan Smith, President
and Members of the Board of Trustees
777 Main Street
Dallas, Texas 75201

Dear Ms. Smith and Members of the Board of Trustees:

The North Texas Food Bank is engaged in a $4.2 million capital funding
endeavor, Feeding the Hungry: A Campaign to Strengthen the Community, for the
purpose of complete renovation of the food distribution center in Dallas. Our objective is
to expand the volume and quicken the way that food is distributed to 400 nonprofit
agencies serving the hungry in North Central Texas.

The Board of Directors of the Food Bank respectfully requests a grant of


$100,000 from the ABC Foundation for this renovation project that will increase storage
and distribution capacity by 50 percent.

Gifts totaling $2 million have been received since the campaign began in late
August. Gift participation by our Board of Directors is 100 percent.

Hunger is the hidden barrier, inhibiting the ability of children to learn, reducing
the productivity of the working poor, and corroding the lives of the elderly.

The Food Bank in Dallas was on track prior to Hurricane Katrina to distribute
about 32 million pounds of food last year to food pantries, after-school programs,
residential treatment programs, emergency shelters, soup kitchens, senior citizen centers,
low-income daycare centers, and other social service centers in the Food Banks 13-
county service area. As a result of the hurricane, the total amount of food distributed
through the Food Bank jumped to 37.4 million pounds by the end of the year.

The Food Bank is a certified member of Americas Second Harvest, the Nations
Food Bank Network of more than 200 strategically positioned food banks in all 50 states.
This network enables a prompt response to hungry people affected by natural disasters.

The Food Bank was founded in 1982 as a result of the leadership and vision of a
small group of civic leaders who sought to control the problem of hunger in Dallas and
nearby counties. The food distribution center and offices are located in a 70,000-square-
foot warehouse building on Shilling Way in southwest Dallas. The building has been
leased from the Perot Foundation at a very modest fee.

28
In early 2005, the Board and executive staff decided that the Food Bank could not
be positioned to meet the projected need over the next 20 years for food distribution in
North Texas without making a better use of floor space and docking through extensive
renovation and re-configuration of the warehouse. A different location was not given
serious consideration. The present facility can be reached within minutes from interstate
and state highways and major streets.

The basic intent of this project is to prepare the Food Bank to serve as many as
possible of the estimated 701,000 individuals that will be living in poverty and need food
assistance in the Food Banks service area by 2020. Information accompanying this
proposal provides additional documentation about the problem of hunger in North Texas
and describes people whose lives are better because of food assistance. Two of our
programs, Kids Caf and Food 4 Kids, are especially designed for hungry children.

Extensive renovation of the Food Banks facility will bring the total floor space
up to 80,000-square-feet and greatly improve the efficiency of the entire operation.
Features in the conversion of the warehouse building into a specially designed food
distribution center are

Increase space available for food inventory by 50 percent through the use of two-
deep pallets stacked on new large metal racks.
Create a five-bay receiving dock on one side of the building so that food goods
can flow in a direct line to the six rows of storage racks and on to the shipping
docks on the opposite side of the building.
Designate areas for agency shopping, food box assembly, quality control
(inspection of certain donated food items), bulk storage, and waste/recycle
compactors.
Establish a Perishable Foods Center including a large walk-in refrigeration unit
and display cases for agency representatives to see available produce and fruits.
Add a large walk-in freezer.
Build a 10,000-square-foot mezzanine level above present offices to
accommodate a volunteer training and education center for up to 60 people; two
conference rooms; a small serving area; offices for the executive director, chief
operating officer, and director of operations; viewing areas for visitors and
executive staff to observe activity on the main floor; two restrooms, and storage.
Re-construct existing offices on the main floor for managers and other staff
members. (The capacity-building plan does not necessitate additional staff but
allows space for more personnel when they may be needed.)
Open a new entrance to the center with a lobby and reception area, a room for
agency representatives that area waiting for their food selections to be filled and
made ready for transport, and work stations for agency relations staff.
Improve signage including a faux silo to direct truckers to the receiving and
shipping sides of the building.
Establish a truck access and parking area on the receiving side of the building.

2
29
The Board has used reserve funds to purchase the building from the Perot
Foundation at a price below appraised market value. In addition, reserve funds of
$80,000 were used to purchase the strip of land for truck access and parking from the
owners of an adjacent building. Campaign income will be used to replenish reserve
funds in this amount for the purchase of the land strip. Gift income will not be used to
replace money spent for the purchase of the building.

A simplified budget for the renovation of the food distribution center is

$ 3,122,000 Construction Costs ($44.68 per square foot)


348,000 Engineering Fees and Permits, Contingency
730,000 Land Strip for Access; Paved Truck Parking Area; Telephone
System; Warehouse Racks, Forklifts, and Other Equipment, and
Furniture
__________

$ 4,200,000 Total Project Costs

Enclosed with this proposal are architectural drawings showing the reconfigured
Warehouse floor, the new mezzanine level, and an exterior perspective; lists of members
of the Board of Directors and campaign leadership with business and professional
affiliations; donor recognition opportunities; a general information pamphlet about the
Food Bank; a Statement of Intent form and return envelope, and 501(c)3 documentation.

We would be pleased to give you and any of the trustees of the ABC Foundation a
tour of our food distribution center so that we may show you how the renovation plan
will enhance our entire operation. Please call John Doe, Director of Development,
214/337-7694, to arrange a visit to the Food Bank or to request any supplemental
information relative to our request.

The strengthened food distribution program enabled through this renovated


facility will provide subsistence and hope for the future for tens of thousands of children
and adults.

Sincerely,

Betty Jones Karen Brown Jim James


Campaign Co-Chair Campaign Co-Chair Campaign Co-Chair

3
30
Summer 2001

The Case for the Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico

When you give a child confidence, you give them the world,
Anita N. Martinez

A Distinctive Mission

The Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico instills cultural pride and awareness in
Hispanic youth while educating the general public about the Hispanic cultures
contributions to the community.

Hot Pink Crepe Paper Dresses

In 1969, Anita N. Martinez became the first Hispanic woman elected to a major
city council in the United States. Shortly thereafter, she gained approval for the
construction of a much-needed recreation center in West Dallas. As a surprise to Anita,
fellow city council members named the new facility in her honor.

While visiting the new center one day, she noticed Hispanic children hugging
the walls and not participating in a competitive basketball game. They humbly watched
the basketball travel back and forth across the gym. As compared to the raucous activity
on the court, the Hispanic children held themselves back. Anita was touched by these
children who lacked the confidence to join in the game.

I was fifth in a family of six, and when I was growing up my mother was busy
with her beauty shop in Little Mexico. Since my older sisters helped her, there was no
one to watch me or give me much attention. My friends and I had to entertain ourselves
the best that we could.

31
A neighborhood friend, our adopted Aunt Rosita, took an interest in us and
taught us dance and theater. Our curtain was a sheet on a clothesline and, because there
wasnt any grass, we watered down the red clay ground to make our stage. Rositas
mother made us Mexican hot pink dresses out of crepe paper and we put on shows for
the neighborhood! To us, this was very exciting!

Sometimes we performed on a friends porch. As people walked home from


work, they would stop and lean over the fence to watch and applaud us! Ill never forget
how good that felt! Learning how to dance gave me confidence and joy!

When I saw the Hispanic children solemnly watching the basketball game at the
recreation center that day, I remembered what motivated me as a child . . . and these
memories motivated me to start the dance company. I realized that whether the children
danced or watched, they could appreciate our Hispanic culture . . . they could relate to the
Hispanic music . . . and they could feel proud of their Hispanic heritage.

The Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico

For almost 26 years, the Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico has woven its
colorful tapestry into the cultural fabric of our community. While bringing dazzling
performances to North Texas, the Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico promotes cultural
awareness, history, geography, physical fitness, discipline, responsibility, and teamwork.
In fact, those who experience the magic of dance through the Anita N. Martinez Ballet
Folklorico develop a better understanding of our communitys heritage as well as of
themselves. Through its programs, the Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico touches more
than 106,000 children and adults each year.

Founded in 1975 in that same recreation center in West Dallas, the Anita N.
Martinez Ballet Folkloricos first dancers were neighborhood children between the ages
of 6 and 18. While it was the first ballet folklorico company in North Texas to maintain a
professional company, it is no longer the only one.

32
The Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folkloricos success spawned other professional
folklorico groups and countless school-based programs in the Dallas/Fort Worth area.
The Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico inspired the formation of secondary school
programs, like the programs at Woodrow Wilson and Skyline High Schools. However,
the Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico remains the only professional folklorico group to
have childrens and youth companies. The Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico is now
considered the largest professional ballet folklorico company in the nation.

The Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico educates the general public about
Hispanic cultural influences and seeks to instill cultural pride and awareness in Hispanic
youth. Hispanic youth served by the Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico tend to be from
low- to moderate-income families in inner city urban areas within Dallas County.

The Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folkloricos programs involve children, youth, and
adults at three levels:
Intense: 425 children, youth, and parents participate annually in dance classes
and/or the summer Culture Camp.
Moderate: 11,000 elementary school-aged children benefit annually from
education materials provided to their teachers and Matinee Magic performances at
the Majestic Theatre.
Audience: 95,000 individuals attend performances throughout the community
annually.

Hispanic Population Growth

Over the last decade, Dallas Hispanic population doubled. According to U.S.
Census Bureau figures, Hispanics now account for 422,587 - or 36 percent - of Dallas
1,188,580 residents. Ten years ago, 21 percent of the citys population, or 210,240
people, were Hispanic.

33
Over the next 30 years, Texas Hispanic population is expected to more than
double. As our communities become more Hispanic, we must address the inherent
political, social, and economic implications of this growth.

The Dropout Problem

A major concern for our community is the Hispanic high school dropout crisis.
While the national dropout rate for whites, blacks, and other minorities has declined
steadily over the last 25 years, the Hispanic dropout rate remains almost constant. While
88.4 percent of whites and 78.9 percent of blacks complete high school, Hispanic
completion rates are still far behind at 57 percent.

The economy we have now can no longer absorb large numbers of dropouts,
said Maria Roledo Montecel, executive director of the Intercultural Development
Research Association, a San Antonio-based group that advocates better education for the
poor and minorities. Our society is highly interdependent. If one portion of our
population is not doing well, the quality of life for us all suffers. 1

So, what must be done to keep our Hispanic youth in school?

The National Dropout Prevention Center at Clemson University has earmarked 15


ways of encouraging children to stay in school through graduation. Among the 15
findings are the following:
Family involvement - Research has consistently found that parental involvement
is the most accurate predictor of a students success in school.
Mentoring/tutoring - A strong mentoring relationship can help a potential dropout
trust an adult and feel less isolated.
Out of school enhancement After-school and summer programs can reduce
information loss and foster interest in new subjects.

1
No Easy Answers Complex factors feed disproportionate Hispanic dropout rate: Written Off:
Texas Dropout Problem, The Dallas Morning News, May 22, 2001.
4

34
Individualized learning Customized instruction programs give at-risk students
one-on-one attention. 2

Hispanic parents dont necessarily trust the schools, says Mr. Villamil,
executive vice president of Apex, a group that holds workshops teaching how to navigate
the education system and the importance of education. You have to deal with the
cultural issue.

Dance A Medium for Instilling Cultural Pride & Confidence

The Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folkloricos Dance Academy classes involve parents in
students lives, reduce students isolation and build trust through interaction with
instructors, foster students interests in new subjects, and provide students with one-on-
one attention through customized instruction. These invaluable benefits increase the
likelihood that children and youth graduate from high school and become productive,
self-sufficient residents of our community.

At the Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico, dance is the medium through which:
Parents see audiences applauding their children, are motivated to be more
involved with their children, gain respect for their children, and take the first step
to be supportive and involved with their school and neighborhood.
Children develop strong relationships and build trust through weekly or biweekly
interaction with professional Hispanic dance instructors.
Children learn about new subjects: Mexican history, heroes, geography, and
dance in an out-of-school or after-school setting while experiencing teamwork,
discipline, responsibility, self expression, and physical fitness.
Children benefit from personalized, one-on-one attention and encouragement
from dance instructors.

2
Stopping the Spiral Ideas abound, but does U.S. have will to solve problem? Texas Dropout
Problem, The Dallas Morning News, May 24, 2001.
5

35
Dance Academy Classes Continuing its tradition of dance education, the Dance
Academy offers dance training in classical ballet, ballet folklorico, and Latin social
dances to children and youth. Classes are taught by professional dancers who not only
provide individualized attention, but also encourage personal discipline, responsibility,
physical fitness, and teamwork. In addition, students learn about the history and Mexican
state of origin of each dance. Classes are offered in two settings: the Anita N. Martinez
Ballet Folklorico studio on Live Oak and local area schools.

Students participating in classes offered at the Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico


studio pay a low rate of $80 per semester for a one-hour class once a week and $150 per
semester for two one-hour classes a week. To encourage parental support of classes and
to assist families that can not afford tuition rates, parents may volunteer with the Anita N.
Martinez Ballet Folklorico. For every hour volunteered by a parent, their childs tuition
is reduced $5. Each year, approximately 45 children and youth benefit from these
classes.

Schools wishing to offer folklorico dance as an after-school program or in


preparation for a special presentation, like Cinco de Mayo, may request that an Anita N.
Martinez Ballet Folklorico professional teach on-site classes. Depending on the needs of
the school, classes may be held once or twice a week for as long as is needed. Schools
pay $25 an hour for this service. Each semester, after-school Dance Academy classes
involve approximately 280 children in 10 12 schools representing three school districts.

Childrens Ensemble and Juniors Company - Children and youth who excel in
Dance Academy classes are invited to join the Childrens Ensemble, for 6 12 year-olds,
or the Junior Company, for youth 13 18 years old. While they continue to refine their
dance skills through weekly classes, Ensemble and Company members perform at more
than 40 community venues annually.

Culture Camp This four-week, bilingual summer camp offers opportunities for
20-30 children to learn about the history, geography, and culinary and visual arts of a

36
state or culture in Mexico. Children also learn how music and dance are celebrated in
that particular region. The program runs from 9:00 a. m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through
Friday and costs $60 a week. In June & July 2001, one Culture Camp intern and five
volunteers held the camp at the Womens Museum in Fair Park.

Matinee Magic More than 11,000 DISD elementary school children experience
the Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico - some for the first time - in ten special
performances each year. Held in the spring around Cinco de Mayo and fall around Diez
y Seis de Setiembre celebrations, 30 schools sent children to performances in 2000-2001.
Seven of the 30 schools received scholarships, a reduced ticket rate of $2 per student.
Otherwise, tickets were $3 for students under 13 years old and $6 for adults. To prepare
students for the event, teachers receive special educational packets with information
about the Majestic Theatre, origin of Cinco de Mayo or Diez y Seis de Setiembre,
portraits of Mexican heroes and dancers to color, information about Mexican states, crafts
projects, games, and stories. In conjunction with Matinee Magic, the Professional
Company gives two evening performances annually.

Stand and Deliver This annual awards program recognizes an Hispanic


administrator, Hispanic teacher, and two Hispanic students for their exemplary service in
the Dallas Independent School District. Award recipients receive a savings bond,
commemorative plaque, and, of course, special recognition at the Stand and Deliver
event.

Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico Professional Company In partnership with


Young Audiences of Greater Dallas, the 14-member professional company conducts
workshops and performs at 30-35 schools and various community venues throughout
Texas. Fees are charged for these performances according to the venue, number of
dancers, and length of performance. A promotional folder outlines the Companys
history, reputation, and pricing schedule.

37
Financing the Initiatives

The Martinez Ballet Folkloricos 2000-2001 expenses will total $282,000. To


date, $190,100 in gifts has been secured, leaving a balance of $82,700. To ensure the
continued success and growth of these effective programs, this ambitious goal must be
reached by the end of the fiscal year, September 30.

Demonstrated Success

I feel so strongly about this program . . . the confidence and self-esteem that
dance gives our young people! It gives them a platform to go on and do bigger and better
things and to contribute to the community.

Its beautiful when the parents get involved and see audiences applauding their
children! Parents gain respect for the children and are motivated to get involved in their
childrens lives, and in their neighborhoods and schools. Anita N. Martinez

The promise of the Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico is in the hands of


those whose generous support will make it possible to give the world to our
communitys Hispanic children and youth.

38
ROOTED IN THE PAST, GROWING FOR THE FUTURE
The Case for Renovating and Expanding Home Hospice of Grayson Countys Office

A DISTINCTIVE MISSION

The mission of Home Hospice of Grayson County is to provide the highest quality of
end-of-life care available to all who seek it, regardless of ability to pay; and to care for
all in our communities who grieve.

HISTORY

Founded in 1982, just eight years after the first hospice was started in the United States,
Home Hospice is the only hospice that has provided continuous service and care to patients and
families in Grayson County for 25 years. Home Hospices team of caring professionals and well-
trained volunteers assist patients and families with services that provide comfort, peace and
resolution while enhancing quality of life and furthering the achievement of goals. A nonprofit
organization, Home Hospice offers services to all who seek them, regardless of ability to pay.

In addition to Grayson County, Home Hospice serves Cooke and Fannin Counties. Within
these three counties, Home Hospice is the only provider accredited by the Community Health Care
Accreditation program.

Home Hospice staff possess significant expertise in hospice care. Over the years, twelve of
the organizations staff have been chosen Best in their respective disciplines by the Texas and New
Mexico Hospice Organization. Professional staff have over 200 years of combined experience in
hospice care most of it with Home Hospice of Grayson County.

Home Hospice owns a 3,575 square foot building at 505 W. Center Street in Sherman from
which it serves its patients, their families and the communities of three counties. In recent years,
approximately 75 percent of Home Hospices patients are from Grayson County, 18 percent are from
Cooke County and 7 percent are from Fannin County.

A 15-member Board of Directors meets 10 times a year to provide leadership for Home
Hospice. The Board is supported by a 26-member Advisory Council and 52-member Auxiliary.
Seven committees: Finance, Facilities, Organization & Administration, Community Relations,
Executive, Continuous Quality Improvement and Ethics give oversight to the work of Home
Hospice. Home Hospice employs 51 full-time staff, ten of whom are dedicated to serving Cooke
County. The Board is also supported by a 15-member Advisory Council and 85-member Auxiliary
that serves the alternative service delivery site in Cooke County.

Ninety-two percent of the organizations $5.6 million budget is derived from patient revenue,
including insurance reimbursements and Medicaid. The remaining eight percent is secured from
individuals, foundations and corporations (6%) and interest income (2%.)

Page 1 of 7 39
GROWTH IN SERVICES

In 1986 just four years after its founding, Home Hospice served 118 patients and volunteers
provided 5,777 hours of service. At the time the present building was occupied in 1993,
approximately 35 patients were served daily and by 2005, a total of 40 patients were served daily.
Today Home Hospice serves more than 100 patients a day. Approximately 500 volunteers provide a
variety of services for patients and give more than 13,000 hours of their time annually.

THE END-OF-LIFE JOURNEY

Most people do not want to die alone in sterile, impersonal surroundings, hooked up by tubes
to machines and cut off from their family and friends and everything that is familiar. Nor do people
want to die in pain.

Johnny was living in his car on the streets of Sherman, his backseat loaded with his few
worldly possessions when his physician told him that his cancer was not responding to treatment.
Johnny was 47 years old and, up until about eighteen months ago, had worked in the healthcare field
as a nurse. His health deteriorated, he was unable to work, his relationship with his family was non-
existent and he had no insurance and very little means of support.

Jennie was 38 years old, the mother of two boys, ages 9 and 13. She was divorced and living
in a neat, but small house in Howe. Jennie knew she had lung cancer, but she continued to work at
the small grocery store as a clerk. Her physician encouraged treatment, but she had no insurance
and treatment was unattainable. Then her back began to ache so badly at work that she sought help
at the Emergency Room and was admitted. By the time she left the hospital, Jennies mother had
arrived from Georgia to help care for her and the two boys. No longer able to work, Jennie was
determined to remain up and around. She rose every day and fought through the process of putting
on her signature overalls and brushing her thinning hair. The boys were frightened and angered by
their mothers deteriorating condition and lack of attention and began acting out at school.

Michael was 28 years old, married and step-dad to two young boys, ages 5 and 6. He was
the only father they knew. Michael and his wife were both employed and living in a neat, clean, yet
relatively small house in Sherman when he began to experience pain in his lower abdomen. After
several trips to the physician and with worsening pain and more tests, he was diagnosed with
advanced colon cancer. With insurance, he was able to undergo treatment. However, treatments
were not successful and his condition did not significantly improve. Because Michael missed a large
number of days at work he was dismissed by his employer. With the resulting reduction in income,
health insurance was no longer an option. Michaels wife continued to work, but the family moved in
with her mother. Michaels condition continued to deteriorate and the boys began to act out in
school.

Death is a reality of life whether the person has lived a long, full life or is one who faces
death earlier than anticipated. Moving toward this final phase of life can be frightening and lonely
for all involved: the person with the life-limiting diagnosis and their family and friends.

Page 2 of 7 40
When people think about death they often consider both spiritual and worldly matters. They
worry about lost income and health insurance and how they may become a burden to their family.
They are concerned about the financial and emotional well-being of their family members after their
death. Often these fears loom so large that they prevent a person from talking about the future and
practical matters or sharing their thoughts and love so they live every moment as fully as possible.

WHEN CARING MATTERS MOST . . . TO MAKE THE WAY LESS LONELY

Enhanced Quality of Life

You matter to the last moment of your life,


and we will do all we can,
not only to help you die peacefully,
but to live until you die.
--Dame Cicely Saunders,
founder of the modern day hospice
movement

Johnnie, Jennie and Michael were fortunate to be referred to Home Hospice and surrounded
by an interdisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, social workers, chaplains, home health aides,
office staff and volunteers who were highly skilled, well trained and compassionate.

Johnny was referred to Home Hospice by his physician. Social workers helped him secure a
small apartment and furnishings. Nurses checked on him daily and managed his medication to
control his pain. A staff member arranged for a donated cell phone with limited minutes so Johnny
wouldnt be isolated. Two volunteers were assigned to visit and take Johnny out for ice cream or
bring a milk shake in. Other volunteers prepared meals and a home health aide was assigned to
bathe and keep Johnny clean and comfortable. Knowing Johnny was actively dying, the nurse
arranged for a hospital bed and, with his permission, contacted his estranged father. Johnnys father
did not want to visit. The nurse arranged for experienced volunteers to stay with Johnny around-the-
clock and contacted his father a second time. Two hours later, Johnnys father arrived and talked to
him without recrimination, expressing fatherly love. Within half an hour of his fathers arrival,
Johnny slipped peacefully from this world. Dying not alone, Johnny was surrounded with the love
and compassion of his father, his Home Hospice nurse and volunteer.

Jennies oncologist referred her to Home Hospice. On visiting her, the nurse ordered a
hospital bed and contacted the community services coordinator to look for an air conditioner. The
social worker began working with the boys to help them understand what was happening. A male
college student was recruited to provide support and time away for the boys. Volunteers provided
two meals a week to relieve stress on Jennies mother and the nurse worked tirelessly to adjust
medications, get new ones and achieve the right balance to manage Jennies pain without making her
drowsy. Jennie was determined to visit with her boys and complete work on a book about her life
and their childhood. When the boys father arrived unexpectedly for a visit after years of no contact,
he took them away and began the legal process of removing them from their dying mother. Home
Hospice staff called in a local volunteer attorney to work on Jennies behalf while her condition
deteriorated. A social worker contacted the father to convince him that the boys would never have
an opportunity to spend time with their mother again. Finally, he relented and they visited twice,
including once overnight. Days later, still battling with every bit of strength she had, Jennie slipped

Page 3 of 7 41
into a coma and died. Jennies pain and physical symptoms had been controlled, she visited with her
boys and she completed the book that told the story of their life together.

Michael came to Home Hospice through his physicians referral. His nurse ordered a
hospital bed and a walker, which Michael told the chaplain he found depressing at the age of 28.
Michael expressed concern about his boys and the signals he saw that they were scared to leave each
morning and Home Hospice staff arranged for a volunteer Licensed Professional Counselor with a
specialty in death and dying to begin regular visits with the boys and their parents. Because Michael
was bored, the social worker and volunteer coordinator assigned a volunteer to get him out for a
coke or coffee. A Game Boy was secured and a volunteer was assigned through the Legacy Program
to help Michael record the story of his life. Michael is still a Home Hospice patient. The chaplain,
social worker and volunteer counselor visit regularly. The boys are calmer and are no longer acting
out in school. Michaels wife is still frightened, but is learning to value the time she has with her
husband. Home Hospice will continue to care for Michael and support his family until his death.
After his death they will provide guidance and comfort through their bereavement.

Patients with life-limiting diagnosis prefer, if possible, to spend their last days at home . . .
alert and free of pain . . . and among people and things they love. Home Hospice is dedicated to
making this possible.

Home Hospice provides special care for dying people, their families and caregivers that:
Treats the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of patients,
Takes place in the patients home or home-like setting,
Concentrates on making patients as free of pain and as comfortable as they want to be,
Considers helping family members an essential part of the mission and
Believes the quality of life to be as important as the length of life.

Services provided by Home Hospice include:


Individual plan of care, coordinated with the patients own physician
Care overseen by physicians who are experts in end-of-life care
Registered Nurse care management by experts in palliative and end-of-life care
Visits to the home or nursing facility by interdisciplinary team members including
o Nurse specialists in pain and symptom control
o Social work services
o Pastoral care
o Personal care from Home Health Aides
o Volunteer assistance
o Bereavement support
Nurse on call 24 hours/7 days a week
Medications, medical supplies and equipment related to the life-limiting illness
Crisis support and respite support
Grief support groups
End-of-life educational seminars and presentations

Page 4 of 7 42
Cost Savings

In addition to significantly improving patient and family quality of life, hospice care saves
money. Research conducted by Duke University and sited in the October 2007 issue of Social
Science and Medicine, reported that hospice reduced Medicare programs expenditures by an
average of $2,309 per hospice user. In addition, the researchers suggested that a greater focus be
placed on lengthening the time in which patients receive hospice care. Not only would this allow
people more opportunity to take advantage of hospices breadth of services, it would also result in
additional cost savings. 1 1

THE GROWING DEMAND FOR HOSPICE CARE

There are several key factors stimulating the demand for hospice care across the U.S and in
Grayson, Cooke and Fannin Counties.

National trends indicate that non-cancer admissions to hospice care continue to rise. In 2006,
the top five chronic conditions served by hospice included heart disease (12.2% of admissions),
debility unspecified (11.8%), dementia (10.0%), and lung disease (7.7%). 2 Hospice admissions due
to cancer have dropped to slightly less than 50 percent.

In addition, hospice use among minorities is increasing and more hospice patients over 65 are
now being served. Four out of five hospice patients are 65 years of age or older and one third of all
hospice patients are 85 years of age and older. 3

In 2005, a total of 40 patients per day were served by Home Hospice. However, by the close
of 2007, Home Hospice experienced a 252 percent increase in demand and served 101 patients per
day. This dramatic increase in services can be attributed to the general publics increased knowledge
of the benefits of end-of-life care, growth in numbers of senior adults, the reputation of Home
Hospice and overall population growth.

Like many regions with strong economies and good educational and cultural offerings, the
Greater Texoma area is growing steadily. Population projections for Grayson County indicate
increases of 4.0 to 4.3 percent every five years from 2005 through 2030. Within this time period,
however, individuals 65 years and older living in Grayson County will increase from 14.7 to 23.2
percent of the total population. As a result, number of individuals over 65 will almost double,
increasing from just over 17,000 to almost 33,400.

THE CURRENT FACILITY

Over the past several years, the Home Hospice Governing Board has become increasingly
concerned about the organizations ability to fulfill the rapidly increasing demand for services and
the staff and volunteer work environment.

1
Ending the Year on a High Note: Dukes New Study Provides Unique View of Hospice Cost Savings, Newsline,
February, 2008.
2
Hospice Facts & Figures: NHPCOs Newest Findings, Newsline, February, 2008.
3
Hospice Facts & Figures: NHPCOs Newest Findings, Newsline, February, 2008.

Page 5 of 7 43
Currently, every available area of the building is being used.

Office space designed for 20 to 25 now houses 40 to 45 staff members. The noise level is so
high that nurses are seen bent over the phones with free hands covering their exposed ears in order to
discern which medicines need to be refilled or the specifics of a change a physician is making. So
many phones ring in such close proximity that no one can tell which one is ringing.

The bereavement coordinator speaks with a distraught woman who just experienced the death
of her husband days before and is having a difficult time. She shares an office with three social
workers and chaplain. Nothing is private or calm and there is not much room between the five desks,
chairs, file cabinets and book shelves.

The Community Services Coordinator who speaks with countless volunteers each day, along
with coordinating fundraising, education and other projects, occupies a desk in the hallway. Her
desk shakes as a colleague sharpens a pencil because the sharpener is located on her computer desk.

Additional staff members cannot be hired as there is no space available for additional
workstations. One passage between rooms and adjacent to the copier and fax machines is so narrow
that only one person can walk through at a time. Conference, library and break room areas have been
converted to workstations and/or supply and medical chart storage. Library materials are now boxed
and in the attic. Supervisors do not have private space in which to counsel employees. Volunteers
must rotate among the workstations of staff who are out of the office. Grief support groups,
committees and the Home Hospice Board must meet at various off-site locations.

The facility is inadequate for the current staff and service demand, much less provide for
future growth. More importantly, the facility does not provide a comfortable, stress-free
environment for family members, staff and volunteers who deal daily with critical, emotional end-of-
life issues.

MEETING THE FUTURE DEMAND FOR HOSPICE CARE

After careful deliberation, the Home Hospice Board of Directors has decided to undertake the
expansion and renovation of the current facility to alleviate the work environment and space needs.
The Board anticipates that the expansion would fulfill the organizations growth needs until at least
2030. The expanded and renovated facility will accommodate workspaces for up to 61 staff and
volunteers in a total of 9,450 square feet.

Approximately 6,300 square feet of conference, office and storage space will be added to the
north end of the existing facility. This new area will provide 34 modular workstations for staff,
seven private staff offices, 400 square feet of file and medical chart storage, a small conference room,
a fax and copier work area, a break room and general storage areas. A small exterior patio adjacent
to the break room will allow staff and volunteers a peaceful, landscaped outdoor environment.
Eleven parking spaces will be added to the existing parking lot. Attic space above the new area will
provide 1,500 square feet of air-conditioned storage space for medical equipment, supplies and
archival and general storage.

The existing 3,575 square feet will be renovated to include a waiting area and
administrative/reception workstation, quiet room, kitchen, large conference room, workroom, a fax

Page 6 of 7 44
and copier work area, three private offices, six workstations and 10-12 cubicles for Certified Nursing
Assistants who work primarily off-site.

FINANCING THE RENOVATION AND EXPANSION

The Home Hospice Board of Directors has authorized a $1.6 million capital campaign to pay
for construction and related costs. A summary of the budget for the expansion and renovation of the
facility is as follows:

Site Preparation $257,000


Building Expansion (7,800 s.f. @ $80/s.f.) 624,000
Building Renovation (3,575 s.f. @ $50/s.f.) 175,000
Furniture, Fixtures & Equipment 300,000
Fees, Permits and Soft Costs 115,000
Contingency (10%) 107,600

Total $1,578,600

Increased utility and building maintenance expenses will be provided through the annual
budget.

RESPONDING TO THE CHALLENGE

In the future, Home Hospice will not be able to meet the demand for hospice services without
a renovated and expanded facility. However, with reconfigured facilities the organization has
enormous potential. This is the opportunity and challenge before us. A more spacious and
comfortable building for the expansion of Home Hospices programs will position the organization to
effectively meet the challenge of fulfilling hospice needs in Grayson, Cooke and Fannin Counties far
into the future.

April 2008

Page 7 of 7 45
HOME HOSPICE R OOTED IN THE P AST , GROWING FOR THE F UTURE
Talking Points For Internal Use

Founded in 1982, Home Hospice is the only hospice that has provided continuous service and care to patients and families in
Grayson County for 25 years. Presently, Cooke and Fannin Counties are also served by Home Hospice.
The mission of Home Hospice of Grayson County is to provide the highest quality of end-of-life care available to all who seek it,
regardless of ability to pay; and to care for all in our communities who grieve.
o Death is a reality of life moving toward this final phase of life can be frightening and lonely for all involved: the
person with the life-limiting diagnosis, family and friends.
o Our team of caring professionals and well-trained volunteers assist patients and families with services that provide
comfort, peace, resolution while enhancing quality of life and furthering the achievement of goals.
In 2005, a total of 40 patients per day were served. However, by the close of 2007, Home Hospice experienced a 252 percent
increase in demand and served 101 patients per day.
o This dramatic increase in services can be attributed to the general publics increased knowledge of the benefits of end-of-
life care, overall population growth, growth in numbers of senior adults and the reputation of Home Hospice.
The Home Hospice Governing Board has become increasingly concerned about the organizations ability to fulfill the rapidly
increasing demand for services and the staff and volunteer work environment.
o Every available area of the building is being used. Office space designed for 20 to 25 now houses 40 to 45 staff.
o The facility is inadequate for the current staff and service demand, much less provide for future growth.
o More importantly, the facility does not provide a comfortable, stress-free environment for family members, staff and
volunteers who deal daily with critical, emotional end-of-life issues.
Patients with life-limiting diagnosis prefer to spend their last days at home . . . alert and free of pain . . . and among people and
things they love. Home Hospice is dedicated to making this possible.
To ensure all patients and families who seek assistance from Home Hospice are surrounded by an interdisciplinary team
dedicated to helping them live every moment as fully as possible, the Rooted in the Past, Growing for the Future building
expansion and renovation campaign has been undertaken.
o The expanded and renovated facility will accommodate workspaces for up to 61 staff and volunteers in a total of 9,450
square feet and serve our community until at least 2030.
o Approx. 6,300 square feet of conference, office and storage space will be added to the north end of the existing facility.
o This new area will provide 34 modular workstations, seven private offices, 400 square feet of file and medical chart
storage, a small conference room, a fax and copier work area, a break room and general storage areas. A small exterior
patio will allow staff and volunteers a peaceful, landscaped outdoor environment. Attic space above the new area will
provide 1,500 square feet of air-conditioned storage space for medical equipment, supplies and archival and general
storage.
o The existing 3,575 square feet will be renovated to include a waiting area and administrative/reception workstation, quiet
room, kitchen, large conference room, workroom, a fax and copier work area, three private offices, six workstations and
10-12 cubicles for Certified Nursing Assistants who work primarily off-site.
o The expansion would fulfill Home Hospices growth needs until at least 2030.
Our Campaign Goal is $1.6 million.
o Gifts totaling $(insert amount) have been committed thus far in this early stage of the campaign.
o The Board is unanimous in its endorsement of this campaign, and all Directors have committed to provide financial
support.
o To date, $(insert amount) is needed to meet this challenge!
Without an expanded and renovated facility, Home Hospice will not be able meet the future demand for services.
A successful campaign will enable Home Hospice to continue providing care, comfort and resolution for years to come to the
growing numbers of patients and families in Grayson, Cooke and Fannin Counties who seek hospice assistance!

46
WHO WE ARE:

The mission of Home Hospice of Grayson County is to provide the highest quality of end-of-
life care available to all who seek it, regardless of ability to pay; and to care for all in our
communities who grieve.

Founded in 1982, just eight years after the first hospice was started in the United States, Home
Hospice is the only hospice that has provided continuous service and care to patients and families in
Grayson County for 25 years. We also serve Cooke and Fannin Counties in addition to Grayson
County. Within these three counties, Home Hospice is the only nonprofit provider accredited by the
Community Health Care Accreditation program.

THE NEED:

Death is a reality of life whether the person has lived a long, full life or is one who faces death earlier
than anticipated. Moving toward this final phase of life can be frightening and lonely for all involved:
the person with the life-limiting diagnosis and their family and friends.

When people think about death they often consider both spiritual and worldly matters. They worry about
lost income and health insurance and how they may become a burden to their family. They are concerned
about the financial and emotional well-being of their family members after their death. Often these fears
loom so large that they prevent a person from talking about the future and practical matters or sharing
their thoughts and love so they live every moment as fully as possible.

OUR SUCCESS:

Our team of caring professionals and well-trained volunteers assist patients and families with services
that provide comfort, peace and resolution while enhancing quality of life and furthering the
achievement of goals. In 2005, a total of 40 patients per day were served. However, by the close of
2007, Home Hospice experienced a 252 percent increase in demand and served 101 patients per day.
This dramatic increase in services can be attributed to the general publics increased knowledge of
the benefits of end-of-life care, overall population growth, growth in numbers of senior adults and the
reputation of Home Hospice.

47
OUR CHALLENGE:

The Home Hospice Governing Board has become increasingly concerned about the organizations ability
to fulfill the rapidly increasing demand for services and the staff and volunteer work environment.
Currently, every available area of the building is being used.

Office space designed for 20 to 25 now houses 40 to 45 staff members. The noise level is high, phones
ring in such close proximity that no one can tell which one is ringing and nothing is private or calm.
Additional staff members cannot be hired as there is no space available for additional workstations,
supervisors do not have private space in which to counsel employees and volunteers must rotate among
the workstations of staff who are out of the office. Grief support groups, committees and the Home
Hospice Board must meet at various off-site locations.

The facility is inadequate for the current staff and service demand, much less provide for future growth.
More importantly, the facility does not provide a comfortable, stress-free environment for family
members, staff and volunteers who deal daily with critical, emotional end-of-life issues.

OUR VISION:

Patients with life-limiting diagnosis prefer, if possible, to spend their last days at home . . . alert and free
of pain . . . and among people and things they love. Home Hospice is dedicated to making this possible.

To ensure all patients and families who seek assistance from Home Hospice are surrounded by an
interdisciplinary team dedicated to helping them live every moment as fully as possible, the Rooted in the
Past, Growing for the Future building expansion and renovation campaign has been undertaken. The
expanded and renovated facility will accommodate workspaces for up to 61 staff and volunteers in a total
of 9,450 square feet and serve our community until at least 2030.

THE NEW FACILITY:

Approximately 6,300 square feet of conference, office and storage space will be added to the north end of
the existing facility. This new area will provide 34 modular workstations for staff, seven private staff
offices, 400 square feet of file and medical chart storage, a small conference room, a fax and copier work
area, a break room and general storage areas. A small exterior patio adjacent to the break room will allow
staff and volunteers a peaceful, landscaped outdoor environment. Eleven parking spaces will be added to
the existing parking lot. Attic space above the new area will provide 1,500 square feet of air-conditioned
storage space for medical equipment, supplies and archival and general storage.

RENOVATIONS:

The existing 3,575 square feet will be renovated to include a waiting area and administrative/reception
workstation, quiet room, kitchen, large conference room, workroom, a fax and copier work area, three
private offices, six workstations and 10-12 cubicles for Certified Nursing Assistants who work primarily
off-site.

CAMPAIGN GOAL: $1.6 million

48
WHEN CARING MATTERS MOST . . . TO MAKE THE WAY LESS LONELY
The End-Of-Life Journey

Most people do not want to die alone in sterile, impersonal surroundings, hooked up by tubes to
machines and cut off from their family and friends and everything that is familiar. Nor do people want to die in
pain.

Johnny was living in his car on the streets of Sherman, his backseat loaded with his few worldly possessions when his
physician told him that his cancer was not responding to treatment. Johnny was 47 years old and, up until about eighteen months
ago, had worked in the healthcare field as a nurse. His health deteriorated, he was unable to work, his relationship with his family
was non-existent and he had no insurance and very little means of support.

Jennie was 38 years old, the mother of two boys, ages 9 and 13. She was divorced and living in a neat, but small house in
Howe. Jennie knew she had lung cancer, but she continued to work at the small grocery store as a clerk. Her physician encouraged
treatment, but she had no insurance and treatment was unattainable. Then her back began to ache so badly at work that she sought
help at the Emergency Room and was admitted. By the time she left the hospital, Jennies mother had arrived from Georgia to help
care for her and the two boys. No longer able to work, Jennie was determined to remain up and around. She rose every day and
fought through the process of putting on her signature overalls and brushing her thinning hair. The boys were frightened and angered
by their mothers deteriorating condition and lack of attention and began acting out at school.

Michael was 28 years old, married and step-dad to two young boys, ages 5 and 6. He was the only father they knew.
Michael and his wife were both employed and living in a neat, clean, yet relatively small house in Sherman when he began to
experience pain in his lower abdomen. After several trips to the physician and with worsening pain and more tests, he was diagnosed
with advanced colon cancer. With insurance, he was able to undergo treatment. However, treatments were not successful and his
condition did not significantly improve. Because Michael missed a large number of days at work he was dismissed by his employer.
With the resulting reduction in income, health insurance was no longer an option. Michaels wife continued to work, but the family
moved in with her mother. Michaels condition continued to deteriorate and the boys began to act out in school.

Death is a reality of life whether the person has lived a long, full life or is one who faces death earlier
than anticipated. Moving toward this final phase of life can be frightening and lonely for all involved: the
person with the life-limiting diagnosis and their family and friends.

When people think about death they often consider both spiritual and worldly matters. They worry
about lost income and health insurance and how they may become a burden to their family. They are concerned
about the financial and emotional well-being of their family members after their death. Often these fears loom
so large that they prevent a person from talking about the future and practical matters or sharing their thoughts
and love so they live every moment as fully as possible.

Enhanced Quality of Life

You matter to the last moment of your life,


and we will do all we can,
not only to help you die peacefully,
but to live until you die.
--Dame Cicely Saunders,
founder of the modern day hospice movement

49
Johnnie, Jennie and Michael were fortunate to be referred to Home Hospice and surrounded by an
interdisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, social workers, chaplains, home health aides, office staff and
volunteers who were highly skilled, well trained and compassionate.

Johnny was referred to Home Hospice by his physician. Social workers helped him secure a small apartment and
furnishings. Nurses checked on him daily and managed his medication to control his pain. A staff member arranged for a donated
cell phone with limited minutes so Johnny wouldnt be isolated. Two volunteers were assigned to visit and take Johnny out for ice
cream or bring a milk shake in. Other volunteers prepared meals and a home health aide was assigned to bathe and keep Johnny
clean and comfortable. Knowing Johnny was actively dying, the nurse arranged for a hospital bed and, with his permission, contacted
his estranged father. Johnnys father did not want to visit. The nurse arranged for experienced volunteers to stay with Johnny
around-the-clock and contacted his father a second time. Two hours later, Johnnys father arrived and talked to him without
recrimination, expressing fatherly love. Within half an hour of his fathers arrival, Johnny slipped peacefully from this world. Dying
not alone, Johnny was surrounded with the love and compassion of his father, his Home Hospice nurse and volunteer.

Jennies oncologist referred her to Home Hospice. On visiting her, the nurse ordered a hospital bed and contacted the
community services coordinator to look for an air conditioner. The social worker began working with the boys to help them
understand what was happening. A male college student was recruited to provide support and time away for the boys. Volunteers
provided two meals a week to relieve stress on Jennies mother and the nurse worked tirelessly to adjust medications, get new ones and
achieve the right balance to manage Jennies pain without making her drowsy. Jennie was determined to visit with her boys and
complete work on a book about her life and their childhood. When the boys father arrived unexpectedly for a visit after years of no
contact, he took them away and began the legal process of removing them from their dying mother. Home Hospice staff called in a
local volunteer attorney to work on Jennies behalf while her condition deteriorated. A social worker contacted the father to convince
him that the boys would never have an opportunity to spend time with their mother again. Finally, he relented and they visited twice,
including once overnight. Days later, still battling with every bit of strength she had, Jennie slipped into a coma and died. Jennies
pain and physical symptoms had been controlled, she visited with her boys and she completed the book that told the story of their life
together.

Michael came to Home Hospice through his physicians referral. His nurse ordered a hospital bed and a walker, which
Michael told the chaplain he found depressing at the age of 28. Michael expressed concern about his boys and the signals he saw that
they were scared to leave each morning and Home Hospice staff arranged for a volunteer Licensed Professional Counselor with a
specialty in death and dying to begin regular visits with the boys and their parents. Because Michael was bored, the social worker and
volunteer coordinator assigned a volunteer to get him out for a coke or coffee. A Game Boy was secured and a volunteer was assigned
through the Legacy Program to help Michael record the story of his life. Michael is still a Home Hospice patient. The chaplain,
social worker and volunteer counselor visit regularly. The boys are calmer and are no longer acting out in school. Michaels wife is
still frightened, but is learning to value the time she has with her husband. Home Hospice will continue to care for Michael and
support his family until his death. After his death they will provide guidance and comfort through their bereavement.

Patients with life-limiting diagnosis prefer, if possible, to spend their last days at home . . . alert and free
of pain . . . and among people and things they love. Home Hospice is dedicated to making this possible.

Home Hospice provides special care for dying people, their families and caregivers that:
Treats the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of patients,
Takes place in the patients home or home-like setting,
Concentrates on making patients as free of pain and as comfortable as they want to be,
Considers helping family members an essential part of the mission and
Believes the quality of life to be as important as the length of life.

50
For Internal Use Only Not For Distribution Winter 2010 - 2011

TRANSFORMING INVISIBLE GIRLS


The Case for Empowering Our Young Victims and Their Families

A DISTINCTIVE MISSION

The mission of the Letot Girls Center is to empower girls to be productive, caring and
responsible citizens by providing them a safe environment for long-term residential, gender-
responsive treatment involving their families and supported by community partners.

YOUTH AND DALLAS COUNTY LAW ENFORCEMENT


Each year, more than 9,700 youth, ages 10 to 17, come into contact with Dallas County law
enforcement. One in five is a first-time offender. Most of them have run away from home, been truant,
or committed class B misdemeanors such as driving while intoxicated or possessing marijuana. Many
have run away as a result of arguments with parents or angry outbursts, some of which escalate into
physical aggression that threaten or injure family members. Others have run away to escape the physical,
sexual and emotional abuse or neglect they are subjected to by relatives and family friends.

LETOT CENTER HISTORY


For more than three decades, Letot Center has provided immediate assessment, crisis
intervention, emergency shelter and referral services to Dallas area youth who are in the beginning stages
of delinquency. The first priority is to stops the crisis, giving the youth, their families and law
enforcement an opportunity to assess the complex factors that created it. By applying combinations of
services, children and teens avoid committing delinquent offenses and entering the Juvenile Justice
System. The approach is unique because, whenever possible, family members are engaged in
comprehensive treatment programs supported by a network of more than 135 community-based
partners.

When its doors opened in 1979, Letot Center was one of the first programs in the United States
to provide multidisciplinary intervention services for youth. The Center was established through a
public-private effort by the Dallas County Juvenile Department, Dallas Independent School District and
the Junior League of Dallas. In 1990, $3 million in private donations funded the construction of a
40,000 square foot, 40-bed central hub for residential shelter and non-residential services.

Today, Letot Center continues to be a national model. The largest and most comprehensive
provider for youth intervention services in the United States, Letot Center has served more than 60,000
youth and their families.

Letot Center is licensed by the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services and
provides 24-hour assessments, crisis intervention, emergency shelter and out-patient counseling and
referral services free of charge to Dallas County residents. In 2009 alone, professional staff of 60 served
more than 2,000 young people and their families, conducting 15,424 counseling sessions and handling

51
more than 3,000 crisis calls. Thirty-nine different law enforcement agencies brought 1,343 youth to
Letot Centers Intake Unit. Youth who received services were primarily female (74%), the average age
was 14.6 years old and approximately 79% were minorities 44% Black, 34% Hispanic and 1%
American Indian and Asian. Additionally, 48 volunteers supplemented the staffs efforts by donating
2,000 hours of their time.

Intake Unit

Letot Centers 24-hour Intake Unit provides immediate, 24-hour family crisis intervention,
assessment and referral services for all Dallas County offenders and runaway youth referred by police
agencies. Intake staff is responsible for placing youth with parents or in a shelter program within six
hours. Staff members work aggressively to engage parents in counseling and divert youth from shelter
placement by providing follow-up non-residential counseling and support services. When needed, a
Transitional Unit of eight beds houses youth while they are waiting.

In 2009, the Intake Unit served 1,341 youth. Sixty-nine percent of the youth who were brought
to the Center were released to parents or relatives due to the Intake Units crisis intervention services
and referrals to a network of more than 135 community-based partners. These youth were provided
individualized treatment plans, empowering them and their families to address critical relationship issues.
Nearby bus and train services bring parents and family members within easy walking distance of the
Center.

Intake Unit staffing includes one supervisor, seven probation officers, part-time intake officers,
one secretary, one transportation officer and five juvenile supervision officers.

Non-residential Services

Probation officers provide services for two programs: Deferred-Prosecution and Crisis
Intervention Services. Staffing includes one supervisor and three probation officers.

Deferred-Prosecution services involve probation officers in providing first-time offenders with


support and monitoring to decrease the probability of future juvenile arrest and referral. In addition, a
truancy probation officer works with the school districts, judges and youth service agencies to manage
truancy problems. Crisis Intervention Services provides families with services and resources through a
maximum of six sessions to prevent future involvement with the Juvenile Justice System.

Last year, 546 youth and families were referred directly from the Intake Unit and participated in
non-residential support services.

Residential Services

Residential Services accommodates up to two dozen girls and eight boys in three dormitories.

While at the shelter, many youth experience, for the first time, strong relationships with caring
adults, physical safety and security and opportunities for personal growth. Interestingly, youth are not
restricted from leaving the facility and ninety-eight percent stay at the Center until they are discharged.
At the time of their discharge 74% of youth were successfully reunited with their families.

The Centers highly structured and intensive program emphasizes each youths talents and assets
and engages youth in activities such as journaling, yoga, visual arts, creative writing, sports and exercise.

52
Page 2 of 13
Individual, group and family counseling and experiential groups help build competency in making
healthy decisions, building positive relationships, managing stress and anger and developing character.

In 2009, Letot served 427 youth. The average length of stay was 24 days and Letots shelter beds
were full 88% of the time.

Programs provided by the Centers professional staff with support from professional agencies
and trained volunteers include:
Education Services / Charter School Dallas County Juvenile Justice Charter School
HIV & STD Testing and Education Dallas County Health Department
Suicide / Depression Screening Suicide and Crisis Center
Psychological Testing Juvenile Department Psychology Services
Psychiatric Consultation Juvenile Department Psychology Services
Substance Abuse Education Juvenile Department Psychology Services
Non-denominational Church Program Volunteer Chaplains

Three Charter School teachers assist youth in continuing their education. For many, its their
first positive school experience. In classes limited to 12 students, teachers work to reintegrate youth
successfully back into the appropriate school environment or into a GED program. Teachers often
succeed in enrolling youth who were dropped from school rolls due to excessive truancy or who never
enrolled in the first place.

Clinical Unit

The Unit is home to the Psychology Division, staffed by a supervising psychologist and three
master-degreed therapists. The team provides stability and ongoing support through crisis screening and
intervention, followed by in-patient and out-patient individual and family therapy. Therapy with shelter
residents focuses on improving skills, while outpatient therapy focuses on enhancing family function.
The Clinical Unit also provides inpatient and out-patient services for girls at risk of being exploited,
employing a specialized assessment tool and curriculum called HOPE (Helping Overcome and Prevent
Exploitation), developed by professionals on the Letot Center staff.

Community Partners

Community partners who work closely with Letot Center and the Juvenile Department include:
Adapt Mobile Crisis Brighter Tomorrows
Ala-non/Alateen Cal Farley Residential
Alcoholic Anonymous Calumet Center
All Church Home Camp Fire USA Dallas
Avance Casa (Salvation Army)
Attitudes and Attire Catholic Charities
Austin Street Shelter Central Dallas Ministries
Autism Speaks Center for Housing Resources
Baylor Dental School Centro De Mi Salud
Bethlehem Foundation Child and Family Guidance Center
Big Brothers Big Sisters or Texas Child Care Group
Big Thought Child First Center
Boles Home Child Protective Services

53
Page 3 of 13
Children First Homeward Bound
Childrens Advocacy Center of Interfaith Housing Coalition
Dallas Irving Cares
Childrens Advocacy Center of Irving Family Advocacy
Denton County Junior Players
Childrens Education Fund Juvenile Detention Alternatives
Childrens Justice Project Initiative
Childrens Medical Center-Pediatric Juvenile Justice
Psychiatry KickStart
City House Shelter KidsHealth
Communities in Schools - Dallas Kiosco Youth and Family
Community Resource Coordination La Voz Del Anciano
Group Lancaster Outreach Center
Consumer Credit Counseling Life Net Texas
Services of Greater Dallas, Inc.
Medicaid
Counseling Institute of Texas
Mental Illness Court
(Garland)
Metanoia
Dallas Bar Association
Methodist Childrens Home
Dallas Bethlehem Center
Metrocrest Social Services
Dallas Challenge
Millwood Hospital
Dallas County Community College
District Mosaic Services
Dallas County Health Department National Mediation Center
Dallas County Public Defenders Neighborhood Services Council
Office Network of Community Ministries -
Dallas Family Preservation Program Richardson
Dallas Life Foundation New Beginnings Center
Dallas Metro Care New Connections
Dallas Police Child Exploitation Nexus Recovery Center
Squad, High Risk Victims and North Dallas Shared Ministries
Trafficking Unit NorthStar Mobile Crisis
Deaf Action Center Our Friends Place
Drug Prevention Resources Parkland Hospital
Family Gateway Phoenix House
The Family Place Project Matthew
Ferguson Road Initiative Promise House
Galaxy Center Providence of Texas
Gay, Lesbian and Straight PsychCentral
Education Network Quality Texas
Girls Inc. Real Options for Women
Girls Living Life On Purpose Salesmanship Club Youth and
Grand Prairie United Charities Family Services
Greater Dallas Council on Alcohol Salvation Army
and Drug Abuse Skills to Empower People Socially
Green Oaks Hospital SMU Legal Clinic
Head Start of Greater Dallas Society of St. Vincent de Paul
Hickory Trails Hospital Southwest Key Behavioral Services
Holy Trinity Center Southwestern Medical School

Page 54
4 of 13
Suicide Prevention Hotline Urban League of Greater Dallas
Suicido Prevencion and North Central Texas
Terrell State Hospital Victims Outreach
Texas Juvenile Probation Volunteer Attorneys
Commission Program/Dallas
Texas Runaway Hotline Volunteer Center of North Texas
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital Volunteers of America
Texas Youth Hotline Waco Center for Youth
Timberlawn Hospital West Texas Boys Ranch
Transition Resource Action Center Youth Advocacy Program
United Creative Class Youth Conversion
United Presbyterian Home Youth Juvenile Justice
United Way Dallas Youth Village Foundation

THE PROBLEM: INVISIBLE GIRLS


Domestic human trafficking has been misunderstood and overlooked. The FBI named Dallas
one of 14 cities in the nation with the highest incidence of commercial sexual exploitation of children.

The majority of the adolescent females, ages 13 17, who come into contact with Dallas County
law enforcement come from homes where chaos is rampant. Physical, sexual and emotional abuse and
domestic violence are the norm and they receive little respect or trust. These girls have no control over
their lives. They never know when the next outburst or abuse will happen. For them, life is
unpredictable and terrifying.

Living in an environment which is dangerous affects girls self-perception and behavior. They
respond by developing their own substance abuse problems, running away from home, skipping school,
fighting with others and committing more serious offenses. Nearly 50% of these girls meet the
diagnostic criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder. Ninety percent of girls who run away are repeat
sexual abuse victims.

Because there are no caring adults protecting them, these girls are isolated and alone. Many run
away from home. Long-standing Juvenile Justice programs focus on victims under 13 and offenders
who commit more serious crimes. These girls are not young enough or bad enough to attract
attention from traditional law enforcement, social service and educational systems. No one is watching
over them or searching for them. They are invisible. On any given night, there are an estimated 400
invisible girls in our community. Dallas Police Department, Letot Center and Texas Department of
Family and Protective Services officials can identify 250 of these girls. The other 150 girls are new to the
streets or are trafficked to or through Dallas County.

Exploited Invisible Girls = Teen Prostitutes

Invisible girls are extremely vulnerable of being exploited by criminals who provide food, shelter,
protection and emotional support. These girls are recruited into prostitution at two critical points in
time: 1) before they leave the chaos of home and 2) after they have run away and are living on the street.

Astute pimps seek invisible girls and seduce them with affection and security which fulfills girls
cravings for emotional connections. Girls become emotionally and physically dependent on pimps and
are manipulated into the life of prostitution, sometimes after physical abuse.

Page 55
5 of 13
The other point in time when girls are recruited into prostitution is after they have run away and
are attempting to live on the street. Bottom girls of prostitution rings reach out to girls on the street
expressing concern and offering food, shelter . . . and a way to make money.

Girls move into the prostitution houses and are welcomed as newcomers. They believe they
have entered a peaceful home with a father figure who loves them. However, girls are expected to turn
tricks 365 days a year and give all their earnings to their pimps.

Interestingly, most teen prostitutes are not drug users. Girls have no money to purchase drugs
and pimps will not fund their girls drug habits. Rather, girls are controlled through emotional security
and kept in prostitution through love and violence - beatings, cigarettes burns and death threats. In
addition, pimps post look-outs to prevent girls from running away.

Despite the abuse they experience and the tricks they must turn, life is predictable for teen
prostitutes and, consequently, preferable to the chaotic home environment they escaped. Sadly however,
life expectancy for teen prostitutes is predictable only seven years from the time they enter the life.

Teen Prostitution in Dallas County

Dallas County has one of the biggest teen prostitution problems in the United States with an
estimated 400 girls on the street at night.

Ten years ago the prevailing thought was that if teens did not want to be in prostitution, they
would get out. Teen prostitutes were labeled as bad, troubled girls. They were arrested as offenders and
jailed. Runaway girls were returned home. Like many law enforcement units across the country, Dallas
Police saw teen prostitutes as offenders.

However, in 2005 Dallas Police officials realized that arrests of teen prostitutes are ineffective.
Teen prostitutes are both dependent on pimps and afraid of being killed by them. Because girls will not
testify against pimps, arrests stopped teen prostitution temporarily and did not lead to the prosecution of
pimps. After their first, second, third and even the fourth arrests and releases from jail, teen prostitutes
headed straight back to their pimps.

Officials realized that they needed a new approach to help teen prostitutes get out of the life.
Police officials began to look into what caused teens to become prostitutes. They found that 80% of the
girls had run away from troubled, fatherless homes. More than 93% had been sexually abused, 96%
physically abused and 87% had been abandoned. Family risk factors included very high levels of parent
physical and sexual abuse, divorce and single parent homes.

As a result, Dallas police began giving teen prostitutes a new label: High Risk
Victims/Runaways, and they formed the High Risk Victims and Trafficking Unit under the Child
Exploitation Squad.

The High Risk Victims and Trafficking Unit

The High Risk Victims and Trafficking Units goals are to:
Curb or prevent repeat runaway incidents by:
o Identifying any prior incidents of sexual abuse and exploitation, and
o Redirect the girl from any future delinquent conduct
Bring to an end or curb the victimization of children through prostitution and sexual
exploitation.

Page 56
6 of 13
This Unit has responsibility for searching for runaway girls and teen prostitutes and, as a result,
processes 250 300 identified high risk victims a year. Once runaway girls are found, officers begin
conversations to help runaway girls and teen prostitutes understand that 1) they are not at fault, but have
been manipulated victims, 2) officers are part of the largest gang in the world who will continue to
seek, find and protect girls again and again, if necessary, and 3) with the help of the High Risk Victims
and Trafficking Unit, Letot and more than 90 community-based services they can avoid or choose to
leave prostitution and rebuild their lives.

A key element in the effectiveness of the High Risk Victims and Trafficking Unit is the
education and training they provide to the entire Dallas police force. This unit regularly educates police
officers about the causes of teen prostitution and how to identify high risk victims and runaway girls
before they become prostitutes. Officers understand that instead of returning the runaway girls to their
homes, early intervention is critical to preventing teen prostitution, removing teens from the life and
arresting pimps.

Twice a month Unit officers, along with volunteer missing persons, vice and undercover officers,
conduct overnight sweeps to search for runaway girls and teen prostitutes identified through their
database of underage runaway girls. Sweeps result in locating girls and taking them to Letot Center for a
short-term stay.

Another key element in the effectiveness of this Unit is the partnerships officers have built with
community-based support services. Officers have emphasized strengthening existing connections within
the community as a way to identify and locate invisible girls, rather than creating a new entity or
nonprofit organization. This Units work was showcased on the National Geographic Channel in 2008
and officers are approached weekly by law enforcement and community leaders from around the country
who are seeking an effective model for preventing invisible girls from becoming teen prostitutes.

A Partial Solution

Dallas is unique in having a High Risk Victims & Trafficking Unit, which identifies and locates
runaway girls and teen prostitutes, and Letot Center, which provides assessments, creates individual
treatment plans and provides short term shelter.

However, removing runaway girls and teen prostitutes from the street and placing them in a
short-term shelter is only a partial solution. The issues that lead girls to run away and/or prostitute are
highly complex and multi-layered, such that 30 60 day shelter stays are not effective. The recidivism
rate for girls referred to short-term placement is 80%. These girls need specialized, long-term treatment
to escape unhealthy dependencies and chaotic and destructive life-styles.

Over the past several years, however, the number of long-term residential service providers
available for contracting with the Dallas County Juvenile Department has declined significantly. This
decline, along with the fact that Dallas has two residential treatment programs for adolescent males with
a total of 184 beds and none for females further exacerbates the situation.

As a result, victims of teen prostitution are sent to locations around the state for long-term
residential services. This arrangement adversely affects girls because:
1. The distance between Dallas and other parts of the state does not allow for family:
a. Contact to work on repairing family conflict or
b. Members to be prepared for participation in community aftercare services prior to
discharge. Reduced family participation with aftercare increases recidivism.
2. Girls who are aggressive and habitually run away, need psychiatric treatment or have been
unsuccessful in previous placements are difficult to place in facilities that allow freedom to

Page 57
7 of 13
participants. Treatment for these women can be delayed because they are held in Juvenile
Detention until an appropriate residential placement can be located.

From August 1, 2009 to July 31, 2010, the Juvenile Department placed 96 girls with contracted
service providers outside Dallas County for long-term treatment. On one particular day, September 21,
2010, 50 girls were in contracted placement outside of the Dallas at a cost of $6,338 a day.

TRANSFORMING INVISIBLE GIRLS


A Complete Solution

A three-tiered approach is required to address the issues that cause girls to run away and to stop
and prevent further teen prostitution:
1) Gender-specific, 6 - 12 month long-term residential placement and treatment,
2) Effective community-based support services for girls and families during and after
residential treatment and
3) Prosecution of offenders/pimps.

Runaway girls and teen prostitutes require treatment that involves all three of these approaches
to be protected from adult abusers and offenders and to build the self-esteem and personal skills to
successfully re-integrate into our community.

The Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center

To fully address the critical and unique needs of invisible girls and their families in Dallas
County, Letot Center will create a long-term, residential treatment program for girls. The Letot Girls
Residential Treatment Center will be designed and developed specifically for girls ages 13 17 and, as
such, will be the larger of two gender-specific, therapeutic programs in the country. The Girls Center
will be the only program in the nation designed to prevent teen prostitution by serving runaway girls.
Issues unique to girls - extreme abuse, prostitution and abandonment will be addressed through an
intensive and highly structured program that will serve up to 96 girls at a time.

The safety of the girls will be the programs highest priority, as they will need protection from
abusive parents, boyfriends and pimps. This locally based program will improve accountability and
coordination by enabling girls to be more quickly moved into treatment. Programs will focus on girls
unique developmental and relational needs and families will be engaged in repairing conflict and
participating in aftercare services.

Each of the programs and opportunities currently offered by Letot through its short-term
residential program, from the Charter school to yoga to sports, will be adapted and provided at the Girls
Residential Treatment Center. Treatment plans and clinical services will address specific issues such as
abuse, exploitation, anger management, parenting skills, sexually transmitted diseases and life skills for
independent living, among other issues. Volunteers will provide opportunities for spiritual growth and
development.

The goals for the Letot Girls Residential Center are to:
Identify girls within the Dallas County Juvenile Justice Systems who need long-term
residential treatment outside their homes,
Effectively provide clinical, educational, medical, recreational and case management services,
Teach girls skills to deal with stress and challenging situations so they do not resort to
dysfunctional and delinquent behavior and

Page 58
8 of 13
Develop intensive aftercare and on-going community services with monitoring designed to
successfully re-integrate invisible girls back into the community.

As a result, girls and their families will:


Be engaged in making decisions about treatment plans,
Be empowered to stay involved with specialized community services,
Experience an environment that values, respects and trusts girls,
Experience girls discovering their strengths, becoming self-aware, resilient and courageous
all of which provide insight into potential for happiness and success.
Learn responsibility, self-respect, self-motivation and respect of authority,
Learn how to apply learned skills and values to their homes, schools and community, and
Prepare for successful re-integration into their community.

Staffing for the Girls Center will include the following:


Administrative staff Mental & physical health
o Superintendent o Lead psychologist
o Assistant director o Eight clinical psychologists
Law enforcement and County services o Nurse (part-time or full-time)
o Probation officer o Cook
o Child protective services officer Charter school
o Law enforcement officer o Principal
o Six case managers o Assistant Principal
o Forty-eight supervision officers o Eight teachers

INVALUABLE PARTNERS
The Dallas County Juvenile Department

The Dallas County Juvenile Board approved the creation of the Letot Girls Residential
Treatment Center on September 27, 2010 and has planned for estimated annual operating expenses of
$2.25 million to be paid by the Juvenile Departments budget. Currently, the Juvenile Department is
funding the placement of girls out of Dallas County with a State of Texas grant. When the Girls Center
is opened, these state funds will fund the Centers operating expenses. The Juvenile Department
anticipates that the cost of operating the Girls Center will equal the out of County placement expenses it
is currently incurring. Although the Girls Center will not save the County money, girls will be provided
the local, long-term comprehensive, family inclusive treatment essential to re-integrating them into our
community.

The Dallas County Commissioners Court

Because the Dallas County Commissioners Court gives oversight to the work of the Dallas
County Juvenile Board, they are an important partner in this new endeavor. The Court developed a
memorandum of understanding between Letot Center and the Commissioners Court that was
approved in early 2011. This action provided full and final confirmation of Dallas Countys commitment
to implement the Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center on completion of an appropriate facility.

The Dallas Womens Foundation

The Dallas Womens Foundation strengthens the entire community by increasing the investment
in women and girls and empowering womens philanthropy. In 2010, the Womens Foundation adopted

Page 59
9 of 13
an impact model grounded in an explicit understanding of social change and identified the commercial
sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) an important issue at the beginning of a social change cycle with
enormous consequences for girls in North Texas.

At the national level, the Dallas Womens Foundation has connected with the Womens Funding
Network and other womens funds through research, education and advocacy efforts to end commercial
sexual exploitation of children in this nation. The Womens Foundation is quantifying domestic
trafficking of girls in Texas as part of a multi-year, multi-state tracking initiative and work in partnership
with Children at Risk to promote legislation addressing this issue. On the local level, the Womens
Foundations interest in these issues dovetail with the Dallas Police Departments High Risk Victims and
Trafficking Units and Letot Centers heightened concern that short-term treatment for runaway girls
and teen prostitutes is ineffective. Consequently, as a conduit to national information and expertise and
a voice for effective local action the Dallas Womens Foundation is an important partner in the effort to
create the Girls Center.

Other statewide partners include:


Statewide Attorneys General taskforce on Human Trafficking
Mosaic Family Services
Human Rights Initiative of North Texas
Catholic Charities
Houston Rescue and Restore Coalition
Texas Rio Grande Legal Aid
Various Statewide coalitions

Additional national partners include:


A Future. Not A Past. Stop the Prostitution of Our Nations Children
Polaris Project
Shared Hope International
ECPAT End Child Prostitution Child Pornography and Trafficking of Children for Sexual
Purposes
Not For Sale Campaign
Girl Effect

A NEW FACILITY
The Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center will be housed in a new two-story, 55,000 square
foot facility which will be built on the corner of Denton Drive and Lombardy, adjacent to the existing
Letot Center. The property was purchased from the Dallas Independent School District by Dallas
County specifically for the Residential Treatment Center.

The exterior of the Girls Center will give the impression of security, while the interior will feel
comfortable and calm. Interior spaces will allow for maximum visibility and supervision. Vision panels
in offices, programs spaces and the six housing units will allow for indirect visual supervision of
residents. Building design will maximize the availability of natural light and provide both indoor and
outdoor visitation areas for girls and their families.

Activity areas will encourage relationship building through the use of moveable furniture
conducive to small groups and intimate interactions between staff and girls and by creating areas for
comfortable personal conversations.

Page 10
60 of 13
The first floor is comprised of a central exterior courtyard surrounded on three sides by 1) an
administrative, intake services and medical area, 2) mechanical, storage, kitchen and dining facilities and
3) educational services and gymnasium area.

The main sections of the first floor and their related features include the following:
Administrative Area
o Main waiting room
o Reception desk
o Visitation and multipurpose room
o Parent lockers and vending room
o Securely fenced outdoor visitation courtyard
o Four small interior visitation rooms
o Changing tables for babies and play areas for interaction
o Administrative waiting area
o Mail / work / copy room
o Records storage area
o Eight offices for the director, assistant director, a secretary, probation officer, child
protective services officer, superintendent, Juvenile Service Officer and law enforcement
officer
o Multi-purpose conference room #1
o Residential courtyard
Intake Services Area
o Intake office
o Beauty shop
o Two supervisors offices
o Multi-purpose conference room #2
o Staff lounge
o Staff restrooms and shower
o Personal property room
Medical Area
o Medical exam/treatment room equipped for gynecological exams
o Medical storage
o Nurse work room
o Two consultation offices will provide private areas to discuss abuse and trauma issues
and for girls to learn about female development and health issues in a confidential
setting.
Mechanical Area
o Mechanical room
o Main electrical room
o Dock
o Laundry
o Maintenance and storage
Kitchen and Dining area
o Dining room
o Serving area
o Kitchen
o Food storage
o Training kitchen
o Secure walkway to the original Letot Center
Educational Services and Gymnasium
o Library
o Special education room

Page 11
61 of 13
o Four classrooms
o Two computer labs
o Principals office
o Assistant principals office
o Registration office
o Books and TEKS storage closets
o Teacher and general workrooms
o Gymnasium

To enhance security, all living quarters will be on the second floor of the Girls Center and look
down upon the central courtyard. Because privacy is very important for teen girls, six residential units
each contain eight bedrooms which surround a central activity room. Bedrooms will feature natural light
as well as security grade night lights built into overhead lighting because girls tend to have nightmares
relating to past trauma. In addition, each girl will have a marker board for personal notes and pictures, a
mirror and space for personal effects.

A time out room, restrooms and showers and a supply closet are included in each of the six
residential units. Because girls need larger grooming areas, restrooms will provide extra outlets for blow
dryers and curling irons as well as ample mirror and sink space.

In between each two residential units are offices for a case manager and Juvenile Service Officer
(JSO), in addition to a therapy workroom. The case manager and JSO offices will have clear views into
the residential unit activity rooms and appropriate views into the shower and restroom areas. Restroom
and shower areas will meet privacy needs without compromising security through the use of saloon
doors and short opaque shower curtains.

Room features, beds and desks in each of the six residential units will scale to be appropriate for
the level of care different groups of girls require. Girls requiring a low level of care will be in a relatively
normal environment, whereas beds and desks will be fixed in place in units serving girls who need a high
level of specialized care.

The existing and new facilities will operate independently, with the exception of three features:
An outdoor walkway, a central courtyard and a full service kitchen. The two facilities will be connected
via a secure outdoor walkway and a central courtyard. In addition, a full service kitchen in the new
facility will enable staff to prepare home-cooked meals for both facilities. Currently, meals for Letot
Center residents are provided by the Dallas County Sheriffs Department.

FINANCING THE EXPANSION


The Board of Trustees of the Letot Center Capital Foundation, a 501(c)3 nonprofit established
to raise funds for the original Letot Center, has authorized a capital campaign to raise gifts and grants for

Page 12
62 of 13
the Girls Residential Treatment Center from foundations, corporations, individuals and families. The
campaign will seek to raise a total of $8.7 million.

A simplified budget for the project is as follows:

Mechanical, Electrical & Plumbing 1,565,200


Masonry & Structural Steel 1,084,200
Wood Trusses and Roofing 797,900
A & E & Miscellaneous 778,127
Property Purchase, Asbestos Abatement, Demolition 652,000
General Conditions & Performance Bonds 518,973
Drywall and Acoustical 470,000
Concrete 423,200
Construction Contingency (5%) 385,000
Finishes 357,600
Contractors Fee 350,000
Glassing & Glazing 298,000
Furniture, Fixtures & Equipment 250,000
Doors, Frames & Hardware 248,100
Site Paving & Utilities 223,400
Site Preparation & Earth Work 178,300
Signage and Specialties 87,000
Landscape & Irrigation 50,000

Total $8,717,000

Donations to the campaign will be directed to and held in the Letot Center Capital Foundation
fund at The Dallas Foundation. The Dallas Foundation will manage the funds and oversee their
disbursement during construction of the facility.

Following the precedent of the existing Letot Center, the facility will be built using private sector
funds and gifted to the County which will provide for ongoing operating expenses and building
maintenance.

RESPONDING TO THE CHALLENGE


Girls who have been exploited have experienced far too much ugliness, chaos and degradation in
their young lives. While we cannot return their childhoods to them, we can give them a safe and caring
place to rebuild their lives. We can give them help and hope for a better future.

This is the opportunity and the challenge before us. With Letot Centers expanded program and
the new Girls Residential Treatment Center, our community has enormous potential for transforming
invisible girls. Generous support of this project will empower our young victims and their families to
live healthy and productive lives.

Page 13
63 of 13
Help Promote Women's Empowerment | Heifer International | Charity Ending Hunger And Poverty

HELP END HUNGER. JOIN OUR E-MAIL LIST.


ABOUT HEIFER EDUCATION OUR PARTNERS NEED HELP?

Ending Hunger and Poverty What You Can Do Join the Conversation Gift Catalog

Give Where
Empower Basic Sustainable Honor
Animals Holidays Occasions Needed
Women Needs Farming Cards
Most

WOMEN'S EMPOWERMENT
If women farmers had access to the same resources as
men, more than 150 million additional people would
have enough food to eat. We aim to make that a
reality. Your gift will provide support for women's
groups, training in gender equality and the means to
send girls to school. Help empower women around the
world to reach their full potential.
64

http://www.heifer.org/gift-catalog/empowerment/index.html[1/25/2016 4:03:47 PM]


Help Promote Women's Empowerment | Heifer International | Charity Ending Hunger And Poverty

GIFTS
Under
$100-
Above
Most
$100 $500 $500 Popular


Give Where
Gift of Women's
Launch a Small
Needed Most Empowerment Business
in India $365
$25,000


Enterpriser Gift
Women Self
New
Basket Help Group Beginnings Gift
$390 $72 Basket
$120

65

http://www.heifer.org/gift-catalog/empowerment/index.html[1/25/2016 4:03:47 PM]


Help Promote Women's Empowerment | Heifer International | Charity Ending Hunger And Poverty


Dream Basket
Promise Gift
Send a Girl to
$120 Basket School
$85 $275


Gift of
The Gift of
Women in
Transformation Women Livestock
Full
$10,000 Empowerment Development
Share
$100 Full
$10,000 $10,000
Share
$100

PASSING ON THE GIFT HAS

9X
Up To

The Impact

TO END HUNGER & POVERTY


66

http://www.heifer.org/gift-catalog/empowerment/index.html[1/25/2016 4:03:47 PM]


Help Promote Women's Empowerment | Heifer International | Charity Ending Hunger And Poverty

Families who receive your gift become donors as they


pass on the gift to other families in their
community. This allows them to help others as you
have helped them.

Search The Gift Catalog

BROWSE THE GIFT CATALOG THE PERFECT GIFT FOR NEED HELP?
ANY HOLIDAY OR CONTACT US
Animals OCCASION
PHONE
GIFTS FOR EVERY 855.9HUNGER
HOLIDAY
Empower Women
(855.948.6437)

EMAIL
Sustainable
Farming GIFTS FOR EVERY
info@heifer.org
OCCASION

LIVE CHAT
Necessities

Send an honor card


VIEW ALL GIFTS CHAT NOW
with your
donation

All gifts to
Heifer
LEARN HOW International
are tax
deductible. A
portion of
donations are
used to raise
awareness about
the issues of
hunger and
poverty through
education.
Learn more

67

http://www.heifer.org/gift-catalog/empowerment/index.html[1/25/2016 4:03:47 PM]


ORGANIZATION:
(PAGE 1 OF 2) 2017 r y l a n d e r a s s o c i a t e s

INTRODUC-
PROBLEM/NEED STATEMENT IMPACTS & SOLUTIONS
TION
Basic
description The root problem experienced by your constituents;
Changes that occur as a result of the solution
of the not the lack of something
organization
Mission & Constituents
Root Problem Proof/Justification Impact Proof/Justification Solutions/Services
Purpose Affected
Name of the Program:

68
ORGANIZATION:
(PAGE 2 OF 2) 2017 r y l a n d e r a s s o c i a t e s

RESULTS ENDORSEMENTS SUMMARY


METHODS RESOURCES DONOR BENEFITS
ACHIEVED & SUPPORT STATEMENT

How the solution is Progress toward Funds, expertise & Expertise & funds
Prospect needs The closing
implemented goals materials required already committed

Resources & Designated Giving


Program Delivery The Service Gap The Financial Gap The Challenge
Personnel Opportunities

69
Defining Root Problems

Antiquated Lethargic
Apathetic Misused
Archaic Mixed up
Biased Muddled
Chaotic Narrow
Conflicting Nebulous
Confusing Neglected
Debilitating Obsolete
Devalued Old
Discouraged Outdated
Disjointed Overlapping
Elusive Pervasive
Excessive Reluctant
Extensive Restricted
Fragmented Rigid
Fuzzy Romantic
Haphazard Separated
Humdrum Shaky
Inaccessible Sporadic
Independent Stale
Insecure Top-heavy
Isolated Vague
Jumbled Weakened

70
Page 1 SAMPLE AGENCY Budget Allocation Model
1/25/2016
Budget for
October 200X - September 200Y
Undesignated In-Direct (Support) Direct Program
Description Sources of Funds Expenditures Sources of Funds and Grand
Allocation Undesignated Total Fund- Comm. / Total Total
Sources of Funds Method Funds Undesignated Admin. Raising Mktg. Sup. Svcs. Program A Program B Total Direct
Civic & Community Groups $5,100 $5,100 $501 $3,300 $3,801 $8,901
Corporations 3,101 3,101 1,502 3,301 4,803 7,904
Faith Community 3,204 3,204 5,503 3,302 8,805 12,009
Foundations 4,104 4,104 4,009 3,304 7,313 11,417
Government 1,105 1,105 506 3,305 3,811 4,916
Individuals 6,106 6,106 507 6,609 7,116 13,222
Program Fees 7,101 7,101 508 3,307 3,815 10,916
Miscellaneous 1,592 1,592 509 3,308 3,817 5,409
Total Sources of Funds $31,413 $31,413 $13,545 $29,736 $43,281 $74,694 Total Funds

Undes. Funds Allocation % % of total 36% 64% 100% Should = 100%


Undes. Funds Allocation $ plugged # $11,435 $19,978 $31,413 Should = Total
Undes. Funds
Total Program Funding $24,980 $49,714 $74,694 Should = TF

Allocation Fund- Comm. / Total


Expenditures Method Admin. Raising Mktg. Sup. Svcs. Program A Program B Total Direct Grand Total
Salaries $3,010 $2,133 $2,056 $7,199 $1,001 $4,025 $5,026 $12,225
Benefits & Taxes 450 320 308 1,078 1,002 2,003 3,005 4,083
Rent / Utilities 1,012 800 600 2,412 1,003 2,004 3,007 5,419
Utilities 553 431 395 1,379 1,004 2,005 3,009 4,388
Repairs & Maintenance 45 91 137 273 2,027 2,006 4,033 4,306
Depreciation 15 38 61 114 1,006 2,007 3,013 3,127
Insurance 16 39 62 117 1,007 2,008 3,015 3,132
Office Supplies / Printing 17 40 63 120 1,008 2,009 3,017 3,137
Postage & Delivery 18 41 64 123 1,009 2,010 3,019 3,142
Bank Service Charge 19 42 65 126 1,010 2,011 3,021 3,147
Miscellaneous 20 43 66 129 1,011 2,012 3,023 3,152
Program 22 45 68 135 1,013 2,014 3,027 3,162
Marketing 23 46 69 138 1,014 2,015 3,029 3,167
Telephone 24 47 70 141 1,015 2,016 3,031 3,172
Contract Labor 25 48 71 144 1,016 2,017 3,033 3,177
Professional Fees 26 49 72 147 1,017 2,018 3,035 3,182
Meetings & Training 27 50 73 150 1,018 2,019 3,037 3,187
Memberships 28 51 74 153 1,019 2,020 3,039 3,192
Travel 29 52 75 156 1,020 2,021 3,041 3,197
Total Direct Expenditures $5,379 $4,406 $4,449 $14,234 $20,220 $40,240 $60,460 $74,694 Total Expense

Support Services Allocation % (Program total direct expenditures divided by agency total direct expenses) x total support service 33% 67% 100% Should = 100%
In-Direct Expenses Based on % of support services allocation $4,760 $9,474 $14,234 Should = Total
Undes. Expenses
Total Program Expenditures $24,980 $49,714 $74,694 Should = TE

Sources over Expenditures $0 $0 $0 $0 Should be equal

Total In-Direct Expenditure $14,234 19%


71
Fund Raising Expenditure $4,406 6%
Rylander Associates 2000
ABC Organization Prospect Questionnaire
Annual Campaign

Respondent Name: I know this person Use my name I will help approach
Endorsement Phone
Very well Casually Yes No Letter Introduction Personal Visit
Abbott, Mr. Gregory
Gregory Abbott
Abercrombie, Mrs. Charles
Sue Abercrombie
Able, Mr. and Mrs. John
John Able
Betty Able
Acerman, Mrs. Vanessa
Vanessa Acerman
Adams, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel M.
Dan Adams
Susie Adams
Adcock, Ms. Lynda
Lynda Adcock
Agnich, Mr. and Mrs. Paul
Paul Agnich
Diane Agnich
Ainsworth, Mr. and Mrs. Dale
Dale Ainsworth
Lisa Ainsworth
Albright, Mr. and Mrs. Claude
Claude Albright
Cynthia Albright
Altman, Mrs. Rebecca C.
Rebecca Altman

Abbott (The) Foundation


Gary Abbott - Pres.
Shawn Abbott - VP
Abell-Hanger Foundation
Robert M. Leibrock - Pres.
James I. Trott - VP - Asst. Sec.
Lester Van Pelt, Jr. - Sec.-Treas.
Arlen L. Edgar
Jerome M. Fullinwider
Trevis Herd
Clarence Scharbauer III
David L. Smith, Executive Director
Adams Foundation (The)
John L. Adams - Pres.- Treas.
Suzanne L. Adams - VP - Sec.
Elise L. Adams - Dir.
John R. Adams - Dir.

5/20/2017
72
PROSPECT WORKSHEET
Date:
Basic Information
Name

Address

Contact Person

Financial Data
Total Assets

Total Grants Paid

Grant Ranges/Amount Needed

Period of Funding/Project

Is Funder a Good Match? Funder Your Organization


Subject Focus 1. 1.
(list in order of importance)
2. 2.

3. 3.

Geographic Limits

Type(s) of Support

Population(s) Served

Type(s) of Recipients

People (Officers, Donors,


Trustees, Staff)
Application Information
Does the funder have printed
guidelines/application forms?
Initial Approach (letter of
inquiry, formal proposal)
Deadline(s)

Board Meeting Date(s)

Sources of Above Information


990-PF -- Year: Requested Received
Annual Report -- Year: Requested Received
Directories/grant indexes
Grantmaker Web site
Notes:

Follow-up:

Copyright 1995-2000
73 Center
The Foundation
http://www.fdncenter.org
Solicitation Calender by Funding Source, Working Date
Program
Prospect / Donor Information Action Planned Action Completed Results
Information
ANNUAL PREVIOUS WORKING ACTIVITY- DATE AMOUNT DATE AMOUNT
STATUS FUNDING SOURCE TYPE DEADLINE DONOR PROGRAM DATE FORMAT REQUESTED REQUESTED RECEIVED RECEIVED
AAAA Corporation a March yes SF & RP 1/15/1999 inquiry N/A 10,000 N/A N/A
AAAA Corporation a March yes SF & RP 3/1/1999 letter 10,000
ABAB Foundation f March 1* no BB 1/15/2000 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
ABAB Foundation f March 1" no BB 2/1/2000 proposal 7,500
received AllGood Foundation f August 1 no SF & RP 7/1/1998 letter 7/29/1998 1,000 8/5/1998 1000
AllGood Foundation f August 1 yes SF & RP 1/1/1999 report 7/29/1998 1,000 8/5/1998 1000
AllGood Foundation f August 1 yes SF & RP 6/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
AllGood Foundation f August 1 yes SF & RP 7/1/1999 letter
done Auto Dealer a November yes SF & RP 10/15/1998 verbal 11/9/1998 250
pending Auto Dealer a November yes SF & RP 11/1/1998 verbal 11/9/1998 250
done AZAZ Foundation f none* yes SF & RP 7/15/1998 inquiry 8/6/1998 5,000 9/9/1998 2,500
received AZAZ Foundation f none* yes SF & RP 8/1/1998 proposal 8/6/1998 5,000 9/9/1998 2,500
AZAZ Foundation f none* yes SF & RP 2/1/1999 report 8/6/1998 5,000 9/9/1998 2,500
AZAZ Foundation f none* yes SF & RP 7/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
AZAZ Foundation f none* yes SF & RP 8/1/1999 proposal
done BCBC Foundation f November 1 yes BB 10/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
pending BCBC Foundation f November 1 yes BB 10/15/1998 letter 10/20/1998 5,000
done Big Church c April yes Undesignated 3/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A
pledged-O Big Church c April yes Undesignated 4/1/1998 letter 4/25/1998 4,000
N/R Big Church-Womens Group r none yes FSEDP 9/30/1998 letter
N/R Big Church-Womens Group r none yes FSEDP 12/31/1998 letter
done Big Foundation f March 31* yes computer 11/1/1998 report 3/20/1998 25,000 5/15/1998 15,000
Big Foundation f March 31* yes SF 2/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
proposal &
Big Foundation f March 31* yes SF 3/1/1999 application
done CCC Group o October 15 yes BB 8/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
pending CCC Group r October 15 yes BB 10/1/1998 application 10/15/1999 5,000
CCCC Corporation a February no BB 1/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
CCCC Corporation a February no BB 2/1/1999 letter
done CDDD Corporation a October yes Undesignated 9/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
pending CDDD Corporation a October yes Undesignated 10/1/1998 letter 10/9/1998 250
done Community Group Grant o October 30* yes BB-WK 9/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
declined Community Group Grant o October 30* yes BB-WK 10/30/1998 proposal 10/30/1998 29,050
Community Group Grant o October 30* yes BB-WK 9/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
declined DDDD Foundation f October 30 yes Planning 9/1/1998 proposal 9/30/1998 25,000
received DDDD Foundation f September 30 yes Loan 9/1/1998 proposal 9/30/1998 90,000 11/10/1998 90,000

done DDDD Foundation f October 30 yes Planning & Loan 9/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
DDDD Foundation f September 30 yes Loan 5/1/1999 report 9/30/1998 90,000 11/10/1998 90,000
DDDD Foundation f September 30 yes Loan 11/1/1999 report 9/30/1998 90,000 11/10/1998 90,000
done DZZZ Foundation f October 31* yes SF & RP 9/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
pending DZZZ Foundation f October 31* yes SF & RP 10/1/1998 letter 10/22/1998 1,000
EEEE Trust f April yes CHIP 3/15/2000 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
74
*indicates deadlines set by funding source rylander associates Page 1
Solicitation Calender by Funding Source, Working Date
ANNUAL PREVIOUS WORKING ACTIVITY- DATE AMOUNT DATE AMOUNT
STATUS FUNDING SOURCE TYPE DEADLINE DONOR PROGRAM DATE FORMAT REQUESTED REQUESTED RECEIVED RECEIVED
EEEE Trust f April yes CHIP 4/1/2000 proposal
Dismantling
done Family Foundation f October 1* yes Racism 8/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Dismantling
received Family Foundation f October 1* yes Racism 9/1/1998 letter 9/29/1998 1,500 11/30/1998 1,500
Dismantling
Family Foundation f October 1* yes Racism 2/1/1999 report 9/29/1998 1,500 11/30/1998 1,500
Dismantling
Family Foundation f October 1* yes Racism 8/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Dismantling
Family Foundation f October 1* yes Racism 9/1/1999 letter
FFFF Foundation f February 1 yes FS 1/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
FFFF Foundation f February 1 yes FS 1/15/1999 letter
declined Financial Company a August yes BB 8/1/1998 letter 8/21/1998 94,500
done Fraternal Foundation f January 10* no SF & RP 12/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
N/R Fraternal Foundation f January 10* no SF & RP 12/15/1999 application
Dismantling
declined GGGG Foundation f June 15 no Racism 6/1/1999 proposal 6/15/1999 10,000
Dismantling
GGGG Foundation f June 15 no Racism 5/15/2000 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Dismantling
GGGG Foundation f June 15 no Racism 6/1/2000 proposal
GHGH Foundation f no SF & RP 1/18/1999 proposal
done GZZZ Foundation f August 1 yes BB 6/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
N/R GZZZ Foundation f August 1 yes BB 7/1/1998 proposal
done HHHH Corp. a December 1 yes Undesignated 10/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
pending HHHH Corp. a December 1 yes Undesignated 11/1/1998 letter 11/30/1998 500 N/A
pending Houston Corp. a March yes Undesignated 10/1/1998 letter 12/9/1998 500
Dismantling
IAAA Foundation f June 30 yes Racism 1/30/1999 report 6/30/1998 5,000 1/12/1999 7500
Dismantling
IAAA Foundation f June 30 yes Racism 6/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Dismantling
IAAA Foundation f June 30 yes Racism 6/15/1999 proposal 5,000
done Involved Church c November 1 yes BB 7/1/1998 report 10/30/1997 4,539 1/27/1998 4500
received Involved Church c November 1 yes BB 9/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Involved Church c November 1 yes BB 7/1/1999 report 10/30/1998 5,000 11/18/1998 4500
Involved Church c November 1 yes BB 9/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
received Involved Church c November 1 yes BB 10/15/1999 letter 10/30/1998 5,000 11/18/1998 4500
Undesignated &
done Karing Church-Foundation f October yes SF & RP 9/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Undesignated &
pending Karing Church-Foundation f October yes SF & RP 10/1/1998 proposal 11/23/1998 15,000
done KKKK Corp. a September yes Undesignated 7/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
pending KKKK Corp. a September yes Undesignated 9/15/1999 letter 9/20/1998 2,500
LAAA Foundation-Special Fund f April 15* yes Undesignated 3/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
75
*indicates deadlines set by funding source rylander associates Page 2
Solicitation Calender by Funding Source, Working Date
ANNUAL PREVIOUS WORKING ACTIVITY- DATE AMOUNT DATE AMOUNT
STATUS FUNDING SOURCE TYPE DEADLINE DONOR PROGRAM DATE FORMAT REQUESTED REQUESTED RECEIVED RECEIVED
LAAA Foundation-Special Fund f October 1* yes Undesignated 3/15/1999 proposal
done Large Church c Novenber 9* yes Undesignated 10/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
pending Large Church c Novenber 9* yes Undesignated 10/15/1998 application 11/9/1998 20,000
pending Large Church Women's Group o June 1* yes SF & RP 5/15/1998 application 6/1/1998 20,923
declined Law Office a monthly no SF & RP 4/15/1998 letter 4/16/1998 15,000
Law Office a monthly no SF & RP 4/15/1999 letter
done LLLL Foundation f September 15 no SF & RP 8/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
pending LLLL Foundation f September 15 no SF & RP 8/1/1998 proposal 8/6/1998 3,000
pending Local Company a November 12* yes Undesignated 11/15/1998 letter 11/9/1998 6,400
Local Company a November 12* yes Undesignated 11/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
September
done Medium Church c 29* yes Undesignated 9/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
September
pending Medium Church c 29* yes Undesignated 9/15/1998 application 9/22/1998 10,500
done MMMM Religious Group r January 15* yes SF&RP, W&S 12/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
MMMM Religious Group r January 15* yes SF & RP 1/1/1999 proposal
proposal/ap
MMMM Religious Group r January 15* yes W&S 1/1/1999 plication
done National Hunger Group o November 3* yes BB 10/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
pledged-O National Hunger Group o November 3* yes BB 10/15/1998 proposal 11/1/1998 8,000 12/22/1998 4,000
done OKOK Trust f December 31* yes computer 11/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
OKOK Trust f December 31* yes computer 12/1/1998 proposal
done Old Tech a October yes SF & RP 10/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
pending Old Tech a October yes SF & RP 11/15/1998 letter
BB, DR, PHC,
done Outreach Church c October 1* yes Undesignated 9/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
pledged-O Outreach Church c October 1* yes BB 9/15/1998 application 10/1/1998 1,500 1/8/1999 1500
Dismantling
pledged-O Outreach Church c October 1* yes Racism 9/15/1998 application 10/1/1998 1,500 1/8/1999 2000
pledged-R Outreach Church c October 1* yes Parkland 9/15/1998 application 10/1/1998 1,500 1/8/1999 1500
BB, DR, PHC,
Outreach Church c October 1* yes Undesignated 9/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done PPPP Foundation f September no SF & RP 8/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
pending PPPP Foundation f September no SF & RP 8/15/1998 proposal 9/6/1998 1,000
done RCCC Foundation f February 1* yes BB & SF & RP 9/1/1998 report 2/1/1998 20,000 8/6/1998 20,000
RCCC Foundation f February 1* yes BB & SF & RP 1/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
RCCC Foundation f February 1* yes BB & SF & RP 1/15/1999 letter 20,000
Regional Hunger Group r February 1* yes SF & RP 12/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Regional Hunger Group r February 1* yes SF & RP 1/1/1999 application
Dismantling
done Regional Nonprofit Group r April 1 yes Racism 9/1/1998 report 2/13/1998 5,000 4/15/1998 5,000
Dismantling
Regional Nonprofit Group r April 1 yes Racism 3/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Dismantling
Regional Nonprofit Group r April 1 yes Racism 3/15/1999 proposal

76
*indicates deadlines set by funding source rylander associates Page 3
Solicitation Calender by Funding Source, Working Date
ANNUAL PREVIOUS WORKING ACTIVITY- DATE AMOUNT DATE AMOUNT
STATUS FUNDING SOURCE TYPE DEADLINE DONOR PROGRAM DATE FORMAT REQUESTED REQUESTED RECEIVED RECEIVED
Regional Nonprofit Group-Special Dismantling
received Fund r June 1 yes Racism 12/15/1998 report 5/27/1998 5,000 7/7/1998 5,000
Regional Nonprofit Group-Special Dismantling
Fund r June 1 yes Racism 4/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Regional Nonprofit Group-Special Dismantling
Fund r June 1 yes Racism 5/1/1999 application 5,000
received Small Foundation f none* yes computer 4/1/1998 proposal 7/7/1998 21,500 10/5/1998 21,500
done Small Foundation f none* yes computer 10/1/1998 report 7/7/1998 21,500 10/5/1998 21,500
Strategic
Small Foundation f none* yes Planning 6/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Strategic
Small Foundation f none* yes Planning 6/15/1999 proposal
received State Foundation f September 1* yes SF & RP 9/1/1998 proposal 8/31/1998 6,000 10/8/1998 5,000
done State Foundation f September 1* yes SF & RP 10/1/1998 report 8/31/1998 6,000 10/8/1998 5,000
State Foundation f September 1* yes SF & RP 7/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
State Foundation f September 1* yes SF & RP 8/1/1999 proposal
State Group o June 1* yes SF & RP 4/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
State Group o June 1* yes SF & RP 5/1/1999 application 10,000
September 30
done Tree Foundation f or March 30* yes SF & RP 8/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
September 30
received Tree Foundation f or March 30* yes SF & RP 9/1/1998 letter 9/29/1998 10,000 11/22/1998 10,000
September 15,
February 15,
received UUUU Foundation f June 15* yes computer 8/15/1997 proposal 9/15/1997 103,553 10/27/1997 55,000
September 15,
February 15,
done UUUU Foundation f June 15* yes computer 4/1/1999 report 9/15/1997 103,553 10/27/1997 55,000
September 15,
February 15,
UUUU Foundation f June 15* yes CHIP 8/15/1999 inquiry
done Volunteer Church c October 1* yes Undesignated 9/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
received Volunteer Church c October 1* yes Undesignated 9/15/1998 application 10/1/1998 5,000 11/12/1999 3,000
Volunteer Church c October 1* yes Undesignated 4/15/1999 report 10/1/1998 5,000 11/12/1999 3,000
Volunteer Church c October 1* yes Undesignated 9/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Volunteer Church c October 1* yes Undesignated 9/15/1999 application
Volunteer Church-Special
received Offering c January 31* yes BB 1/30/1998 proposal 2/13/1998 61,890 7/1/1998 122,890
Volunteer Church-Womans
Group r January 15 yes SF & RP 12/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Volunteer Church-Womans
Group r January 15 yes SF & RP 1/1/1999 application
August 30,
November 30,
done VVVV Foundation f March 30* yes FSEDP or CHIP 7/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A

77
*indicates deadlines set by funding source rylander associates Page 4
Solicitation Calender by Funding Source, Working Date
ANNUAL PREVIOUS WORKING ACTIVITY- DATE AMOUNT DATE AMOUNT
STATUS FUNDING SOURCE TYPE DEADLINE DONOR PROGRAM DATE FORMAT REQUESTED REQUESTED RECEIVED RECEIVED
August 30,
November 30,
N/R VVVV Foundation f March 30* yes FSEDP or CHIP 8/1/1998 application
done West Foundation f December 31 no SF & RP 11/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
West Foundation f December 31 no SF & RP 12/1/1999 proposal
done Women's Group o December 9* no BB 10/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
N/R Women's Group o December 9* no BB 11/6/1998 proposal
Women's Group o December 9* no BB 11/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Women's Group o December 9* no BB 11/15/1999 proposal
done Youth Focus Foundation f February 1 no SF & RP 1/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Youth Focus Foundation f February 1 no SF & RP 1/15/1999 proposal

78
*indicates deadlines set by funding source rylander associates Page 5
Solicitation Calendar by Status, Working Date, Funding Source
Program
Prospect / Donor Information Action Planned Action Completed Results
Information
ANNUAL PREVIOUS WORKING ACTIVITY- DATE AMOUNT DATE AMOUNT
STATUS FUNDING SOURCE TYPE DEADLINE DONOR PROGRAM DATE FORMAT REQUESTED REQUESTED RECEIVED RECEIVED
declined Law Office a monthly no SF & RP 4/15/1998 letter 4/16/1998 15,000
declined Financial Company a August yes BB 8/1/1998 letter 8/21/1998 94,500
declined DDDD Foundation f October 30 yes Planning 9/1/1998 proposal 9/30/1998 25,000
declined Community Group Grant o October 30* yes BB-WK 10/30/1998 proposal 10/30/1998 29,050
Dismantling
declined GGGG Foundation f June 15 no Racism 6/1/1999 proposal 6/15/1999 10,000
done Big Church c April yes Undesignated 3/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A
done GZZZ Foundation f August 1 yes BB 6/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done Involved Church c November 1 yes BB 7/1/1998 report 10/30/1997 4,539 1/27/1998 4500
done AZAZ Foundation f none* yes SF & RP 7/15/1998 inquiry 8/6/1998 5,000 9/9/1998 2,500
done KKKK Corp. a September yes Undesignated 7/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
August 30,
November 30,
done VVVV Foundation f March 30* yes FSEDP or CHIP 7/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done LLLL Foundation f September 15 no SF & RP 8/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done PPPP Foundation f September no SF & RP 8/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done CCC Group o October 15 yes BB 8/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Dismantling
done Family Foundation f October 1* yes Racism 8/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
September 30
done Tree Foundation f or March 30* yes SF & RP 8/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A

done Medium Church c September 29* yes Undesignated 9/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
BB, DR, PHC,
done Outreach Church c October 1* yes Undesignated 9/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done RCCC Foundation f February 1* yes BB & SF & RP 9/1/1998 report 2/1/1998 20,000 8/6/1998 20,000
Dismantling
done Regional Nonprofit Group r April 1 yes Racism 9/1/1998 report 2/13/1998 5,000 4/15/1998 5,000
done Volunteer Church c October 1* yes Undesignated 9/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done CDDD Corporation a October yes Undesignated 9/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done Community Group Grant o October 30* yes BB-WK 9/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A

done DDDD Foundation f October 30 yes Planning & Loan 9/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done DZZZ Foundation f October 31* yes SF & RP 9/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Undesignated &
done Karing Church-Foundation f October yes SF & RP 9/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done BCBC Foundation f November 1 yes BB 10/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done Large Church c Novenber 9* yes Undesignated 10/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done National Hunger Group o November 3* yes BB 10/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done Old Tech a October yes SF & RP 10/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done Small Foundation f none* yes computer 10/1/1998 report 7/7/1998 21,500 10/5/1998 21,500
done State Foundation f September 1* yes SF & RP 10/1/1998 report 8/31/1998 6,000 10/8/1998 5,000

79
*indicates deadlines set by funding source 2/16/2008, 8:56 PM Page 1
Solicitation Calendar by Status, Working Date, Funding Source
ANNUAL PREVIOUS WORKING ACTIVITY- DATE AMOUNT DATE AMOUNT
STATUS FUNDING SOURCE TYPE DEADLINE DONOR PROGRAM DATE FORMAT REQUESTED REQUESTED RECEIVED RECEIVED
done Auto Dealer a November yes SF & RP 10/15/1998 verbal 11/9/1998 250
done HHHH Corp. a December 1 yes Undesignated 10/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done Women's Group o December 9* no BB 10/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done Big Foundation f March 31* yes computer 11/1/1998 report 3/20/1998 25,000 5/15/1998 15,000
done OKOK Trust f December 31* yes computer 11/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done West Foundation f December 31 no SF & RP 11/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done Fraternal Foundation f January 10* no SF & RP 12/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done MMMM Religious Group r January 15* yes SF&RP, W&S 12/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
done Youth Focus Foundation f February 1 no SF & RP 1/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
September 15,
February 15,
done UUUU Foundation f June 15* yes computer 4/1/1999 report 9/15/1997 103,553 10/27/1997 55,000
N/R GZZZ Foundation f August 1 yes BB 7/1/1998 proposal
August 30,
November 30,
N/R VVVV Foundation f March 30* yes FSEDP or CHIP 8/1/1998 application
N/R Big Church-Womens Group r none yes FSEDP 9/30/1998 letter
N/R Women's Group o December 9* no BB 11/6/1998 proposal
N/R Big Church-Womens Group r none yes FSEDP 12/31/1998 letter
N/R Fraternal Foundation f January 10* no SF & RP 12/15/1999 application
pending Large Church Women's Group o June 1* yes SF & RP 5/15/1998 application 6/1/1998 20,923
pending LLLL Foundation f September 15 no SF & RP 8/1/1998 proposal 8/6/1998 3,000
pending PPPP Foundation f September no SF & RP 8/15/1998 proposal 9/6/1998 1,000

pending Medium Church c September 29* yes Undesignated 9/15/1998 application 9/22/1998 10,500
pending CCC Group r October 15 yes BB 10/1/1998 application 10/15/1999 5,000
pending CDDD Corporation a October yes Undesignated 10/1/1998 letter 10/9/1998 250
pending DZZZ Foundation f October 31* yes SF & RP 10/1/1998 letter 10/22/1998 1,000
pending Houston Corp. a March yes Undesignated 10/1/1998 letter 12/9/1998 500
Undesignated &
pending Karing Church-Foundation f October yes SF & RP 10/1/1998 proposal 11/23/1998 15,000
pending BCBC Foundation f November 1 yes BB 10/15/1998 letter 10/20/1998 5,000
pending Large Church c Novenber 9* yes Undesignated 10/15/1998 application 11/9/1998 20,000
pending Auto Dealer a November yes SF & RP 11/1/1998 verbal 11/9/1998 250
pending HHHH Corp. a December 1 yes Undesignated 11/1/1998 letter 11/30/1998 500 N/A
pending Local Company a November 12* yes Undesignated 11/15/1998 letter 11/9/1998 6,400
pending Old Tech a October yes SF & RP 11/15/1998 letter
pending KKKK Corp. a September yes Undesignated 9/15/1999 letter 9/20/1998 2,500
pledged-O Big Church c April yes Undesignated 4/1/1998 letter 4/25/1998 4,000
pledged-O Outreach Church c October 1* yes BB 9/15/1998 application 10/1/1998 1,500 1/8/1999 1500
Dismantling
pledged-O Outreach Church c October 1* yes Racism 9/15/1998 application 10/1/1998 1,500 1/8/1999 2000
pledged-O National Hunger Group o November 3* yes BB 10/15/1998 proposal 11/1/1998 8,000 12/22/1998 4,000
pledged-R Outreach Church c October 1* yes Parkland 9/15/1998 application 10/1/1998 1,500 1/8/1999 1500

80
*indicates deadlines set by funding source 2/16/2008, 8:56 PM Page 2
Solicitation Calendar by Status, Working Date, Funding Source
ANNUAL PREVIOUS WORKING ACTIVITY- DATE AMOUNT DATE AMOUNT
STATUS FUNDING SOURCE TYPE DEADLINE DONOR PROGRAM DATE FORMAT REQUESTED REQUESTED RECEIVED RECEIVED
September 15,
February 15,
received UUUU Foundation f June 15* yes computer 8/15/1997 proposal 9/15/1997 103,553 10/27/1997 55,000
Volunteer Church-Special
received Offering c January 31* yes BB 1/30/1998 proposal 2/13/1998 61,890 7/1/1998 122,890
received Small Foundation f none* yes computer 4/1/1998 proposal 7/7/1998 21,500 10/5/1998 21,500
received AllGood Foundation f August 1 no SF & RP 7/1/1998 letter 7/29/1998 1,000 8/5/1998 1000
received AZAZ Foundation f none* yes SF & RP 8/1/1998 proposal 8/6/1998 5,000 9/9/1998 2,500
received DDDD Foundation f September 30 yes Loan 9/1/1998 proposal 9/30/1998 90,000 11/10/1998 90,000
Dismantling
received Family Foundation f October 1* yes Racism 9/1/1998 letter 9/29/1998 1,500 11/30/1998 1,500
received State Foundation f September 1* yes SF & RP 9/1/1998 proposal 8/31/1998 6,000 10/8/1998 5,000
September 30
received Tree Foundation f or March 30* yes SF & RP 9/1/1998 letter 9/29/1998 10,000 11/22/1998 10,000
received Involved Church c November 1 yes BB 9/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
received Volunteer Church c October 1* yes Undesignated 9/15/1998 application 10/1/1998 5,000 11/12/1999 3,000
Regional Nonprofit Group-Special Dismantling
received Fund r June 1 yes Racism 12/15/1998 report 5/27/1998 5,000 7/7/1998 5,000
received Involved Church c November 1 yes BB 10/15/1999 letter 10/30/1998 5,000 11/18/1998 4500
OKOK Trust f December 31* yes computer 12/1/1998 proposal
Volunteer Church-Womans
Group r January 15 yes SF & RP 12/1/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Regional Hunger Group r February 1* yes SF & RP 12/15/1998 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
AllGood Foundation f August 1 yes SF & RP 1/1/1999 report 7/29/1998 1,000 8/5/1998 1000
FFFF Foundation f February 1 yes FS 1/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
MMMM Religious Group r January 15* yes SF & RP 1/1/1999 proposal
proposal/ap
MMMM Religious Group r January 15* yes W&S 1/1/1999 plication
RCCC Foundation f February 1* yes BB & SF & RP 1/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Regional Hunger Group r February 1* yes SF & RP 1/1/1999 application
Volunteer Church-Womans
Group r January 15 yes SF & RP 1/1/1999 application
AAAA Corporation a March yes SF & RP 1/15/1999 inquiry N/A 10,000 N/A N/A
CCCC Corporation a February no BB 1/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
FFFF Foundation f February 1 yes FS 1/15/1999 letter
RCCC Foundation f February 1* yes BB & SF & RP 1/15/1999 letter 20,000
Youth Focus Foundation f February 1 no SF & RP 1/15/1999 proposal
GHGH Foundation f no SF & RP 1/18/1999 proposal
Dismantling
IAAA Foundation f June 30 yes Racism 1/30/1999 report 6/30/1998 5,000 1/12/1999 7500
AZAZ Foundation f none* yes SF & RP 2/1/1999 report 8/6/1998 5,000 9/9/1998 2,500
CCCC Corporation a February no BB 2/1/1999 letter
Dismantling
Family Foundation f October 1* yes Racism 2/1/1999 report 9/29/1998 1,500 11/30/1998 1,500
Big Foundation f March 31* yes SF 2/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
81
*indicates deadlines set by funding source 2/16/2008, 8:56 PM Page 3
Solicitation Calendar by Status, Working Date, Funding Source
ANNUAL PREVIOUS WORKING ACTIVITY- DATE AMOUNT DATE AMOUNT
STATUS FUNDING SOURCE TYPE DEADLINE DONOR PROGRAM DATE FORMAT REQUESTED REQUESTED RECEIVED RECEIVED
AAAA Corporation a March yes SF & RP 3/1/1999 letter 10,000
proposal &
Big Foundation f March 31* yes SF 3/1/1999 application
LAAA Foundation-Special Fund f April 15* yes Undesignated 3/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Dismantling
Regional Nonprofit Group r April 1 yes Racism 3/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
LAAA Foundation-Special Fund f October 1* yes Undesignated 3/15/1999 proposal
Dismantling
Regional Nonprofit Group r April 1 yes Racism 3/15/1999 proposal
Law Office a monthly no SF & RP 4/15/1999 letter
Regional Nonprofit Group-Special Dismantling
Fund r June 1 yes Racism 4/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
State Group o June 1* yes SF & RP 4/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Volunteer Church c October 1* yes Undesignated 4/15/1999 report 10/1/1998 5,000 11/12/1999 3,000
DDDD Foundation f September 30 yes Loan 5/1/1999 report 9/30/1998 90,000 11/10/1998 90,000
Regional Nonprofit Group-Special Dismantling
Fund r June 1 yes Racism 5/1/1999 application 5,000
State Group o June 1* yes SF & RP 5/1/1999 application 10,000
AllGood Foundation f August 1 yes SF & RP 6/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Dismantling
IAAA Foundation f June 30 yes Racism 6/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Strategic
Small Foundation f none* yes Planning 6/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Dismantling
IAAA Foundation f June 30 yes Racism 6/15/1999 proposal 5,000
Strategic
Small Foundation f none* yes Planning 6/15/1999 proposal
AllGood Foundation f August 1 yes SF & RP 7/1/1999 letter
Involved Church c November 1 yes BB 7/1/1999 report 10/30/1998 5,000 11/18/1998 4500
AZAZ Foundation f none* yes SF & RP 7/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
State Foundation f September 1* yes SF & RP 7/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
AZAZ Foundation f none* yes SF & RP 8/1/1999 proposal
State Foundation f September 1* yes SF & RP 8/1/1999 proposal
Dismantling
Family Foundation f October 1* yes Racism 8/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
September 15,
February 15,
UUUU Foundation f June 15* yes CHIP 8/15/1999 inquiry
Community Group Grant o October 30* yes BB-WK 9/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Dismantling
Family Foundation f October 1* yes Racism 9/1/1999 letter
BB, DR, PHC,
Outreach Church c October 1* yes Undesignated 9/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Volunteer Church c October 1* yes Undesignated 9/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Involved Church c November 1 yes BB 9/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
82
*indicates deadlines set by funding source 2/16/2008, 8:56 PM Page 4
Solicitation Calendar by Status, Working Date, Funding Source
ANNUAL PREVIOUS WORKING ACTIVITY- DATE AMOUNT DATE AMOUNT
STATUS FUNDING SOURCE TYPE DEADLINE DONOR PROGRAM DATE FORMAT REQUESTED REQUESTED RECEIVED RECEIVED
Volunteer Church c October 1* yes Undesignated 9/15/1999 application
DDDD Foundation f September 30 yes Loan 11/1/1999 report 9/30/1998 90,000 11/10/1998 90,000
Women's Group o December 9* no BB 11/1/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Local Company a November 12* yes Undesignated 11/15/1999 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Women's Group o December 9* no BB 11/15/1999 proposal
West Foundation f December 31 no SF & RP 12/1/1999 proposal
ABAB Foundation f March 1* no BB 1/15/2000 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
ABAB Foundation f March 1" no BB 2/1/2000 proposal 7,500
EEEE Trust f April yes CHIP 3/15/2000 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
EEEE Trust f April yes CHIP 4/1/2000 proposal
Dismantling
GGGG Foundation f June 15 no Racism 5/15/2000 inquiry N/A N/A N/A N/A
Dismantling
GGGG Foundation f June 15 no Racism 6/1/2000 proposal

83
*indicates deadlines set by funding source 2/16/2008, 8:56 PM Page 5
Solicitation Calendar Instructions
The purpose of the Solicitation Calendar is to schedule and manage contact points with funding
sources that require a written document (proposal, application, letter, or report) to request a
contribution. The solicitation calendar is not intended to be used as a financial document.

Usage: One entry or row in the excel spreadsheet refers to one action for one particular
funding source. In some cases only one entry may be necessary, however when two major
actions are planned for one funding source (e.g. Inquiry to get guidelines and Proposal to request
the funds) then two entries should be made in the calendar.

The following is a description of each field (or column) in the calendar:

COLUMN
NAME DESCRIPTION
Status: The state of a particular action. Some of the typical status entries are:
declined,
done,
n/r (no request made),
pending,
pledged,
received,
blank/no entry (to be done.)

Funding The name of the prospect for whom the action is planned.
Source: (Ensure that multiple entries for a single funding source are spelled and/or
abbreviated in exactly the same manner so that sorts on the funding source
column will group all of a funding sources entries together.)

Type: The type of funding source. Some of the typical types of entries are:
c = corporation,
i = individual,
f = foundation,
o = organization.

Annual The submission deadline date by which the planned action must be complete.
Deadline: An asterisk beside a date indicates a definite deadline that was set by the
funding source.
A date without an asterisk indicates a deadline set by the nonprofit
organization based upon other factors such as past history with the funding
source or the date(s) when reports are due.
Annual deadline entries include: n/a, a specific date, quarterly, etc.
Previous Indicates whether a funding source has given to the organization previously.
Donor: Previous donor entries include: yes and no.

Program: Indicates the particular program in which the funding source has interest and
for which the request should be made.

84 rylander associates
Working The date on which the planned action should be initiated.
Date: The working date is determined by development staff.

Activity- The kind of contact action planned for a funding source.


Format: Some of the typical Activity-Format entries are:
inquiry,
proposal,
request application form,
application,
request contact name & guidelines,
report.

Date The date the planned action was carried out or completed.
Requested: The date of a proposal or request.

Amount The amount of funds requested from a funding source.


Requested: Amount requested entries include:
a specific dollar amount,
tbd (To Be Determined)
n/a (for those planned actions that do not involve a request for funds.)

Date The date a contribution was received.


Received: Enter n/a for planned actions that do not involve a direct request for funds.

Amount The amount of funds received.


Received: Enter n/a for planned actions that do not involve a direct request for funds.

Sort Order
1. Status, Working Date, Funding Source: Groups entries together by status and then in
working date order. A blank status column indicates work to be done and lists items in
date order.
2. Funding Source, Working Date: Groups entries for a single funding source together.
Allows assessment of whether all entries for cultivation and solicitation of that funding
source have been made.

Notes:
1. When information about a contribution, decline, etc. is received the information should be
recorded and new inquiry and proposal entries should be made for the next year.
2. When a contribution is received, the received amount and date should be recorded, and a
report entry should be made for an appropriate future working date. In other words, future
planned actions should be added to the calendar so that it continually rolls out into the
future.
3. Working dates, funding source names and status entries must be entered consistently so
that their columns can be sorted.

85 rylander associates
October 19, 2011

Name
The Meadows Foundation
Address
City, State Zip

Dear Name:

As you know, the Letot Center Capital Foundation is engaged in an $8.7 million campaign to
create the Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center. This new, nationally unique Center will be designed
and developed to address issues unique to our communitys exploited girls - extreme abuse, prostitution
and abandonment.

Girls who have been exploited have experienced far too much ugliness, chaos and degradation in
their young lives. While we cannot return their childhoods to them, we can give them a safe and caring
place to rebuild their lives. We can give them help and hope for a better future.

This long-term, therapeutically intensive, family-focused treatment center for girls will serve up
to 96 girls at a time and, in doing so, will be the larger of two gender-specific, therapeutic programs in
the nation. A national model, the Letot Girls Center will be the only program in the nation designed to
prevent teen prostitution by serving runaway girls.

The Girls Center is the result of strong support and years of collaboration between the Dallas
Police Department, Dallas County Commissioners Court, the Dallas County Juvenile Department, The
Dallas Womens Foundation and the Junior League of Dallas. In addition, Child Protective Services is
among 135 community partners which support Letot Center and will support the new Girls Center.

In celebration of its 25th Anniversary, The Dallas Womens Foundation has committed $1 million
to the creation of the Girls Center. The Junior League of Dallas committed $100,000 in honor of its
90th Anniversary, which is the Leagues third investment in runaway youth since 1979. The Dallas
County Juvenile Department will provide for the Girls Centers $2.25 million annual operating budget.

These strong investors and partners position Dallas to lead the way in creating this national
model. With an expanded Letot Center program and a new facility, our community has enormous
potential for transforming invisible girls. Generous support of this project will address mental health
issues in a comprehensive manner and empower our young victims and their families to live healthy and
productive lives.

On behalf of the Board of Trustees, we respectfully request a grant of $500,000, payable over 3
5 years, from The Meadows Foundation. We would be pleased to recognize a grant at this level in the
area of the education walkway, library and two classrooms. In addition, The Meadows Foundation
would be recognized with all donors to the project in a prominent location inside the building.

86
We are pleased to let you know that a total of $5.6 million has been secured toward the $8.7
million goal, leaving $3.1 million to be raised.

Enclosed with this proposal are materials outlined in the Foundations grant application
guidelines, architectural drawings of the new facility, a letter from Dallas County Commissioners, a Girls
Center program description, a Letot Center brochure, an IRS letter of determination, gift recognition
opportunities and a statement of intent form.

Should you have any questions or need additional information, please feel free to contact us.
Thank you for the opportunity to present this request for your consideration . . . as well as all The
Meadows Foundation does for our community.

Sincerely,

Name Name
President, Letot Center Capital President Emeritus, Letot Center Capital
Foundation Foundation
Campaign Co-Chair Campaign Co-Chair
Phone Number Phone Number

2
87
LETOT CENTER CAPITAL FOUNDATION
PROPOSAL TO

THE MEADOWS FOUNDATION


LETOT CENTER
A Model for the Nation Since 1979

The mission of the Dallas County Juvenile Departments Letot Center is to assist referred youth
in becoming productive, law abiding citizens while promoting public safety and victim restoration.

For more than three decades, Letot Center has provided immediate assessment, crisis
intervention, emergency shelter and referral services to Dallas-area youth who are in the beginning stages
of delinquency. The first priority is to stop the crisis, giving the kids, their families and law enforcement
an opportunity to assess the complex factors that created it.

By applying combinations of services, children and teens avoid committing delinquent offenses
and entering the Juvenile Justice System. The approach is unique because, whenever possible, family
members are engaged in comprehensive treatment programs supported by a network of more than 135
community-based partners. (Please see the enclosed list.)

When its doors opened in 1979, Letot Center was one of the first programs in the United States
to provide multidisciplinary intervention services for youth. The Center was established through a
public-private effort by the Dallas County Juvenile Department, Dallas Independent School District and
the Junior League of Dallas. In 1990, $3 million in private donations funded the construction of a
40,000-square-foot, 40-bed central hub for residential shelter and non-residential services. As one of
seven juvenile facilities operated by the Juvenile Department, Letot Center is funded by Dallas County.

Today, Letot Center continues to be a national model. The largest and most comprehensive
provider for youth intervention services in the United States, Letot Center has served more than 60,000
youth and their families.

Letot Center Services: Varied Needs and a Variety of Ways to Answer Them

Letot Center is licensed by the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services and
provides 24-hour assessments, crisis intervention, emergency shelter, outpatient counseling and referral
services free of charge to Dallas County residents. In 2009 alone, the Centers professional staff of 60
served more than 2,000 young people and their families, conducting 15,424 counseling sessions and
handling more than 3,000 crisis calls.

Thirty-nine different law enforcement agencies brought 1,343 youth to Letot Centers Intake
Unit. Youth who received services were primarily female (74%), the average age was 14.6 years old and
approximately 79% were minorities 44% Black, 34% Hispanic and 1% American Indian and Asian.
Forty-eight volunteers supplemented the staff s efforts by donating 2,000 hours of time.

Programs provided by the Centers professional staff with support from professional agencies
and trained volunteers include:
Education Services / Charter School Dallas County Juvenile Justice Charter School
HIV & STD Testing and Education Dallas County Health Department
Suicide / Depression Screening Suicide and Crisis Center
Psychological Testing Juvenile Department Psychology Services

3
88
Psychiatric Consultation Juvenile Department Psychology Services
Substance Abuse Education Juvenile Department Psychology Services
Non-denominational Church Program Volunteer Chaplains

Services are provided to youth and their families through four program units:
Intake Unit: Provides immediate assessment and referral services for Dallas County
offenders and runaway youth referred by police. Intake staff is responsible for placing youth
back with parents or in a shelter program within six hours. In 2009, the Intake Unit served
1,341 children and teens. Sixty-nine percent were released to parents or relatives after crisis
intervention and referrals to a network of more than 135 community-based partners.
Non-residential Services: Provides deferred prosecution and crisis intervention. Deferred
prosecution involves support and monitoring of first-time offenders by probation officers to
decrease the probability of future juvenile arrests. In 2009, 546 youth and families
participated in non-residential support services.
Residential Services: Accommodates up to two dozen girls and eight boys in three
dormitories. Although they are not restricted from leaving the facility, 98 percent choose to
stay until they are discharged, at which time 74 percent are successfully reunited with their
families. In 2009, Letot Center served 427 kids and its beds were full 88 percent of the time.
Clinical Unit: The Unit is home to the Psychology Division, staffed by a supervising
psychologist and three master-degreed therapists. The team provides stability and ongoing
support through crisis screening and intervention, followed by in-patient and out-patient
individual and family therapy. Therapy with shelter residents focuses on improving skills,
while outpatient therapy focuses on enhancing family function. The Clinical Unit also
provides inpatient and out-patient services for girls at risk of being exploited, employing a
specialized assessment tool and curriculum called HOPE (Helping Overcome and Prevent
Exploitation), developed by professionals on the Letot Center staff.

THE PROBLEM
The majority of the adolescent females, ages 13 17, who come into contact with Dallas County
law enforcement live in homes where chaos is rampant. Physical, sexual and emotional abuse and
domestic violence are the norm and there is no respect or trust. Adult caregivers are often neglectful and
are struggling to deal with their own mental health problems and trauma.

These girls have cognitive distortion, a twisted, false or negative way of thinking about their
feelings. They feel as if they have no control over their lives. They never know when the next traumatic
experience or abuse will happen. For them, life is unpredictable and terrifying

Living in an environment which is dangerous affects girls self-perception and behavior. Girls
respond by developing harmful and self-destructive coping skills such as substance abuse, skipping
school, fighting with others and committing more serious offenses. Many run away from home as a
means for survival in search of a more structured and supportive environment. Nearly 50% of these
girls meet the diagnostic criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder. Ninety percent of girls who run away
are repeat sexual abuse victims. Their low self-esteem, resulting from child sexual abuse, puts them at
risk for depression.

Because there are no caring adults protecting them, these girls are isolated and alone. Long-
standing Juvenile Justice Programs focus on victims under 13 and offenders who commit more serious
crimes. These girls are not young enough or bad enough to attract attention. No one is watching over
them or searching for them. They are invisible. On any given night, there are approximately 400
invisible girls in our community. Dallas Police Department, Letot Center and Texas Department of
Family and Protective Services officials can identify approximately 250 of these girls. The other 150
girls are new to the streets or are trafficked to or through Dallas County.

4
89
Exploited Girls = Teen Prostitutes

Invisible girls are extremely vulnerable of being exploited by criminals who provide food,
shelter, protection and emotional support. Astute pimps seek invisible girls and seduce them with
affection and security which fulfill girls cravings for emotional connections. Pimps and other highly
trained adult criminals seek individuals with low- self-esteem to control them to meet their own selfish
needs. Girls become emotionally and physically dependent on pimps and are manipulated into the life
of prostitution, often after physical abuse.

Despite the abuse they experience and the tricks they must turn, life is predictable for teen
prostitutes and, consequently, preferable to the chaotic home environment they escaped. This false since
of control helps girls avoid the difficult task of facing the harsh reality of their lives. Acknowledging
their past truths is simply too painful, so they cope by avoidance and are at risk for greater negative
mental health outcomes. Sadly, life expectancy for teen prostitutes is predictable only seven years after
they enter the life.

A Partial Solution

Dallas is unique in having a High Risk Victims & Trafficking Unit within the Police Department,
which identifies and locates runaway girls and teen prostitutes, and Letot Center, which conducts
assessments, creates individual treatment plans and provides short-term shelter. However, removing
runaway girls and teen prostitutes from the street and placing them in a short-term shelter is only a
partial solution.

The issues that lead girls to run away and/or prostitute are highly complex and multi-layered,
such that 30 60 day shelter stays are not effective. The recidivism rate for girls referred for short-term
placement is 80%. These girls need specialized, long-term treatment to escape unhealthy dependencies
and chaotic and destructive life-styles.

Over the past several years, however, the number of long-term residential service providers
available for contracting with the Dallas County Juvenile Department has declined significantly. This
decline, along with the fact that Dallas has two residential treatment programs for adolescent males with
a total of 184 beds and none for females further exacerbates the situation.

As a result, victims of teen prostitution are sent to locations around the state for long-term
residential services. This arrangement adversely affects girls because:
1. The distance between Dallas and other parts of the state does not allow for family:
a. Contact to work on repairing family conflict or
b. Members to be prepared for participation in community aftercare services prior to
discharge. Reduced family participation with aftercare increases recidivism.
2. Girls who are aggressive and habitually run away, need psychiatric treatment or have been
unsuccessful in previous placements are difficult to place in facilities that allow freedom to
participants. Treatment for these women can be delayed because they are held in Juvenile
Detention until an appropriate residential placement can be located.

From August 1, 2009 to July 31, 2010, the Juvenile Department placed 96 girls with contracted
service providers outside Dallas County for long-term treatment. On one particular day, September 21,
2010, 50 girls were in contracted placement outside of the Dallas at a cost of $6,338 a day.

5
90
TRANSFORMING INVISIBLE GIRLS
A Complete Solution

Invisible girls need specialized, long-term treatment to escape unhealthy dependencies and
chaotic and destructive life-styles. A three-tiered approach is required to protect invisible girls from adult
abusers and to build the self-esteem and personal skills needed to successfully re-integrate into our
community.
1. Gender-specific, 6 - 12 month long-term residential placement and treatment,
2. Community-based support services for girls and families during and after residential
treatment, and
3. Prosecution of offenders/pimps.

The Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center - A National Model

To fully address the critical and unique needs of invisible girls and their families in Dallas
County, Letot Center will create a Girls Residential Treatment Center. Designed and developed
specifically for girls ages 13 17, treatment will address issues unique to girls - extreme abuse,
prostitution and abandonment.

This long-term, therapeutically intensive, family-focused treatment center for girls will serve up
to 96 girls at a time and will be the larger of two gender-specific, therapeutic programs in the nation.
The only other such program in the country is Angelas House, in Atlanta, Georgia, which serves up to
10 teen prostitutes. Because Angelas House serves girls who have already prostituted, the Letot Girls
Center will be the only program in the nation designed to prevent teen prostitution by serving runaway
girls.

The mission of the Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center will be to empower neglected and
exploited girls to be productive, caring and responsible citizens by providing them a safe environment for
long-term residential, gender-responsive treatment involving their families and supported by community
partners.

Treatment plans will be highly personalized such that girls may stay at the Center from three
months to one year. Letot Center staff anticipates serving approximately 100 girls during the programs
initial year.

The safety of the girls will be the programs highest priority, as they will need protection from
abusive parents, boyfriends and pimps. This locally based program will improve accountability and
coordination by enabling girls to be more quickly moved into treatment. Programs will focus on girls
unique developmental and relational needs and families will be engaged in repairing conflict and
participating in aftercare services.

Each of the programs and opportunities currently offered by Letot Center through its short-
term residential program, from the Charter school to yoga to sports, will be adapted and provided at the
Girls Residential Treatment Center. Treatment plans and clinical services will address specific issues
such as abuse, exploitation, anger management, parenting skills, sexually transmitted diseases and life
skills for independent living, among other issues. Volunteers will provide opportunities for spiritual
growth and development. (Please see the enclosed The New Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center
Program for a description of the program development method, goals and evaluation criteria.)

The goals for the Letot Girls Residential Center are to:
Identify girls within the Dallas County Juvenile Justice Systems who need long-term
residential treatment outside their home,
Effectively provide clinical, educational, medical, recreational and case management services,

6
91
Help youth uncover their innate line of talent,
Support youth in establishing an environment that encourages spiritual growth and
development,
Teach girls skills to deal with stress and challenging situations so they do not resort to
dysfunctional and delinquent behavior, and
Develop intensive aftercare and on-going community services with monitoring designed to
successfully re-integrate invisible girls back into the community.

As a result, girls and their families would:


Be engaged in making decisions about treatment plans,
Be empowered to stay involved with specialized community services,
Experience an environment that values, respects and trusts girls,
Experience girls discovering their strengths, becoming self-aware, resilient and courageous
all of which provide insight into potential for happiness and success,
Learn responsibility, self-respect, self-motivation and respect of authority,
Deepen their own understanding of spirituality in efforts of discovering successful ways to
live,
Develop talents that leads youth to focus their interest in new and positive directions,
Learn how to apply learned skills and values to their homes, schools and community, and
Prepare for successful re-integration into their community.

The Girls Center will be licensed by Child Care Licensing with the Texas Department of Family
Services.

Criteria for Acceptance

The program committee established the following criteria for acceptance into the Girls Center.
All cases will be evaluated on a case-by-case situation with respect to how the Center will meet each girls
needs.
No sex offenders Gang affiliation
Fourth grade reading/sentence History of using weapons
comprehension level Sexual abuse
Lowest acceptable IQ is 65 Asthma with medication
No history of arson Neurological disorders with medical
On psychiatric medication care
Pregnant is acceptable with medical Cruelty to animals
clearance and early discharge plan Eating disorders
Substance abuse as secondary Homicidal ideation with safety plan
treatment Psychotic with ongoing psychiatric care
Physical limitations, flexible Major depressive disorder with
according to youths needs psychiatric care and safety plan
No encopretic Bipolar with psychiatric care and safety
Self-inflicted abuse plan
Runaway history Schizophrenia- stabilized on medication
Aggravated offenses with psychiatric care and safety plan
Suicidal ideations with safety plan Autism/ developmental disorder
History of suicidal gestures with ADHD
safety plan Generalized anxiety
History of theft Conduct
Gang membership

7
92
Program Specifics

The basic objectives of the program will be to research, create and utilize:
A gender-informed evidence-based risk and needs assessment instrument that will identify
the precise needs of each girl,
Trauma- based services to address past traumatic experiences, substance abuse and mental
health issues and both the parents and youths role in how they relate to current situation,
and
A gender-specific cognitive-behavioral evidence-based program through comprehensive,
integrated and culturally relevant services.

The core of the treatment model will be gender-responsive services that provide intensive
therapy and a strong community-wrap around program for each girl and her family. This type of mental
health treatment model will reduce stressors before transitioning girls back into their environments. In
addition, this approach will allow research and knowledge about female socialization and development as
well as each girls risks, strengths and needs to guide all aspects of treatment design and delivery.

Several of the curriculum models that are being explored and compared thus far are: Seeking
Safety, Girls Circle, Thinking for a Change; Challenge Seven; The Change Companies Adolescent
Relapse Prevention Workbook; and Thinking, Feeling, and Behaving, an Emotional Education
Curriculum. Possible orientation tools include PACT (Positive Achievement Change Tool) and the
Achenbach Assessment.

Treatment Team Meetings

Every month each girl and her family will meet with the treatment team. Treatment team
members include the Letot caseworker, therapist, teacher or principal, psychiatrist, nurse, and director or
superintendent. To encourage decision-making and empowerment, each girl will have the opportunity to
choose a mental health group and focus with approval by their treatment team. The therapist will make
summary progress notes and goal specific individualized treatment plans for the girl and their family/
identified caregiver.

Girls will start each treatment team meeting by providing an update on their behavior, feelings,
health and progress toward case plan goals that were set the previous month. Girls and family members
will recommend, sign off on and leave with a copy of their goals for the next month. Treatment team
meetings empower girls and their families and hold them accountable.

Education

The educational program will allow girls to attend school on site through the Dallas Countys
Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program. Educational services will address all levels of learning as
well as learning disabilities. Teachers specially qualified to teach high risk girls will cover core subjects
(Reading, Language Arts, English, Math, Science, and Social Studies) in addition to Health and Physical
Education. The environment will encourage creative expression and exploration through arts, music and
drama. Core subject areas will be congruent with the girls home school in accordance to TEA
standards.

Therapy

Individual, family, group, and in-home therapy services will be provided. All family members
will be involved in the evaluation, assessment and therapeutic treatment planning at the start of
admission. When girls prepare to transition back into their home, therapy will be attachment and
relationship focused to create support and structure to decrease stressors and conflict that may arise in
the home. Such intensive counseling will enable girls to develop positive and effective communications
skills within their environment.
8

93
The Life Skills Training (LST) Program is a universal program that will be used with middle
school students. It is designed to address a wide range of risk and protective factors by teaching general
personal and social skills, along with drug resistance skills and education. The LST Booster program will
be used with high school students to retain the gains of the middle school LST program.

Staffing

Staffing for the Girls Center will include the following:


Administrative staff Mental & physical health
o Superintendent o Lead psychologist
o Assistant director o Eight clinical Masters- level
Law enforcement and County therapists
services o Nurse (part-time or full-time)
o Probation officer o Cook
o Child protective services officer Charter school
o Law enforcement officer o Principal
o Six case managers o Assistant Principal
o Forty-eight supervision officers o Eight teachers

Invaluable Partners

The Girls Center is the result of strong support and years of collaboration between the Dallas
Police Department, Dallas County Commissioners, the Dallas County Juvenile Department, The Dallas
Womens Foundation and the Junior League of Dallas.

The Dallas Womens Foundation has committed $1 million to the Girls Center in celebration of
its 25th Anniversary. The Junior League of Dallas committed $100,000 in honor of its 90th Anniversary,
which is the Leagues third investment in runaway youth since 1979. The Dallas County Juvenile
Department will provide for the Girls Centers $2.25 million annual operating budget.

THE NEW FACILITY


The Girls Residential Treatment Center will be housed in a new two-story, 55,000 square foot
facility which will be built on the corner of Denton Drive and Lombardy, adjacent to the existing Letot
Center. The property was purchased by Dallas County from the Dallas Independent School District
specifically for this purpose. (Please see the enclosed Girls Center site map, floor plans and elevations.)

The exterior of the Girls Center will give the impression of security, while the interior will feel
comfortable and calm. Interior spaces will allow for maximum visibility and supervision. Vision panels
in offices, programs spaces and the six housing units will allow for indirect visual supervision of
residents. Building design will maximize the availability of natural light and provide both indoor and
outdoor visitation areas for girls and their families.

Activity areas in the Girls Center will encourage relationship building through the use of
moveable furniture conducive to small groups and intimate interactions between staff and girls and by
creating areas for comfortable personal conversations.

The first floor is comprised of a central exterior courtyard surrounded on three sides by 1) an
administrative, intake services and medical area, 2) mechanical, storage, kitchen and dining facilities and
3) educational services and gymnasium area. To enhance security, all living quarters will be on the
second floor of the Girls Center and look out upon the central courtyard.

Six residential units will each contain eight bedrooms and surround a central activity room.
Bedrooms will feature natural light as well as security grade night lights built into overhead lighting
because girls tend to have nightmares relating to past trauma.
9

94
In between each two residential units will be offices for a case manager and Juvenile Service
Officer (JSO), in addition to a therapy workroom. Room features, beds and desks in each of the six
residential units will scale to be appropriate for the level of care different groups of girls require. Girls
requiring a low level of care will be in a relatively normal environment, whereas beds and desks will be
fixed in place in units serving girls who need a high level of specialized care.

The existing and new facilities will operate independently, with the exception of three features:
An outdoor walkway, a central courtyard and a full service kitchen. The two facilities will be connected
via a secure outdoor walkway and a central courtyard. In addition, a full service kitchen in the new
facility will enable staff to prepare home-cooked meals for both facilities. Currently, meals for Letot
Center residents are provided by the Dallas County Sheriff s Department.

REQUEST
Girls who have been exploited have experienced far too much ugliness, chaos and degradation in
their young lives. While we cannot return their childhoods to them, we can give them a safe and caring
place to rebuild their lives. We can give them help and hope for a better future.

This is the opportunity and the challenge before us. With Letot Centers expanded program and
the new Girls Residential Treatment Center, our community has enormous potential for transforming
invisible girls. Generous support of this project will address mental health issues in a comprehensive
manner and empower our young victims and their families to live healthy and productive lives.

For this reason, the Letot Center Capital Foundation Board of Trustees respectfully requests a
gift of $500,000, payable over three to five years, from The Meadows Foundation toward the $8.7
million cost of the new Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center facility.

To date, $5.6 million in donations has been received from the Dallas Womens Foundation, the
Embrey Family Foundation, Hoblitzelle Foundation, Rees-Jones Foundation, Harold Simmons
Foundation, Evans Family Foundation, Hillcrest Foundation, Perot Foundation, The Vin and Caren
Prothro Foundation, anonymous foundations and generous individuals., among others.

RECOGNITION
In grateful recognition for a gift of $500,000, the Board of Trustees of the Letot Center Capital
Foundation will be pleased to provide recognition in the area of the education walkway, library and two
classrooms. In addition, The Meadows Foundation would be recognized with all donors to the project
in a prominent location inside the building.

EVALUATION
The new Girls Center facility will be evaluated on the basis of its completion in relation to the
construction plan, timeline and budget. After capital funding is secured, construction will require 10
12 months.

An Evaluation sub-committee of the Girls Center Program Development Committee will have
responsibility for creating a tracking system for girls who leave the Girls Center as well as establishing
program evaluation criteria. A core measure of success will be to reduce recidivism among runaway girls
and teen prostitutes which currently stands at 80%.

For a detailed list of evaluation components under consideration, please see the attached The
New Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center Program description, pages 8 9.

10

95
CONCLUSION
Girls who have been exploited have experienced far too much ugliness, chaos and degradation in
their young lives. While we cannot return their childhoods to them, we can give them a safe and caring
place to rebuild their lives. We can give them help and hope for a better future.

This is the opportunity and the challenge before us. With Letot Centers expanded program and
the new Girls Residential Treatment Center, our community has enormous potential for transforming
invisible girls. Generous support of this project will empower our young victims and their families to
live healthy and productive lives.

11

96
Logo letterhead

March 6, 2012

Name
Title
The Moody Foundation
2302 Postoffice Street, Suite 704
Galveston, TX 77550

Dear Name:

The Letot Center Capital Foundation is engaged in an $8.7 million campaign to create the Letot
Girls Residential Treatment Center. This new, nationally unique Center will be designed and developed
to address issues unique to our communitys exploited girls - extreme abuse, prostitution and
abandonment.

Domestic human trafficking has been misunderstood and overlooked. The FBI named Dallas
one of 14 cities in the nation with the highest incidence of commercial sexual exploitation of children.
On any given night, there are an estimated 400 invisible girls in our community. Dallas Police
Department, Letot Center and Texas Department of Family and Protective Services officials can identify
250 of these girls. The other 150 girls are new to the streets or are trafficked to or through Dallas
County.

The mission of the Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center is to empower neglected and
exploited girls to be productive, caring and responsible citizens by providing them a safe environment for
long-term residential, gender-responsive treatment involving their families and supported by community
partners. This is groundbreaking work and Dallas is on the frontline, nationally, in developing
treatment for invisible girls.

Including the Dallas Womens Foundation commitment of $1 million in celebration of their 25th
anniversary, we have secured a total of $7.4 million in gifts and pledges, leaving $1.3 million to be raised.

We respectfully request a grant of $1.5 million, $1.3 million to complete the campaign and
$200,000 for enrichment and vocational programming. Additional information requested in the Format
for Grant Application document is enclosed. Should you have any questions, please feel free to contact
either of us.

Thank you for the opportunity to present this request for your consideration . . . as well as all
The Moody Foundation does for the State of Texas.

Sincerely,

Name Name
President, Letot Center President Emeritus, Letot Center
Capital Foundation Capital Foundation
Co-Chair, Letot Girls Center Campaign Co-Chair, Letot Girls Center Campaign
Phone Number Phone Number

97
LETOT CENTER CAPITAL FOUNDATION

Request Summary
Organization Description: Since 1979, Letot Center has provided immediate assessment, crisis
intervention, emergency shelter and referral services to Dallas-area male and female youth who are in the
beginning stages of delinquency. The first priority is to stop the crisis, giving the youth, their families and
law enforcement an opportunity to assess the complex factors that created it. The Center was established
through a public-private effort by the Dallas County Juvenile Department, Dallas Independent School
District and the Junior League of Dallas. One of seven facilities operated by the Juvenile Department,
Letot Center offers 30 60 day residential and non-residential treatment and is funded by Dallas County.
The largest and most comprehensive provider for youth intervention services in the United States, Letot
Center has served more than 60,000 youth and their families.

Community Need: Domestic human trafficking has been misunderstood and overlooked. The FBI
named Dallas one of 14 cities in the nation with the highest incidence of commercial sexual exploitation
of children. The majority of the adolescent females, ages 13 17, who come into contact with law
enforcement live in homes where chaos is rampant. Physical, sexual and emotional abuse and domestic
violence are the norm. These girls have no control over their lives. They never know when the next
outburst or abuse will happen. For them, life is unpredictable and terrifying. Because there are no caring
adults protecting them, these girls are isolated and alone. They are invisible. Ninety percent of girls
who run away from home are repeat sexual abuse victims. An estimated 400 girls are on the streets of
Dallas County any given night. Dallas Police Department, Letot Center and Texas Department of Family
and Protective Services officials can identify approximately 250 of these girls. The other 150 girls are
new to the streets or are trafficked to or through Dallas County by their pimps. The issues that lead girls
to run away and/or prostitute are highly complex and multi-layered, such that 30 60 day shelter stays
are not effective. The recidivism rate for girls referred for short-term treatment is 80%.

The Girls Center: To fully address the critical and unique needs of girls in Dallas County who have
been exploited and abused, Letot Center will create a Girls Residential Treatment Center. The mission
of the Letot Girls Center is to empower neglected and exploited girls to be productive, caring and
responsible citizens by providing them a safe environment for long-term residential, gender-responsive
treatment involving their families and supported by community partners.

Developed for girls ages 13 17, treatment will address issues unique to girls - extreme abuse,
prostitution and abandonment through a highly structured, long-term, residential program. A three-
tiered approach is required to protect invisible girls from adult abusers and build the self-esteem and
personal skills needed to successfully re-integrate into our community: 1) Gender-specific 6 - 12 month
residential treatment, 2) Community-based support services for girls and families during and after
residential treatment, and 3) Prosecution of offenders/pimps. Nationally unique, the Center will be the
larger of two gender-specific programs in the nation and the only one with a prevention program for
runaway girls. Center staff anticipates serving 100 girls and their families during the programs initial
year. A Program Evaluation sub-committee is creating a tracking system for girls who leave the Center
and establishing evaluation criteria. A core measure of success will be to reduce recidivism among
runaway girls and teen prostitutes which currently stands at 80% to 65% within two years.

The two-story, 55,000 square foot Girls Center will be built adjacent to the existing Letot Center. Key
partners include the Dallas County Commissioners Court and the Dallas County Juvenile Department,
which plans to cover the Girls Centers $2.25 million operating expenses in its budget. The Dallas
Womens Foundation has pledged $1 million to the Girls Center in celebration of their 25th Anniversary.

A grant of $1.5 million from The Moody Foundation would provide $1.3 million needed to complete the
$8.7 million campaign and $200,000 for enrichment and vocational training programs.

98
LETOT CENTER CAPITAL FOUNDATION
III. INFORMATION ON ORGANIZATION REQUESTING FUNDS

A. Name, mailing and physical address, telephone, e-mail and website information for
organization and contact person for organization.

Letot Center Capital Foundation


Address (mailing and physical address)
Dallas, Texas Zip
Phone number
www.letotgirlscenter.org
Name, President
Phone number
email address

B. Brief history of organization

Letot Center - A Model for the Nation Since 1979

The mission of the Dallas County Juvenile Departments Letot Center is to assist referred youth in
becoming productive, law abiding citizens while promoting public safety and victim restoration.

For more than three decades, Letot Center has provided immediate assessment, crisis intervention,
emergency shelter and referral services to Dallas-area youth who are in the beginning stages of
delinquency. The first priority is to stop the crisis, giving the kids, their families and law enforcement an
opportunity to assess the complex factors that created it.

By applying combinations of services, children and teens avoid committing delinquent offenses and
entering the Juvenile Justice System. The approach is unique because, whenever possible, family
members are engaged in comprehensive treatment programs supported by a network of more than 135
community-based partners. (Please see the enclosed list.)

When its doors opened in 1979, Letot Center was one of the first programs in the United States to
provide multidisciplinary intervention services for youth. The Center was established through a public-
private effort by the Dallas County Juvenile Department, Dallas Independent School District and the
Junior League of Dallas. In 1990, $3 million in private donations funded the construction of a 40,000-
square-foot, 40-bed central hub for residential shelter and non-residential services. As one of seven
juvenile facilities operated by the Juvenile Department, Letot Center is funded by Dallas County.

Today, Letot Center continues to be a national model. The largest and most comprehensive provider for
youth intervention services in the United States, Letot Center has served more than 60,000 youth and
their families.

C. Purpose and goals of organization

Letot Center Services: Varied Needs and a Variety of Ways to Answer Them

Letot Center is licensed by the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services and provides 24-
hour assessments, crisis intervention, emergency shelter, outpatient counseling and referral services free
of charge to Dallas County residents. In 2009 alone, the Centers professional staff of 60 served more
than 2,000 young people and their families, conducting 15,424 counseling sessions and handling more
than 3,000 crisis calls.

Thirty-nine different law enforcement agencies brought 1,343 youth to Letot Centers Intake Unit.
Youth who received services were primarily female (74%), the average age was 14.6 years old and
3

99
approximately 79% were minorities 44% Black, 34% Hispanic and 1% American Indian and Asian.
Forty-eight volunteers supplemented the staff s efforts by donating 2,000 hours of time.

D. Types of programs offered by organization

Programs provided by the Centers professional staff with support from professional agencies and
trained volunteers include:
Education Services / Charter School Dallas County Juvenile Justice Charter School
HIV & STD Testing and Education Dallas County Health Department
Suicide / Depression Screening Suicide and Crisis Center
Psychological Testing Juvenile Department Psychology Services
Psychiatric Consultation Juvenile Department Psychology Services
Substance Abuse Education Juvenile Department Psychology Services
Non-denominational Church Program Volunteer Chaplains

Services are provided to youth and their families through four program units:
Intake Unit: Provides immediate assessment and referral services for Dallas County
offenders and runaway youth referred by police. Intake staff is responsible for placing youth
back with parents or in a shelter program within six hours. In 2009, the Intake Unit served
1,341 children and teens. Sixty-nine percent were released to parents or relatives after crisis
intervention and referrals to a network of more than 135 community-based partners.
Non-residential Services: Provides deferred prosecution and crisis intervention. Deferred
prosecution involves support and monitoring of first-time offenders by probation officers to
decrease the probability of future juvenile arrests. In 2009, 546 youth and families
participated in non-residential support services.
Residential Services: Accommodates up to two dozen girls and eight boys in three
dormitories. Although they are not restricted from leaving the facility, 98 percent choose to
stay until they are discharged, at which time 74 percent are successfully reunited with their
families. In 2009, Letot Center served 427 kids and its beds were full 88 percent of the time.
Clinical Unit: The Unit is home to the Psychology Division, staffed by a supervising
psychologist and three master-degreed therapists. The team provides stability and ongoing
support through crisis screening and intervention, followed by in-patient and out-patient
individual and family therapy. Therapy with shelter residents focuses on improving skills,
while outpatient therapy focuses on enhancing family function. The Clinical Unit also
provides inpatient and out-patient services for girls at risk of being exploited, employing a
specialized assessment tool and curriculum called HOPE (Helping Overcome and Prevent
Exploitation), developed by professionals on the Letot Center staff.

IV. INFORMATION ON PROPOSED PROJECT

A. Description of project

1. Nature of Project
The Problem

The majority of the adolescent females, ages 13 17, who come into contact with Dallas County law
enforcement live in homes where chaos is rampant. Physical, sexual and emotional abuse and domestic
violence are the norm and there is no respect or trust. Adult caregivers are often neglectful and are
struggling to deal with their own mental health problems and trauma.

100
These girls have cognitive distortion, a twisted, false or negative way of thinking about their feelings.
They feel as if they have no control over their lives. They never know when the next traumatic
experience or abuse will happen. For them, life is unpredictable and terrifying

Living in an environment which is dangerous affects girls self-perception and behavior. Girls respond by
developing harmful and self-destructive coping skills such as substance abuse, skipping school, fighting
with others and committing more serious offenses. Many run away from home as a means for survival
in search of a more structured and supportive environment. Nearly 50% of these girls meet the
diagnostic criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder. Ninety percent of girls who run away are repeat
sexual abuse victims. Their low self-esteem, resulting from child sexual abuse, puts them at risk for
depression.

Because there are no caring adults protecting them, these girls are isolated and alone. Long-standing
Juvenile Justice Programs focus on victims under 13 and offenders who commit more serious crimes.
These girls are not young enough or bad enough to attract attention. No one is watching over them or
searching for them. They are invisible. On any given night, there are approximately 400 invisible girls
in our community. Dallas Police Department, Letot Center and Texas Department of Family and
Protective Services officials can identify approximately 250 of these girls. The other 150 girls are new to
the streets or are trafficked to or through Dallas County.

2. Specific need of project and purpose for acting on need at this time
Exploited Girls = Teen Prostitutes

Invisible girls are extremely vulnerable of being exploited by criminals who provide food, shelter,
protection and emotional support. Astute pimps seek invisible girls and seduce them with affection and
security which fulfill girls cravings for emotional connections. Pimps and other highly trained adult
criminals seek individuals with low- self-esteem to control them to meet their own selfish needs. Girls
become emotionally and physically dependent on pimps and are manipulated into the life of
prostitution, often after physical abuse.

Despite the abuse they experience and the tricks they must turn, life is predictable for teen prostitutes
and, consequently, preferable to the chaotic home environment they escaped. This false since of control
helps girls avoid the difficult task of facing the harsh reality of their lives. Acknowledging their past
truths is simply too painful, so they cope by avoidance and are at risk for greater negative mental
health outcomes. Sadly, life expectancy for teen prostitutes is predictable only seven years after they
enter the life.

A Partial Solution

Dallas is unique in having a High Risk Victims & Trafficking Unit within the Police Department, which
identifies and locates runaway girls and teen prostitutes, and Letot Center, which conducts assessments,
creates individual treatment plans and provides short-term shelter. However, removing runaway girls and
teen prostitutes from the street and placing them in a short-term shelter is only a partial solution.

The issues that lead girls to run away and/or prostitute are highly complex and multi-layered, such that
30 60 day shelter stays are not effective. The recidivism rate for girls referred for short-term placement
is 80%. These girls need specialized, long-term treatment to escape unhealthy dependencies and chaotic
and destructive life-styles.

Over the past several years, however, the number of long-term residential service providers available for
contracting with the Dallas County Juvenile Department has declined significantly. This decline, along
with the fact that Dallas has two residential treatment programs for adolescent males with a total of 184
beds and none for females further exacerbates the situation.

As a result, victims of teen prostitution are sent to locations around the state for long-term residential
services. This arrangement adversely affects girls because:
5

101
1. The distance between Dallas and other parts of the state does not allow for family:
a. Contact to work on repairing family conflict or
b. Members to be prepared for participation in community aftercare services prior to
discharge. Reduced family participation with aftercare increases recidivism.
2. Girls who are aggressive and habitually run away, need psychiatric treatment or have been
unsuccessful in previous placements are difficult to place in facilities that allow freedom to
participants. Treatment for these women can be delayed because they are held in Juvenile
Detention until an appropriate residential placement can be located.

From August 1, 2009 to July 31, 2010, the Juvenile Department placed 96 girls with contracted service
providers outside Dallas County for long-term treatment. On one particular day, September 21, 2010, 50
girls were in contracted placement outside of the Dallas at a cost of $6,338 a day.

3. Goals and Objectives of Project


Transforming Invisible Girls - A Complete Solution

Invisible girls need specialized, long-term treatment to escape unhealthy dependencies and chaotic and
destructive life-styles. A three-tiered approach is required to protect invisible girls from adult abusers
and to build the self-esteem and personal skills needed to successfully re-integrate into our community.
1. Gender-specific, 6 - 12 month long-term residential placement and treatment,
2. Community-based support services for girls and families during and after residential
treatment, and
3. Prosecution of offenders/pimps.

The Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center - A National Model

To fully address the critical and unique needs of invisible girls and their families in Dallas County, Letot
Center will create a Girls Residential Treatment Center. Designed and developed specifically for girls
ages 13 17, treatment will address issues unique to girls - extreme abuse, prostitution and
abandonment.

This long-term, therapeutically intensive, family-focused treatment center for girls will serve up to 96
girls at a time and will be the larger of two gender-specific, therapeutic programs in the nation. The only
other such program in the country is Angelas House, in Atlanta, Georgia, which serves up to 10 teen
prostitutes. Because Angelas House serves girls who have already prostituted, the Letot Girls Center
will be the only program in the nation designed to prevent teen prostitution by serving runaway girls.

The mission of the Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center will be to empower neglected and
exploited girls to be productive, caring and responsible citizens by providing them a safe environment for
long-term residential, gender-responsive treatment involving their families and supported by community
partners. Treatment plans will be highly personalized such that girls may stay at the Center from three
months to one year. Letot Center staff anticipates serving approximately 100 girls during the programs
initial year.

The safety of the girls will be the programs highest priority, as they will need protection from abusive
parents, boyfriends and pimps. This locally based program will improve accountability and coordination
by enabling girls to be more quickly moved into treatment. Programs will focus on girls unique
developmental and relational needs and families will be engaged in repairing conflict and participating in
aftercare services.

Each of the programs and opportunities currently offered by Letot Center through its short-term
residential program, from the Charter school to yoga to sports, will be adapted and provided at the Girls
Residential Treatment Center. Treatment plans and clinical services will address specific issues such as
abuse, exploitation, anger management, parenting skills, sexually transmitted diseases and life skills for
independent living, among other issues. Volunteers will provide opportunities for spiritual growth and

102
development. (Please see the enclosed The New Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center Program
for a description of the program development method, goals and evaluation criteria.)

The goals for the Letot Girls Residential Center are to:
Identify girls within the Dallas County Juvenile Justice Systems who need long-term
residential treatment outside their home,
Effectively provide clinical, educational, medical, recreational and case management services,
Help youth uncover their innate line of talent,
Support youth in establishing an environment that encourages spiritual growth and
development,
Teach girls skills to deal with stress and challenging situations so they do not resort to
dysfunctional and delinquent behavior, and
Develop intensive aftercare and on-going community services with monitoring designed to
successfully re-integrate invisible girls back into the community.

The Girls Center will be licensed by Child Care Licensing with the Texas Department of Family
Services.

Program Specifics

The basic objectives of the program will be to research, create and utilize:
A gender-informed evidence-based risk and needs assessment instrument that will identify
the precise needs of each girl,
Trauma- based services to address past traumatic experiences, substance abuse and mental
health issues and both the parents and youths role in how they relate to current situation,
and
A gender-specific cognitive-behavioral evidence-based program through comprehensive,
integrated and culturally relevant services.

The core of the treatment model will be gender-responsive services that provide intensive therapy and a
strong community-wrap around program for each girl and her family. This type of mental health
treatment model will reduce stressors before transitioning girls back into their environments. In
addition, this approach will allow research and knowledge about female socialization and development as
well as each girls risks, strengths and needs to guide all aspects of treatment design and delivery.

Treatment Team Meetings

Every month each girl and her family will meet with the treatment team. Treatment team members
include the Letot caseworker, therapist, teacher or principal, psychiatrist, nurse, and director or
superintendent. To encourage decision-making and empowerment, each girl will have the opportunity to
choose a mental health group and focus with approval by their treatment team. The therapist will make
summary progress notes and goal specific individualized treatment plans for the girl and their family/
identified caregiver.

Girls will start each treatment team meeting by providing an update on their behavior, feelings, health
and progress toward case plan goals that were set the previous month. Girls and family members will
recommend, sign off on and leave with a copy of their goals for the next month. Treatment team
meetings empower girls and their families and hold them accountable.

Education

The educational program will allow girls to attend school on site through the Dallas Countys Juvenile
Justice Alternative Education Program. Educational services will address all levels of learning as well as
learning disabilities. Teachers specially qualified to teach high risk girls will cover core subjects (Reading,
Language Arts, English, Math, Science, and Social Studies) in addition to Health and Physical Education.

103
The environment will encourage creative expression and exploration through arts, music and drama.
Core subject areas will be congruent with the girls home school in accordance to TEA standards.

Therapy

Individual, family, group, and in-home therapy services will be provided. All family members will be
involved in the evaluation, assessment and therapeutic treatment planning at the start of admission.
When girls prepare to transition back into their home, therapy will be attachment and relationship
focused to create support and structure to decrease stressors and conflict that may arise in the home.
Such intensive counseling will enable girls to develop positive and effective communications skills within
their environment.

The Life Skills Training (LST) Program is a universal program that will be used with middle school
students. It is designed to address a wide range of risk and protective factors by teaching general
personal and social skills, along with drug resistance skills and education. The LST Booster program will
be used with high school students to retain the gains of the middle school LST program.

Vocational Programs

To ensure girls possess a vocational skill and can begin supporting themselves when they are released
from the Center, vocational programs such as cosmetology, culinary arts and medical will be offered.
Specific certifications will include make-up artist, shampoo technician, medical office assistant and
medical assistant. A career assessment will be used to help the residents with vocational and life
planning. Additional online vocational options and a culinary arts program are under consideration.

The New Facility

The Girls Residential Treatment Center will be housed in a new two-story, 55,000 square foot facility
which will be built on the corner of Denton Drive and Lombardy, adjacent to the existing Letot Center.
The property was purchased by Dallas County from the Dallas Independent School District specifically
for this purpose. (Please see the enclosed Girls Center site map, floor plans and elevations.)

The exterior of the Girls Center will give the impression of security, while the interior will feel
comfortable and calm. Interior spaces will allow for maximum visibility and supervision. Vision panels
in offices, programs spaces and the six housing units will allow for indirect visual supervision of
residents. Building design will maximize the availability of natural light and provide both indoor and
outdoor visitation areas for girls and their families.

Activity areas in the Girls Center will encourage relationship building through the use of moveable
furniture conducive to small groups and intimate interactions between staff and girls and by creating
areas for comfortable personal conversations.

The first floor is comprised of a central exterior courtyard surrounded on three sides by 1) an
administrative, intake services and medical area, 2) mechanical, storage, kitchen and dining facilities and
3) educational services and gymnasium area. To enhance security, all living quarters will be on the
second floor of the Girls Center and look out upon the central courtyard.

Six residential units will each contain eight bedrooms and surround a central activity room. Bedrooms
will feature natural light as well as security grade night lights built into overhead lighting because girls
tend to have nightmares relating to past trauma. In between each two residential units will be offices for
a case manager and Juvenile Service Officer (JSO), in addition to a therapy workroom. Room features,
beds and desks in each of the six residential units will scale to be appropriate for the level of care
different groups of girls require. Girls requiring a low level of care will be in a relatively normal
environment, whereas beds and desks will be fixed in place in units serving girls who need a high level of
specialized care.

104
The existing and new facilities will operate independently, with the exception of two features: An
outdoor walkway and a full service kitchen. The two facilities will be connected via a secure outdoor
walkway. In addition, a full service kitchen in the new facility will enable staff to prepare home-
cooked meals for both facilities. Currently, meals for Letot Center residents are provided by the Dallas
County Sheriff s Department.

B. Plans for administration of proposed activity

1. Key staff for project and qualifications


Staffing

Staffing for the Girls Center will include the following:


Administrative staff Mental & physical health
o Superintendent o Lead psychologist
o Assistant director o Eight clinical Masters- level
Law enforcement and County therapists
services o Nurse (part-time or full-time)
o Probation officer o Cook
o Child protective services officer Charter school Dallas Independent
o Law enforcement officer School District
o Six case managers o Principal
o Forty-eight supervision officers o Assistant Principal
o Eight teachers

Qualifications for the above positions will be in accordance with current Dallas County Juvenile
Department and Dallas Independent School District requirements. Please see the attached Letot Girls
Residential Treatment Center Proposed Operating Budget for staffing and operating expense details.

2. Number of new personnel involved and plan for new personnel upon completion of
project
Because the Girls Center will be a new facility, all of the personnel will be new. It is likely that some
staff currently working at Letot Center and serving on committees and sub-committees to develop the
Girls Center curriculum may choose to apply for transfers to the Girls Center.

C. Plans for operating project

1. Timetable and/or schedule for implementing project


Construction drawings are underway and a late spring or fall groundbreaking is anticipated to coincide
with completing the $8.7 million campaign goal. Construction will require 14 16 months. The Junior
League of Dallas will plan and execute festivities to celebrate the Girls Center grand opening.

2. Current status of the project


To date, $7.4 million of the $8.7 million campaign goal has been secured.

D. Plans for financing the project

1. Itemized statement of expenditures for the entire project


Financing the Expansion

The Board of Trustees of the Letot Center Capital Foundation has authorized a capital campaign to raise
gifts and grants for the expansion from foundations, corporations, individuals and families. The
campaign will seek to raise a total of $8.7 million.
9

105
A summary budget for project is as follows:

Mechanical, Electrical & Plumbing 1,565,200


Masonry & Structural Steel 1,084,200
Wood Trusses and Roofing 797,900
A & E & Miscellaneous 778,127
Property Purchase, Asbestos Abatement, Demolition 652,000
General Conditions & Performance Bonds 518,973
Drywall and Acoustical 470,000
Concrete 423,200
Construction Contingency (5%) 385,000
Finishes 357,600
Contractors Fee 350,000
Glassing & Glazing 298,000
Furniture, Fixtures & Equipment 250,000
Doors, Frames & Hardware 248,100
Site Paving & Utilities 223,400
Site Preparation & Earth Work 178,300
Signage and Specialties 87,000
Landscape & Irrigation 50,000

Total $8,717,000

Budgets for enrichment and vocational activities are being developed as programs are explored. These
funds will be held in the Letot Center Enrichment and Grounds Fund at The Dallas Foundation,
separate from funds donated for construction purposes.

Donations to the capital campaign will be directed to and held in the Letot Center Capital Foundation
fund at The Dallas Foundation. The Dallas Foundation will manage the funds and oversee their
disbursement during construction of the facility.

Following the precedent of the existing Letot Center, the facility will be built using private sector funds
and gifted to the County which will provide for ongoing operating expenses and building maintenance.

2. Specific amount being requested from The Moody Foundation


Trustees of the Letot Center Capital Foundation respectfully request a grant of $1.5 million - $1.3
million would be used to complete the campaign and $200,000 would be used for enrichment and
vocational programs.

In grateful recognition for a gift of $1.5 million, the Board of Trustees of the Letot Center Capital
Foundation will be pleased to create The Moody Foundation Education Wing. In addition, The Moody
Foundation will be recognized with all donors to the project in a prominent location inside the building.

3. Listing of funds on hand or pledged for project (from foundations, individuals,


corporations, in-kind, etc.
Major Donors
February 28, 2012

CAPITAL CAMPAIGN GOAL: $8,700,000

10

106
FUNDING PLEDGED & RECEIVED $7,355,644

TOTAL
Foundations $5,328,108
Dallas Womens Foundation 1,000,000
Embrey Family Foundation 500,000
Hoblitzelle Foundation 500,000
Meadows Foundation 500,000
Rees-Jones Foundation, The 500,000
Simmons Foundation, Harold 500,000
Anonymous Foundation 300,000
Hillcrest Foundation 250,000
Perot Foundation 250,000
Anonymous Foundation 197,000
Anonymous Foundation 175,000
Hersh Foundation 100,000
Weaver Foundation, The Gil and Dody 100,000
Young Foundation, George and Fay 100,000
Anonymous Fund 75,000
Dallas Foundation, The 50,000
Hoglund Foundation, The 50,000
Weaver Charitable Trust, Bill and Katie 25,000
Williams Fund of the DWF, Abigail 25,000
Zale Foundation, M.B. and Edna 25,000
Anonymous Fund 20,000
Communities Foundation of Texas 20,000
Baron and Blue Foundation 10,000
Anonymouse 10,000
Anonymous Fund of the Dallas Foundation 10,000
Perkins-Prothro Foundation 10,000
Foundation grants < $10,000 26,108

Individuals $408,036
Name $200,000
Name 101,716
Name 25,000
Name 25,000
Individual gifts < $20,000 51,320

Organizations $940,000
Crystal Charity Ball 850,000
Junior League of Dallas, 90th Anniversary $90,000

Corporations $27,500
Ben E. Keith Company 20,000
Mary Kay, Inc. 5,000
Anonymous $2,500

Dallas County (In-kind) $652,000

BALANCE REQUIRED: $1,344,356

11

107
4. Listing of other sources where proposals for project are submitted or pending
Dallas Southwest Osteopathic Physicians
Gill Foundation, Pauline Allen
Hunt Philanthropic Fund, Nancy Ann and Ray L.
Luse Foundation, W. P. & Bulah
McCune Trust, John R.
McDermott Foundation, Eugene
Myers Foundation, Mike
Sturgis Charitable Trust, Roy & Christine

5. Description of how project will be financed after initial funding expires


The Dallas County Juvenile Department will provide for the Girls Centers $2.25 million annual
operating budget.

E. Plans for evaluation of project

1. Unit of measure and time span for evaluation


A core measure of success will be to reduce recidivism among runaway girls and teen prostitutes.

2. Projected results
Recidivism, which currently stands at 80%, will be reduced to 65% within two years and further in future
years.

3. Proposed method for evaluating impact or success or project.


An Evaluation sub-committee of the Girls Center Program Development Committee will have
responsibility for creating a tracking system for girls who leave the Girls Center as well as establishing
program evaluation criteria. The following components of the Girls Center program will be considered
as evaluation criteria are developed:
Gender (Female) Responsive
o Curriculum will be written for females
o Treatment model will have gender responsive focus
o All facility staff be trained in providing gender responsive services prior to opening
Evaluation method: Data collection; service plans and other reports.
Family Participation
o Family participation will written in court orders
o Assist in transportation needs; bus passes, handicap, etc.
o Have members of treatment team do a quarterly home visit with family
o Include family in decision-making regarding treatment plans
o Provide parent education groups including, adolescent development, parenting skills,
adolescent mental illness/psychotropic medications, dealing with abuse and
posttraumatic stress syndrome, grief and loss, physical health, and student coaching.
Evaluation method: Data Collection
Medical and Dental
o Regular access to medical and dental exams and treatment
o Education on the importance in regular exams and treatment
o Arrange for access to services after discharge
Evaluation method: Data collection from screenings
Volunteers
o Mentoring
o Professional/Career counseling
12

108
o Provide donated goods and services to the center's residents
Evaluation Method: surveys
Chaplaincy Services
o Provides opportunity for spiritual formation while insuring their rights of religious
freedom.
o Involve community churches.
Preparation for Independent Living
o Partner with the Transition Resource Action Center
Emergency Services
Jobs/Careers
Legal Services
PAL Benefits
Special Needs
Transitional Housing
Transportation
Education
o Individual education plans
o ARDS
o Credit recovery
o Improvement in grades
o State testing
o GED preparation and testing
o On-line course work
o Educational transition services to locate a new school setting, or find resources for
career training
Evaluation Method: Data collection from school records.
Case Management Services
o Participate on treatment team
o Develop and coordinate network of community resources to wrap around the family
o Rights Protection - assured for center youth by a Rights Officer, who is available to
assist center youth, families and staff in understanding the youth's rights, privileges, and
responsibilities
Evaluation Method: Progress reports
Clinical Services
o Clinical Assessment tool
o Coordination of the treatment team
o Individual and group therapy
o Family therapy
o Group therapy with specialized focus
Treatment
o Develop individualized treatment plan for each resident based on goals or targets
centered on the behaviors of concern that led to the referral.
o Develop the treatment plan within ten (10) days of admission and review at periodic
intervals throughout the person's stay
o Provide an on-site NA and AA groups for residents targeting, lifestyle issues, drug
problems, and their underlying issues.
o Community involvement: Achievement of behavioral change within the treatment
environment is only part of the task. Test newly acquired skills in a community
environment. Provide the residents with opportunities to do so through interaction with
volunteers who come to the facility, trips into the community for a variety of reasons,

13

109
and interactions with their families at the facility or on scheduled therapeutic home
visits.
Evaluation Method: Data collection; progress reports; follow-up upon completion
of program.
Aftercare Program
o Family Participation in Aftercare program after discharge.
Evaluation Method: Data Collection and Follow-up home visits.
Program Evaluation
o Program completion = 165 days to 180 days; No probation violations; No administrative
discharges; No new offenses committed
Evaluation Criteria: 85% successful discharge
o Parent/legal guardian attends individual, family group therapy and treatment team
meetings.
Evaluation criteria: 80% participation by parent/legal guardian
o Re-Entry in Educational program

4. Target audience for disseminating results of project


The target audiences for disseminating results of the project include the Dallas Police Department,
Dallas County Commissioners, the Dallas County Juvenile Department and The Dallas Womens
Foundation. The High Risk Victims and Trafficking Unit of the Dallas Police Force will disseminate the
information in presentations made around the nation about Dallas landmark work with runaway youth
and exploited girls.

Statewide partners that would receive the information include:


Statewide Attorneys General taskforce on Human Trafficking
Mosaic Family Services
Human Rights Initiative of North Texas
Catholic Charities
Houston Rescue and Restore Coalition
Texas Rio Grande Legal Aid
Various Statewide coalitions

Additional national partners that would be sent the information include:


A Future. Not A Past. Stop the Prostitution of Our Nations Children
Polaris Project
Shared Hope International
ECPAT End Child Prostitution Child Pornography and Trafficking of Children for Sexual
Purposes
Not For Sale Campaign
Girl Effect

V. SUPPORT INFORMATION PERTAINING TO ORGANIZATION REQUESTING FUNDS

A. Photocopy of latest IRS determination of tax-exempt status under Sections 501(c)(3)


dated after January 1, 1970. IRS letter dated September 20, 2011 is attached.

B. 1. Statement of organization letterhead affirming there has been no change in


purpose, character or method of operation subsequent to the issuance of the IRS ruling.
Statement on letterhead is attached.

14

110
2. Pursuant to the Pension Protection Act of 2006, please provide a statement
affirming that applicant is not a functionally integrated Type 3 supporting organization
as defined by the IRS. Statement on letterhead is attached.

C. Complete copy of most recently files Form 990. Form 990 dated October 13, 2011 is
attached.

D. Current operating budget for organization* Letot Center and the Letot Girls Center is a
program of the Dallas County Juvenile Department.

E. Projected operating budget for years(s) in which funding is requested* Please see the
attached Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center Proposed Operating Budget

F. Audited financial statement for most recent year* Please see the attached umbrella letter
and audit from The Dallas Foundation.
The Letot Center Capital Foundation was formed in 1988 to receive $3 million in private sector
donations to build the existing Letot Center facility. At the time the Foundation was initiated, this
was its only purpose.

Since the completion of the $3 million campaign, the Foundation has provided funding to Letot
Center for three primary purposes:
1) Furniture and equipment (50%),
2) Special youth programs (40%) and
3) Staff recognition (10%).

Expenditures for any one item have not exceeded $5,000 - $10,000 annually. The Foundation has
no staff or overhead and all Letot Center operating expenses are provided for by Dallas County,
through the Dallas County Commissioners Court and Juvenile Department.

Because Letot Center is a Dallas County entity, it does not receive donations. Rather, donations are
channeled to the Foundation and distributed for the three purposes listed above.

Occasional donations to the Foundation are received from individuals and organizations who visit
and/or volunteer, grateful individuals whose children were served by Letot Center and generous
individuals who were involved with the organizations founding in 1979. The Foundation does not
raise funds.

Over the years the Foundation has maintained a balance of between $25,000 and $40,000 and had
revenues of less than $25,000 annually. Consequently, it does not have an annual budget, financial
statements or an audit. Income and expense statements are the only financial records maintained.
Changes in IRS regulations required the Foundation to file its first 990N in 2009. The Foundations
first full 990 was submitted for 2010.

Donations to the Girls Center campaign are being directed to and held in the Letot Center Capital
Foundation fund at The Dallas Foundation. The Dallas Foundation will manage the funds and
oversee their disbursement during construction of the facility.

For more information about the Letot Center Capital Foundation please contact Name, President, at
phone number or email address.

15

111
G. Interim financial statement of income and expenses from time of last audit to present.*
Please see the attached budget and financial statement from The Dallas Foundation.

H. Roster of present officers and directors,, including business affiliations.* Please see the
attached Letot Center Capital Foundation leadership roster.

I. Support letters from key persons backing the project. Please see the attached letter from the
Dallas County Commissioners Court.

J. Any readily available printed materials, such as annual reports, pamplets or catalogs.
Please see the attached:
Letot Center brochure
Letot Center and Letot Girls Center Program Comparison
Letot Girls Center fact sheet
Letot Girls Center floor plans
Invisible Girls Stories
Letot Girls Center Community Partners

*Not applicable to government agencies.

16

112
The Hoglund Foundation
Full Grant Proposal Checklist
The following is a checklist of the items that must be included in your Full Grant Proposal.
Please return this form signed by the person responsible for writing the Full Grant Proposal and
the Executive Director, along with all required documentation.

The organizations name, address, phone number, contact person, email address,
and website, if applicable.

The organizations mission statement, brief summary and statement of need.


Amount of funds requested and the purpose for the funds being requested.
Project or capital budget (if applicable) and plans to support the project
along with a project timeline.

Total annual operating budget.


Plans for evaluation of the project or program.
A list of current Officers and Board of Directors.
Documentation of tax-exempt status from the IRS verifying eligibility.
A detailed explanation of the purpose of the requested funds.
An explanation as to why the agency is best suited to provide this
project or program.

Names of other community resources, if any, that are serving this need.
Current year-to-date financial statements and operating budget.
Most recent audited financial statement (or last years IRS Form 990 filed and the
last fiscal years internal financial statements if audit is not available).

A list of other major funding and potential funding sources or matching funds.
A summary of the number of people served annually by this program or project
and the anticipated outcome.

Detailed analysis of the evaluation method/plan for program or project.

Name ___________________________________________ Date_______________

Name ___________________________________________ Date_______________

Agency _______________________________________________________________

5910 N. Central Expwy., Suite 255, Dallas, TX 75206 p 214.987.3605 f 214.363.6507 www.hoglundfoundation.org
113
Proposal Checklist
(Compiled from The Grantsmanship Centers Proposal checklist and selected local foundation guidelines)

Introduction/background

____ Text clearly establishes who is applying for funds


____ Expresses agencys mission, purpose and goals
____ Describes agencys program services
____ Provides evidence of accomplishments, reliability and credibility

Statement of Need

____ Statement supported by statistics/information from published reports, surveys, sources of


authority
____ Need and proposed solutions are of reasonable dimensions not trying to solve all the problems
of the world
____ Describes how the project will have broad community impact both now and in the future
____ Text makes a compelling case; is interesting, brief and free of jargon

Objectives

____ Objectives are clear, concise and specific


____ Objectives address problems referred to in Statement of Need
____ Describes population that will benefit
____ States time by which objectives will be accomplished
____ Describes the evaluation process

Action Plan /Methodology

____ Text clearly describes sequence of project activities and reasons for selecting activities
____ Describes staffing (professional and volunteer) for client population
____ Presents a reasonable scope of activities that can be completed within the time and resources of
the program

Evaluation procedures

____ Presents a plan for evaluating project or a plan for modifying the project, if necessary
____ States who will be evaluating, criteria for success, how data will be gathered
____ Describes any evaluation reports to be produced

114
Funding

____ Budget is detailed in all aspects (benefits, taxes, pension)


____ Tells the same story as the narrative
____ Contains no unexplained amounts for contingency, misc.
____ Includes all items asked of the funding source as well as items paid for by other sources
(including services and products)
____ Includes consultant fees

Future funding

____ Provides a specific plan for future funding of project


____ Describes other funding sources being approached for project
____ Explains how maintenance costs will be obtained (i.e., capital construction grant/endowment for
maintenance)
____ Has minimal reliance on future grant support

Summary Concluding

____ States the overall impact the funder will have through the project
____ Explains how the request reflects the funders interests and values
____ Expresses professional and community support for the project
____ Repeats specific financial request
____ Text is compelling, interesting and free of jargon

Summary Introductory

____ Identifies the grant applicant, the proposed project, total cost of project, specific request, funds
already obtained
____ Refers to timeliness and uniqueness of project
____ Refers to credibility of the agency
____ Briefly refers to community need, proposed project and solutions
____ Text is brief, clear and compelling

115
May 8, 2008

Namet
Foundation Name
Address
City, State Zip

Dear Name:

Thank you for the past support The (Name of Foundation) has
provided Home Hospice. The Foundation has demonstrated its commitment
to providing charity hospice care in Grayson County and, for this, we are
deeply grateful. At this time, we want to present a special request that will
impact Home Hospices ability to provide hospice care far into the future.

Home Hospice is engaged in a $1.6 million capital funding endeavor


for the purpose of renovating and expanding our offices to provide an efficient
and productive work environment. Our goal is to create an environment
which will enable staff and volunteers to meet the rapidly growing demands of
patients and family members for hospice services until at least 2030.

On behalf of the Board of Directors, we respectfully request a grant of


$250,000, spread over three years, from The (Name of Foundation). We
would be pleased to recognize a grant at this level in the areas of the Main
Entrance Waiting Area and the Large Training/Conference room. In addition,
(The Name of Foundation would be recognized with all other donors to the
project in a prominent location inside the building.

Gifts totaling $186,400 have been committed thus far in this early
stage of the campaign. The Board is unanimous in its endorsement of this
campaign, and all Directors have committee to provide financial support.

The End of Life Journey - When people think about death they often
consider both spiritual and worldly matters. They worry about lost income
and health insurance and how they may become a burden to their family.
They are concerned about the financial and emotional well-being of their
family members after their death. Often these fears loom so large that they
prevent a person from talking about the future and practical matters or sharing
their thoughts and love so they live every moment as fully as possible.

116
As you know, Home Hospice works daily providing the highest quality end-of-life
care available to patients with a life-limiting diagnosis as well as comfort and support to
families who grieve. We offer services to all who seek them, regardless of ability to pay.

Growing Demand - Like many regions with strong economies and good
educational and cultural offerings, the greater Texoma area is growing steadily. Population
projections for Grayson County indicate increases of 4.0 to 4.3 percent every five years
from 2005 through 2030. Within this time period, however, individuals 65 years and older
living in Grayson County will increase from 14.7 to 23.2 percent of the total population.
As a result, number of individuals over 65 will almost double, increasing from just over
17,000 to almost 33,400.

Our team of caring professionals and well-trained volunteers assist patients and
families with services that enhance quality of life, comfort, peace, resolution and
achievement of goals. In 2005, a total of 40 patients per day were served. However, by
the close of 2007, Home Hospice experienced a 252 percent increase in demand and served
101 patients per day. This dramatic increase in services can be attributed to the general
publics increased knowledge of the benefits of end-of-life care, overall population growth,
growth in numbers of senior adults and the reputation of Home Hospice.

While Home Hospice serves patients of all ages, a significant majority of patients
are elderly. During 2007, seventy percent of the patients served by Home Hospice were
over 70 years of age. Approximately 41 percent of the total patients served (239) were
women and 30 percent (164) were men.

In 2007, Home Hospice provided charity care to 37 patients, just over 6.5% of the
total patients served. In the first quarter of 2008, however, 13 charity care patients have
been served.

The Current Facility - Home Hospice owns a 3,580 square foot building at 505 W.
Center Street in Sherman from which it serves its patients, their families and the
communities of three counties. At the time the building was occupied in 1993,
approximately 35 patients were served daily and the facility was more than adequate for all
programs and services.

However, over the past several years, the Home Hospice Governing Board has
become increasingly concerned about the organizations ability to fulfill the rapidly
increasing demand for services and the staff and volunteer work environment. Currently,
every available area of the building is being used. Office space designed for 20 to 25 now
houses 40 to 45 staff members.

The noise level is so high that nurses are seen bent over the phones with free hands
covering their exposed ears in order to discern which medicines need to be refilled or the
specifics of a change a physician is making. So many phones ring in such close proximity
that no one can tell which one is ringing.

117
The bereavement coordinator who often speaks with distraught family members
who have just experienced a death shares an office with three social workers and chaplain.
Nothing is private or calm and there is not much room between the five desks, chairs, file
cabinets and book shelves.

Additional staff members cannot be hired as there is no space available for


additional workstations. One passage between rooms and adjacent to the copier and fax
machines is so narrow that only one person can walk through at a time. Conference,
library and break room areas have been converted to workstations and/or supply and
medical chart storage. Library materials are now boxed and in the attic. Supervisors do
not have private space in which to counsel employees. Volunteers must rotate among the
workstations of staff who are out of the office. Grief support groups, committees and the
Home Hospice Board must meet at various off-site locations.

The facility is inadequate for the current staff and service demand, much less to
provide for future growth. More importantly, the facility does not provide a comfortable,
stress-free environment for family members, staff and volunteers who deal daily with
critical, emotional end-of-life issues.

Meeting Future Demand - To meet growing challenges, Home Hospice Governing


Board is taking prudent steps to ensure adequate facilities in Sherman, the center from
which our professional and capable staff come together and then disburse. We have
decided to undertake the expansion and renovation of the current facility to alleviate the
work environment and space needs. The expanded and renovated facility will
accommodate workspaces for up to 61 staff and volunteers in a total of 9,880 square feet.

Approximately 6,300 square feet of conference, office and storage space will be
added to the north end of the existing facility. This new area will provide 34 modular
workstations for staff, seven private staff offices, 300 square feet of file and medical chart
storage, a small conference room, a fax and copier work area, a break room and general
storage areas. A small exterior patio adjacent to the break room will allow staff and
volunteers a peaceful, landscaped outdoor environment. Eleven parking spaces will be
added to the existing parking lot.

In addition, attic space above the new area will provide 1,500 square feet of air-
conditioned storage space for medical equipment, supplies and archival and general
storage.

The existing 3,580 square feet will be renovated to include a waiting area and
administrative/reception workstation, quiet room, kitchen, large conference room,
workroom, a fax and copier work area, three private offices, six workstations and 10-12
cubicles for Certified Nursing Assistants who work primarily off-site.

118
Financing the Renovation and Expansion - A summary of the budget for the
expansion and renovation of the facility is as follows:

Site Preparation $257,000


Building Expansion (7,800 s.f. @ $80/s.f.) 624,000
Building Renovation (3,575 s.f. @ $50/s.f.) 175,000
Furniture, Fixtures & Equipment 300,000
Fees, Permits and Soft Costs 115,000
Contingency (10%) 107,600

Total $1,578,600

Building maintenance and operational expenses will be provided for in Home


Hospices annual budget. Once the $1.6 million goal is achieved, no further funds will be
required for the Capital Campaign.

The Rooted in the Past, Growing for the Future capital building project will be
evaluated on 1) the timely renovation and expansion of the facility, 2) a comparison of
actual and budgeted project expenses, 3) the increase in patients and families served after
the first year in the reconfigured facility. It is not possible to state a time-specific goal for
this building project until construction documents and plans are finalized. However, we
anticipate that construction will require six to eight months.

A more spacious and comfortable building for the expansion of programs will
position Home Hospice to effectively meet the challenge of fulfilling hospice needs far
into the future.

Enclosed with this proposal are architectural drawings showing the reconfigured
facility, a list of Home Hospice Trustees and Campaign Cabinet members, a general
information brochure, an IRS letter of determination, donor recognition opportunities, a list
of committed funding, a Statement of Intent form and return envelope. Please let us know
if there is any additional information we may provide.

Please let us know if there is any additional information we may provide or if you
would like to arrange a tour. Thank you for all The (Name of Foundation) does to benefit
our community . . . and for your consideration of our request.

Sincerely,

Name Name Name


Co-Chair, Co-Chair, Executive Director
Campaign Cabinet Campaign Cabinet

Encl:

119
The Rees-Jones Foundation Application Form Page 1 of 13

The Rees-Jones Foundation Application Form


Organization Information

Organization Name
Letot Center Capital Foundation

Legal Name
Please list the name of your organization as it appear on your IRS Determination Letter.

Letot Center Capital Foundation

Address
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

City
Dallas

State
Texas

Zip Code
XXXXX

Phone
XXXXXXXXXX

Fax

E-mail Address
General information e-mail address, NOT the primary contact's e-mail address.

Website Address

Organization Type
From the drop down below, please select the description that best describes your organization.

Youth Programs

Annual Budget
Total Annual Operating Budget

$0

120

https://www.grantrequest.com/SID_797/Default.asp?PRINTER=1&SESID=407cedce348... 12/23/2010
The Rees-Jones Foundation Application Form Page 2 of 13

Percentage of Annual Budget Dedicated to Program Expenses


Program expenses are distinguished from administrative expenses and fundraising expenses.

Ending Month of Your Fiscal Year


Sep

Organization Mission Statement


The mission of the Dallas County Juvenile Department's Letot Center is to assist referred youth in becoming productive, law
abiding citizens while promoting public safety and victim restoration. (Mission statement for the existing Letot Center.)

Primary Organization Contact Information

Please fill out the following fields as they pertain to Executive Director/CEO/President of your organization.

Prefix
Ms.

First Name
XXXX

Last Name
XXXXXX

Title
Superintendent

E-mail
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Office Phone
(XXX) XXX-XXXX

Proposal Contact Information

Please fill out the following fields as they pertain to the contact person for this proposal.

If this contact is the same as the Primary Organization Contact, leave these fields blank.

Prefix
Ms.

First Name
XXXXX

Last Name

121

https://www.grantrequest.com/SID_797/Default.asp?PRINTER=1&SESID=407cedce348... 12/23/2010
The Rees-Jones Foundation Application Form Page 3 of 13

XXXXXX

Title
Campaign Co-Chair

E-mail
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Office Phone
XXXXXXXXXX

Organization Background

Please provide a description of your organization.

Background
Brief history of the organization and description of existing services that includes the following: mission statement, current
programs and accomplishments
The mission of the Dallas County Juvenile Department's Letot Center is to assist referred youth in becoming productive, law
abiding citizens while promoting public safety and victim restoration.

Since 1979 Letot Center has provided immediate assessment, crisis intervention, emergency shelter and referral services to
Dallas area youth who are in the beginning stages of delinquency. The Center "stops the crisis" allowing the youth, their
families and law enforcement an opportunity to assess the complex factors that led to the crisis. Through the Center's
comprehensive services, youth avoid committing criminal offenses and entering the Juvenile Justice System. The Center's
services are unique because, whenever possible, family members are engaged in treatment programs supported by a network
of more than 135 community-based partners.

As one of the first programs in the United States to provide comprehensive intervention services for youth, Letot Center
remains a national model. The Center was established through a public-private effort by the Dallas County Juvenile
Department, Dallas Independent School District and the Junior League of Dallas. In 1990, a 40,000 square foot, 40-bed facility
built with $3 million in private donations became the central point for providing residential shelter and non-residential services.
Today, Letot Center is the largest and most comprehensive provider for youth intervention services in the United States and
has served more than 60,000 youth and their families.

Additional Background Information


Please provide supplemental information that will give a more complete picture of your organization than provided in your
letter of inquiry. Include number of people served per year, demographics of served population, and current number of staff
and volunteers, etc.
Licensed by the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, the Letot Center's staff of 60 provides 24-hour
assessments, crisis intervention, emergency shelter and out-patient counseling and referral services, all of which is provided
free of charge to Dallas County residents. In 2009, the Center served 2,024 youth and their families, conducted 15,424
counseling sessions and handled more than 3,000 crisis calls. Thirty-nine different law enforcement agencies brought 1,343
youth to Letot Center's Intake Unit. Youth who received services were primarily female (74%), an average age was 14.6 years
old and approximately 79% minority -- 44% Black, 34% Hispanic and 1% American Indian and Asian. Additionally, 48
volunteers enhanced Letot Center programs by giving 2,000 hours of their time.

Intake Unit
Letot Center's 24-hour Intake Unit provides immediate family crisis intervention, assessment and referral services for all Dallas
County status offenders and runaway youth referred by police agencies. The Unit works aggressively to engage parents in
counseling and divert youth from shelter placement by providing follow-up non-residential counseling and support services.
Intake staff is responsible for placing youth back with parents or in a shelter program within six hours. If needed, a Transitional
Unit of eight beds houses youth while they are waiting.

In 2009, the Intake Unit served 1,341 youth. Sixty-nine percent of the youth who were brought to the Center were released to
parents or relatives due to the Intake Unit's crisis intervention services and referrals to a network of more than 135
community-based partners. These youth were provided individualized treatment plans, thus empowering them and their
families to address critical relationship issues. Nearby bus and train services bring parents and family members within easy

122

https://www.grantrequest.com/SID_797/Default.asp?PRINTER=1&SESID=407cedce348... 12/23/2010
The Rees-Jones Foundation Application Form Page 4 of 13

walking distance of the Center.

Intake Unit staffing includes one supervisor, seven probation officers, part-time intake officers, one secretary, one
transportation officer and five juvenile supervision officers.

Non-residential Services
Probation officers provide services for two programs: Deferred-Prosecution and Crisis Intervention Services. Staffing includes
one supervisor and three probation officers.

Deferred-Prosecution services involve probation officers in providing first-time offenders with support and monitoring to
decrease the probability of future juvenile arrest and referral. In addition, a Truancy Probation Officer works with the school
districts, judges and youth service agencies to manage truancy problems. Crisis Intervention Services provides families with
services and resources through a maximum of six sessions to prevent future involvement with the Juvenile Justice System.

Last year, 546 youth and families were referred directly from the Intake Unit and participated in non-residential support
services.

Residential Services
Letot Center's 32-bed residential shelter can serve 24 girls and 8 boys in three separate dormotories. In 2009, Letot served
427 youth. The average length of stay was 24 days and Letot's shelter beds were full 88% of the time.

While at the shelter, many youth experience, for the first time, strong relationships with caring adults, physical safety and
security and opportunities for personal growth. Interestingly, youth are not restricted from leaving the facility and ninety-eight
percent stay at the Center until they are discharged. At the time of their discharge 74% of youth were successfully reunited
with their families.

The Center's highly structured and intensive program emphasizes each youth's talents and assets and engages youth in
activities such as journaling, yoga, visual arts, creative writing, sports and exercise. Individual, group and family counseling
and experiential groups help build competency in making healthy decisions, building positive relationships, managing stress
and anger and developing character.

Professional staff deliver a wide range of programs with support from professional agencies and trained volunteers. Examples
include:
Education Services / Charter School -- Dallas County Juvenile Justice Charter School
HIV & STD Testing and Education -- Dallas County Health Department
Suicide / Depression Screening -- Suicide and Crisis Center
Psychological Testing -- Juvenile Department Psychology Services
Psychiatric Consultation -- Juvenile Department Psychology Services
Substance Abuse Education -- Juvenile Department Psychology Services
Non-denominational Church Program -- Volunteer Chaplains

Three Charter School teachers assist youth in continuing their education which, for many youth, is their first positive school
experience. Classes are limited to 12 students and teachers work to reintegrate youth successfully back into the appropriate
school environment or into a GED program. Often teachers are able to enroll youth who were never enrolled in school or who
were dropped from school rolls due to excessive truancy.

Clinical Unit
The Psychology Division provides therapeutic services to youth and families served by the Center. One supervising psychologist
and three master's level therapists work to stabilize the youth and their family system and provide ongoing support. Specific
services include crisis screening and intervention, in-patient and out-patient individual and family therapy. Work with youth in
the residential shelter focuses on improving skills and work with youth and families in non-residential programs focuses on
enhancing the family's functioning. In addition, the Clinical Unit provides inpatient and out-patient services for girls who have
been or are at risk of being exploited. Core elements of these services are a specialized assessment and curriculum, HOPE --
Helping Overcome and Prevent Exploitation, which were developed by the Unit.

Proposal Information

Project Title
A one sentence description of your project.

Transforming Invisible Girls, a project to empower our young victims and their families and combat human trafficking in Dallas
County.

123

https://www.grantrequest.com/SID_797/Default.asp?PRINTER=1&SESID=407cedce348... 12/23/2010
The Rees-Jones Foundation Application Form Page 5 of 13

Requested Amount
$5,000,000

Project or Operations Description


Please provide a brief description (500 words) of your project.

The Letot Girls' Residential Treatment Center will be a long-term, residential treatment program designed for girls ages 13 -
17. It will be the largest of two gender-specific, therapeutic programs in the country and the only program in the nation
designed to prevent teen prostitution by serving runaway girls. Issues unique to girls - extreme abuse, prostitution and
abandonment - will be addressed through an intensive and highly structured program that will serve up to 96 girls at a time.

Geographical Area Served


From the drop down below, please select the geographic area where the funds would be spent.

Texas-North Texas-Dallas

Type of Support
From the drop down below, please select the support type option that best matches the use for which the funding is requested.

Capital Fund Support

Project Budget
Total cost of the project

$8,700,000

This section will address the description and goals of the proposed project or program.

Please explain the unmet need your project or program addresses. Include information about the targeted population and the
projected benefit to that population.
THE PROBLEM: INVISIBLE GIRLS
The majority of the adolescent females, ages 13 -- 17, who come into contact with Dallas County law enforcement come from
homes where chaos is rampant. Physical, sexual and emotional abuse and domestic violence are the norm and they receive
little respect or trust. These girls have no control over their lives. They never know when the next outburst or abuse will
happen. For them, life is unpredictable and terrifying.

Living in an environment which is dangerous affects girls' self-perception and behavior. They respond by developing their own
substance abuse problems, running away from home, skipping school, fighting with others and committing more serious
offenses. Nearly 50% of these girls meet the diagnostic criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder. Ninety percent of girls who
run away are repeat sexual abuse victims.

Because there are no caring adults protecting them, these girls are isolated and alone. Many run away from home. Long-
standing Juvenile Justice programs focus on victims under 13 and offenders who commit more serious crimes. These girls are
not young enough or "bad" enough to attract attention from traditional law enforcement, social service and educational
systems. No one is watching over them or searching for them. They are "invisible." On any given day, Dallas Police
Department, Letot Center and Texas Department of Family and Protective Services officials can identify approximately 250 of
these girls in our community.

Exploited Invisible Girls = Teen Prostitutes


Invisible girls are extremely vulnerable of being exploited by criminals who provide food, shelter, protection and emotional
support. These girls are recruited into prostitution at two critical points in time: 1) before they leave the chaos of home and 2)
after they have run away and are living on the street.

Astute pimps seek invisible girls and seduce them with affection and security which fulfills girls' cravings for emotional

124

https://www.grantrequest.com/SID_797/Default.asp?PRINTER=1&SESID=407cedce348... 12/23/2010
The Rees-Jones Foundation Application Form Page 6 of 13

connections. Girls become emotionally and physically dependent on pimps and are manipulated into "the life" of prostitution,
sometimes after physical abuse.

The other point in time when girls are recruited into prostitution is after they have run away and are attempting to live on the
street. "Bottom girls" of prostitution rings reach out to girls on the street expressing concern and offering food, shelter . . . and
a way to make money.

Girls move into the prostitution houses and are welcomed as newcomers. They believe they have entered a peaceful home with
a father figure who loves them. However, girls are expected to turn "tricks" 365 days a year and give all their earnings to their
pimps.

Interestingly, most teen prostitutes are not drug users. Girls have no money to purchase drugs and pimps will not fund their
girls' drug habits. Rather, girls are controlled through emotional security and kept in prostitution through love and violence -
beatings, cigarettes burns and death threats. In addition, pimps post "look-outs" to prevent girls from running away.

Despite the abuse they experience and the "tricks" they must turn, life is predictable for teen prostitutes and, consequently,
preferable to the chaotic home environment they escaped. Sadly however, life expectancy for teen prostitutes is predictable --
only seven years from the time they enter "the life."

Human Trafficking in Dallas County


Dallas County has one of the largest human trafficking problems in the United States with an estimated 400 girls on the street
at night.

Ten years ago the prevailing thought was that if teens did not want to be in prostitution, they would get out. Teen prostitutes
were labeled as bad, troubled girls. They were arrested as offenders and jailed. Runaway girls were returned home. Like many
law enforcement units across the country, Dallas Police saw teen prostitutes as offenders.

However, in 2005 Dallas Police officials realized that arrests of teen prostitutes are ineffective. Teen prostitutes are both
dependent on pimps and afraid of being killed by them. Because girls will not testify against pimps, arrests stopped teen
prostitution temporarily and did not lead to the prosecution of pimps. After their first, second, third and even the fourth arrests
and releases from jail, teen prostitutes headed straight back to their pimps.

Officials realized that they needed a new approach to help teen prostitutes get out of "the life." Police officials began to look
into what caused teens to become prostitutes. They found that 80% of the girls had run away from troubled, fatherless homes.
More than 93% had been sexually abused, 96% physically abused and 87% had been abandoned. Family risk factors included
very high levels of parent physical and sexual abuse, divorce and single parent homes.

The High Risk Victims and Trafficking Unit's goals are to:
Curb or prevent repeat runaway incidents by:
o Identifying any prior incidents of sexual abuse and exploitation, and
o Redirect the girl from any future delinquent conduct
Bring to an end or curb the victimization of children through prostitution and sexual exploitation.

This Unit has responsibility for searching for runaway girls and teen prostitutes and, as a result, processes 250 - 300 identified
high risk victims a year. Once they are found, officers begin conversations to help runaway girls and teen prostitutes
understand that 1) they are not at fault, but have been manipulated victims, 2) officers are part of the largest "gang" in the
world who will continue to seek, find and protect girls again and again, if necessary, and 3) with the help of the High Risk
Victims and Trafficking Unit, Letot and more than 90 community-based services they can avoid or choose to leave prostitution
and rebuild their lives.

A key element in the effectiveness of the High Risk Victims and Trafficking Unit is the education and training they provide to
the entire Dallas police force. This unit regularly educates police officers about the causes of teen prostitution and how to
identify high risk victims and runaway girls before they become prostitutes. Officers understand that instead of returning the
runaway girls to their homes, early intervention is critical to preventing teen prostitution, removing teens from "the life" and
arresting pimps.

Twice a month Unit officers, along with volunteer missing persons, vice and undercover officers, conduct overnight sweeps to
search for runaway girls and teen prostitutes identified through their database of underage runaway girls. Sweeps result in
locating girls and taking them to Letot Center for a short-term stay.

Another key element in the effectiveness of this Unit is the partnerships officers have built with community-based support
services. Officers have emphasized strengthening existing connections within the community as a way to identify and locate
invisible girls, rather than creating a new entity or nonprofit organization. This Unit's work was showcased on the National
Geographic Channel in 2008 and officers are approached weekly by law enforcement and community leaders from around the
country who are seeking an effective model for preventing invisible girls from becoming teen prostitutes.

A Partial Solution
Dallas is unique in having a High Risk Victims & Trafficking Unit, which identifies and locates runaway girls and teen prostitutes,
and Letot Center, which provides assessments, creates individual treatment plans and provides short term shelter.

However, removing runaway girls and teen prostitutes from the street and placing them in a short-term shelter is only a partial
solution. The issues that lead girls to run away and/or prostitute are highly complex and multi-layered, such that 30 - 60 day
shelter stays are not effective. The recidivism rate for girls referred to short-term placement is 80%. These girls need
specialized, long-term treatment to escape unhealthy dependencies and chaotic and destructive life-styles.

125

https://www.grantrequest.com/SID_797/Default.asp?PRINTER=1&SESID=407cedce348... 12/23/2010
The Rees-Jones Foundation Application Form Page 7 of 13

Over the past several years, however, the number of long-term residential service providers available for contracting with the
Dallas County Juvenile Department has declined significantly. This decline, along with the fact that Dallas has two residential
treatment programs for adolescent males and none for females further exacerbates the situation.

As a result, victims of teen prostitution are sent to locations around the state for long-term residential services. This
arrangement adversely affects girls because:
1. The distance between Dallas and other parts of the state does not allow for family:
a. Contact to work on repairing family conflict or
b. Members to be prepared for participation in community aftercare services prior to discharge. Reduced family participation
with aftercare increases recidivism.
2. Girls who are aggressive and habitually run away, need psychiatric treatment or have been unsuccessful in previous
placements are difficult to place in facilities that allow freedom to participants. Treatment for these women can be delayed
because they are held in Juvenile Detention until an appropriate residential placement can be located.

From August 1, 2009 to July 31, 2010, the Juvenile Department placed 96 girls with contracted service providers outside Dallas
County for long-term treatment. On one particular day, September 21, 2010, 50 girls were in contracted placement outside of
the Dallas at a cost of $6,338 a day.

Please provide specific components and logistics of the project or program. Include the date by which funding is needed.

TRANSFORMING INVISIBLE GIRLS


A Complete Solution
A three-pronged approach is required to address the issues that cause girls to run away and to stop and prevent further teen
prostitution:
1) Gender-specific, 6 - 9 month long-term residential placement and treatment,
2) Effective community-based support services for girls and families during and after residential treatment and
3) Prosecution of offenders/pimps.

Runaway girls and teen prostitutes require treatment that involves all three of these approaches to be protected from adult
abusers and offenders and to build the self-esteem and personal skills to successfully re-integrate into our community.

The Letot Girls' Residential Treatment Center


To fully address the critical and unique needs of invisible girls and their families in Dallas County, Letot Center will create a
long-term, residential treatment program for girls. The Letot Girls' Residential Treatment Center will be designed and
developed specifically for girls ages 13 - 17 and, as such, will be the larger of two gender-specific, therapeutic programs in the
country. The Girls' Center will be the only program in the nation designed to prevent teen prostitution by serving runaway girls.
Issues unique to girls - extreme abuse, prostitution and abandonment - will be addressed through an intensive and highly
structured program that will serve up to 96 girls at a time.

The safety of the girls will be the program's highest priority, as they will need protection from abusive parents, boyfriends and
pimps. This locally based program will improve accountability and coordination by enabling girls to be more quickly moved into
treatment. Programs will focus on girls' unique developmental and relational needs and families will be engaged in repairing
conflict and participating in aftercare services.

Each of the programs and opportunities currently offered by Letot through its short-term residential program, from the Charter
school to yoga to sports, will be adapted and provided at the Girls' Residential Treatment Center. Treatment plans and clinical
services will address specific issues such as abuse, exploitation, anger management, parenting skills, sexually transmitted
diseases and life skills for independent living, among other issues. Volunteers will provide opportunities for spiritual growth and
development.

A NEW FACILITY
The Letot Girls' Residential Treatment Center will be housed in a new two-story, 55,000 square foot facility which will be built
on the corner of Denton Drive and Lombardy, adjacent to the existing Letot Center. The property was purchased from the
Dallas Independent School District by Dallas County specifically for the Residential Treatment Center.

The existing and new facilities will operate independently, with the exception of three features: An outdoor walkway, a central
courtyard and a full service kitchen. The two facilities will be connected via a secure outdoor walkway and a central courtyard.
In addition, a full service kitchen in the new facility will enable staff to prepare "home-cooked" meals for both facilities.
Currently, meals for Letot Center residents are provided by the Dallas County Sheriff's Department.

The exterior of the Girls' Center will give the impression of security, while the interior will feel comfortable and calm. Interior
spaces will allow for maximum visibility and supervision. Vision panels in offices, programs spaces and the six housing units will
allow for indirect visual supervision of residents. Building design will maximize the availability of natural light and provide both
indoor and outdoor visitation areas for girls and their families.

126

https://www.grantrequest.com/SID_797/Default.asp?PRINTER=1&SESID=407cedce348... 12/23/2010
The Rees-Jones Foundation Application Form Page 8 of 13

Activity areas will encourage relationship building through the use of moveable furniture conducive to small groups and
intimate interactions between staff and girls and by creating areas for comfortable personal conversations.

The first floor is comprised of a central exterior courtyard surrounded on three sides by 1) an administrative, intake services
and medical area, 2) mechanical, storage, kitchen and dining facilities and 3) educational services and gymnasium area.

The main sections of the first floor and their related features include the following:
Administrative Area
o Main waiting room
o Reception desk
o Visitation and multipurpose room
o Parent lockers and vending room
o Securely fenced outdoor visitation courtyard
o Four small interior visitation rooms
o Changing tables for babies and play areas for interaction
o Administrative waiting area
o Mail / work / copy room
o Records storage area
o Eight offices for the director, assistant director, a secretary, probation officer, child protective services officer,
superintendent, Juvenile Service Officer and law enforcement officer
o Multi-purpose conference room #1
o Residential courtyard
Intake Services Area
o Intake office
o Beauty shop
o Two supervisor's offices
o Multi-purpose conference room #2
o Staff lounge
o Staff restrooms and shower
o Personal property room
Medical Area
o Medical exam/treatment room equipped for gynecological exams
o Medical storage
o Nurse work room
o Two consultation offices will provide private areas to discuss abuse and trauma issues and for girls to learn about female
development and health issues in a confidential setting.
Mechanical Area
o Mechanical room
o Main electrical room
o Dock
o Laundry
o Maintenance and storage
Kitchen and Dining area
o Dining room
o Serving area
o Kitchen
o Food storage
o Training kitchen
o Secure walkway to the original Letot Center
Educational Services and Gymnasium
o Library
o Special education room
o Four classrooms
o Two computer labs
o Principal's office
o Assistant principals office
o Registration office
o Books and TEKS storage closets
o Teacher and general workrooms
o Gymnasium

To enhance security, all living quarters will be on the second floor of the Girls' Center and look out and down upon the central
courtyard. Because privacy is very important for teen girls, six residential units each contain eight bedrooms which surround a
central activity room. Bedrooms will feature natural light as well as security grade night lights built into overhead lighting
because girls tend to have nightmares relating to past trauma. In addition, each girl will have a marker board for personal
notes and pictures, a mirror and space for personal effects.

A time out room, restrooms and showers and a supply closet are included in each of the six residential units. Because girls
need larger grooming areas, restrooms will provide extra outlets for blow dryers and curling irons as well as ample mirror and
sink space.

In between each two residential units are offices for a case manager and Juvenile Service Officer (JSO), in addition to a therapy
workroom. The case manager and JSO offices will have clear views into the residential unit activity rooms and appropriate

127

https://www.grantrequest.com/SID_797/Default.asp?PRINTER=1&SESID=407cedce348... 12/23/2010
The Rees-Jones Foundation Application Form Page 9 of 13

views into the shower and restroom areas. Restroom and shower areas will meet privacy needs without compromising security
through the use of saloon doors and short opaque shower curtains.

Room features, beds and desks in each of the six residential units will scale to be appropriate for the level of care different
groups of girls require. Girls requiring a low level of care will be in a relatively normal environment, whereas beds and desks
will be fixed in place in units serving girls who need a high level of specialized care.

A leadership gift of $5 million would be recognized by naming the new facility for the Rees-Jones family or a family member. A
leadership pledge at this time from the Rees-Jones Foundation would demonstrate the importance of this project to our
community, thus encouraging other foundations and individuals to participate in the campaign. Funds would be needed when
the construction contract is awarded.

State goals that are measurable and time-specific, and a description of how progress will be measured.

THE GIRLS' CENTER PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE


A committee of experts has been assembled to create and give oversight to the implementation of an evidence-based model
for the Girls' Residential Treatment Center. Beginning in January 2011, the committee will meet twice a month to develop
treatment programs and evaluation criteria. As the Center's treatment model evolves, sub-committees will be formed to further
program and policy development. Committee participants include:
Assistant Dean, Criminology Department, University of Texas at Dallas
Texas Department of Family and Protective Services
o Child Care Licensing Representative
o Child Protective Services
Dallas County:
o Letot Center residential staff
o Aftercare Placement staff
o Deputy Director of Psychiatrics
o Senior Therapist
o Contract Placement Supervisor
o Juvenile Department Research Statistician
o Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program
o Juvenile Department Volunteer Coordination
o Assistant District Attorney
o Field Probation Officer
o Regional Director for Child Protective Services

PROGRAM MODEL DEVELOPMENT:


Although the Girl's Center Program Development Committee is beginning its work, there are a number of program priorities,
goals and specifics, resulting from the Letot Center's short-term work with runaway girls and teen prostitutes, which can be
outlined at this time.

The Girls' Center will be designed and developed specifically for girls ages 13 - 17. A three-pronged approach is required to
address the issues that cause girls to run away and to prevent and stop further teen prostitution:
1) Gender-specific, 6 - 9 month long-term residential placement and treatment,
2) Effective community-based support services for girls and families during and after residential treatment and
3) Prosecution of offenders/pimps.

Runaway girls and teen prostitutes require treatment that involves all three of these approaches to be protected from adult
abusers and offenders and to build the self-esteem and personal skills to successfully re-integrate into our community.

PROGRAM PRIORITIES AND GOALS:


The safety of the girls will be the program's highest priority, as they will need protection from abusive parents, boyfriends and
pimps. Programs will focus on girls' unique developmental and relational needs and families will be engaged in repairing conflict
and participating in aftercare services. Issues unique to girls - extreme abuse, prostitution and abandonment - will be
addressed through an intensive and highly structured program. This locally based program will improve accountability and
coordination by enabling girls to be more quickly moved into treatment.

Each of the programs and opportunities currently offered by Letot through its short-term residential program, from the Charter
school to yoga to sports, will be adapted and provided at the Girls' Residential Treatment Center. Treatment plans and clinical
services will address specific issues such as exploitation, anger management, parenting skills, sexually transmitted diseases
and life skills for independent living, among other issues. Volunteers will provide opportunities for spiritual growth and
development.

The goals for the Letot Girls' Residential Center are to:

128

https://www.grantrequest.com/SID_797/Default.asp?PRINTER=1&SESID=407cedce348... 12/23/2010
The Rees-Jones Foundation Application Form Page 10 of 13

Identify girls within the Dallas County Juvenile Justice Systems who need long-term residential treatment outside their home,
Effectively provide clinical, educational, medical, recreational and case management services,
Teach girls skills to deal with stress and challenging situations so they do not resort to dysfunctional and delinquent behavior
and
Develop intensive aftercare and on-going community services with monitoring designed to successfully re-integrate invisible
girls back into the community.

As a result, girls and their families would:


Be engaged in making decisions about treatment plans,
Be empowered to stay involved with specialized community services,
Experience an environment that values, respects and trusts girls,
Experience girls discovering their strengths, becoming self-aware, resilient and courageous -- all of which provide insight into
potential for happiness and success.
Learn responsibility, self-respect, self-motivation and respect of authority,
Learn how to apply learned skills and values to their homes, schools and community, and
Prepare for successful re-integration into their community.

The Girls' Center will be licensed by Child Care Licensing with the Texas Department of Family Services.

PROGRAM SPECIFICS:
The basic objectives of the program will be to research, create and utilize:
A gender-informed evidence-based risk and needs assessment instrument that will identify the precise needs of each girl,
Services to address past traumatic experiences, substance abuse and mental health issues, and both the parents' and youth's
role in how they relate to current situation,
A gender-specific cognitive-behavioral evidence-based program through comprehensive, integrated and culturally relevant
services.

The core of the treatment model will be gender-responsive services that provide intensive therapy and a strong community
wrap-around program for each girl and her family. This type of treatment model will reduce stressors before transitioning girls
back into their environments. In addition, this approach will allow research and knowledge about female socialization and
development as well as each girl's risks, strengths and needs to guide all aspects of treatment design and delivery.

Treatment Team Meetings


Every month each girl and her family will meet with the treatment team. Treatment team members include the Letot
caseworker, therapist, teacher or principal, psychiatrist, nurse, and director or superintendent. Girls will start each meeting by
providing an update on their behavior, feelings, health and progress toward case plan goals that were set the previous month.
The therapist will make summary progress notes. Girls' and family members' will recommend, sign off on and leave with a copy
of their goals for the next month. Treatment team meetings empower girls and their families and hold them accountable.

Education
The educational program will allow girls to attend school on site through the Dallas County's Juvenile Justice Alternative
Education Program. Educational services will address all levels of learning as well as learning disabilities. Teachers specially
qualified to teach high risk girls will cover core subjects (Reading, Language Arts, English, Math, Science, and Social Studies) in
addition to Health and Physical Education. The environment will encourage creative expression and exploration through arts,
music and drama. Core subject areas will be congruent with the girls' home school in accordance to TEA standards.

Therapy
Individual, family, group, and in-home therapy services will be provided. All family members will be involved in the assessment
and therapeutic treatment immediately. When girls prepare to transition back into their home, therapy will be very intense to
address stressors that arise. Such intensive counseling will enable girls to develop positive and effective communications within
their environment.

The Life Skills Training (LST) Program is a universal program that will be used with middle school students. It is designed to
address a wide range of risk and protective factors by teaching general personal and social skills, along with drug resistance
skills and education. The LST Booster program will be used with high school students to retain the gains of the middle school
LST program.

STAFFING:
Staffing for the Girls' Center will include the following:
Administrative staff
o Superintendent
o Assistant director
Law enforcement and County services
o Probation officer
o Child protective services officer
o Law enforcement officer
o Six case managers
o Forty-eight supervision officers
Mental & physical health
o Lead psychologist
o Eight clinical psychologists
o Nurse (part-time or full-time)

129

https://www.grantrequest.com/SID_797/Default.asp?PRINTER=1&SESID=407cedce348... 12/23/2010
The Rees-Jones Foundation Application Form Page 11 of 13

o Cook
Charter school
o Principal
o Assistant Principal
o Eight teachers

EVALUATION
An Evaluation sub-committee will have responsibility for creating a tracking system for girls who leave the Girls' Center as well
as establishing program evaluation criteria. A core measure of success will be to reduce recidivism among runaway girls and
teen prostitutes which currently stands at 80%.

The following components of the Girls' Center program will be considered as evaluation criteria are developed:
Gender (Female) Responsive
o Curriculum will be written for females
o Treatment model will have gender responsive focus
o All facility staff be trained in providing gender responsive services prior to opening
Evaluation method: Data collection; service plans and other reports.
Family Participation
o Family participation will written in court orders
o Assist in transportation needs; bus passes, handicap, etc.
o Have members of treatment team do a quarterly home visit with family
o Include family in decision-making regarding treatment plans
o Provide parent education groups including, adolescent development, parenting skills, adolescent mental illness/psychotropic
medications, dealing with abuse and posttraumatic stress syndrome, grief and loss, physical health, and student coaching.
Evaluation method: Data Collection
Medical and Dental
o Regular access to medical and dental exams and treatment
o Education on the importance in regular exams and treatment
o Arrange for access to services after discharge
Evaluation method: Data collection from screenings
Volunteers
o Mentoring
o Professional/Career counseling
o Provide donated goods and services to the center's residents
Evaluation Method: surveys
Chaplaincy Services
o Provides opportunity for spiritual formation while insuring their rights of religious freedom.
o Involve community churches.
Preparation for Independent Living
o Partner with the Transition Resource Action Center
Emergency Services
Jobs/Careers
Legal Services
PAL Benefits
Special Needs
Transitional Housing
Transportation
Education
o Individual education plans
o ARDS
o Credit recovery
o Improvement in grades
o State testing
o GED preparation and testing
o On-line course work
o Educational transition services to locate a new school setting, or find resources for career training
Evaluation Method: Data collection from school records.
Case Management Services
o Participate on treatment team
o Develop and coordinate network of community resources to wrap around the family
o Rights Protection - assured for center youth by a Rights Officer, who is available to assist center youth, families and staff in
understanding the youth's rights, privileges, and responsibilities
Evaluation Method: Progress reports
Clinical Services
o Clinical Assessment tool
o Coordination of the treatment team
o Individual and group therapy
o Family therapy
o Group therapy with specialized focus
Treatment
o Develop individualized treatment plan for each resident based on goals or targets centered on the behaviors of concern that
led to the referral.
o Develop the treatment plan within ten (10) days of admission and review at periodic intervals throughout the person's stay
o Provide an on-site NA and AA groups for residents targeting, lifestyle issues, drug problems, and their underlying issues.

130

https://www.grantrequest.com/SID_797/Default.asp?PRINTER=1&SESID=407cedce348... 12/23/2010
The Rees-Jones Foundation Application Form Page 12 of 13

o Community involvement: Achievement of behavioral change within the treatment environment is only part of the task. Test
newly acquired skills in a community environment. Provide the residents with opportunities to do so through interaction with
volunteers who come to the facility, trips into the community for a variety of reasons, and interactions with their families at the
facility or on scheduled therapeutic home visits.
Evaluation Method: Data collection; progress reports; follow-up upon completion of program.
Aftercare Program
o Family Participation in Aftercare program after discharge.
Evaluation Method: Data Collection and Follow-up home visits.
Program Evaluation
o Program completion = 165 days to 180 days; No probation violations; No administrative discharges; No new offenses
committed
Evaluation Criteria: 85% successful discharge
o Parent/legal guardian attends individual, family group therapy and treatment team meetings.
Evaluation criteria: 80% participation by parent/legal guardian
o Re-Entry in Educational program

Please provide research, with appropriate citations, pertaining to the project or program (if applicable).

1) The Dallas Police Department's High Risk Victims and Trafficking Unit, the Texas Department of Family and Protective
Services and Letot Center maintain lists of identified girls who have run away or are prostituting. These lists provide evidence
that 250 "invisible" girls are on the streets in our community on any given day.
High Risk Victims and Trafficking Unit -- 50
Texas Department of Family and Protective Services -- 100
Letot Center (Juvenile Department) -- 100

2) The estimated 400 teen prostitutes in Dallas County was provided by the Dallas Police Department's High Risk Victims and
Trafficking Unit. This figure is comprised of the identified girls who have run away or are prostituting as well as additional girls
who have not been identified through local law enforcement or agencies. The 150 unidentified girls are more likely to be
involved in state-wide or nation-wide human trafficking.

3) The recidivism rate for girls who have run away or prostituted and participated in short-term local treatment or long-term
out-of-county treatment is 80%, according to the Dallas County Juvenile Department.

What other entities support your organization as a whole? List sources of support from other entities for this specific project or
program.
The capital campaign for the Girls' Center will begin in early 2011. However, early gifts received from individuals and Dallas
County funds used to purchase property total $882,000.

INVALUABLE PARTNERS
The Dallas County Juvenile Department
The Dallas County Juvenile Board approved the creation of the Letot Girls' Residential Treatment Center on September 27,
2010 and has planned for estimated annual operating expenses of $2.25 million to be paid by the Juvenile Department's
budget. Currently, the Juvenile Department is funding the placement of girls out of Dallas County with a State of Texas grant.
When the Girls' Center is opened, these state funds will fund the Center's operating expenses. The Juvenile Department
anticipates that the cost of operating the Girls' Center will equal the out of County placement expenses it is currently incurring.
Although the Girls' Center will not save the County money, girls will be provided the local, long-term comprehensive, family
inclusive treatment essential to re-integrating them into our community.

The Dallas County Commissioners Court


Because the Dallas County Commissioners Court gives oversight to the work of the Dallas County Juvenile Board, they are an
important partner in this new endeavor. The Court is developing a "memorandum of understanding" between Letot Center and
the Commissioners Court that it is expected to be approved in early January. This action will provide full and final confirmation
of Dallas County's commitment to implement the Letot Girls' Residential Treatment Center on completion of an appropriate
facility.

131

https://www.grantrequest.com/SID_797/Default.asp?PRINTER=1&SESID=407cedce348... 12/23/2010
The Rees-Jones Foundation Application Form Page 13 of 13

The Dallas Women's Foundation


The Dallas Women's Foundation strengthens the entire community by increasing the investment in women and girls and
empowering women's philanthropy. In 2010, the Women's Foundation adopted a model for doing its work successfully that
creates social change across four "shifts." The four "shifts" are the behavior of women and girls in addition to defining and
framing an issue, policy development and maintaining gains. As a result, the Women's Foundation identified human trafficking
and the commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) as issues in which it could affect change across all four shifts.

At the national level, the Women's Foundation has connected with the Women's Funding Network to support changes in federal
and state laws, statewide research on the intensity and types of exploitation affecting our children and girls and law
enforcement training. On the local level, the Women's Foundation's interest in these issues dovetail with the Dallas Police
Department's High Risk Victims and Trafficking Unit's and Letot Center's heightened concern that short-term treatment for
runaway girls and teen prostitutes is ineffective. Consequently, as a conduit to national information and expertise and a voice
for effective local action the Women's Foundation is an important partner in the effort to create the Girl's Center.

Please explain your plans to support the project or program after the grant period.

The Dallas County Juvenile Board approved the creation of the Letot Girls' Residential Treatment Center on September 27,
2010 and has planned for estimated annual operating expenses of $2.25 million to be paid by the Juvenile Department's
budget. Currently, the Juvenile Department is funding the placement of girls out of Dallas County with a State of Texas grant.
When the Girls' Center is opened, these state funds will fund the Center's operating expenses. The Juvenile Department
anticipates that the cost of operating the Girls' Center will equal the out of County placement expenses it is currently incurring.

Attachments

Title File Name


Letot Center Cap Fnd
Last Certified Audit
990N.pdf
IRS Determination Letter Letot 501-(c) 3.pdf
Letot-Leadership-12-16-
List of Organization's Board Members
10.pdf
Letot-Floor Plans-Elev-Site
Photographs
Map.pdf
Letot-Proposed GRTC
Annual Operating Budget
OperBudget draft_3.xls
Project Budget Letot-GRTC Budget.pdf
Last Certified Audit List of Staff.docx
Photographs Girls in the Letot Center.docx

Files attached to this form may be deleted 120 days after submission.

132

https://www.grantrequest.com/SID_797/Default.asp?PRINTER=1&SESID=407cedce348... 12/23/2010
LETOT GIRLS RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT CENTER

Question: In looking at research and trying to design best practices - what would happen if the
program design required more financial resources than operations funding from the county
providedstaff, other resources, etc. How would this be addressed? Is the program content committed to
providing what is perceived as best practice or only what the County funding will provide.

Responses:

Letot Centers 25 year track record has proven it to be an effective model for changing the course of
youth on the brink of delinquency. The importance of de-institutionalizing status offenders, truant
and runaway youth through programming especially designed to address their needs, has been
recognized nationally as a model for this client population.

As the largest and most comprehensive provider for youth intervention services in the United States,
Letot Center has served more than 60,000 boys and girls and their families. While at the shelter, many
youth experience, for the first time, strong relationships with caring adults, physical safety and security
and opportunities for personal growth. Interestingly, youth are not restricted from leaving the facility
and ninety-eight percent stay at the Center until they are discharged. At the time of their discharge
74% of youth were successfully reunited with their families. In 2009, Letots residential program
served 427 youth. The average length of stay was 24 days and Letots shelter beds were full 88% of the
time.

As a result of Letot Centers tenure and success, Juvenile Department leadership and Letot staff have
developed expertise regarding the competencies and finances required to operate an effective youth
program. In addition, Letot staff has gained significant experience working with neglected and
exploited girls over the past five to six years.

This expertise and experience is being tapped in the creation of the Girls Center plan and curriculum.
The success of the Letot Center model gives every indication that its replication with gender-based
curriculum and an extended residential time frame will change the lives of neglected and exploited
girls.

The Dallas County Juvenile Department is strongly committed to providing what is determined as
best practice for our communitys youth.
o Dr. Terry Smith, Executive Director of the Dallas County Juvenile Department stated, "The
Department and Dallas County are fully supporting our Letot Girls Residential Treatment
Center. We have a variety of avenues to seek, should funding become an issue. Our best
practice is to put YOUTH FIRST! and to ensure the success of this program. We have grants we
will apply for and current grants in existence. I personally do not anticipate a problem with
meeting any unforeseen resources."
o The program model being developed will be measured and evaluated on semi-annual basis.
Clearly, refinements will be required to improve the model once long-term treatment is
implemented.

The Letot Center Capital Foundation Board has potential for providing special funding for the Girls
Center as it has for Letot Center since 1990. The Board could be expanded to include more
community volunteers and/or the current Letot Campaign Advisory Council members could remain
for future support of both current Letot and the new Girls Center.

133
COMMON GRANT APPLICATION
Letot Center Capital Foundation application to The Mike & Mary Terry Family Foundation
*A general rule of thumb for length of the application is approximately 7-9 pages of complete text.
I. CONTACT INFORMATION
Contact Name: XXXXXXXXXXXXXX Executive Director or President: XXXXXXXXX

Contact Position or Title: Campaign Counsel Email address: XXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Contact Email and Phone: XXXXXXXXX

Mailing address:
City: Dallas State: Texas ZIP Code: XXXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXX
Website: www.letotgirlscenter.org Phone: XXXXXXXXXXX Fax: XXXXXXXXXX

II. ORGANIZATION BACKGROUND


1. Date founded: 1988
2. Tax ID Number: 75-2251532

3. Legal Name: Letot Center Capital Foundation, a 501(c)3


nonprofit organization. Responses below relate to the Letot
4. DBA: N/A
Girls Residential Treatment Center which will be a program
of the Dallas County Juvenile Department
Organization Mission Statement: The mission of the Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center is to empower neglected and
exploited girls to be productive, caring and responsible citizens by providing them a safe environment for long-term residential,
gender-responsive treatment involving their families and supported by community partners.
5.

Organization Vision Statement (if applicable): The Girls Center vision is that neglected and exploited girls celebrate their
talents and possess confidence, integrity, self-respect, positive relationships and quality of life.
6.

7. # Full-time staff: TBD 8. # Part-time staff: TBD

9. # of volunteers and how your organization uses them (if applicable): TBD

10. Brief overview of the organizations background/history: Since 1979 Letot Center has provided immediate crisis
intervention, emergency shelter and referral services to Dallas area youth who run away from home, are truant or commit
class B misdemeanors. The Center stops the crisis, allowing youth, their families and law enforcement an opportunity to
assess the complex factors that led to the crisis. As a result, youth avoid committing criminal offenses and entering the
Juvenile Justice System. The Centers services are unique because, whenever possible, family members are engaged in
treatment programs supported by a network of more than 135 community-based support partners.

Letot Center was established through a public-private effort by the Dallas County Juvenile Department, Dallas Independent
School District and the Junior League of Dallas. In 1990, a 40,000 square foot, 40-bed facility built with private donations
became the central point for providing residential shelter and non-residential services. Today, Letot Center is the largest and
most comprehensive provider for youth intervention services in the United States and has served more than 60,000 youth and
their families.

The Letot Center Capital Foundation was formed in 1988 to receive $3 million in private sector donations to build the existing
Letot Center facility. At the time the Foundation was initiated, this was its only purpose.

Since the completion of the $3 million campaign, the Foundation has provided funding to Letot Center for three primary
purposes:
1) Furniture and equipment (50%),
2) Special youth programs (40%) and
3) Staff recognition (10%).

Common Grant Application Beta Version 1


134
Expenditures for any one item have not exceeded $5,000 - $10,000 annually. The Foundation has no staff or overhead and
all Letot Center operating expenses are provided for by Dallas County, through the Dallas County Commissioners Court and
Juvenile Department.

Once again, the Letot Center Capital Foundation has stepped forward to secure private sector funds for a facility to protect our
communitys youth. Donations to the Girls Center campaign are being directed to and held in the Letot Center Capital
Foundation fund at The Dallas Foundation. The Dallas Foundation will manage the funds and oversee their disbursement
during construction of the facility.

11. Organizations with whom you collaborate and how The Dallas County Juvenile Board has approved the
creation of the Letot Girls' Center and will provide for its estimated annual operating expenses of $2.25 million. Currently,
the Juvenile Department is funding the placement of girls out of Dallas County with a State of Texas grant. When the
Girls' Center is opened, these state funds will fund the Center's operating expenses. The Juvenile Department anticipates
that the cost of operating the Girls' Center will equal the out of County placement expenses it is currently incurring. The
Dallas County Commissioners Court has provided full and final confirmation of Dallas County's commitment to implement
the Letot Girls' Center on completion of an appropriate facility. In addition, the Dallas Womens Foundation is interested in
addressing the commercial sexual exploitation of children, both locally and nationally, and has committed $1 million to the
project. Letot Center works closely with 135 community partners.

12. Provide unduplicated number served annually: In its first year of operation, the Girls Center will serve 100 neglected
and exploited girls.

III. GRANT REQUEST INFORMATION

1. Date of Request: 12/20/12 2. Date Payment Needed: March 1, 2013

4. Amount of Request: $487,024; $337,024 to finish


3. Title of Grant Request: Letot Girls Residential
the campaign for construction of the Girls Center and
Treatment Center
$150,000 for enrichment programs

5. Total Project Budget: $9.4 million


6. Grant purpose - Please confirm these align with funders guidelines (check all that apply):

Arts Animals Health Social Services Youth Elderly Environment Education


Other Human trafficking

7. Type of Funding (check all that apply):

Seed/Pilot Funding Project support Capacity Building Capital General Operating Support
Other

8. Geographic area served: Dallas County

9. Demographic breakdown: Population breakdown by socioeconomic status, ethnicity, gender, age: Girls, age 12
17; 1% Asian; 44% Black; 34% Hispanic and Latino; 21% White

10. Timeframe in which funds will be used? FROM: 2013 TO: 2016
For multi-year grants, indicate amount by year. Construction funds 2013 2014; Enrichment funds 2014 - 2016

11. Executive Summary this is an opportunity to tell your story including a brief description of the
organization, who you are, what you do and why you do what you do, the needs and how you are addressing
those needs, how the grant funds will be used and the expected outcomes and how they will be measured in 600
words or less.

Domestic human trafficking has been misunderstood and overlooked. The FBI named Dallas one of 14 cities in the nation
with the highest incidence of commercial sexual exploitation of children. The majority of the adolescent females, ages 13
17, who come into contact with Dallas County law enforcement live in homes where chaos is rampant. Physical, sexual and
emotional abuse and domestic violence are the norm and girls receive little respect or trust. These girls have no control over

Common Grant Application Beta Version 2


135
their lives. They never know when the next outburst or abuse will happen. For them, life is unpredictable and terrifying.

Because there are no caring adults protecting them, these girls are isolated and alone. Many run away from home. Long-
standing Juvenile Justice Programs focus on victims under 13 and offenders who commit more serious crimes. These girls are
not young enough or bad enough to attract attention. No one is watching over them or searching for them. They are
invisible.

On any given night, there are an estimated 400 invisible girls in our community. Dallas Police Department, Letot Center and
Texas Department of Family and Protective Services officials can identify 250 of these girls. The other 150 girls are new to
the streets or are trafficked to or through Dallas County.

Invisible girls are extremely vulnerable of being exploited by criminals who provide food, shelter, protection and emotional
support. Astute pimps seek invisible girls and seduce them with affection and security which fulfill girls cravings for
emotional connections. Girls become emotionally and physically dependent on pimps and are manipulated into the life of
prostitution, often after physical abuse.

Despite the abuse they experience and the tricks they must turn, life is predictable for teen prostitutes and, consequently,
preferable to the chaotic home environment they escaped. Sadly however, life expectancy for teen prostitutes is predictable
only seven years after they enter the life.

Dallas is unique in having a High Risk Victims & Trafficking Unit within the Police Department, which identifies and locates
runaway girls and teen prostitutes, and Letot Center, which conducts assessments, creates individual treatment plans and
provides short-term shelter. However, removing runaway girls and teen prostitutes from the street and placing them in a
short-term shelter is only a partial solution.

The issues that lead girls to run away and/or prostitute are highly complex and multi-layered, such that 30 60 day shelter
stays are not effective. The recidivism rate for girls referred for short-term placement is 80%. In addition, Dallas County has
two long-term residential treatment centers for boys with a total of 184 beds and none for girls.

Invisible girls need specialized, long-term treatment to escape unhealthy dependencies and chaotic and destructive life-
styles. A three-tiered approach is required to protect invisible girls from adult abusers and to build the self-esteem and
personal skills needed to successfully re-integrate into our community.

1) Gender-specific, 6 - 12 month long-term residential placement and treatment.


2) Community-based support services for girls and families during and after residential treatment, and
3) Prosecution of offenders/pimps.

To fully address the critical and unique needs of invisible girls and their families in Dallas County, Letot Center will create a
Girls Residential Treatment Center. Designed and developed specifically for girls ages 13 17, treatment will address issues
unique to girls - extreme abuse, prostitution and abandonment through a highly structured, long-term residential program
which will serve 100 girls in the first year. The Girls Residential Treatment Center will be housed in a new two-story,
55,000 square foot facility adjacent to the existing Letot Center.

12. How do the goals of the proposal relate to the funders priorities and mission? The goals of the Letot Girls
Residential Treatment Center are aligned with all three of The Mike & Mary Terry Family Foundations focus areas. The Girls
Center will:
Provide equal opportunities for all children by engaging our communitys neglected and exploited girls in opportunities
to change the course of their young lives and become productive, self-sufficient adults.
Advance youth through education by ensuring that neglected and exploited girls finish high school or receive their
GED, receive vocational training and possess a vocational skill to support themselves.
Ensure a haven for those in need by providing a safe, secure, long-term residential treatment center where they can
receive the specialized treatment they need and assist appropriately in the process to convict perpetrators.

Common Grant Application Beta Version 3


136
IV. GRANT DETAILS
1. Narrative
Please provide information on 1) the main issues or problems this grant request addresses and details on why
and how you address these issues 2) proposal details and 3) evaluation and performance measures. (This is your
opportunity to make a persuasive case for support!)

The Problem
The majority of the adolescent females, ages 13 17, who come into contact with Dallas County law enforcement live in
homes where chaos is rampant. Physical, sexual and emotional abuse and domestic violence are the norm and there is no
respect or trust. Adult caregivers are often neglectful and are struggling to deal with their own mental health problems and
trauma.

These girls have cognitive distortion, a twisted, false or negative way of thinking about their feelings. They feel as if they
have no control over their lives. They never know when the next traumatic experience or abuse will happen. For them, life is
unpredictable and terrifying

Living in an environment which is dangerous affects girls self-perception and behavior. Girls respond by developing harmful
and self-destructive coping skills such as substance abuse, skipping school, fighting with others and committing more
serious offenses. Many run away from home as a means for survival in search of a more structured and supportive
environment. Nearly 50% of these girls meet the diagnostic criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder. Ninety percent of
girls who run away are repeat sexual abuse victims. Their low self-esteem, resulting from child sexual abuse, puts them at
risk for depression.

Because there are no caring adults protecting them, these girls are isolated and alone. Long-standing Juvenile Justice
Programs focus on victims under 13 and offenders who commit more serious crimes. These girls are not young enough or
bad enough to attract attention. No one is watching over them or searching for them. They are invisible. On any given
night, there are approximately 400 invisible girls in our community. Dallas Police Department, Letot Center and Texas
Department of Family and Protective Services officials can identify approximately 250 of these girls. The other 150 girls
are new to the streets or are trafficked to or through Dallas County.

Exploited Girls = Teen Prostitutes


Invisible girls are extremely vulnerable of being exploited by criminals who provide food, shelter, protection and emotional
support. Astute pimps seek invisible girls and seduce them with affection and security which fulfill girls cravings for
emotional connections. Pimps and other highly trained adult criminals seek individuals with low- self-esteem to control them
to meet their own selfish needs. Girls become emotionally and physically dependent on pimps and are manipulated into
the life of prostitution, often after physical abuse.

Despite the abuse they experience and the tricks they must turn, life is predictable for teen prostitutes and, consequently,
preferable to the chaotic home environment they escaped. This false since of control helps girls avoid the difficult task of
facing the harsh reality of their lives. Acknowledging their past truths is simply too painful, so they cope by avoidance and
are at risk for greater negative mental health outcomes. Sadly, life expectancy for teen prostitutes is predictable only
seven years after they enter the life.

A Partial Solution
Dallas is unique in having a High Risk Victims & Trafficking Unit within the Police Department, which identifies and locates
runaway girls and teen prostitutes, and Letot Center, which conducts assessments, creates individual treatment plans and
provides short-term shelter. However, removing runaway girls and teen prostitutes from the street and placing them in a
short-term shelter is only a partial solution.

The issues that lead girls to run away and/or prostitute are highly complex and multi-layered, such that 30 60 day shelter
stays are not effective. The recidivism rate for girls referred for short-term placement is 80%. These girls need specialized,
long-term treatment to escape unhealthy dependencies and chaotic and destructive life-styles.

Over the past several years, however, the number of long-term residential service providers available for contracting with

Common Grant Application Beta Version 4


137
the Dallas County Juvenile Department has declined significantly. This decline, along with the fact that Dallas has two
residential treatment programs for adolescent males with a total of 184 beds and none for females further exacerbates the
situation.

As a result, victims of teen prostitution are sent to locations around the state for long-term residential services. This
arrangement adversely affects girls because:
The distance between Dallas and other parts of the state does not allow for family:
o Contact to work on repairing family conflict or
o Members to be prepared for participation in community aftercare services prior to discharge. Reduced
family participation with aftercare increases recidivism.
Girls who are aggressive and habitually run away, need psychiatric treatment or have been unsuccessful in
previous placements are difficult to place in facilities that allow freedom to participants. Treatment for these
women can be delayed because they are held in Juvenile Detention until an appropriate residential placement can
be located.

From August 1, 2009 to July 31, 2010, the Juvenile Department placed 96 girls with contracted service providers outside
Dallas County for long-term treatment. On one particular day, September 21, 2010, 50 girls were in contracted placement
outside of the Dallas at a cost of $6,338 a day.

Transforming Invisible Girls - A Complete Solution


Invisible girls need specialized, long-term treatment to escape unhealthy dependencies and chaotic and destructive life-
styles. A three-tiered approach is required to protect invisible girls from adult abusers and to build the self-esteem and
personal skills needed to successfully re-integrate into our community.
Gender-specific, 6 - 12 month long-term residential placement and treatment,
Community-based support services for girls and families during and after residential treatment, and
Prosecution of offenders/pimps.

The Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center - A National Model


To fully address the critical and unique needs of invisible girls and their families in Dallas County, Letot Center will create a
Girls Residential Treatment Center. Designed and developed specifically for girls ages 13 17, treatment will address
issues unique to girls - extreme abuse, prostitution and abandonment.

This long-term, therapeutically intensive, family-focused treatment center for girls will serve up to 96 girls at a time and
will be the larger of two gender-specific, therapeutic programs in the nation. The only other such program in the country is
Angelas House, in Atlanta, Georgia, which serves up to 10 teen prostitutes. Because Angelas House serves girls who have
already prostituted, the Letot Girls Center will be the only program in the nation designed to prevent teen prostitution by
serving runaway girls.

The mission of the Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center will be to empower neglected and exploited girls to be
productive, caring and responsible citizens by providing them a safe environment for long-term residential, gender-
responsive treatment involving their families and supported by community partners. Treatment plans will be highly
personalized such that girls may stay at the Center from three months to one year. Letot Center staff anticipates serving
approximately 100 girls during the programs initial year.

The safety of the girls will be the programs highest priority, as they will need protection from abusive parents, boyfriends
and pimps. This locally based program will improve accountability and coordination by enabling girls to be more quickly
moved into treatment. Programs will focus on girls unique developmental and relational needs and families will be
engaged in repairing conflict and participating in aftercare services.

Each of the programs and opportunities currently offered by Letot Center through its short-term residential program, from
the Charter school to yoga to sports, will be adapted and provided at the Girls Residential Treatment Center. Treatment
plans and clinical services will address specific issues such as abuse, exploitation, anger management, parenting skills,
sexually transmitted diseases and life skills for independent living, among other issues. Volunteers will provide
opportunities for spiritual growth and development. (Please see the enclosed The New Letot Girls Residential Treatment

Common Grant Application Beta Version 5


138
Center Program for a description of the program development method, goals and evaluation criteria.)

The goals for the Letot Girls Residential Center are to:
Identify girls within the Dallas County Juvenile Justice Systems who need long-term residential treatment outside
their home,
Effectively provide clinical, educational, medical, recreational and case management services,
Help youth uncover their innate line of talent,
Support youth in establishing an environment that encourages spiritual growth and development,
Teach girls skills to deal with stress and challenging situations so they do not resort to dysfunctional and delinquent
behavior, and
Develop intensive aftercare and on-going community services with monitoring designed to successfully re-integrate
invisible girls back into the community.

The Girls Center will be licensed by Child Care Licensing with the Texas Department of Family Services.

Program Specifics
The basic objectives of the program will be to research, create and utilize:
A gender-informed evidence-based risk and needs assessment instrument that will identify the precise needs of
each girl,
Trauma-based services to address past traumatic experiences, substance abuse and mental health issues and both
the parents and youths role in how they relate to current situation, and
A gender-specific cognitive-behavioral evidence-based program through comprehensive, integrated and culturally
relevant services.

The core of the treatment model will be gender-responsive services that provide intensive therapy and a strong community-
wrap around program for each girl and her family. This type of mental health treatment model will reduce stressors before
transitioning girls back into their environments. In addition, this approach will allow research and knowledge about female
socialization and development as well as each girls risks, strengths and needs to guide all aspects of treatment design and
delivery.

Treatment Team Meetings


Every month each girl and her family will meet with the treatment team. Treatment team members include the Letot
caseworker, therapist, teacher or principal, psychiatrist, nurse, and director or superintendent. To encourage decision-
making and empowerment, each girl will have the opportunity to choose a mental health group and focus with approval by
their treatment team. The therapist will make summary progress notes and goal specific individualized treatment plans for
the girl and their family/identified caregiver.

Girls will start each treatment team meeting by providing an update on their behavior, feelings, health and progress toward
case plan goals that were set the previous month. Girls and family members will recommend, sign off on and leave with a
copy of their goals for the next month. Treatment team meetings empower girls and their families and hold them
accountable.

Education
The educational program will allow girls to attend school on site through the Dallas Countys Juvenile Justice Alternative
Education Program. Educational services will address all levels of learning as well as learning disabilities. Teachers specially
qualified to teach high risk girls will cover core subjects (Reading, Language Arts, English, Math, Science, and Social
Studies) in addition to Health and Physical Education. The environment will encourage creative expression and exploration
through arts, music and drama. Core subject areas will be congruent with the girls home school in accordance to TEA
standards.

Therapy
Individual, family, group, and in-home therapy services will be provided. All family members will be involved in the
evaluation, assessment and therapeutic treatment planning at the start of admission. When girls prepare to transition back

Common Grant Application Beta Version 6


139
into their home, therapy will be attachment and relationship focused to create support and structure to decrease stressors
and conflict that may arise in the home. Such intensive counseling will enable girls to develop positive and effective
communications skills within their environment.

The Life Skills Training (LST) Program is a universal program that will be used with middle school students. It is designed to
address a wide range of risk and protective factors by teaching general personal and social skills, along with drug resistance
skills and education. The LST Booster program will be used with high school students to retain the gains of the middle
school LST program.

Vocational Programs
To ensure girls possess a vocational skill and can begin supporting themselves when they are released from the Center,
vocational programs such as cosmetology, culinary arts and health professions will be offered. Activities and workshops
developed by volunteer professionals will provide a seamless transition for girls from the Center to a vocational private trade
school or community college or into a high school of professional trade.

The Dallas County Juvenile Department's Charter School will provide basic infrastructure, staffing and equipment for high
school and GED programs. However, County budgets cannot provide for vocational programs. Items such as career
assessments which will examine girls' interests, personalities, values, knowledge, skills and abilities and comprehension
assessment tests that determine grade level functioning are essential.

Culinary items required include cookware, food products and supplies. Youth Village will partner with the Girls' Center and
offer a Serve Safe Food Handler License, horticulture program, nutrition culinary arts program and computer skills program.
Expenses incurred by Youth Village for these programs must be covered by the Girls' Center. Cosmetology expenses include
the Shampoo License and beauty products and supplies. Health profession expenses include online courses, training and
demonstration equipment and entry level health care certificates. Field trips will expose girls to the practical implementation
of their vocation and incur transportation and off-campus meals expenses. A vocational training budget is being compiled at
this time. However, the anticipated total first year expenditures for vocational training could range from $150,000 to
$250,000.

The New Facility


The Girls Residential Treatment Center will be housed in a new two-story, 55,000 square foot facility which will be built on
the corner of Denton Drive and Lombardy, adjacent to the existing Letot Center. The property was purchased by Dallas
County from the Dallas Independent School District specifically for this purpose. (Please see the enclosed Girls Center site
map, floor plans and elevations.)

The exterior of the Girls Center will give the impression of security, while the interior will feel comfortable and calm.
Interior spaces will allow for maximum visibility and supervision. Vision panels in offices, programs spaces and the six
housing units will allow for indirect visual supervision of residents. Building design will maximize the availability of natural
light and provide both indoor and outdoor visitation areas for girls and their families.

Activity areas in the Girls Center will encourage relationship building through the use of moveable furniture conducive to
small groups and intimate interactions between staff and girls and by creating areas for comfortable personal conversations.

The first floor is comprised of a central exterior courtyard surrounded on three sides by 1) an administrative, intake services
and medical area, 2) mechanical, storage, kitchen and dining facilities and 3) educational services and gymnasium area. To
enhance security, all living quarters will be on the second floor of the Girls Center and look out upon the central courtyard.

Six residential units will each contain eight bedrooms and surround a central activity room. Bedrooms will feature natural
light as well as security grade night lights built into overhead lighting because girls tend to have nightmares relating to past
trauma. In between each two residential units will be offices for a case manager and Juvenile Service Officer (JSO), in
addition to a therapy workroom. Room features, beds and desks in each of the six residential units will scale to be
appropriate for the level of care different groups of girls require. Girls requiring a low level of care will be in a relatively
normal environment, whereas beds and desks will be fixed in place in units serving girls who need a high level of specialized

Common Grant Application Beta Version 7


140
care.

The existing and new facilities will operate independently, with the exception of two features: An outdoor walkway and
a full service kitchen. The two facilities will be connected via a secure outdoor walkway. In addition, a full service
kitchen in the new facility will enable staff to prepare home-cooked meals for both facilities. Currently, meals for
Letot Center residents are provided by the Dallas County Sheriffs Department.

Staffing
Staffing for the Girls Center will include the following:
Administrative staff
o Superintendent
o Assistant director
Law enforcement and County services
o Probation officer
o Child protective services officer
o Law enforcement officer
o Six case managers
o Forty-eight supervision officers
Mental & physical health
o Lead psychologist
o Eight clinical Masters- level therapists
o Nurse (part-time or full-time)
o Cook
Charter school Dallas Independent School District
o Principal
o Assistant Principal
o Eight teachers

Qualifications for the above positions will be in accordance with current Dallas County Juvenile Department and Dallas
Independent School District requirements. Please see the attached Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center Proposed
Operating Budget for staffing and operating expense details.

Evaluation
An Evaluation sub-committee has responsibility for creating a tracking system for girls who leave the Girls Center as well as
establishing program evaluation criteria. A core measure of success will be to reduce recidivism among runaway girls and teen
prostitutes which currently stands at 80% to 65% in two years.

The following components of the Girls Center program will be considered as evaluation criteria are developed:
Gender (Female) Responsive
o Curriculum will be written for females
o Treatment model will have gender responsive focus
o All facility staff be trained in providing gender responsive services prior to opening
Evaluation method: Data collection; service plans and other reports.
Family Participation
o Family participation will written in court orders
o Assist in transportation needs; bus passes, handicap, etc.
o Have members of treatment team do a quarterly home visit with family
o Include family in decision-making regarding treatment plans
o Provide parent education groups including, adolescent development, parenting skills, adolescent mental
illness/psychotropic medications, dealing with abuse and posttraumatic stress syndrome, grief and loss, physical
health, and student coaching.
Evaluation method: Data Collection
Medical and Dental
o Regular access to medical and dental exams and treatment
o Education on the importance in regular exams and treatment
o Arrange for access to services after discharge
Evaluation method: Data collection from screenings
Volunteers

Common Grant Application Beta Version 8


141
o Mentoring
o Professional/Career counseling
o Provide donated goods and services to the center's residents
Evaluation Method: surveys
Chaplaincy Services
o Provides opportunity for spiritual formation while insuring their rights of religious freedom.
o Involve community churches.
Preparation for Independent Living
o Partner with the Transition Resource Action Center
Emergency Services
Jobs/Careers
Legal Services
PAL Benefits
Special Needs
Transitional Housing
Transportation
Education
o Individual education plans
o ARDS
o Credit recovery
o Improvement in grades
o State testing
o GED preparation and testing
o On-line course work
o Educational transition services to locate a new school setting, or find resources for career training
Evaluation Method: Data collection from school records.
Case Management Services
o Participate on treatment team
o Develop and coordinate network of community resources to wrap around the family
o Rights Protection - assured for center youth by a Rights Officer, who is available to assist center youth, families
and staff in understanding the youth's rights, privileges, and responsibilities
Evaluation Method: Progress reports
Clinical Services
o Clinical Assessment tool
o Coordination of the treatment team
o Individual and group therapy
o Family therapy
o Group therapy with specialized focus
Treatment
o Develop individualized treatment plan for each resident based on goals or targets centered on the behaviors of
concern that led to the referral.
o Develop the treatment plan within ten (10) days of admission and review at periodic intervals throughout the
person's stay
o Provide an on-site NA and AA groups for residents targeting, lifestyle issues, drug problems, and their underlying
issues.
o Community involvement: Achievement of behavioral change within the treatment environment is only part of the
task. Test newly acquired skills in a community environment. Provide the residents with opportunities to do so
through interaction with volunteers who come to the facility, trips into the community for a variety of reasons, and
interactions with their families at the facility or on scheduled therapeutic home visits.
Evaluation Method: Data collection; progress reports; follow-up upon completion of program.
Aftercare Program
o Family Participation in Aftercare program after discharge.
Evaluation Method: Data Collection and Follow-up home visits.
Program Evaluation
o Program completion = 165 days to 180 days; No probation violations; No administrative discharges; No new
offenses committed
Evaluation Criteria: 85% successful discharge
o Parent/legal guardian attends individual, family group therapy and treatment team meetings.
Evaluation criteria: 80% participation by parent/legal guardian
o Re-Entry in educational program

Request
A grant of $487,024; $337,024 to finish the campaign and reach the $9.4 million goal to construct the Girls Center and
$150,000 for enrichment programs, would generate both short and long-term impact on the lives of our communitys
neglected and exploited girls. We would be please to recognize a grant at this level in the area of three residential unit

Common Grant Application Beta Version 9


142
activity rooms or another area of the Foundations choice.

2. Provide unduplicated number to be served annually by proposal (if applicable):

In its first year of operation, the Girls Center will serve 100 neglected and exploited girls.

3. Tell a story that illustrates the impact of your proposal or organization on an individual.

The following is a true story of an invisible girl who has been served by Letot Center, but who would have been better served by
the long-term, gender-specific treatment which will be offered by theLetot Girls Residential Treatment Center.

Tanya

Presenting Problem: Runaway, truancy, substance abuse.

History: Tanya was abandoned by her parents and lived with her grandmother most of her life. She was physically and
emotionally abused by her biological parents and sexually abused by an uncle and a cousin while living in the home of her
grandmother.

Tanya had her first referral to Letot Center at the age of 15. During a routine traffic stop, police discovered that she had run
away from home and they brought her to Letot Center, where she acknowledged having run away five previous times. Tanya
was very defiant and after a brief stay at the Letot Center, she was released to her grandmother. Within days, she ran away
again and the police found her on the street. The Court released her to Letot Center where she remained for 73 days.

Tanyas behavior improved vastly and toward the end of her stay staff established that she was very close to an older cousin.
However, because she had stayed at Letot Center beyond the normal 30 60 day time-frame, a non-residential plan was
developed for counseling and she was returned back to her grandmothers home. After a month of being home, Tanya ran away
again. The police located her after she was on the run for four months and the court ordered her into the first of many
placements outside Dallas County. She continued to run away, each time she was returned home from placement and admitted
to being involved in some prostitution while out in the streets.

Issues: Physical and emotional abandonment/rejection, sexual abuse, prostitution.

Outcome: Tanya was in several placements over the course of four years. Her behavior improved and the placements forced
her to follow rules and gave her reasonable consequences, consistency and routines. Being far away from home did not allow
her to develop a healthy relationship with her older cousin while in placement. Tanya was pregnant and back in Letot Center
awaiting her 18th birthday when staff established a positive family friend for her to live with. Tanyas desire to bond with her
child was evident when she agreed to work with the Nurse Family Partnership. She had a little girl and is currently pregnant
with her second child. She is attending ATI and working on her medical transcription certification.

***A Letot Girls Residential Treatment Center located in Dallas would have enabled staff to engage a positive caregiver in
Tanyas treatment plan and build on that relationship during a long-term stay. As a result, Tanya would have received the in-
depth treatment she needed earlier. Her runaway and prostitution incidents would have been reduced and she and her family
would have been better prepared for her to transition back into her environment.

4. Implementation Timeline (specifically related to this request if applicable)


Please include major events, activities and when they will take place. (bullet point and chronological order)

Summer 2012 - Construction plans were revised and re-bid due to changes in State of Texas guidelines for residential
programs and Juvenile Department staffing requirements. This delayed the approval process and beginning of groundwork.
October 2012 - The Girls Center construction contract, approved by Hill & Wilkinson Construction Group, Ltd. and the Letot
Center Capital Foundation, was submitted to Dallas County.
November 2012 - An attorney expert on public-private sector partnerships was retained and submitted to the County a
Chapter 381 Community Economic Development Program and Agreement. The Chapter 381 Agreement is under review by
the Dallas County attorneys.
January-February 2013 - When the Chapter 381 Agreement review is complete, it will be presented to the Dallas County
Commissioners Court for approval. Approval of this agreement will provide County staff with clearance to execute the
construction contract.
February-March 2013 - Construction of the Girls Center is expected to begin and will require 12 14 months.
2014 Girls Center opens

Common Grant Application Beta Version 10


143
5. Describe plans to support the proposal after the term of this grant.

When the Girls Center is completed, the Letot Center Capital Foundation will give the facility to the County, as they did with the
current Letot Center. Dallas County and the Dallas County Juvenile Department will provide for the Girls Centers estimated
annual operating expenses of $2.25 million, in addition to building maintenance and repairs.

6. Provide an updated list of all other entities asked to support the proposal with amounts and responses to date.
When do you expect to hear from pending requests?

Please see the attached list of donors to the Girls Center. $9,062,976 in gifts and pledges has been secured toward the $9.4
goal, leaving an outstanding balance of $337,024. An additional, $375,500 has been secured for enrichment programs,
vocational and life skills programs and landscaping extras which the Dallas County budget cannot provide. At this time, a
$100,000 enrichment proposal is pending with one individual

7. Goals, Baseline and Target Numbers


Goals should relate to the specific grant request, not organizational goals. More than three goals may be provided.
See Glossary of Terms for definitions and examples.

GOALS Baseline # Target #


1. To construct a 55,000 SF Girls Residential Treatment Center that
adheres to Dallas Green Building Program. January 2011 March 2014
2. To serve up to 96 girls at a time, serving 100 during the first twelve 96 at a time; 100 in
months of operation. Zero the first year
3. To reduce recidivism among runaway girls and teen prostitutes from
80% to 65% two years after the new facility is operational. 80% 65%

Common Grant Application Beta Version 11


144
ATTACHMENTS
Electronic materials preferred. Funder may not require all of these documents.

Names and Titles of Key Staff

Board list and affiliations

Project Budget (if applicable) Capital Campaign Budget

Organizational Budget for current fiscal year including revenue by source E.g. Foundations, individuals,
government Proposed Girls Center Operating Budget

Organizational Budget for next year including revenue by source E.g. Foundations, individuals, government
(if available) Not available

Most recent 990 Form

Most recent signed audited financial statement (if available) for last two years The Dallas Foundation audit is
attached, along with an umbrella exemption letter.

Current financial statements The Dallas Foundation

A copy of your 501 C 3 IRS determination letter

THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME AND EFFORT IN COMPLETING THESE FORMS!

Please check with individual funders for any additional requirements

145
1
Definitions adapted from When and How to Use External Evaluations by Tracey A. Rutnik and Marty Campbell,
Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers, 2002.
Clara Blackford & W. Aubrey Smith Foundation

https://www.bankofamerica.com/philanthropic/foundation.go?fnId=68
Instructions
Welcome to the Bank of America, Philanthropic Solutions online grant application. We look forward to
working with you and your organization. This secure tool ensures easy submission of your application,
while upholding our mission to award grants in accordance with the philanthropic mission of each
foundation. Please note that your web browser must allow cookies as you will receive a unique account
URL to return and check the status of your application. Note that application fields accept numeric or
text data only, so please do not include tables or columns in your responses.

Before you begin, please be sure to:

Visit www.bankofamerica.com/grantmaking and review the guidelines, mission, and any state-
specific application procedures of the foundation to which you are applying.
Review the Online Application Help.
Review the foundation's online application questions in advance. To do this, select the Printer
Friendly Version. You may prepare your answers offline, then copy and paste into the online
application later.
Review the list of required documents and prepare them for submittal. Applications without these
documents will not be considered. (Note: Attachment size limit is 25MB)

The online application is comprised of 6 sections:

1. Instructions
2. About Your Organization
3. Your Grant Request
4. Organization Financials & Acknowledgement
5. Attachments
6. Review My Application

About Your Organization


Provide information about your organization.

Federal Tax ID #
Enter your organization's federal tax identification number provided by the IRS, if appropriate. If using a fiscal
sponsor, enter that organization's tax ID here. Enter the number without a dash.

Organization name

Legal name of organization (if different from above)

Organization NTEE

Benefitting organization
Indicate the organization name here only if using a fiscal sponsor.

146
Street or mailing address

City

State

ZIP code

Telephone
(6175551212)

Website address
(www.greatagency.org)

Overview of organization
Provide a brief overview of your organization. Please do not exceed 150 words or your entry will be truncated.

Number of full-time employees


Enter numerals or "0" if not applicable.

Number of part-time employees


Enter numerals or "0" if not applicable.

Number of volunteers
Enter numerals or "0" if not applicable.

Contact Information

Provide contact information for the Head of the Organization as well as the Primary Contact of this request (if
different).

Head of Organization
147
Prefix

First name

Middle initial

Last name

Title

Street or mailing address

City

State

ZIP code

Telephone

Extension

Email address

Primary Contact for Request

Same as Head of Organization

148
Prefix

First name

Middle initial

Last name

Title

Street or mailing address

City

State

ZIP code

Telephone

Extension

Email address

Your Grant Request


Describe the services for which you are seeking support. If project/program support is requested, tailor
your responses to that particular project; if operating support is requested, tailor your responses to
address the organization.

Type of support requested

149
Amount requested
(example: 50000)

Term
State the proposed grant period in numbers of whole months (enter "12" if a one-year grant is requested).

Project/program title
Enter the name of your project/program. For operating requests write "general operations of the organization."

Proposed number of people to be served


(example: 2000 / If not applicable enter 0)

Description of Request
Provide a brief description of the request. Please do not exceed 150 words or your entry will be truncated.

Purpose
Describe the need being addressed and your organization's unique role in meeting those needs, including anything
that would distinguish your organization from others providing similar services in the communities you serve. Please
do not exceed 300 words or your entry will be truncated.

Description of activities
Describe the request's activities providing detailed information about how it will address the stated need and the
intended impact. Include the number of individuals served through this grant and the number of hours participants
are involved. Please do not exceed 600 words or your entry will be truncated.

Sustainability plan
How will the organization and/or request activities be sustained? Describe the overall sustainability plan for your
organization and/or your project/program in terms of staffing and finances. How would the proposed activities
and/or your organization be affected if you do not receive the requested funding? Please do not exceed 600 words
or your entry will be truncated.

150
Challenges
Describe the challenges to the success of the activities in the proposal and how these factors could be overcome.
Please do not exceed 500 words or your entry will be truncated.

Goals
State the specific goals and expected outcomes/success indicators of the requested project/program/organization,
including how you plan to meet these goals and outcomes. Include a timeline for accomplishing your goals for the
term of the grant request. If this is an existing program, state the outcomes of the most recent year of the
project/program/organization. Please do not exceed 600 words or your entry will be truncated.

Demographics for This Request

Geographical area served

Gender of population served

Age group served


Up to two selections may be made if necessary.

Ethnicity of population served


Up to two selections may be made if necessary.

Population served
Up to three selections may be made if necessary.

Additional demographics
Explain demographics further if above questions did not allow for sufficient specificity. Please do not exceed 200
words or your entry will be truncated.

151
Project/Program Profile

This next section describes the project or program for which you are requesting the grant. If you are
requesting general operating funds, you do not need to complete this section and should skip directly to
4. Organization Financials & Acknowledgement in the progress meter above.

Project/program area

Total project/program or capital budget


(example: 50000)

Current project/program or capital budget revenue


Enter the projected revenue for the year (first year if multiple-year request) you are requesting support. (example:
50000.00)

Current project/program or capital budget expenses


Enter the projected expenses for the year (first year if multiple-year request) you are requesting support. (example:
50000.00)

Previous year project/program or capital revenue


If this is a continuing project/program, enter the total revenue from the year previous to this request. (example:
50000.00)

Previous year project/program or capital expenses


If this is a continuing project/program, enter the total expenses from the year previous to this request. (example:
50000.00)

Organization Financials & Acknowledgement


Provide a snapshot of your organization's financial status and history.

Fiscal year end date of organization (month/day)

Last completed fiscal year end date (Most Recent)


Indicate the fiscal year end date used for the next seven questions.

Organization Financials
152
Please indicate revenue and expense from the most recently completed financial statements that have been audited,
reviewed, or compiled by an independent auditor. This applies to the next seven questions.

Total revenue
(example: 50000.00)

Total expenses
(example: 50000.00)

Total assets
(example: 50000.00)

Total liabilities
(example: 50000.00)

Unrestricted net assets


(example: 50000.00)

Total net assets


(example: 50000.00)

Change in net assets


(example: 50000.00)

Current Fiscal Year

Fiscal year budget date


Indicate the fiscal year end date used for the next three questions.

Total annual organization operating budget


(example: 50000)
45498596

Board approved budget projection - revenue


(example: 50000.00)

153
Board approved budget projection - expenses
(example: 50000.00)

Percent of total expenses allocated toward administrative costs


(example: 20)
15

Current market value of endowment


(example: 50000.00)
125619986

Valuation date

06/30/2016

Operating Deficit
If your organization experienced a deficit in either of the past two years, state the amount and provide an
explanation, including whether it was a planned deficit. Please do not exceed 200 words or your entry will be
truncated.

Grant Acknowledgement

Grant application accuracy


I certify that I completed this form, and the information I provided is complete and accurate.
No

Grant consideration
I understand that the completion and submission of this application does not guarantee favorable consideration of
this request.
No

Attachments

Please provide the following documents. Applications without the appropriate


attachments will not be considered. Prior to uploading, make sure to include page
154
numbers and your organizations name on each page. Scroll to the bottom of the page
to upload the required attachments.

1. Board List: Provide name, affiliation, address, years on the board, and any
additional information.
2. Organization Summary: Provide the mission statement and a brief description
of the history, goals, audience served, services/programs, organizational
structure, and key achievements of the organization.
3. Organizational Budget: Include an organizational budget with revenue and
expenses for the year for which you are requesting funding. Provide a current
and proposed grant year budget (if different), and budget projections for each
year for which multi-year support is requested. If you are using a fiscal sponsor,
that organization's budget should be used for this section.
4. Project Budget (not applicable for general operating requests): If the
requested funds are to be used for anything other than the general operating
expenses of the organization, include a detailed, line-item total project budget
for the year funds are requested, including revenue and expenses. If this is an
existing project, submit a project budget for the year prior to the requested
budget. Multiple year requests must include corresponding years' budget
projections.
5. Other Funding Sources: Provide a list of foundation, corporate, United Way,
and/or government support secured for the year funds are requested and the
prior year. Please state the source, dollar amount, grant time period, and
whether the contributions are pending or have been received. All columns
should state a total amount. If operating support is requested, provide this
information for the organization; if project support is requested, also note when
funds are designated for the project requested. If multi-year support is
requested, provide information on any multi-year pledges.
6. Financial Statements: Please provide a copy of your organization's (or fiscal
sponsor's) most recent financial statements. (audited, reviewed, or compiled by
an independent auditor, whichever is required for your agency) If your
organization's budget size does not require an independent audit, please provide
us with unaudited financial statements and the organizations most recent Form
990.
7. IRS Determination Letter: Provide a copy of the IRS tax exemption
determination letter confirming 501(c)(3) status.

o If your organization does not have a determination letter from the IRS
but is covered under group exemption, please provide evidence from
the exemption holder which includes their TIN and a statement that your
organization is covered under that group exemption.
o If you are applying on behalf of a government agency or
instrumentality, please provide a copy of the legislative act creating a
board or commission; a letter from an authorized government official
confirming the status of a subsidiary body; or supply a government
affirmation letter from the IRS.
o If you are applying on behalf of a church which is not covered
under a group exemption, provide evidence that your organization is
engaged in charitable work by including at least 3 of the following items
(assembled in one attachment): organizational documents, including
bylaws; documentation of a definite & distinct ecclesiastical government;
the number of members; governing board information; any literature
published by the church; programs, services and hours of operation and
number of members; how the ministers are selected; and/or the name of
schools that prepared ministers.

PDF, Word, or Excel are all acceptable attachment formats. Label each attachment with
a title that corresponds to our list. Please do not send any materials beyond what is

155
requested as they will not be reviewed. The total combined size of your attachments
cannot exceed 25 MB.

156
August 13, 2001

Name
Foundation Name
Address
City, State Zip

Dear Name:

For almost 26 years, the Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico has woven its colorful tapestry into
the cultural fabric of our community. Through its programs, the Anita N. Martinez Ballet
Folklorico touches more than 106,000 children and adults each year.

As you may know, Dallas Hispanic population doubled in the past decade. While the Anita N.
Martinez Ballet Folklorico celebrates and educates the general public about the Hispanic
cultures contributions to the community, it is also concerned with instilling cultural pride and
awareness in the growing numbers of Hispanic youth.

Of particular concern is the Hispanic high school dropout crisis. Four ways of encouraging
children to stay in school through graduation as identified by The National Dropout Prevention
Center at Clemson University are benefits provided by Dance Academy classes!

Academy classes involve parents in students lives, reduce students isolation and build trust
through interaction with instructors, foster students interests in new subjects, and provide
students with one-on-one attention through customized instruction. These invaluable benefits are
known to increase the likelihood that children and youth graduate from high school and become
productive, self-sufficient residents of our community.

At this time, we would like to inquire as to whether we may submit a full proposal requesting
The (Name of Foundations) support for Dance Academy classes. A one-page fact sheet
outlining the Anita N. Martinezs programs is attached

Ms. (Name), should you have any questions about the Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico or
need more information, please feel free to contact either of us.

Thank you for your consideration of our request.

Sincerely,

Namw Name
President Executive Director
Phone number Phone number

157
Date

ABC Foundation, Inc.


c/o Mr. xxxx xxxxxx
Address
City, State Zip

Dear Mr. XXXXX:

I understand that the trustees of the ABC Foundation have a policy of not accepting
unsolicited proposals from nonprofit organizations. I am requesting your permission to send you
a proposal from Los Barrios Unidos Community Clinic for your consideration.

Los Barrios is involved in a campaign to raise funds toward a second clinic building that
will cost $5 million. The new clinic will be located on Singleton Boulevard in West Dallas and
has been designed to provide needed mother and child services to low-income families. Last
year, Los Barrios provided primary medical, dental and support care services to over 68,000
patients.

The full proposal will describe the anticipated benefits of the second clinic to our largely
Mexican American client base. We will also provide information about Los Barrios in general.

Members of our Board of Trustees clearly understand that your consent to receive a
proposal from us does not imply any gift intention. Please call or write me if we can send you a
proposal. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Name
Executive Director

158