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<p align="center"><font size="5" face="MingLiU_HKSCS"></font><font
size="5" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"> Dahui Zonggao (1089
1163)<br>
<font size="3">aka Miaoxi; posthumous title: Pujue Universal
Enlightenment<br>
(Rmaji:) Daie Sk; aka Myki; posthumous title: Fukaku</font></font></p>
<div align="center"> </div>
<div align="center"></div>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Dahui Zonggao
(10891163) was born in Xuancheng in present-day Anwei; his family
name was Xi . He left home at the age of sixteen and entered Huiyun si ,
a temple on Mount Dong , where he was ordained the following year. From early
on, after reading the Yunmen guanglu (Extensive record of Yunmen), he
felt a special sense of relationship with Yunmen Wenyan (864949).
During an extensive pilgrimage Dahui studied under some of the important Caodong
masters of his time, and, later, under Zhantang Wenzhun (10611115) of
the Huanglong line of Linji Chan. Following Wenzhun's death, Dahui, on Wenzhun's
deathbed advice, joined the assembly under Yuanwu Keqin at the temple Tianning
Wanshou si in the capital, Bianliang , in modern Kaifeng. One day
during a lecture Yuanwu said, A monk asked Yunmen, What is the place from
which all Buddhas come?' Yunmen replied, East Mountain walks on the water.' But
if I were asked the same question I would simply say, A fragrant breeze comes
from the south, and in the palace a refreshing coolness stirs. At these words
Dahui was greatly enlightened. Dahui eventually became Yuanwu's dharma-heir and
Pgina 1
dahui.txt
succeeded him as master of the monastery. His renown soon spread as far as the
capital; in 1126 he was given a purple robe and an honorary name, Fori , by
Lu Shun (n.d.), Minister of the Right. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">When the Northern
Song dynasty fell to the invading Jurchens in 1127, Dahui fled south and lived
for a time with his teacher Yuanwu, then residing at the temple Zhenru yuan
on Mount Yunju . Following Yuanwu's return to Sichuan in 1130, Dahui
built a hermitage on the mountain where a Yunmen temple had formerly stood, and
soon attracted a large following. He later moved to Yunmen an in modern
Fujian. In 1137, at the invitation of the prime minister, Zhang Jun (a
former student of Yuanwu), he went to Mount Jing near the city of Hangzhou
. The assembly under him there is said to have numbered over two thousand. In
1141 Dahui was laicized for advocating armed resistance against the Jurchen
invaders of the Northern Song. He retired to Hengyang in modern Hunan and
there wrote his Zhengfayan zang (Treasury of the true dharma eye). In
1150 he moved to Meiyang in modern Guangdong, then in the midst of a plague
that eventually took the lives of half of his students. He devoted himself to
helping the populace, remaining even after he was officially pardoned in 1155,
until in 1158 he returned to Mount Jing on imperial command. There he soon
attracted an assembly of about 1,700 students and received the patronage of
Emperor Xiaozong (r. 11621189). He died in 1163, leaving ninety-four
Dharma heirs. He was granted the posthumous title Chan Master Pujue .
</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Two of the
best-known aspects of Dahui's teaching are his opposition to what he called the
silent-illumination false Chan of the Caodong school, and his
promotion of koan-introspecting Chan , which from his time on came to
characterize the practice of the Linji school. His ongoing debate with the
eminent Caodong master Hongzhi Zhengjue (10911157) on the subject of
silent illumination versus koan work is famous in Zen circles. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">The basic source
for Dahuis life is <em>Dahui pujue chanshi nianpu </em>
(Chronological biography of Dahui), compiled by his disciple, Zuyong . There
is also an inscription written by Zhang Jun , <em>Dahui pujue chanshi taming
</em> compiled by Zuyong, incl. in <em>Dahui pujue chanshi yulu
</em> (T1998a = 47.811b-943a, esp 836-837). </font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Zen Dust 562,
408-410 </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"> The Zhengfayan
zang (Treasury of the true dharma eye) is a collection of koans and
dialogues compiled between 1147 and 1150 by Dahui Zonggao (10891163);
the sermon referred to is in fascicle 2 (x 67, no. 1309, 574bc). The Zongmen
liandeng huiyao was compiled in 1183 by Huiweng Wuming
(n.d.), three generations after Dahui in the same line; the sermon is found in
zh 20 (x 79: 173a). </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Dahui Zonggao,
the famous popularizer of koans in the Sung period of China, wrote a koan
collection titled Zhengfa Yanzang (Treasury of the Correct Dharma Eye,
W-G.: Cheng-fa yen-tsang, J.: Shbgenz) <br>
Dahui's Shbgenz is composed of three scrolls prefaced by three short
introductory pieces. <br>
Pgina 2
dahui.txt
Upon arriving in China, Dogen Kigen first studied under Wuji Lepai, a disciple
of Dahui, which is where he probably came into contact with Dahui's
Shbgenz.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong><br>
</strong>Wikipedia: <strong>Writings</strong> <br>
<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dahui_Zonggao"
target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dahui_Zonggao</a> </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"> Only one work
can be attributed to Dahui, a collection of koans entitled Cheng-fa yen-tsang
[22] (The Storehouse of the True Dharma Eye, J. Shobogenzo)</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Dahui also
compiled the Ch'an-lin pao-hsun (Treasured Teachings of the Ch'an
Monastic Tradition), instructions of former Chan abbots about the virtues and
ideals of monastic life, in collaboration with another monk, Ta-kuei. A disciple
of Dahui, Tsu-yung, compiled a collection of Dahui's life and teaching called
Ta-hui Pu-chueh Ch'an-shih nien-pu (Chronological Biography of Chan Master
Ta-hui). The Chih-yueh lu, compiled by Chu Ju-chi of the Ming, also contains
information on Dahui's teachings and is the basis of the J. C. Cleary
translation Swampland Flowers, of which the majority is a collection of letters
Dahui wrote to his students.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br>
<strong>Ta-hui Tsung-kao and Kung-an Ch'an</strong><br>
by Chun-Fang Yu<br>
<em>Journal of Chinese Philosophy</em>, V. 6 (1979), pp. 211-235.<br>
<a href="http://ccbs.ntu.edu.tw/FULLTEXT/JR-JOCP/jc22069.htm"
target="_blank">http://ccbs.ntu.edu.tw/FULLTEXT/JR-JOCP/jc22069.htm</a> <br>
<a href="http://www.thezensite.com/ZenEssays/HistoricalZen/TaHui.html"
target="_blank">http://www.thezensite.com/ZenEssays/HistoricalZen/TaHui.html</a>
</font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br>
<br>
</font> </p>
</blockquote>
<p align="left">&nbsp;</p>
<p align="center"><font size="5" face="MingLiU_HKSCS"> <img width="270"
height="568" src="https://terebess.hu/zen/DahuiZonggao1.jpg"> <img
width="568" height="568" src="https://terebess.hu/zen/DahuiZonggao2.jpg" alt="
@"> </font></p>
<p align="center"><font size="5" face="MingLiU_HKSCS"> </font><font
size="5" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Chanlin baoxun / <font
face="MingLiU_HKSCS"></font> Chanmen baoxun<font size="3"><br>
(Rmaji:) Zenrin hkun / Zenmon hkun<br>
(English:) Precious Lessons from the Chan Schools / Treasured Instructions of
the Chan Grove / Precious Admonishments from the Groves of Chan / Zen Gate
Jeweled Instructions / </font><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">Treasured Teachings of the Ch'an Monastic
Tradition</font></font></p>
<p align="left"><font size="5" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><font size="2">early 12th cent.<br>
Compiled by Miaoxi [Myki] &amp; Zhu'an Shigui [Chikuan Shikei]
of Longxiang [Rysh] (1083-1146) </font></font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Zhu'an Shigui
Pgina 3
dahui.txt
of Longxiang (1083-1146) [Chu-an Shih-kuei of Lung-hsiang] Chikuan Shikei of
Rysh. A Dharma heir of Foyan Qingyuan, who was a student of Wuzu Fayan. Zhu'an
is also known as Kushan [Drum Mountain], where he later taught and which was a
center of Buddhist studies in Dogens time. Zhu'an, who is praised by Dogen for
his literary expression of Dharma, compiled a collection of stories, &quot;Zen
Gate Jeweled Instructions,&quot; together with Dahui.<br>
late 12th cent. expanded by Jingshan (d.u) [Keizan], published in
1368<br>
first published in Japan in 1279</font></p>
</blockquote>
<p><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">PDF: <a
href="Thomas-Cleary-Zen-Lessons.pdf" target="_blank"><strong>Zen
Lessons</strong></a></font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><br>
Translated by Thomas Cleary </font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">This is a
remarkable text. Chinese Ch'an Buddhism, better known in the West by its
Japanese name of Zen, is a subtle fusion of confucianism, Daoism and early
Indian Buddhism. Its recorded writings, although distinctly Buddhist in nature,
are nevertheless often presented in a structure similar to that found in the
Confucian book known as The Analects (Lunyu). Zen Lessons is no exception to
this observation. The original Chinese text that Zen Lessons is drawn from is
known as the Chanmen Baoxun (or, 'Chanlin Baoxun'). This translates as 'Precious
Lessons of the Ch'an Schools', and dates from the early Song Dynasty
(960-1279AD). This text was compiled in the early twelfth century by Ch'an
masters Dahui and Zhu-an, bringing together in one place, a compendium of
private dialogue, discussion and letters, covering a broad range of questions
regardimg the political, social and philosophical issues faced by Ch'an
practitioners during the early Song.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">This Thomas
Cleary translation offers the Chanmen Baoxun in an English language format that
presents the work in 217 short chapters that range in constitution from anything
between 5 or 6 lines, to 5 or 6 paragraphs. The text is comprised of material
drawn from sources dated to around the early to middle Song Dynasty - the time
of Dahui and Zhu-an's existence. The first Ch'an master quoted in the text is
called Mingjiao, and the last Ch'an master to be featured is called Jiantang.
Interestingly, one of the compilers - Dahui (1089-1163) - is mentioned in the
body of the text, by the name 'Miaoxi'. Dahui has subsequently become famous for
another work attributed to him, namely that of a collection of letters of Ch'an
instruction, written by himself to many lay and monastic practitioners of Ch'an,
thus demonstrating that an enlightened master can free the Mind with words
either in person, or through the written word. JC Cleary has translated this
work into English, entitled 'Swampland Flowers. JC Cleary is, of course, the
brother of Thomas Cleary, and both have used their considerable translation
skills to render The Blue Cliff Record (Biyan Lu) into English. This is
significant, as the Ch'an master responsible for this excellent work - Yuanwu
(1063-1135) - is also mentioned in Zen Lessons.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">This text and
translation of Zen Lessons is something of a gem and is highly recommended for
study by students of both Ch'an and Zen. The song Dynasty Ch'an masters were
very concerned by the lack of standards even then, and how the perceived quality
Pgina 4
dahui.txt
of Ch'an students had diminished considerably since the time of the Tang Dynasty
(618-907). There is a sense of urgency in the presented wisdom. An urgency that
fits well in today's age of corruption, war and injustice.</font></p>
</blockquote>
<p align="center">&nbsp;</p>
<p align="center"><font size="5" face="MingLiU_HKSCS"> </font><font
size="5" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Zhengfa yanzang
</font></p>
<p align="center"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><font size="3"><em>(Rmaji:)</em></font></font><font size="3"
face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"> <font size="3" face="Verdana,
Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"> Daie Sk: </font>Shbgenz<br>
<em>(English:) </em>The Storehouse of the True Dharma Eye / Treasury of the
Correct Dharma Eye<em><br>
(Magyar:)</em> Ta-huj Cung-kao: Az igaz trvny szemefnye </font></p>
<p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">A
collection of koans and dialogues compiled between 1147 and 1150.</font></p>
<p align="left">&nbsp;</p>
<p align="center"><font size="5" face="MingLiU_HKSCS">
</font><font size="5" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"> Dahui Pujue
chanshi yulu</font><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">
<br>
(Rmaji:) Daie Fukaku zenji goroku<br>
(English:) Recorded Sayings of Chan Master Dahui Pujue</font></p>
<p align="center">&nbsp;</p>
<p align="center"><font size="5" face="MingLiU_HKSCS">
</font><font size="5" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"> Dahui Pujue
chanshi zongmen wuku</font><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><br>
(Rmaji:) Daie Fukaku zenji shmon muko<br>
(English:) Chan Master Dahui Pujue's Arsenal of the Tradition</font></p>
<p align="center">&nbsp;</p>
<p align="center"><font size="5" face="MingLiU_HKSCS"></font><font
size="5" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"> Dahui Pujue chanshi
shu</font><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br>
(Rmaji:) Daie Fukaku zenji sho<br>
(English:) Chan Master Dahui Pujue's Letters</font></p>
<p><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br>
</font><strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><b><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"
size="2"><b><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b><font
face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b><font
color="#FF8040"><a name="a"
id="a"></a></font></b></font></b></font></b></font></b>Swampland Flowers: The
Letters and Lectures of Zen Master Ta Hui</font><font size="2" face="Verdana,
Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"></font></strong><font size="2" face="Verdana,
Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br>
Tr. by J. Christopher Cleary<br>
[Selections from Qu Ruji's (1548-1610) Zhiyue lu / Records of
Pointing at the Moon, Vols. 31-32.]<br>
New York: Grove Press, 1977, Shambhala Publications, 2006, 176 p. </font></p>
<blockquote>
Pgina 5
dahui.txt
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Ch'an master Ta
Hui (1088-1163) lived during the Song Dynasty (960-1279). His name 'Ta Hui' was
bestowed upon him posthumously by the emperor Hsia Tsung, and means 'Great
Wisdom'. Ta Hui was the Dharma heir of Ch'an master Yuan Wu of the Lin Chi
lineage of Ch'an - Yuan Wu is famous for compiling the Blue Cliff Record (Pi Yen
Lu), a collection of Ch'an dialogues attributed to Ch'an masters throughout the
ages. This collection is the English translation of the Chinese text entitled
'Chih Yueh Lu' (Records of Pointing at the Moon), volumes 31 and 32. As ancient
China had a postal service, Ta Hui was able to keep in-touch with Ch'an students
from around China. <br>
<br>
The author-translator - JC Cleary - dedicates this book to his brother -
Thomas Cleary - acknowledging that without his brothers encouragement, he would
not have read or translated Ta Hui's words. The book is simple and concise. The
material contained therein, carries the impression that it was written solely
for the benefit of the reader, such is Ta Hui's wisdom and Cleary's ability. The
book is separated into five sections: </font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Forward. <br>
About the Author. <br>
Translator's Introduction. <br>
Ta Hui's Letters. <br>
Lineage and Names. </font></p>
</blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Although Ta Hui
inherited the Lin Chi Ch'an teaching, he did not discriminate between lineages.
Indeed, the great Ts'ao-Tung Ch'an lineage holder - Hung Chih - a contemporary
of Ta Hui, left Ta Hui in charge of his affairs when he died. Ta Hui wrote the
following poem: <br>
<br>
Birth is thus <br>
Death is thus <br>
Verse or no verse <br>
What is the fuss? <br>
<br>
He let the brush slip from his hand, and peacefully passed away. His
students collected his teachings together, which are presented in this book. A
delightful translation which all Ch'an and Zen students should earnestly study.
</font></p>
<p><a href="https://www.innerdirections.org/swampland-flowers/"
target="_blank"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">https://www.innerdirections.org/swampland-flowers/</font></a></p>
</blockquote>
<p align="left">&nbsp;</p>
<p align="left"><strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><b><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"
size="2"><b><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b><font
face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"
size="2"><b></b></font></b></font></b></font></b></font></strong></p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><font
size="3"><strong> <img width="580" height="615"
Pgina 6
dahui.txt
src="https://terebess.hu/zen/dahui.jpg"> </strong></font></font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><font
size="3"><strong>Dahui Zonggao (10891163): </strong></font><br>
<font size="3"><strong>The Image Created by His Stories about Himself and by
His Teaching Style </strong><em></em></font><em><br>
</em><font size="3"><strong>by Miriam Levering</strong></font><em> <br>
</em>In:<em> <a href="ZenMasters.html" target="_blank">Zen
Masters</a></em>, eds.

Steven Heine and Dale Wright, Oxford University Press, New York,
2010</font> </p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">This chapter
focuses on the image of Zen (Chan) Master Dahui Zonggao (10891163) presented in
the <em>Dahui's Letters (Dahui shu) </em> and the <em>Recorded Sayings of Chan
Master Dahui Pujue (Dahui Pujue Chanshi yulu) </em>. Dahui Zonggao permanently
transformed Chinese Chan Buddhism. First, he was strongly influential in
blending Chan with Huayan Buddhist philosophy; second and most important, Dahui
devised a meditation method that has been fundamental to Chan practice ever
since, the <em>kan huatou </em> method. Dahui Zonggao's influence has been vast,
and a considerable part of his lasting attraction and popularity can be
attributed to the image of his forceful, fearless and caring personality and
teaching style found in his records. It is high time that we examined these
texts in terms of the image of Dahui, his insights and ideas, his personality,
and his teaching methods, for it is through this image that his influence has
been felt. </font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Levering,
Miriam</font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Ph.D.
Dissertation:<br>
Ch'an Enlightenment for Laymen: Ta-hui and the New Religious Culture of
the Sung.<br>
1978, Harvard University. Prof. Masatoshi Nagatomi, adviser. Awarded
&quot;Distinction&quot;.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Dahui's
Letters.<br>
I am currently working on an annotated scholarly translation into English
of Dahui's Letters (Dahui<br>
Pujue Chanshi shu), a six-fascicle portion of the Recorded Sayings of
Dahui Zonggao (1089-1163). <br>
I am also writing a comprehensive introduction outlining the significance
of Dahui's Letters in Chinese<br>
and Korean Buddhist thought and practice.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">&quot;Ta-hui
and Lay Buddhists: Ch'an Sermons on Death,&quot; in David W. Chappell, ed.,<br>
Buddhist and Taoist Practice in Medieval Chinese Society (vol. II of
Buddhist and<br>
Taoist Studies series). Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1987, pp.
181-206.<br>
<a
Pgina 7
dahui.txt
href="https://www.academia.edu/8902305/Chan_Enlightenment_for_Laymen_Ta-hui_Tsun
g-kao_Dahui_Zongao_1089-1163_and_Chan_Sermons_on_Death"
target="_blank">https://www.academia.edu/8902305/Chan_Enlightenment_for_Laymen_T
a-hui_Tsung-kao_Dahui_Zongao_1089-1163_and_Chan_Sermons_on_Death </a>
</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">A Monk's
Literary Education: Dahui's Friendship with Juefan Huihong; <br>
Chung-Hwa Buddhist Journal, No.13.2 (May 2000) pp. 369384 <br>
<a href="http://buddhism.lib.ntu.edu.tw/FULLTEXT/JR-BJ001/93610.htm"
target="_blank">http://buddhism.lib.ntu.edu.tw/FULLTEXT/JR-BJ001/93610.htm<br>
</a><br>
&quot;Dahui Zonggao and Zhang Shangying: The Importance of a Scholar in the
Education of a Song Chan Master.&quot; <br>
The Journal of Sung-Yuan Studies 30 (2000), pp. 115-139.<br>
<a
href="https://www.academia.edu/8570942/Dahui_Zonggao_and_Zhang_Shangying_in_the_
late_Northern_Song_dynasty"
target="_blank">https://www.academia.edu/8570942/Dahui_Zonggao_and_Zhang_Shangyi
ng_in_the_late_Northern_Song_dynasty </a> </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Was there
religious autobiography in China before the thirteenth century?: The Chan
master Ta-Hui Tsung-Kao (10891163) as autobiographer. <br>
Journal of Chinese Religions, 2002, 30: 97119.</font></p>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p align="left">&nbsp;</p>
<p align="left">&nbsp;</p>
<p align="left"><strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><b><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"
size="2"><b><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b><font
face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b><font
color="#FF8040"><a name="b"
id="b"></a></font></b></font></b></font></b></font></b>Selected Sayings of
Master Daie Soko</font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"></font></strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><br>
<em>Zen Traces,</em> Volume 33 Number 4 September 2011 </font></p>
<p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">THE
TEXT<br>
If people who study transcendent wisdom abandon this expedience and go<br>
along with passions, they will certainly be controlled by the demons of<br>
delusion. And while yielding to sense objects to impose theories, and say<br>
that affliction is itself enlightenment, and ignorance is itself great
wisdom;<br>
acting in terms of existence with every step, while talking of emptiness
with<br>
each breath. Without admonishing oneself for being dragged along by the<br>
power of habitual action, to go on and teach others to deny cause and
effect,<br>
the vicious poison of misguided delusion has entered the guts of people
who<br>
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act like this. They want to escape from passion, but it is like trying to
put<br>
out the fire by pouring on oil are they not to be pitied? Only having<br>
penetrated through can you say that affliction is itself enlightenment,
and<br>
ignorance is identical to great wisdom. Within the wondrous heart of the<br>
original, vast quiescence which is pure, clear, perfect illumination there
is<br>
not a single thing that can cause obstruction. It is like the emptiness of<br>
space, even the word Buddha is alien to it, to say nothing of there still
being<br>
passions or afflictions as the opposite. This affair is like the bright sun
in<br>
the blue sky shining clearly, changeless and motionless, without
diminishing<br>
or increasing, it shines everywhere in the daily activities of everyone,<br>
appearing in everything. Though you try to grasp it, you cannot get it;<br>
though you try to abandon it, it always remains; it is vast and
unobstructed,<br>
utterly empty like a gourd floating on water, it cannot be reined in, or
held<br>
down. Since ancient times since when good people of the path have attained<br>
this, they have appeared and disappeared in the sea of birth and death,
able<br>
to use it fully. There is no deficit or surplus, like cutting up
sandalwood,<br>
each piece is it.</font></p>
<p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">VEN.
MYOKYO-NIS COMMENTS<br>
If people who study transcendent wisdom, Prajna that is, abandon this<br>
expedience, we heard last time what these expedients are not to give
oneself<br>
airs, not to talk greatly, not to use language that is difficult to
understand, to be<br>
quite ordinary, skilful means which fit, and this expedience within the
skilful<br>
means are the important thing. If therefore, those who study transcendent
wisdom<br>
abandon these expedient means one can very easily run off at the mouth,
having<br>
read a little bit, thinking one has grasped it, and talking ones head off as
if one<br>
knew what it was all about, not even giving oneself airs, quite running away
by<br>
itself.<br>
I remember vividly, in the mid-fifties in fathers Zen class, after the
class<br>
was over we were reading whatever book was available, and then we would go
to<br>
the nearest coffee house, or tea-room as it was then, and then we would talk
and<br>
talk of how we understood it, and how we saw it, and then we would be thrown
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out<br>
because it was closing time, and we would go to the next one which was open a
bit<br>
longer. And we couldnt contain ourselves. Well, this is out of ignorance,
not<br>
only just wanting to show what one knows.<br>
But, If people who study transcendent wisdom abandon this expedience, at<br>
that time nobody knew any better and it didnt come to much anyway, but<br>
nowadays it is a little bit different and at the time when Master Daie was
talking<br>
there were, and there have always been, those who really said, this is how it
is,<br>
and gave great examples and didnt really know what it was all about. So,
If<br>
people who study transcendent wisdom abandon this expedience and go along
with<br>
passions, they will certainly be controlled by the demons of delusion. If we
go<br>
along with passions, when the Fires flare up, when the volcanoes erupt, then
we<br>
certainly are controlled by the demons of delusion. Because then, whatever
comes<br>
up in that eruption, we take for real, and we believe it and we believe it
with that<br>
same fierceness with which the eruption comes.<br>
There is an excellent gauge which might be worthwhile if you havent done<br>
it, and that is to get yourself a tape recorder everybody has one nowadays
and<br>
either your spouse, or a very good friend, anyway someone who knows all
the<br>
weaknesses that we have. And then tell them what the thing is about, and
start<br>
talking about it, and you get a bit niggled. And you get just to the point
where you<br>
always react, and let the tape recorder run, set for quarter of an hour, and
then it<br>
has to shut itself off, you cant do it anymore. The other, no doubt, by that
time is<br>
also a little bit high, but it clicks off. And then for a week you let it
stand there.<br>
And then you listen to that tape you will not believe it, when you hear your
own<br>
voice suddenly rising higher and higher, and with unctuous conviction the
greatest<br>
platitudes come out. It is one of the more sobering experiences, and if you
havent<br>
done it yet, I strongly suggest you do it. That is when the demons of delusion
run<br>
away with us. And while yielding to sense objects, being carried away by
sense<br>
objects, and please remember that these are not just outside objects, but
also<br>
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mental objects yielding to these, being carried away by them, and yet<br>
nevertheless in spite of them, or using them, to impose theories, and say
it is<br>
this, I know it!, or what I know and have read and understood, that
affliction is<br>
enlightenment, and ignorance is itself wisdom, that is what it says in some
of the<br>
books, I have read it myself! And act therefore, also, according to that
with every<br>
step, and yet talking of emptiness with every breath. Without
admonishing<br>
oneself for being dragged along by the power of habitual action. As we
are<br>
dragged along by the power of habitual action we cant keep the demons of<br>
delusion down, weve never tried it.<br>
And so this is where we need the practice, where we need the strength to<br>
really hold together, rather than going on and talking to others, to deny
cause and<br>
effect. The vicious poison of misguided delusion has entered the guts of
people<br>
who act like this. The vicious poison, he calls it, of misguided
delusion. With<br>
no training and no framework, the whole thing explodes. And yet, They,
such<br>
people, want to escape from passion, but how can you escape from the
passions if<br>
you allow them to carry you away again and again? It is like trying to put
out the<br>
fire by pouring on oil. What happens if there is a fire and you pour oil on
it?<br>
Arent such people to be pitied? This, and Master Daie really lays it on, is
a<br>
careful warning, not only in our talking, but in our thinking that we have to
keep to<br>
the practice, to the framework and not continuously allow our own ideas, our
own<br>
passions, our own weaknesses, to obstruct and rule us. Because, says
Master<br>
Daie, only having penetrated all the way through can you say that affliction
is<br>
itself enlightenment, and ignorance is identical to great wisdom. Only
having<br>
penetrated all the way through. Although it is true, if you tell it to
somebody else<br>
then it is likely to be another snare. This is why it is so important that the
talk<br>
matches and is on the right level.<br>
If you talk to a child who is learning his multiplication tables I dont
know<br>
whether people still learn multiplication tables nowadays, or whether they
go<br>
straight on the computer, I dont know but in my time at least we had to
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learn<br>
multiplication tables, and then more and more mathematics, and when we came
to<br>
integral calculus, it was a natural progression; but if you talk about
integral<br>
calculus to a child who is just learning multiplication tables, he will think
you are<br>
off your rocker, or that there is something magnificent, magical about it. And
so<br>
this matching is an important thing. Only having penetrated all the way
through<br>
can you say that affliction is itself enlightenment, and ignorance is
identical to<br>
great wisdom. And it is not only in talking, it is also in our reading;
having just<br>
read that affliction is itself enlightenment, ignorance is identical to great
wisdom,<br>
Now I know! Now Ill have no more trouble!, and then I wonder where the<br>
trouble and obstructions come from when, after all, I know it. I have only
ensnared<br>
myself even more.<br>
But Master Daie tells us, Within the wondrous heart of the original, vast<br>
quiescence, that wide, open emptiness, which is pure, clear, perfect
illumination,<br>
there is not a single thing that can cause obstruction. You remember the
sixth<br>
Patriarch, Before thinking of good and bad, before thinking, when there
is<br>
nothing we must not misunderstand that nothing either, it is not that there
is<br>
nothing, but there is no obstruction because there is just one, Master Daie
calls it<br>
pure, clear, perfect illumination, and being one, and having become one with
it,<br>
there is not a single thing that can cause obstruction. It is like the
emptiness of<br>
space, and even the word Buddha is something alien to this vast emptiness,
like<br>
space. The word Buddha doesnt belong to it. Thats only made up by us. To
say<br>
nothing of there still being passions. How can there be passions or
afflictions as<br>
the opposite of that vast quietness. There is just nothing.<br>
And Master Daie then continues, This affair is like the bright sun in the<br>
blue sky, shining clearly, changeless and motionless, without diminishing
or<br>
increasing. Like the bright sun in the blue sky, shining clearly. It does
not<br>
change, it does not hop about. It shines without diminishing or increasing,
and it<br>
shines everywhere. It does not shine more on this, or less on that. It doesnt
even<br>
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want to shine. Shining is its nature. And it shines everywhere in the
daily<br>
activities of everyone.<br>
Master Daie is very careful in really trying to point the finger towards it.
It<br>
shines everywhere, in the daily activities of everyone. It cannot be hidden.
The<br>
Sixth Patriarch again said, The peasant uses it all day long, but is not
aware of it.<br>
The daily activities of everyone, whatever we are doing, it shines through it,
and<br>
appearing in everything, like the sun shining clearly. Though you try to grasp
it, to<br>
see it, to hold it, to look at it, you cannot get it. The knife that cuts but
cannot cut<br>
itself, the eye that sees but cannot see itself. And this is the delusion of
I, thinking<br>
that it can grasp it, and look at it as if it was something extra, something
separate.<br>
But that - if you want to call it the True Face, because we are mostly
concerned<br>
with that - cannot be seen, it cannot be grasped, but it works. You cannot get
it.<br>
And though you try to abandon it - this is the other side of it - it always
remains.<br>
You cannot see it, and you cannot get rid of it either. It is in the oneness,
in the<br>
total union with it, and the functioning in that union, which takes the body
in as<br>
well as the mind and the thought and the heart and the whole lot. But it has
no I<br>
with it, as observer.<br>
You can learn typing exactly - with which finger you press which key - you<br>
can have it perfectly in your head. And when you are then put in front of
a<br>
typewriter, will you be able to type? No, because you havent got that
physical<br>
skill, which needs to be trained. And when really used to it there is a
oneness with<br>
it, you dont need to think about it any more. As long as you have to think
about it,<br>
it is not yet truly at one. And Master Daie uses the old analogy: Like a
gourd<br>
floating on water, it cannot be reined in or held down. Since ancient times
when<br>
good people of the Path have attained this, they have appeared and disappeared
in<br>
the sea of birth and death, able to use it fully. Since ancient times when
good<br>
people of the Path have attained this, this insight, this oneness with it and
acting<br>
with it, within it in response to the situation - because there is no I that
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wants to do<br>
this, that, and the other - then they have appeared and disappeared in the sea
of<br>
birth and death, able to use it fully. Able to use it fully, smoothly, in
response to<br>
the situation, in obedience to the situation, and to the benefit of all
concerned.<br>
The other day I had a letter from somebody who has been doing the practice<br>
for quite some time. And she is in a job where the money was running out,
and<br>
there was great talk about what could be done, and how the employment
could<br>
continue, and there were very heated opinions. And she said she suddenly
realised<br>
that it was no good having her own opinion on that, that everybody was
having<br>
them, and she was talking to the manager, and suddenly saw his point so<br>
completely that she could only nod. And at that moment, he looked at her
and<br>
said, Yes, but it could go in a much simpler way, and the whole situation
defused<br>
itself.<br>
Its very important that we realise that this unity is not a conking out, but
is<br>
the full smooth going with the situation, and it has a habit of defusing
situations,<br>
because it touches everything.<br>
Disappearing and appearing in the sea of birth and death, able to use it
fully.<br>
There is no deficit or surplus in that use. Master Daie compares it to
cutting up<br>
sandalwood, each piece is it. Like cutting up sandalwood. You cannot increase
it,<br>
you cannot decrease it, it just is, neither more nor less, it just is. In
everything, in<br>
every action. In cutting a piece of bread, in lifting a finger, in whatever it
is, in<br>
response to the demands of the situation. Like cutting up sandalwood, each
piece<br>
is it. And when it comes to that, then the thing works together in harmony.
And<br>
this is where the Buddhas teaching points us, to this harmonious working<br>
together. Can we please take this to heart and ponder it down in the
zendo?</font></p>
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