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The Stoughton Courier Hub Thursday, July 27, 2017 • Vol. 136, No. 1 • Stoughton, WI

The

Stoughton

Courier Hub

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Vol. 136, No. 1

Stoughton, WI

ConnectStoughton.com

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The Stoughton Courier Hub Thursday, July 27, 2017 • Vol. 136, No. 1 • Stoughton, WI

Photo by Amber Levenhagen

Brian Christensen reads a page from his journal, which documents his time spent serving in Iraq. The journal was stolen from his car last weekend and was returned last week after the community rallied for its return.

Wounded warrior journal returned

New Stoughton resident victim of string of car thefts

AMBER LEVENHAGEN

Unified Newspaper Group

Having spent nine years in Iraq, retired Army Staff Sgt. Brian Chris - tensen saw both the good and the bad. Now, having lived in Stoughton for the past year, he’s also experienced both sides of humanity here as well. Christensen, who served in Iraq from August 1997 to August 2006,

was one of several Stoughton resi - dents recently victimized by a string of vehicle thefts. But while the thief (or thieves) were likely after mon - ey, jewelry or technological gadgets,

what they stole from Christensen had

far more value to him. On Saturday, July 15, Christensen noticed his bookbag and journal were missing from his car. Those might not seem like important losses, except he uses the journal during therapy at the VA Hospital in Madison to help treat his symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Christensen works as a pharmacy

technician at the hospital, and said he’s been returning to the journal over the last several months to help him work through issues related to PTSD, which he said is “invaluable” because of the memories it holds, and that he wants his sons to find it years from now to learn more about “who I am and who I was.” “Twelve years after coming home, most of what I remember are the sad and bad things, the hard to get over things,” he said, “But this book has really made me remember that there

Turn to Journal/Page 16

City of Stoughton

Riverfront

developer

withdraws

Geall cites ‘uncertainty,’ city undecided on how to proceed

BILL LIVICK

Unified Newspaper Group

The master developer of the Yahara Riverfront Redevelopment withdrew from that role last week, throwing the effort into disarray and leaving plan - ners uncertain about the

project’s future. At the start of a joint meeting of the Common

Council and Redevelop -

ment Authority on Tues - day, July 18, Mark Geall, Principal o f Ta n e s a y Development, announced

that he’s withdrawing from

the project, at least for now, because elected offi - cials do not agree on what they want to include in the project. Geall said the RDA was

Turn to RDA/Page 13

Street near Trailer building closed

Officials cite safety concerns

BILL LIVICK

Unified Newspaper Group

Two blocks of East South Street are closed for an indefinite period of time because of safety con - cerns about the structural

inte grity of the Highway Trailer building. City officials decided to close the 500 and 600 blocks of the street Tues -

day night after hearing

about a report deli vered to the Redevelopment Authority by Steve Mar- Pohl, of Insite Consulting

Turn to Street/Page 16

Celebrating 40 years under the hood

KIMBERLY WETHAL

Hub Correspondent

Olson Auto Exchange isn’t exactly the same as when it was started four decades ago. That’s not surprising, because neither are brothers John and Jack Olson. While the two have always shared a passion for automobiles, they’ve found their interests in the indus - try have shifted as years passed. Naturally , their business followed suit, and 40 years later, it’s changed

names a few times – from

John’s Body Shop to Olson

Automotive and finally to its current name – along with the objectives at hand. “I always seemed to like body work,” John said. “When Jack and I were in high school, we had older cars. Jack’s first car was a ‘67 Mustang, my first car was a ‘52 Ford. We always had old cars.” At the age of 20, John opened the body shop on July 27, 1977, right across the road from his father Vern’s car dealership off

Hwy. 51 where the Stough - ton Wellness and Athletic Center f acility now stands. By opening up a body shop to service his dad’s cars, John filled a need in his father’s business. For years, it was a family affair for the Olsons. Jack, only 13 at the time, would later become John’s busi - ness partner, while Vern w as a business partner for both of them. When they transitioned from body shop work to rust-proofing and detail - ing for 17 Madison car

dealerships, Vern would help move cars when John and Jack were in Madison. He also assisted with anoth - er side business where they sold of a lot of the same clean-up and decal products that they used in their ser- vice shop in Madison. “Our dad w as running around selling it,” Jack said. “He liked to talk to people like that.” John added, “He helped get that business going.” There was a time where

Turn to Auto/Page 14

The Stoughton Courier Hub Thursday, July 27, 2017 • Vol. 136, No. 1 • Stoughton, WI

Photo by Kimberly Wethal

Vintage gas pumps sit behind one of the garages.

The Stoughton Courier Hub Thursday, July 27, 2017 • Vol. 136, No. 1 • Stoughton, WI

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The Stoughton Courier Hub Thursday, July 27, 2017 • Vol. 136, No. 1 • Stoughton, WI

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The Stoughton Courier Hub Thursday, July 27, 2017 • Vol. 136, No. 1 • Stoughton, WI

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July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub

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Cooksville celebrates 175 years

Cooksville, located in the northwest corner of Rock County, celebrated the 175th anniversary of the establishment of the community and honored its founders with a party featuring local food, art and music from a range of artistic groups on Saturday, July 22.

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com Cooksville celebrates 175 years Cooksville, located in the northwest

Jeanne Julseth, right, one of the organizers of Cooksville’s 175th anniversary celebration, talks with state Rep. Don Vruwink (D-Milton), who attended the event being held in his district.

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Photos by Kimberly Wethal

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July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com Cooksville celebrates 175 years Cooksville, located in the northwest

Jon Langsdorf, of Madison, looks at the specifics of an engine at the car show.

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Margie Walder’s dogs Casper, left, and Callie relax in the shade under the tent.

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July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub

3

Stoughton Area School District

School board, council agree to form committee

Group would continue talk on joint issues

SCOTT DE LARUELLE

Unified Newspaper Group

Looking to better address issues that affect both the city and school district – namely marketing, hous - ing, school enrollment and po verty – leaders for both are forming a joint commit - tee to help explore answers. Creation of the ad hoc committee was a main top - ic of the July 20 joint meet- ing of Stoughton Common Council’s Committee of the Whole and the Stoughton Area school board. It was a follow-up session to an initial meeting between the two groups April 20, with plans for the larger groups to continue to meet quar - terly to discuss common issues. Communication with city officials about work - ing together to improve was a key topic in the April school board election that swept out three incum - bents and brought in three political newcomers. That election also brought to the forefront the issues of school financing and the lack of housing growth in the city as main issues to work on collaboratively with the council. On those big issues, this new committee is expect - ed to do much of the leg - work. The group features co-chairs in Jonathon Coughlin from the school board and Kathleen John - son from the city, as well a s school board mem - bers Tim Bubon and Joe Fre ye and city alders Mike

Engelberger and Greg Jen - son. The committee plans to report back to both bod - ies within the next 60 days. “The idea here is for us to share information and collectively try to take that

information and put togeth -

er some sort of an action plan to address the issue,” said Common Council president Tim Swadley, a former SASD board mem - ber. “If you guys are in the loop on what we’re doing and were in the loop on what you’re doing, hope - fully we can make good decisions.” A t M o n d a y n i g h t ’s school board meeting, pres - ident Scott Dirks said it’s lik ely representatives of the Stoughton Chamber of Commerce will be invited to participate. “We don’t want to have such a large committee that you can’t get meeting dates,” he said. “This is going to be six people and they can invite whom they want to invite, and that’s probably much more work - able.” Dirks said he’ s “real - ly excited” about the new committee and its tasks – the first two of which will be looking at marketing the area and attracting sin - gle-family housing for new, young families. “This is one of the things I was hoping would come out of setting up these joint meetings between the board and the city council,” he said. “I had some concerns a few months ago maybe there wasn’t that unanimi - ty of direction, but I think we’re all kind of moving in the same direction, which is encouraging.” “This isn’t just for the school district, this is for the whole community.”

More meetings planned

While no future meeting date has been set, both city and school district leaders seem pleased at the results of their two joint meetings, as well as each side’s will - ingness to continue them.

They will probably be continued on a quarterly basis, due to the difficulties in getting a 12-person Common Council and seven-member school board together

Stoughton Area School District board president Scott Dirks said the two joint meetings have been “very helpful in raising awareness of school district issues.”

“It appears, especially based on what I was hearing from city council members at that meeting, that there is a genuine appreciation for the need to attract young families

Common Council president Tim Swadley said he was “really impressed” by the collaboration and con - tributions by all of those who participated in the two joint meetings, and said he’s looking forward to the ad hoc committee’s recommendations.

“We really have some great leaders in our commu - nity,” he said.

On the Web

View the meeting on WSTO at

wsto.tv/vod/?category=City+Council

Dirks said he hopes the committee will help raise awareness of needs in the Stoughton community as a whole, and help “spur the city into developing poli - cies and plans to encour - age the construction of an affordable range of single-family housing in Stoughton.” “Right now, such housing is in very short supply,” he said. “The demand is clear- ly there. Now we just need for more of it to be built.”

Development and marketing

No formal action was taken at the meeting. The group also discussed the city’s comprehensive plan, population growth, school enrollment, development and marketing. Common Council mem - ber Sid Boersma, a Realtor, said the city is “deficient in both new housing and older

housing right now.” “If it’s a decent-priced house, they are now on the

market for 4-5 days and they are getting offers,” he said. “We don’t have enough places to sell. Who can move into a communi - ty if we don’t have enough housing? And it’s got to be decent housing for young families.” City planning director Rodney Scheel said while some residential develop - ment is coming on line in the Nordic Ridge neighbor- hood, planned residential development at Kettle Park West has been held up due to issues with connectivity to Hwy. 138. Despite the high demand for housing in the area, there was also a consen - sus that Stoughton needs to further increase its visi - bility and attractiveness to young families. Scheel said the recent Parade of Homes was encouraging, drawing 3,600 visitors. “It’s certainly brought new eyes to the communi - ty that (haven’t) been there before,” he said. Stoughton Area School District superintendent Tim Onsager said there has been some talk “on and off” the

past few years on coopera -

tive marketing efforts, but “nothing has come to frui - tion.” “We need a concerted effort amongst the differ - ent entities – the school district, city, chamber – to market what we have to offer,” he said. “We’re in a great place. You come to Stoughton and it’s a small- town feel with big-city amenities close by.” Onsager took aim at Stoughton’s neighbors, which have been drawing prospective families – and

students – away from the district. “We have to do a bet - ter job and work together and sell the differences we have, say, with Oregon,” he said, noting that Stoughton has advantages of its own hospital, two grocery stores and plenty of restaurants to choose from. “We need a concerted effort to work together. The district would be interested in combin - ing financial resources to “bring someone in to shape that marketing plan.” Johnson, a Realtor, said Stoughton needs to empha - size the quality of their schools; or at the least, combat possibly inaccurate perceptions about them. “I’m concerned that Stoughton doesn’t have the best reputation for schools, and I think we need to emphasize the qualities we do have, because when you have young families, they look at the quality of the schools,” she said. “I lost a few neighbors because they didn’t want to send their kids to Kegonsa (Elementa - ry School), they wanted to be in another area.” Dirks said Stoughton simply needs to do a better job at letting people outside the city or school district know about the good things going on here. “Stoughton’s a great community for a lot of dif - ferent reasons,” he said. “I d on’t think we’re doing a very good job communi - cating to the outside world just what it is.”

Email Unified Newspaper Group reporter Scott De Laruelle at scott. delaruelle@wcinet.com.

Stoughton man shot, killed in Madison

Police: Victim was ‘targeted’

SCOTT GIRARD

Unified Newspaper Group

A 29-year-old Stoughton man was shot and killed in Madison as part of what police believe was a “tar - geted homicide” early Monday morning.

The victim’s name had not been released as of the Hub’s deadline on Tues - day. When it is available, this story will be updated

on ConnectStoughton.com.

According to the Mad - ison Police Department i ncident report, the man suffered “numerous gun - shot wounds” just after 3 a.m. July 24 on the 2000 block of Adderbury Lane off of Raymond Road.

Multiple people called 911 to report the gunshots, and police located a vehi - cle with apparent gun shot damage and shell casings in the area. The investigation was continuing as of Tuesday, and MPD public informa - tion officer Joel DeSpain told the Hub the y are “not at a point where we have any named suspects.” “We’re hoping to get

i n f o r m a t i o n f r o m t h e community right now,” DeSpain said. “We’re concerned there could be retaliation in the streets for what happened last night. We are concerned that this violence may lead to more shootings.”

Contact Scott Girard at ungreporter@wcinet.com and follow him on Twitter

@sgirard9.

Send it in!

We like to send reporters to shoot photos, but we can’t be everywhere. And we know you all have cameras. So if you have a photo of an event or just a slice of life you think the community might be interested in, send it to us and we’ll use it if we can. Please include contact information, what’s happening in the photo and the names of people pictured. You can submit it on our website at ConnectStoughton.com, email to editor Jim Ferolie at stoughtoneditor@wcinet.com or drop off electronic media at our office at 135 W. Main St. Questions? Call 873-6671.

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See something wrong?

The Courier Hub does not sweep errors under the rug. If you see something you know or even think is in error, please contact editor Jim Ferolie at 873-6671 or at stoughtoneditor@wcinet.com so we can get it right.

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  • 4 July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub

Opinion

ConnectStoughton.com

Letters to the editor

‘Pee and move on’

This is in response to a letter to the editor in the Hub’s July 20 publication regarding all-gender bathrooms. I will humor you, previous writer, and assume for a moment that you have an incomplete idea of the concept of ‘all-gender.’ I hope this is the case, and not the alternative (what I fear to be your intention - al ignorance toward an evolving school of thought). An all-gender bathroom is a

toilet

for

humans. It’s a lavato -

... ry. A water closet. A sign read -

ing “All-Gender” could easily be replaced with a sign reading “Gotta Pee? Accomplish That Here.” You neglected to mention exactly why you are opposed to these bathrooms, but I can only assume someone of your age (all due respect) possesses not the advantage of having grown up in a society increasingly accept- ing of diversity. A surprisingly revolutionary concept in recent sociopolitical dialogue is this:

all humans go to the bathroom. Right? I am struck by the irony in your argument. That you would be so vehemently opposed to inclusivity within a church is appalling. I have therefore tak - en the liberty to include a few examples of people who would benefit from this development. There are, of course, transgender individuals who struggle every day with something as funda - mental as feeling comfortable while they use a public toilet.

Unfortunately, I’ve got a feel- ing that the aspect of these new facilities inspiring your hostility is the very concept of transgen - derism. Instead, consider an elderly person, a child, or a person with disabilities who may require assistance in the bathroom. I have the extreme privilege to support adults with developmen - tal disabilities here in Stoughton, and often support individuals whose gender identity does not match my own. All-gender restrooms are a blessing in that they allow me to support those individuals to my fullest ability in public, without either of us feeling uncomfortable complet- ing the most natural of human functions. It’s disheartening that the religion you preach is also the catalyst behind your opposition to inclusivity. You stated, “the Bible does not proclaim all-gen - der bathrooms” — true, public plumbing etiquette may not have been of chief concern over 2,000 years ago, but correct me if I’m wrong — your Bible also proclaims acceptance, right? I encourage you to rethink your perspective. Accept with grace. Include others with respect. Love equally those both like and unlike yourself. In other words, pee and move on. Thank you.

Alexandra Weeden City of Stoughton

Thursday, July 27, 2017 • Vol. 136 No. 1 USPS No. 1049-0655 Periodical Postage Paid, Stoughton,
Thursday, July 27, 2017 • Vol. 136 No. 1 USPS No. 1049-0655 Periodical Postage Paid, Stoughton,

Thursday, July 27, 2017 • Vol. 136 No. 1

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Periodical Postage Paid, Stoughton, WI and additional offices. Published weekly on Thursday by the Unified Newspaper Group, A Division of Woodward Communications, Inc. POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to The Stoughton Courier Hub, PO Box 930427, Verona, WI 53593.

Office Location: 135 W. Main Street, Stoughton, WI 53589 Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday and Friday Phone: 608-873-6671 • FAX: 608-873-3473 e-mail: stoughtoneditor@wcinet.com Circulation customer service: (800) 355-1892

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July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com Letters to the editor ‘Pee and move on’

Community Voices

Future Liars coming to the fairgrounds every summer

T he moment I was old enough

to join, I pledged my head,

heart, hands, and health to

things that I can’t remember. That’s because a lie is much harder to recall than the truth. I should know, because I am an incredible liar – and it was our local 4-H group that made me one. We stood before our green-and- white flag once a month to

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com Letters to the editor ‘Pee and move on’

Wollin-Dunn

start our club

meeting, and while my sister pressed a cool

hand against her blouse and made eye contact with

the thing as she recited the pledge, I mumbled in the direction of my tennies and the sweat from my hot, little hand, dampened my T-shirt, branding me the liar I now was. My sister really did care about her club, her community, her coun- try and her world, but I just wanted to go to the Fair! And I was not alone. In order to participate in the local Fair each summer, a 4-H kid would not only have to recite that oath once per month, she would also have to turn in tenuous prom- ises on paper about what kind of projects other than animals she would prepare for the Fair, lip-sync Christmas Carols at nursing homes in December and sometimes pre- tend to want to be an officer of the club. Our dedication to deceit was year-round. Those of us who were farm kids but not deeply enough immersed in real farming to belong to the Future Farmers of America were nonetheless prone to bragging about our farm chores. At my family’s farm, we didn’t do chores. Twice a day, Mom and

I would tug on our barn boots and our gloves because it was time to “feed” and “milk the goats.” What types of animals we were feeding varied from year to year, so we didn’t get any more specific than that, but that is what we always said. When I went to play at those other 4-H kids’ farms I discovered

not a single one of them did chores at all. They were all just feeding and milking the same as we did! Little liars. Of course, chores at home and chores at the Fair are totally dif- ferent. At the Fair, our club had a sign-up sheet for “Barn Duty,” and

kids were climbing all over one

another to get their names on the sheet so they could sit there all day, holding a pitchfork and waiting for some Holstein to stand up and poop. At home you might claim that you couldn’t clean the pen because the wheelbarrow was too heavy, but at the Fair you became a manure super-hero. Our club had a lot of pooping heifers and a couple of pooping cows, but hardly any pooping beef cattle. By peering through our little herd of black and white we could just make out the massive Angus or Hereford bodies and the tall FFA boys at the far end of the barn. Sometimes a 4-H girl sitting on a show trunk would suddenly announce that she needed to get something from her dad’s truck and she’d stroll on down that aisle and you’d see her hair go flying sideways when she walked by the huge fans keeping those beef steers cool, but then she’d be out of sight so you’d go back to watching your cud-chewers and waving at flies. When she finally came back smil- ing and still carrying nothing but the truck keys, it confirmed that she, too, was a liar. Even if all you wanted to do was

hang out in the barn, you eventu- ally had to change your shoes and wash your hands and go up to the exhibition building to check on your other projects. Some kids pledged their hands to carpentry, some to sewing, and some to baking. A lot of farm kids didn’t want to have to do those other projects, but it made us better

people to fib and say we enjoyed trying something new – and to flat- out lie that we had given it our best effort. Show day was the best day of the Fair, especially when it was over. Kids could have a pretty stressful time if they got their show

clothes dirty, or their heifer was

in heat, or they couldn’t find their show halter, but after it was all done and every kid hoisted every other kid up to put their blue-and- red stickers on the signs above their projects, everybody could honestly relax. That is when some 4-H girl would be walking back from changing out of her “whites” back into her shorts and T-shirt, and some FFA boy would just be inno- cently carrying a couple of buckets of water, and all of a sudden those buckets would be empty and that girl would be soaking wet and yelling. Only the kids who liked each other got into water fights so you knew right away that boy liked that girl. And when that 4-H girl screamed at the top of her lungs that she hated that FFA boy, he would be grinning from ear to ear because he knew she was a magnificent liar and didn’t mean a word of it. In fact, she might even pledge her lying little 4-H heart to him… for that one sweet week at the Fair.

Kelsey Wollin-Dunn is a Town of Rutland resident.

US ‘not a Christian theocracy’

Regarding Neal Larson’s religious diatribe, may I remind him that the United States is not a Christian theocracy. I trust this will be the case as long as the Republic exists.

Jay Hatheway City of Stoughton

Correction

In the July 13 edition of the Hub, a letter to the editor incorrectly spelled the submitter’s last name. His name is David Handt. The Hub regrets the error.

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July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub

5

Letters to the editor

Inclusion, acceptance welcomed

I’m writing in response to the hate-filled letter in last week’s Hub regarding gender-neutral bathroom facilities. The writer claims that it is a “lie” that all-gender bath- rooms are needed. I’m not sure how he could possibly know this. As a parent, I would welcome all-gender bathrooms so that I could comfortably accompany my young son to the bathroom, or so that my husband could assist my daughter. All-gen- der restrooms make spaces more accommodating for people in a wide variety of circumstances, but the writer

did not consider that. He only considered his personal need to express judgment on transgender individuals. I’m no expert on trans- gender issues, but I do know that public messages of hate can cause harm. A recent study found that 40 percent of transgender adults report- ed having made a suicide attempt, the great majority of those (over 90 percent) before the age of 25. These children absorb the hatred and shameful messages, and often feel so hopeless and unloved as a result that they try to end their beautiful young lives.

Like Mr. Larsen, I was also born at Stoughton Hos- pital (November 13, 1976) and Stoughton is where I have chosen to raise my fam- ily. I welcome any efforts in our community to increase inclusion, acceptance, and openness to all. To all my LGBTQI neigh- bors, please know that you are loved beyond measure. You are treasured members of our community and our lives. We love you and are proud to offer our support.

Mia Croyle City of Stoughton

All gender bathrooms should be considered

Recently I read a letter to the editor concerning all-gender bathrooms in Stoughton, and wish to offer my own opinion. As someone who loves history, I often like to look back on past societies when debating current events. In my research I was surprised to find that, according to Time magazine, the first gendered bathrooms were established in Paris, France in the 18th century. These new gendered bathrooms were created in response to women’s entry into the workforce. Thinking wom - en were “of the weaker sex” they invented separate bathrooms to serve as a sort

of safe haven from public life. Knowing this, I would like to point out that early readers of the Bible and even Jesus Christ himself used all-gender bathrooms. You are correct in saying that the Bible “does not proclaim ‘all gender bath - rooms,’” but that is merely because there was no such thing as a gendered bath - room at the time. I agree with your worry about the city spending too much money on bathrooms, and having half the number of restrooms in every build - ing is a sure way to battle that issue and save the city money.

Finally, members of the transgender or nonbinary community shouldn’t have to question their own iden - tity to simply use the bath - room. Shouldn’t Stoughton be devoted to making its residents feel more com - fortable and accepted by their community? In conclusion, I think that all-gender restrooms in Stoughton should be seri- ously considered. This an important topic that should be discussed by the com - munity.

Emma Crowley City of Stoughton

POLICE REPORTS

The Stoughton Police De - partment logged 2,432 inci - dents in June. Cases of inter- est for the month were; nine intoxicated driver arrests, eight drug incidents, nine batteries, three burglaries, 58 thefts, 11 frauds, 14 domestic distur- bances, 33 disturbances, 22 disorderly conducts, 19 traffic crashes, 57 EMS assists, 14 alarms, 13 juvenile incidents, 70 911 calls, three runaways, five warrant arrests, eight threats, 26 animal complaints, and officers responded to 58 suspicious activity calls. Of - ficers also logged 117 assist cases, 66 criminal charges, 33 ordinance violations, and 139 traffic arrests from 95 traffic stops. The following were selected as significant cases by the de- partment:

June 3

Officers arrested a 19-year- old woman for Battery and Disorderly Conduct following a domestic disturbance.

June 4

Officers arrested a 27-year- old man for Battery and Dis- orderly Conduct following a domestic disturbance. Officers arrested a 27-year- old woman on an Outstanding Warrant following the officer attempting to serve the war- rant on a known wanted per- son. Officers arrested a 46-year- old man for OMW third Of - fense following a traffic stop and Hit & Run.

June 5

Officers arrested a 34-year- old man on a Probation Hold

following a welfare check

where the subject was found intoxicated in violation of his probation.

June 6

Officers took two juveniles (13 and 14 years old) into protective custody on charges of theft and receiving stolen property following the theft of a bicycle. Both were later re- leased to parents.

June 9

Officers arrested a 34-year- old man on a Probation Hold following welfare check where the subject was found intoxi- cated in violation of his proba- tion. Officers arrested a 38-year- old woman for Theft from a Motor Vehicle & Attempted Theft from a Motor Vehicle after the subject was caught entering parked vehicles and removing property.

June 12

Officers arrested a 42-year- old man for OWI 3rd Offense following a traffic stop.

Officers arrested a 37-year- old man for Impeding Breath- ing, False Imprisonment, and Battery following a domestic disturbance. Officers arrested a 35-year- old man for Substantial Bat- tery, Impeding Breathing, and Disorderly Conduct following a domestic disturbance.

June 13

Officers arrested a 36-year- old man on an Outstanding Warrant after the officer ob - served the subject that he knew was wanted.

June 14

Officers arrested a 32-year-

old woman for Bail Jumping, Possession of THC, and a Pro- bation Hold following a traffic stop where the officer smelled THC in the vehicle. A 31-year- old man was also arrested for Probation Hold in the incident.

June 17

Officers arrested a 36-year- old man for a Parole Violation after officers were called to a residence for a possible sui- cide attempt. Officers arrested a 33-year- old woman for Disorderly Con- duct following a disturbance at a residence. Officers arrested a 33-year- old woman for Disorderly Conduct following a domestic disturbance. Officers arrested a 19-year- old woman for Resisting/Ob- structing an Officer and Dis - orderly Conduct following a domestic disturbance.

June 18

Officers arrested a 40-year- old man on an Outstanding Warrant following a traffic stop. Subject was also cited for Operating After Revocation. Officers arrested a 34-year- old man on a Probation Hold following a welfare check where the subject was found intoxicated in violation of his probation. O fficer took a 15-year-old boy into custody and trans - ported him the Juvenile Re - ception Center on a charge of Disorderly Conduct following a disturbance at a residence. Officers arrested a 32-year- old woman for Disorderly Conduct and Resisting/Ob - structing an officer following a disturbance at a local estab- lishment.

Kardasz receives service award

BILL LIVICK

Unified Newspaper Group

S t o u g h t o n U t i l i t i e s director Bob Kardasz received the Donald L. Smith Distinguished Ser - vice Award last month, the Municipal Electric Utili - ties of Wisconsin organi - zation’s highest award for public service. The award is bestowed in recognition of exceptional leadership in and dedica - tion to public power. Kar- dasz received the award at the MEUW Annual Con - ference awards ceremony June 29 at the Edgewater Hotel in Madison. K a r d a s z h a s b e e n involved in the public power utility industry for over 37 years. He has served as MEUW President, on the Board of Directors and partici - pated in various commit - tees. He has also assisted MEUW staf f and other member communities in evaluating, developing and maintaining pro - grams and services that are accessible to all mem - bers. Kardasz has been the director of Stoughton Utilities since joining the city in February 1980.

For his first decade with

the city, he also wore two

other hats – as city engi - neer and director of Public Works As director of Stoughton Utilities, with a roughly $20 million annual budget and a staff of 25, Kardasz is a key player in the city’s overall operations. In 2012, he received a Lifetime Achievement Award by WPPI Energy, the regional power company that serves 51 locally owned not-for- profit electric utilities, including Stoughton’s. Mayor Donna Olson said

Kardasz is well-respected in the utilities field and has for years demonstrated his dedication to the Stough - ton community. “It’s not only the time B o b ’s g ive n bu t t h e advances he’s helped cre - ate at Stoughton Utilities,” she said. “We are extreme - ly fortunate to have some - one like Bob, with his kno wledge and expertise and respect.”

Email Unified Newspaper Group reporter Bill Livick at bill.livick@wcinet.com.

Special Sale Pricing Saturday&Sunday, July 29 & 30 • 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday, July 28 •
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11:00 a.m. Wide Open Pedal Pullers (ages 4-12) 5:00 p.m. Slow Pitc h Softball Tournament 6:00
11:00 a.m. Wide Open Pedal Pullers (ages 4-12)
5:00 p.m.
Slow Pitc h Softball Tournament
6:00 p.m.
Wisconsin Horse Pullers Association Horse Pull
8:30 p.m.
Live Music with Shotgun Jane
Concessions by Utica Nora Tra ilblazers a nd beer tent all we eken d l ong!
All pulling events are f re e a nd ca rr y-ins are n ot allowe d.
46 th UTICA FESTIVAL
Utica Community Association Park
August 4-6, 2017
(between Cambridge and Stoughton on the corner of Hwys. B&W)
It’s the best party in the countr y with softball, baseball,
horse pulls, tractor pulls, live music and more!
Saturday, August 5, 2017
Sunday, August 6, 2017
Friday, August 4, 2017
Visit uticapark.org
Noon Badger Tr uc k Pullers
10:00 a.m. South Central Farm Tractor Pull
Slow Pitc h Softball Tournament
Craft Fair in School House
Craft Fair in School House
8:00 a.m.
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Dusk
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10:30 a.m. South Central Farm Tractor Pull
Noon
Badger State Tractor and Tr uc k Pull
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Live Music with Jesse Walker
3:00 p.m. Spectator Tr uck Pull
5:00 p.m.
Live Music with Wayne Road
8:00 p.m.
Raffle Drawing
8:00 a.m.
ThunderCat Fireworks Display
1:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m.
Home Talent Baseball (Utica vs. Stoughton)
Home Talent Baseball (Utica vs. Stoughton)
Badger State Tractor Pull
4:00 p.m.
Tr i-County Mini Rod Pullers
8:00 p.m.
Live Music with Cher ry Pie

6

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub

ConnectStoughton.com

Coming up

Gazebo Musikk

Blue Spruce will perform for the next Gazebo Musikk series from 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday, July 27, at the Rotary Park Gazebo, 324 S. Sixth St. Members Kyle Donskey, Mark Hoskins, and Jeff Stanton are influ - enced by the styles of Neil Young, Tom Petty, The Beatles, Dave Mat - thews Band, Coldplay, and the Doo - bie Brothers. Bring your lawn chairs or blankets for the free concert; beer and wine are permitted, but no glasses. For information, visit facebook. com/gazebomusikk.

Tinndolan

The runner-up finalists of “Nor - way’s Got Talent” reality-TV contest show, Tinndølan will perform a free show at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, July 27, 2017, at the Stoughton Opera House. Tinndølan (pronounced: Tin- doe- lahn) is a Norwegian folk music and dance group from Tinn located in Telemark county in south central Norway. For information, visit stoughtonop - erahouse.com/events or skaalen.com and click on the events calendar.

Dementia presentation

Join Pat Wilson, Family Support Specialist with the Alzheimer’s and Dementia Alliance of Wisconsin, to gain a better understanding of the reasons why behavior changes occur

and get problem-solving tips to help prevent and cope with these changes. This presentation will be offered at two different locations and times. It will first be held at 10 a .m. Wednes - day, July 26, at Stoughton Hospital in the Bryant Health Education Cen - ter, 900 Ridge St. Then at 6:30 p.m. at the library, 304 S. Fourth St., in the Carnegie Meeting Room. For information, call 873-2356.

ROHS

R Olde House Society (ROHS) will hold its next meeting at 7 p.m. on Thursday, July 27 at Altemus Cor- ners House Bed and Breakfast Inn, 1345 Tower Drive (corner of Hwy 51 and Tower Drive). The house is a federal style cream city brick house built in the early 1870’s. It is completely refurbished with three guest bathrooms and four bedrooms. It also has period antiques and handmade Victorian lampshades accent every room and a southern style front porch with gazebo. The ROHS is a group of people preserving Stoughton’s treasures, one house at a time. Attendees are asked to bring a treat to share and their non-alcoholic beverage of choice. F o r i n f o r m a t i o n , c o n t a c t rohstoughton@gmail.com

Our Daily Bread

Visit First Lutheran Church, 310 E. Washington St., for the free

monthly “Our Daily Bread” meal from 4-6 p.m. Sunday, July 30. The meal will be served at 4:30 p .m. and includes brats, hot dogs, fruit salad, beans, chips, angel food cake with strawberries and ice cream, lemonade, milk and coffee. No carry-out meals are available; for transportation to dinner, call 873- 7494 by 10 a.m. on Sunday and leave a message. Rides are provided free of charge within the Stoughton Area School District. This month’s meal is sponsored by Christ Lutheran Church. For information, call 873-7761.

Bible school

Children ages 4-12 are invited to attend Vacation Bible School (VBS) at Bible Baptist Church of Utica star- ing 7 p .m. August 2, at the church, 2095 Hwy. W in Utica, located between Cambridge and Stoughton. The VBS will run three consecu - tive Wednesday nights, August 2, 9 and 16, all starting at 7 p.m. The Theme this year is “Cowboy Boots in Deepest Africa,” based on a true story of missionary Bill Rice. Parents are welcome to attend. An adult Bible study and nursery (ages 0-3) will be available. Children are encouraged to dress like a cowboy or African theme. For information, call Ann Kutz at

423-4610.

Baha’i Faith Covenant Lutheran Church For information: Alfred Skerpan, 877-0911 or Gail and Greg Gagnon, 873-9225
Baha’i Faith
Covenant Lutheran Church
For information: Alfred Skerpan, 877-0911
or Gail and Greg Gagnon, 873-9225
us.bahai.org Stoughton study classes.
1525 N. Van Buren St., Stoughton • 873-7494
covluth@chorus.net • covluth.org
Saturday: 5:30 p.m. Worship
Sunday: 9 a.m. Worship
Seventh Day Baptist
Church of Albion
616 Albion Rd., Edgerton
561-7450 • albionsdb@gmail.com
forministry.com/USWISDBGCASD1
Bible Baptist Church
2095 Hwy. W, Utica
873-7077 • 423-3033
Sunday: 10 a.m. - Worship; 6 p.m. - Worship
Ezra Church
Worship Saturday 11- Sabbath School 10
Fellowship Meal follows service on first Sabbath
515 E. Main St., Stoughton • 834-9050
ezrachurch.com
Sunday:10 a.m.
Stoughton Baptist Church
Corner of Williams Dr. & Cty. B, Stoughton
Christ Lutheran Church
873-6517
700 Hwy. B, Stoughton
873-9353 • e-mail: office@clcstoughton.org
Summer worship times:
First Lutheran Church
310 E. Washington, Stoughton
873-7761 • flcstoughton.com
Sunday: 8:30 & 10 a.m. worship
Sunday: 10:30 a.m. - Worship;
6 p.m. - Evening Service
5:30 p.m. Saturday; 9 a.m. Sunday
St. Ann Catholic Church
Christ the King Community
Church
Fulton Church
401 W. Main St., Stoughton • 877-0303
christthekingcc.org • Sunday: 10 a.m. - Worship
323 N. Van Buren St., Stoughton
873-6448 • 873-7633
Weekday Mass: Nazareth House
and St. Ann’s Church
Weekend Mass: Saturday - 5:15 p.m.;
Sunday - 8 and 10:30 a.m.
Christian Assembly Church
1844 Williams Drive, Stoughton • 873-9106
Saturday: 6 p.m. worship; Sunday: 10 a.m.
worship
9209 Fulton St., Edgerton
884-8512 • fultonchurch.org
Sunday: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Worship Services
Coffee Fellowship: 9 a.m.
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Varsity (High Schoolers): 12-3 p.m.
AWANA (age 2-middle school): 3-5 p.m.
United Methodist of Stoughton
The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints
Good Shepherd By The Lake
Lutheran Church
1860 Hwy. 51 at Lake Kegonsa, Stoughton
525 Lincoln Avenue, Stoughton
stoughtonmethodist.org
Stoughtonumc@Wisconsinumc.org
Sunday: 8 a.m. - Short Service;
10 a.m. - Full Worship
825 S. Van Buren, Stoughton
877-0439 • Missionaries 957-3930
Sunday: 9 a.m. Sunday school and Primary
873-5924
Sunday Worship: 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.
Adult Bible Study: 9:15-9:45 a.m.
West Koshkonong Lutheran Church
1911 Koshkonong, Stoughton
Sunday: 10:30 a.m. - Worship
Cooksville Lutheran Church
LakeView Church
11927 W. Church St., Evansville
882-4408
2200 Lincoln Ave., Stoughton
873-9838 • lakevc.org
Sunday: 9:30 a.m. Worship
Western Koshkonong
Lutheran Church
Pastor Karla Brekke
Sunday: 10 a.m. Worship and Sunday School
2633 Church St., Cottage Grove
Sunday: 9:30 a.m. worship
11 a.m. Bible study
Getting Our Lives in Order
“I will instruct you and teach you in the way you should go;
I will counsel you with my loving eye on you.”
–Psalm 32:8 NIV
873-4590
1358 Hwy 51, Stoughton
Pete Gunderson
Mike Smits • Dale Holzhuter
Martha Paton, Administrative Manager
Sara Paton Barkenhagen, Administrative Assistant
Paul Selbo, Funeral Assistant
www.gundersonfh.com
221 Kings Lynn Rd.
Stoughton, WI 53589
(608) 873-8888
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Bible is the Book of Proverbs. It is filled with Godly wisdom for living a
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Community calendar

Wednesday, July 26

• 9:30 a.m., Storytime (ages 0-5), library, 873-6281 • 10:30 a.m., Storytime (ages 0-5), library, 873-6281 • 3-4 p.m., Travelogue- Hawaii, senior center, 873-

8585

Thursday, July 27

• 1 p.m., Senior center book discussion: Eligible by Cur tis Sittenfeld and Pride and Prejudice by Jane Aus- ten, senior center, 873-8585

• 6-7:30 p.m., Gazebo Musikk presents Blue Spruce, Rotary Park, Rotary Park Gazebo, 401 E. Main St., facebook.com/gazebomusikk

• 7 p.m. R Olde House Society (ROHS) meeting, Altemus Corners House Bed and Breakfast Inn, 1345 Tower Drive (corner of Hwy 51 and Tower Drive), rohstoughton@gmail.com

• 7 p.m., Stoughton High School presents Seussical the Musical ($12 for adults, $8 for students and senior citizens), SHS auditorium, showtix4u.com

• 7:30-9:30, Tinndolan Dancers and Singers, Stoughton Opera House, 381 E. Main St., stoughtonoperahouse.com

Friday, July 28

• 7 a.m. to 1 p.m., Stoughton Farmers Market, Stoughton Plaza, 1050 W. Main St., stoughtonwi.com/ farmersmarket

• 9:30 a.m., Library story time, library, 873-6281

• 7 p.m., Stoughton High School presents Seussical the Musical ($12 for adults, $8 for students and senior citizens), SHS auditorium, showtix4u.com

Saturday, July 29

• 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Stoughton Community Farmers Market, Forrest Street (North of Main St.), stoughtonwi.com/farmersmarket

• 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Stoughton Historical Society Muse- um open, 324 S. Page St., 873-1943

• 7 p.m., Stoughton High School presents Seussical the Musical ($12 for adults, $8 for students and senior citizens), SHS auditorium, showtix4u.com

Sunday, July 30

• 4-6 p.m., “Our Daily Bread” community meal, First Lutheran Church, 310 E. Washington St., 873-7761

Tuesday, August 1

• 9:30 a.m., Memory cafe, library, 873-6281 • 6:30 p.m., Evening story time, library, 873-8585

Wednesday, August 2

• 9:30 a.m., Storytime (ages 0-5), library, 873-6281 • 10:30 a.m., Storytime (ages 0-5), library, 873-6281

• 6:30 p.m., Baby storytime (ages 0-2), library, 873-

6281

• 6:30 p.m., Foundation SciFi book group: The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North, library,

873-6281

Thursday, August 3

• 1-5 p.m., Personal Essentials Pantry, 343 E. Main St., pepstoughton.org

• 6:30-8 p.m., Adult Craft Club- plant it!, library, 873-

6281

• 6-7:30 p.m., Gazebo Musikk presents The Happy Fun-Time Jam, Rotary Park, Rotary Park Gazebo, 401 E. Main St., facebook.com/gazebomusikk

Friday, August 4

• 7 a.m. to 1 p.m., Stoughton Farmers Market, Stoughton Plaza, 1050 W. Main St., stoughtonwi.com/farmersmarket • 9:30 a.m., Library story time, library, 873-6281 • Noon to 1 p.m., Appetite for Arts: Mark Twain and Ameri- can Art, senior center, 873-8585

Support groups

Diabetic Support Group

6 p.m., second Monday, Stoughton Hospital, 628-

Low Vision Support

1-2:30 p.m., third Thurs - day, senior center, 873-

6500

8585

Dementia Caregivers

Parkinson’s Group

2 p.m., second Thursday, senior center, 873-8585

1:30-2:30 p.m., fourth Wednesday, senior center,

873-8585

Crohn’s/Colitis/IBD Support Group

Multiple Sclerosis Group

5:30 p.m., third Wednes - day, Stoughton Hospital,

10-11:30 a.m., second Tuesday, senior center,

873-7928

873-8585

Grief Support Groups

Anorexia and Bulimia Group

2 p.m., third Wednesday, senior center, 873-8585

6 p.m., first Thursday, Stoughton Hospital, 628-

6500

Submit your community calendar

and coming up items online:

ConnectStoughton.com

ungcalendar@wcinet.com

ConnectStoughton.com

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub

7

ConnectStoughton.com July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub 7 You Should Know Mike & Terry Niedfeldt City/town

You Should Know

ConnectStoughton.com July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub 7 You Should Know Mike & Terry Niedfeldt City/town

Mike & Terry Niedfeldt

City/town of residence: Stoughton

ConnectStoughton.com July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub 7 You Should Know Mike & Terry Niedfeldt City/town

Occupation/place of employment or business name: We have both worked for Thrivent Financial for over 30 years each.

Who are the members of your family?: Mike has two grown children, Amanda and Chelsee. Terry is married to Tammy Niedfeldt with two grown children and three grandchildren

How long have you lived in the area?: Mike – I have lived in the Stoughton area for 31 years. Terry - I have worked in the Stoughton area for 27 years and lived here for the last 14 years.

What organizations are you involved in and how long have you been with them? (50-100

words): Mike - I have been involved in the Stoughton Lions Club for the last four years and have helped with Habitat for Humanity.

How else are you active in the community?: Terry and Mike - We have been involved in many different community programs in the Stoughton area through different fund raising events and action teams that have been sponsored by volunteer groups and Thrivent members in the community. Many of these events are to help local organizations in Stoughton or families in need. One true example of this is the Raise the Flag program in Stoughton. This program helps raise funds for the new Veterans Memorial park each year for its upkeep. Many different volunteer groups help in this effort along with community donors to make this a success. Over $11,000 has been raised for 2017 alone.

How do you feel you help make a difference in your community?: Mike – I feel it is best to lead by example and can hopefully inspire others to get involved to help out on different causes that are important to them. Many ways that this can be done are with Thrivent action teams as Terry mentions below. Terry - It is important for me to help empower others to live more gen- erously. One way to do this is to help Thrivent Financial members utilize the benefits of Thrivent Financial Action Teams and Choice dollars. The impact of empowering others with tools to help them live more generous lives is second to none.

Hobbies/interests: Mike - Some of my hobbies include home remodel work, riding on the Harley, and attending sporting events. Terry - I enjoy many different activities including camping, fishing, traveling and sightseeing, wood working, wine making and spoiling grandchildren.

What do you like best about your community and why?: Mike – What I like is that where there are needs in the community it always comes together to help those in need or to get a cause taken care of. Terry - The one thing that has drawn me to the Stoughton area is the close- ness of the community. I have felt like part of the Stoughton family for the time that I have been here and look forward to many more years to come.

What personal satisfaction do you get from serving in your community?: Mike - It is just great to see the end results and how lives have been affected from the end results of the work that has been able to be done. Terry - I feel a sense of accomplishment when I see others whom I have helped, help others. I like to think of it as the pay it forward concept. If someone is in need, do you give them a fish to eat or do you help teach them to fish. I feel satisfied when someone has learned how to fish.

If money were no object, what kind of gift would you give your community?: Mike – I would try to develop some sort of resource where people from the community would be able to come forth and apply for funding that could then be used to help benefit causes that are import- ant to them and help bring the community together. Terry - I would like for everyone in the com- munity to help and respect others. The gift of generosity can be and is a very powerful tool to use. The personal feeling of accomplishment in helping others is empowering.

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ConnectStoughton.com July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub 7 You Should Know Mike & Terry Niedfeldt City/town

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Search for us on Facebook as “Stoughton Courier Hub” and then LIKE us.

ConnectStoughton.com July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub 7 You Should Know Mike & Terry Niedfeldt City/town
ConnectStoughton.com July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub 7 You Should Know Mike & Terry Niedfeldt City/town
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8

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub

ConnectStoughton.com

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com You Should Know Jon Lewis Age: 68 City/town of

You Should Know

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com You Should Know Jon Lewis Age: 68 City/town of
July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com You Should Know Jon Lewis Age: 68 City/town of

Jon Lewis

Age: 68

City/town of residence:

Stoughton

Occupation/place of employment or busi- ness name: retired Neuropsychologist

Who are the members of

your family?: Wife Sylvia, son Max

How long have you lived in the area?: 30 years

What organizations are you involved in and how long have you been with them?:

Stoughton River and Trails Task Force, past Chair, since 1996, Stoughton Opera House board, since 2012, vice chair of The Nature Conservancy, Wisconsin Chapter 2004, Syttende Mai executive com- mittee, 2012-2017, Stoughton Planning Commission, 1993- 2004, Stoughton Wellness Coalition, 2016, Stoughton Police and Fire Commission president, 2015-2016, Stoughton Livsreise Center Steering committee, 2013- 2015, founder and president of the Stoughton Opera House Friends Association, 2013, Stoughton Community Foundation board, 2016, Dane County Friends of Scandinavian Culture presi- dent, 2014.

How else are you active in

the community?: I participated in Senior Center accreditation process, I sing in the Edvard Grieg Choir, was President of The Norwegian Singers Association, volunteered in the schools, was chief of psy- chology at Stoughton Hospital, organized a fundraiser for the high school music depart- ment.

How do you feel you help make a difference in

your community?: Simply by participating actively in what’s going on in Stoughton. Raising money for the Opera House has allowed us to improve the facilities in ways the city could not afford in this time of tight budgets. If you participate in the community, you improve it.

Hobbies/interests: I fish when it’s warm out and I do a lot of photography. Singing in the Grieg Choir is a hobby, I guess, and I love to do it. I also really enjoy junky novels, mostly sci-fi.

What do you like best about your community and

why?: The Opera House is my fave, but the list is long. The Opera House brings vitality and bustle to the downtown, and has an amazing lineup. We recently finished the fourth year of the Catfish River Music Festival, which is a lot of work, but a lot of fun. Stoughton has friendly people, a sense of its own history, Norwegians and lots of beautiful old houses. Parks are plentiful and beau- tiful and the bicycle paths are great and getting better.

What personal satisfaction do you get from serving in your community?: Seeing the results of people’s efforts, whether or not I participated.

If money were no object, what kind of gift would you

give your community?: I would follow the lead of the Bryant Foundation, which has done such a great job of supporting and enhancing the community through the years.

Sylvia Lawrence

City/town of residence:

Stoughton

Occupation/place of employment or business

name: I am a stay-at-home mom, formerly a CNA with Skaalen Home and Nazareth House.

Who are the members of

your family?: Husband Steve Lawrence, kids Hannah, 13, Felix, 4, and Virginia, May 2, three cats, one dog and three hens.

How long have you lived

in the area?: I’m a second generation Stoughtonite and graduated here! Our commu- nity is too special to leave!

What organizations are you involved in and how long have you been

with them?: I am a found- ing member of Naturally Stoughton, a group that formed in 2013 in hopes to bring safer turf maintenance practices to Stoughton. We merged with Sustainable Stoughton in 2014 for which I proudly served until May of 2017. I am on the Board of the Stoughton Community Farmers Market, established in 2015.

How else are you active

in the community?: Through my involvement with the Saturday Farmers Market, I had an opportunity to coor- dinate Shop Small Saturday and Victorian Holiday Artisan Market, in 2016. The events featured quality local artists and crafters. Stoughton is filled with talented folks. Keep an eye on the Community Market Page for exciting news about 2017 Shop Small and Victorian Holiday events!

How do you feel you help make a difference in your

community?: They say, “it takes a village.” I am a vil- lager working together with countless other volunteers to make Stoughton a brighter community.

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July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com You Should Know Jon Lewis Age: 68 City/town of

Hobbies/interests: I am a fiber arts fanatic; spinning, knitting, weaving, dyeing, and crocheting! My husband works very hard in the garden, so I work hard preserv - ing the treats from summer by canning, pickling or dehydrating.

What do you like best about your com - munity and why?: I love how action-ori- ented the community is. When we see an issue, a group forms to take it on. Our community has a lot of passion and we invest our time and resources into tackling the issues, whether it’s ensuring our youth have access to food during the summer, substance abuse prevention, advocating for safe parks, ETC, Stoughtonites mobilize.

What personal satisfaction do you get

from serving in your community?: The

personal satisfaction I get from my service

to the community is knowing that I am demonstrating stewardship to my children. We must get involved in order to shape the world we want to live in; my kids are learn - ing this through action, not words.

If money were no object, what kind of gift would you give your community?:

If I had the opportunity to give the city a

gift and money were no object, I would work to create a public health coalition in Stoughton. This would encompass reduc - ing pesticide exposure on green space, access to free nutritious food at all times, a 24/7 free health clinic, crisis stabilization and better treatment options for the grow- ing opioid epidemic.

think the community should know? Whom do you
think the
community
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know?
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do you

Send your ideas of

community members who

go above and beyond to

communityreporter@wcinet.com for our next

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Please include as much information as possible, including contact information and what makes that person stand out.

think the community should know? Whom do you Send your ideas of community members who go

ConnectStoughton.com

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub

9

ConnectStoughton.com July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub 9 Photos by Evan Halpop Elijah Hartberg (right), 11,

Photos by Evan Halpop

Elijah Hartberg (right), 11, from Stoughton, chats with community members who are showing off a robotic car at the truck event hosted by the Stoughton Public Library on July 19 at Mandt Park.

Exploring on Truck Day

Dozens of families visited Mandt Park Wednesday, July 19, for Truck Day. Community vehicles from the police and fire department and other city service trucks were at the park for the kids to explore and take pictures.

ConnectStoughton.com July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub 9 Photos by Evan Halpop Elijah Hartberg (right), 11,

Sienna Marten, front, 9, of Stoughton explores the buttons with her mother Rebecca Hanna, back, in a emergency vehicle at the truck event hosted by the Stoughton Public Library on July 19 at Mandt Park.

ConnectStoughton.com July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub 9 Photos by Evan Halpop Elijah Hartberg (right), 11,

Brittany Rusch of Stoughton shows her son, Griffin, 3, in an emergency vehicle at the truck event hosted by the Stoughton Public Library on July 19 at Mandt Park.

ConnectStoughton.com July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub 9 Photos by Evan Halpop Elijah Hartberg (right), 11,

Photo submitted

The home of Barbara and Robert Shenk at 617 Hamilton St. was selected as the July Yard of the Month by the Stoughton Heritage Garden Club.

July Yard of the Month

The Stoughon Heritage Garden Club has chosen the home of Barbara and Rob - ert Shenk at 617 Hamilton St. as the July Yard of the Month. Barbara shared that they have developed the floral landscapes that surround

all sides of their proper - ty throughout the 30 years the y have lived there. She especially looks forward to July, when a variety of colorful perennials such as lilies, coneflowers, daisies, astilbe, hydrangea, and clematis are at their peak,

which also enhance their backyard pool area. The Stoughton Heritage Garden club welcomes guests at its meetings on the third Tuesday of the month. For more information, visit facebook.com/Stoughton - GardenClub/.

Get ready for Kubb

The Stoughton Kubb club and Sons of Norway Stoughton branch held a Kubb yard game at Virgin Lake park teaching kids how to play Kubb, a traditional Norwegian yard game, Saturday, July 15. A Stoughton Kubb Invitational was held Saturday, July 22 with proceeds going toward the senior center.

ConnectStoughton.com July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub 9 Photos by Evan Halpop Elijah Hartberg (right), 11,

Photo by Helu Wang

Sadie Bergeson, 6, learns how to throw out a Kubb to make it rotate properly for scoring.

  • 10 Thursday, July 27, 2017

Courier Hub

For more sports coverage, visit:

ConnectStoughton.com

SportS

Jeremy Jones, sports editor

845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor

845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com

Fax: 845-9550

Home Talent League

10 Thursday, July 27, 2017 Courier Hub For more sports coverage, visit: ConnectStoughton.com S portS Jeremy

Photo by Jeremy Jones

T.J. DiPrizio scores on a wild pitch in front of McFarland pitcher Nick Schreiber in the bottom of the sixth inning Sunday. Stoughton won the Southeast Section game 8-1.

Big inning leads to sweep

Win over McFarland extends league lead

JEREMY JONES

Sports editor

Big innings have carried the Stoughton Merchants all season. Sunday the Merchants showed the ability to play small ball, as well, as the bottom of the order helped carry the team to an 8-1 Southeast Section victory over the visiting McFarland Muskies. Stoughton has clinched the top seed from the west division and will host a Southeast final on Aug. 13. They can clinch home field advantage

throughout the Southeast playoffs with one more win or a loss by Fort Atkinson. A one-run game through 5½ innings, Stoughton broke the game open with a pair of suicide squeezes at Norse Park.

Clean-up hitter Ryan Nyhagen led off the four-run bottom of the sixth inning with a double, and Dave Han- son reached base on an error by short- stop Kyle Bender with one out before T.J. DiPrizio walked to load the bases. The bottom of the order supplied a bit of unexpected heroics, laying two suicide squeezes to help Stoughton take a 6-1 lead. Backup Sam Simon, playing in place of Jake Wenzel, got down the first bunt to plate a run. Simon

Southeast Section

West Division

W-L

East Division

W-L

Stoughton

13-1

Fort Atkinson

11-2

Albion

9-4

Jefferson

9-3

McFarland

6-7

Cambridge

6-6

Evansville

5-8

Clinton

6-6

Utica

2-11

Waterloo

4-7

Deerfield

1-12

Lake Mills

4-9

reached first base safely as McFarland had no one covering the bag. “When the bottom of the order gets on base and is scoring runs for you, that’s huge,” pitcher Ben Riffle said. “We’re a team with power, but we

can play small ball when we need to. I think the bunts threw them off both times.” Tanner Klitzke popped up his first

Turn to Merchants/Page 11

Wrestling

10 Thursday, July 27, 2017 Courier Hub For more sports coverage, visit: ConnectStoughton.com S portS Jeremy

Photo submitted

Stoughton’s Rose Ann Marshall finished seventh overall July 16-18 in the USA Women’s Cadet Nationals in Fargo, N.D. Marshall was also named a Wisconsin All-American.

Marshall is first All-American woman from Stoughton

ANTHONY IOZZO

Assistant sports editor

Stoughton’s Rose Ann Marshall traveled to in the USA Women’s Cadet Nationals in Fargo, N.D., July 16-18 and became the first All-American woman in Stoughton history. Marshall finished seventh overall at 106 pounds and had a 7-2 overall record. Marshall said she was honored to not only be the first woman in Stough - ton to be an All-American b ut was also honored to be able to do it in her first year wrestling in the Cadet Nationals. “To be able to place in my first year, it was really amazing,” Marshall said. “I never thought I would be able to place in my first year.” Marshall defeated Con - necticut’s Joanne Ortiz 11-10 in the seventh-place

Turn to Wrestling/Page 11

10 Thursday, July 27, 2017 Courier Hub For more sports coverage, visit: ConnectStoughton.com S portS Jeremy

Photo by Joe Koshollek

Utica’s Doug Vike takes a throw from catcher Cody Jump as Albion’s Cameren Wileman (19) steals second base during the first inning of the game Sunday at Utica.

Home Talent League

Utica gets swept by Albion

JEREMY JONES

Sports editor

Utica was swept by Albion on Sun - day, falling 13-5 at home against the sec - ond-place Tigers. Christian Stokstad took the loss for Utica, giving up six earned runs on 14 hits and one walk over six innings. He struck out one. Aaron Schauer tossed three innings of relief, allowing five more runs on nine hits. Jake Taylor earned the win for Albion. He allowed three earned runs over seven innings on nine hits. He walked two. Josh Eastman tossed two innings of scoreless relief, striking out two. Cody Jump went 2-for-3 at the plate to pace the A’s. Brennan Deegan (4-for-6), Jake Zeimet (4-for-6), Cameren Wileman (3-for-6), Ols - tad (3-for-5), Aaron Laskowski (2-for-4), Evan Deegan (2-for-6), Tyler Oren (2-for-6)

What’s next

Utica (2-11) travels to Evansville (5-8) for a doubleheader at noon on Sunday. The A’s then close out the season 1 p.m. Sat- urday, Aug. 5 at Utica Fest against the rival Stoughton Merchants (13-1).

and Eastman (2-for-6) all had multiple hits for the Tigers, who had 23 hits in the win. Three of Brennan Deegan’s four hits were doubles.

Night League

The A’s remained winless in Central Sec - tion Night League action on Thursday, fall - ing 9-0 against undefeated Middleton. Utica (0-9) finishes out the season 6 p.m. Thursday against Sun Prairie (2-6).

ConnectStoughton.com

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub

11

Wrestling: Marshall takes seventh at USA Cadet Nationals

Continued from page 10

match. Team Wisconsin finished fifth over- all with 50 points. Team California won with 102 points. Marshall also defeated Pennsyl - vania’s Mia Butler 12-2, Florida’s Angela Lorusso 10-0, Colorado’s Emily Llamas 10-0, Pennsylvania’s Montana Delawder 12-2, Wisconsin’s Josie Bartishofski 18-8 and Ohio’s Kailiena Allen 15-6. The two losses came to Indiana’s Ciera Broukal 8-6 and New York’s

Rhylee Jung 6-4. Broukal finished

sixth, and Jung made the round of 16 in the championship bracket. Marshall said it was a difficult road in the consolation bracket, but she was able to stay focused against each opponent. “It was really tough,” Marshall said. “I just had to wrestle one match at a time and just make sure I was ready for my match and wasn’t think - ing whether the person was good or not. I just had to see how it went and always be on my offensive.” Marshall will next be setting her

sights on the Stoughton High School wrestling team. She will be a fresh - man starting in the fall and hopes her experience gives her an edge to make the team. Besides wrestling in meets, Mar- shall has also been attending camps with Pat Kilty, who is the director of the women’s program for Team Wis - consin. “His camps are really tough and I have been doing them quite a while,” Marshall said. “I think it will help me prepare for the high school season.”

Merchants: Stoughton falls to Verona in Night League game

Continued from page 10

bunt attempt, which landed just out of the reach of the Muskies’ catcher before lay- ing down a second bunt that scored Hanson. “We were in the bottom of the order and we weren’t stringing any hits together, so I thought why not roll the dice,” manager Dale Seffens said. “Sam and Tanner did a nice job getting bunts down.” DiPrizio added a run on a wild pitch and Irvin Medina singled home another for a 6-1 lead. Chris Lund led off the sev- enth with a single back at pitcher Nick Schreiber, and Nyhagen then hammered a double into the right center field gap. But Lund got a late read on the ball and was thrown out at home. Lund, who is returning to 100 percent after sustain - ing an ankle injury earlier this year, still had a big day, going 3-for-4 with a sin - gle, double, RBI and a run scored. Seffens said Lund has been a big addition for the Merchants, coming over from Utica this season. Max Fuller and DiPrizio added a pair of RBI singles in the final two innings. Riffle tossed the first seven innings before giving way to Erick Sperloen. Riffle gave up five hits, walked two and struck out three. “Today was probably the best my arm has felt all sea- son,” he said. “I left a few pitch es get away but I was around the zone all day.” Sperloen struck out one in two innings of relief. He allowed one baserunner. Irvin Medina walked in the first inning and then scored two hitters later on Lund’s double to right center after being sacrificed into scoring position by Winder Fuentes. Stoughton extended its lead to 2-0 on a triple by Nyhagen, which scored Lund from first base. The Muskies’ lone run came in the top of the fourth inning as Justin Hanson walked with one out before Adam Hagerty blooped an RBI single to cut the Stough- ton lead to 2-1. S chreiber went the dis - tance and took the loss for McFarland. He allowed five earned runs on nine hits. “If you look at McFar - land’s record, they have six losses by two runs or less,” Riffle said. “We knew they would be out of the playoff

ConnectStoughton.com July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub 11 Wrestling: Marshall takes seventh at USA Cadet Nationals

Photo by Jeremy Jones

Sam Simon lays down a suicide squeeze in the sixth inning. The basehit helped the Mer- chants score four runs in the inning to break the game open as Stoughton beat McFarland

8-1.

picture with a loss today and we expected them to play well.”

Night League

The Merchants could not get the clutch hits on July 18 in a 4-1 loss to Verona at Stampfl Field in the Thurs- day Night League. Rookie Cavaliers’ pitcher Brad Laufenberg struck out five and scattered nine hits and a walk, and Stoughton stranded four runners in scor- ing position. The Merchants (5-3) are now two-and-a-half games in back of first-place Middleton (8-0) and two games behind Verona (7-1) in the Central Section. Stoughton’s magic number to reach the Night League playoffs is one. The Merchants and Mono- na/McFarland (3-5) are locked in a playoff race and although each team has one game remaining, Stoughton can lock up the final playoff spot with a win 6 p.m. Thurs- day at Norse Park. Verona took a 2-0 lead in the bottom of the first. Klay- ton Brandt, Mike Jordahl a nd Luke Yapp all singled with one out, and Derek Murphy knocked in Brandt and Jordahl with a two-run

single. Justin Moore doubled with two outs in the top of the sec- ond, and Dan Campbell fol- lowed with an infield single to the shortstop, but Laufen - berg struck out Sperloen to end the threat. The Cavaliers then added another run in the bottom of the inning. David Lund sin - gled to right field, and Alan Kopp was hit by a pitch. Jeff Bishop bunted Lund and Kopp to second and third with one out, and Jacob Slonim followed with an RBI single to make it 3-0. Laufenberg once again had to get out of a small jam in the fifth. Campbell singled to right, and he later reached third on a groundout and a passed ball. Fuentes walked to put run- ners on the corners for the second time in the game for Stoughton, but Laufenberg induced a grounder for the final out of the inning. Verona took a 4-0 lead in the bottom of the fifth after

Murphy popped a ball high into the lights that fell in for a double in right. Murphy later scored on a passed ball. The Merchants final - ly got on the board in the sixth. Nyhagen doubled to right-center field, and Scott Nachreiner singled to put runners on the corners with one out. Moore then plated Nyha - gen with a basehit to left field, but Laufenberg got out of the inning with a 6-4-3 double play. Laufenberg finished the complete game with a 1-2-3 seventh inning. He allowed an earned run on nine hits and a walk, striking out five. Sperloen took the loss for Stoughton. He allowed three earned runs on six hits and two walks and a hit by pitch in three innings. Riffle pitched two innings and allowed an earned run on two hits, two walks and a hit by pitch. Jeremy Dunnihoo pitched the sixth and hit one batter.

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Viking Open tennis

tournament

The sixth annual Viking Open tennis tournament will be held Aug. 4-6 on the Stoughton High School ten- nis courts. This tournament is the largest weekend tournament in the state, attracting approx- imately 150 tennis players of all ages and their families to the Stoughton community. Varsity boys and girls tennis coach Ryan Reischel started the tournament as a fundraiser for the tennis pro- gram back in 2012 and it has be en growing strong ever since. The tournament is geared towards players who have had some match experience. While the tournament is competitive, there is a very laid-back and fun element to the tournament as well. “We have pizza delivered free of charge for the play- ers, there is a raffle with awesome prizes from local businesses, and there are free giveaways all three days of the tournament. It is really just a great big celebration of tennis,” Reischel said. There are flights in singles, doubles, and mixed doubles, and each flight is broken down by age group. Anyone interested in play- ing in the tournament should

c ontact Ryan Reischel at 628-4928 or by email at reischelryan@gmail.com.

Booster 5K run/walk

The Viking Booster Trek 5K run/walk will take place 9 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 19, at Mandt Park. The event will kick off the Coffee Break festival. Registration is $15 and forms can be picked up at the chamber, Level Up Fitness, Salon X or SWAC. They can also be printed off at stough- tonsportsboosters.org. You may also sign up online at racesignup.com. All registrations received before Aug. 4 will receive a com- memorative Viking Booster Trek T-shirt. The Stoughton Sports Boosters was formed to sup- port the high school athletic department. Throughout the school year individual sports teams make requests to fund specific projects or have additional expenses that need the club’s help. In addition to general and corporate memberships, the boosters host other major fundraisers throughout the year to raise money for the club. More information about the boosters or becoming a booster member can be found on the group’s web- site.

Madison International Speedway

Big rigs night set for Friday

The Bandit Big Rig Series, Must See Sprint Cars, Midwest Truck Series and 6Shooters will be in action Friday as part of the Big Rigs and Big Wings Night at Madison Interna - tional Speedway. Highlighting the rac - ing action will be the first appearance by the Bandit Big Rig Series, which fea - tures big rig tractor trucks battling it out side-by- side for the first time in 35 years. Also, the Must See Sprint Series brings their high flying winged sprint cars to Madison. These rock - ets will approach speeds close to 140 mph as they fly around the track. Back for their third visit this season is the Midwest Truck Series, which began at Madison back in 1997. Grassroots racing takes

place with Madison’s very own 6Shooters featuring a stock, entry level six-cylin- der car division for anyone who wants to become a rac- er.

Pit

g a t e s

o p e n

a t

3:30 p.m. Grandstands open at 6 with racing at 7:30. Adult tickets are $25. Whelen Heroes, seniors and students aged 12-17 pay $22, and children aged 6-11 cost $10. Children 5 and under are free.

Double feature

postponed

The Kuhn Agriculture and Olson Automotive Buck Night, featuring dou- ble features for the Whelen All-American Series w as canceled last Friday. The next Buck Night promotion will take place on Aug. 25.

- John Wells

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  • 12 July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub

Obituaries

ConnectStoughton.com

Emil G. Robyn

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com Emil G. Robyn Emil Robyn Emil “Mick” G.

Emil Robyn

Emil “Mick” G. Robyn, age 91, passed away on Tuesday, July 18, 2017 at Skaalen Nursing and Rehab. He was born in Chicago,

lll. on Febru -

  • ary 2, 1926,
    George and Evelyn (Aerts) Robyn. He served as a signalman on USS LSM – 85, partici - pating in the battle of Leyte Gulf and other combat actions culminating in the defeat of Japan. He worked for over 35 years as an engraver at R.R. Donnelley

the son of

printing in Chicago. He

moved to Stoughton in

  • 1987 with his wife Betty

(Rowe). Emil enjoyed golf, craft - ing stained glass lamps and going on long walks. He is survived by his t wo c h i l d r e n , G e o rg e (Joy) Robyn and Eve - lyn (Michael) Viland, five grandchildren and six great grandchildren. Emil was preceded in death by

his wife of 57 years, son

Richard Robyn and brother George Robyn. A special thank you to the staff at Skaalen Home for their care of Emil. Memori- als may be made in Emil’s name to Skaalen Home.

A celebration of

Emil’s life will be held at

1:30 p.m., Saturday Aug.

5, 2017 at Skaalen Home

Chapel, 400 N. Morris St., Stoughton, with Rev. James Koza presiding. A time of gathering will take place from 12:30 until the time of services on Saturday. Please share your memo - ries at cressfuneralservice. com

Allan E. Skinner

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com Emil G. Robyn Emil Robyn Emil “Mick” G.

Allan Skinner

Allan E. “Al” Skinner III,

age 73, of Madison, passed away on Tuesday, July 18,

2017, at Agrace Hospice -

Care. He w as born on Aug.

19, 1943, in

  • Evanston,
    of Allan Jr. and Ida Mae (Johnson) Skinner. Al graduated from Stoughton High School. He attended Wisconsin School of Electronics and Univer - sity of Wisconsin. He was an electrical and broadcast engineer for Midwestern Broadcast, Airforce MARS

Ill., the son

s t a t i o n , U W B a d g e r s

Broadcast and other vari -

ous radio stations across the Midwest. Al w as an avid sports fan, especially enjoying the Badgers, Green Bay Packers, Chicago Cubs and golf. Al is survived by his beloved family, Darleen Laufenberg, Sharon (Dave) Adams and Cindy Cooley; nieces and nephews; and

many friends.

He was preceded in death by his parents; and partner of 33 years, Mark Cooley. Funeral services will be held at gunderson east funeral and cremation care,

  • 5203 Monona Dr., Madi -

son, at noon, Monday, July

24, 2017, with the Rev. Jer-

ry Amstutz presiding.

Visitation will be held

at the funeral home from

10 a.m. until the time of the service on Monday. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Dane County Humane Society. Online condolences may be made at gundersonfh. com.

Carol F. Eugster

Memorial service for Carol Fosshage Eugster 6 p.m., Friday, July 28

Mt. Horeb Evangelical Lutheran Church Chap - el, 315 East Main St., Mt. Horeb

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Marjorie L. Gullickson

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com Emil G. Robyn Emil Robyn Emil “Mick” G.

Marjorie Gullickson

Marjorie L. “Marg” (Oyen) Gullickson, age

79, of Stoughton, passed away on Monday, July 24,

2017, at Agrace Hospice -

Care, after succumbing to a recent stroke. She was born on Nov. 19, 1937, in Rockford, Ill. Marg graduated from Har- lem High School in Loves

Park, Ill. She married Reynold

Gullickson on June 7, 1956, at Grace Luther - an Church in Loves Park. Mar g was employed as a homemaker, legal secre - tary, bank employee and w orked in admissions at Stoughton Hospital. For many years, she was an integral part of running the family owned Norse Mar- ket in Stoughton.

Ov er the past years, Marg developed a great passion for quilting, cher- ishing the many pieces she c reated and the wonderful friendships she made. She was a wonderful wife, mother, grandmother and friend to many and was deeply rooted in her faith at Covenant Lutheran Church. Marg is survived by her daughter, Jill (Kent) Hoard

of Whitewater; sons, Rich - ard “Rick” (Deanna) Gul - lickson of Stoughton and Jay (Kim) Gullickson of Fox Point; granddaughters, Ashley, Emily (Steven), Amber (Michael), Kailey and Amanda; great-grand - children, Kyler, Benjamin and Charlotte; sisters-in- law, Rose Lee, Rita and Grace Gullickson and Elrene Oyen; and broth - er-in-law, Roger (Cyndie) Gullickson. She w as preceded in death by her parents; the love of her life, Reynold; brothers, Allen and Donald Oyen; and brother-in-law, Ralph Gullickson. A Celebration of Life will be held at covenant lutheran church, 1525 N. Van Buren St., Stough - ton, at noon, Friday, July 28, 2017, with the Re v. Jerry Tews presiding. A

luncheon will follow the service. Private family interment will be held at a later date. Visitation will be held at the church from 10 a.m. until the time of the service on Friday. Memorials may be made, in Marg’s name, to Covenant Lutheran Church. The family would like to thank the wonder - ful staff of professionals who provided care to Mom over the past week, and to all who offered support, thoughts, prayers and kind words during this difficult time.

Gunderson Stoughton Funeral & Cremation Care 1358 Hwy. 51 North at Jackson (608) 873-4590

Stoughton History

120 Years ago (1897)

• While our trip around the lake was no easy task it was nevertheless a pleasant one. In summing matters up at the end of our journey, we find there are 77 cot - tages and six tents strewn around the beautiful shore, containing a population of 476 souls. As many of the houses are now vacant, we estimate that when the season is in its height, the population will increase to nearly 1,000 people. • T.G. Mandt has invent - ed another patent, a side draft to a b uggy. By this means the horse can fol - low a smooth path, while the wheels track in the ruts

made by a double rig, the same as with a cutter. • The woodshed to the dwelling house occupied by C. Shumway took fire Sunday evening and was discovered by neighbors just in time to prevent a conflagration. A bucket bri- gade was formed and the blaze extinguished without the aid of the fire depart - ment. • The new street roller, weighing six tons, pur - chased by the city, arrived W ednesday. The stone crusher has not yet arrived by is expected daily. • Blooming health, long life, prosperity and happi - ness come by taking Rocky Mountain Tea. No failures. Sold by all druggists.

80 Years ago (1937)

• War news from Camp

D o u g l a s :

To d a y

t h e

war games commence.

July

Everything from shooting in the range to guard duty. Sgt. Skavlem has a new job up here. He is over at the service company bak - ing hams. • The annual school census which was tak - en by Misses Elinore and Doroth y Buehler, reveals an increase of 81 school children over the number reported last year. This year there are 1,168 chil - dren between the ages of f our and 20 residing in the school district. • Work of extending the Kegonsa electric line to a few farms northwest of Stoughton, was begun Thursday morning by Andrew M. Quam and a crew of men. • Honolulu - Navy fliers Saturday resumed their sky patrol in a final search for Amelia Earhardt and Capt. Fred Noonan. Unless found by Saturday, the two will join the long roll of fliers who tried to span the Pacific and never came back.

55 Years ago (1962)

• Miss Mary Lindgren was crowned Queen of the Stoughton Fair Sunday night before a large grand - stand audience … some of the finest livestock in the world was shown at the Stoughton Junior Fair last weekend. Total attendance was estimated at 25,000. • Our town made Bob Ripley’s “Believe it or Not” again. Susan Olson sent a clipping from the Dallas Newspaper which read, Anna Green of

Stoughton, Wis., planted a

peach stone at the age of

  • 93 and lived to eat the fruit

of her tree. • The ancient barn adjoining the Matson Motor Company is being torn down to make room for a parking lot. The barn and the residence prop - erty on the corner were purchased by the Matson Company for expansion. The residence will remain as is for present. • Upwards of 75 Little League baseball players and other Stoughton boys will make the annual bus trip to Milwaukee Thurs - day to see a big league

baseball g ame. The Braves will play the New York Mets.

  • 10 Years ago (2007)

• By approving the instal- lation of security cameras around the perimeter of Stoughton school build - ings, would-be criminals will be less lik ely to com - mit vandalism, robbery and other acts of crime. At least that’s the hope of the Stoughton Board of Edu - cation, who unanimously supported the recommen - dation from the board’s facilities committee. • City residents can expect to see a dramatic change in the Yahara River later this month when the impoundment area behind the Stoughton dam is drawn down by about five feet so the dam can be inspected. • Slowly, but surely, Stoughton city staff mem - bers, the Stoughton Plan Commission and teams of

consultants with expertise in everything from traf -

fic to landscaping to light p oles are making headway on the proposal to develop the 183-acre Linnerud tract at US Hwy. 51 and County B. Starting last month, the Plan Commission began meeting twice monthly to review and recommend changes to voluminous development plans submit - ted for the tract as a whole, as well as separate plans submitted by Wal-Mart for the construction of a super- center on about 25 acres of the property. • The water impound - ment area behind the Stoughton dam will be drawn down starting Fri - day, July 20 to allow for an

inspection of the structure by professional engineers. • Part of Stoughton’s landscape was altered Wednesday when the 54-year-old water tower behind River Bluff Ele - mentary School was torn down. A construction com- pany worked all day on Wednesday disassembling the water tower and tank, which was first installed in Stoughton in 1951. • Laurie Sullivan, trea - surer/accountant for the City of Milton, has been hired as Stoughton’s new finance director. Sullivan, 46, succeeds John Neal, who retired as Stoughton’s finance director on May 1, following 25 years in the position.

– Compiled by Scott De Laruelle

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July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com Emil G. Robyn Emil Robyn Emil “Mick” G.

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July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com Emil G. Robyn Emil Robyn Emil “Mick” G.
July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com Emil G. Robyn Emil Robyn Emil “Mick” G.
July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com Emil G. Robyn Emil Robyn Emil “Mick” G.

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July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub

13

RDA: Group to meet Aug. 9 to assess project, possible next steps for riverfront redevelopment

Continued from page 1

premature in seeking pri - vate partners in redevel - oping a 12-acre former i ndustrial area between the Yahara River and East South Street. Geall said after partici - pating in a public design - ing exercise (known as a charrette) in June, it became clear that the Com - mon Council does not sup - port the project plan the RDA based its request for development proposals on. RDA chair Peter Sveum said he was disappointed with Geall’s decision but understands it. He said alders must reach agree - ment on several issues before a de veloper would be willing to lead the rede - velopment effort. “I’m v ery concerned about where this develop - ment is going,” he said. Among the disagree -

ments are whether there o ught to be private home - ownership rather than rent - al properties, whether his - toric buildings in the area should be preserv ed, and to what extent retail should be included in the mix of new buildings.

T h e

R D A

s e l e c t e d

Geall to serve as master

developer of the project last

October, and in Decem - ber he submitted his plan f or the area. He expected to adjust the plan after the charrette, based on what he learned from the public. But after becoming aware of the city’s disagreements over the project, he said, he decided to withdraw. “The uncertainty makes it difficult to plan for the project,” Geall told the Hub in a phone interview from Chicago last week. “It’s a beautiful site, with its proximity to Main Street and the river. All of the things that attracted us to the site initially are still there. But over the course of the past year, we learned more things that are giving us pause.” Geall said he hasn’t ruled out returning to lead the redevelopment effort, but the council must reach consensus on what it wants for the area, which is locat - ed between East South S treet and the Yahara Riv - er, and Fourth Street on the west and Se venth Street to the east. “These redevelopment sites are very hard to come by, and Stoughton is an amazing communi - ty,” Geall said. “So we’re al ways going to remain

interested in it, once those uncertainties are removed.” City officials began eye - ing the redevelopment area in 2006, and the council in 2009 approved a project plan for it. But some of the assumptions in the plan, including demolishing buildings to make way for new ones, might no longer be supported by a majority of the current council. The RDA sought a mas - ter developer to lead the project last year , send - ing out what’s known as a request for proposals, or RFP, to more than 100 developers in Wisconsin and northern Illinois last year and received only one response, from Tanesay. Two other developers – Gorman and Company and Movin’ Out – expressed interest in developing smaller or complementary projects. But the overall redevel - opment effort needs to be led by a master de veloper, said RDA consultant Gary Becker. And the city needs to have a clear vision, he added. “The council needs to tell us what their policies are for that area,” he said. “That may mean we have to go in and amend the all those plans that we have to

reflect the current council policy.” Sveum said the RDA’s efforts were moving for - ward until the RDA voted in March to demolish the Highway Trailer building to clear the site for redevel - opment. The Common Council reversed that decision the following week. It later voted to approve the demo - lition for most of the build - ing but preserve a smaller structure, kno wn as the blacksmith shop, within the larger complex. “The night we voted to take that building down was the night that every - thing changed,” Sveum observed. At last week’s meeting, RDA member Ron Chris - tianson noted the RDA “met its goal of bringing all the parties to the table.” Assessing the state of the redevelopment effort in light of Geall’s announce - ment, he added, “The council is on the precipice of a great success or a great debacle.” In a phone interview, Sveum agreed. But he doubted the RDA can “come up with a plan” that the council would accept. “I don’t think they even know what they’ll accept,”

Timeline

September 2014: MillFab ceases operations April 2015: RDA offers $700,000 for property March 2016: RDA increases offer to $750,000 August 2016: Court approves RDA offer September 2016: RDA solicits redevelopment proposals February 2017: RDA selects Tanesay as master developer March 2017: RDA recommends Movin’ Out as secondary developer

April 11: Council votes to preserve Mandt Foundry build- ing

June 9-11, 2017: Design charrette July 18: Master developer Tanesay withdraws

What’s next

The Redevelopment Authority meets Wednesday, Aug. 9, to assess the redevelopment project and decide its next step. In the meantime, RDA officials hope the Com- mon Council will reach consensus on what it wants to include in the redevelopment area.

he said. Mayor Donna Olson told the Hub that city alders “need to have a serious dis - cussion” about their prior- ities for the redevelopment project. “They’re going to have to come to a consensus, and it will have to be a consensus

because not everybody’s going to agree on every - thing,” she said. “That’s just human nature. They’ll have to reach a consensus before they can move for - ward.”

Contact Bill Livick at bill. livick@wcinet.com

ConnectStoughton.com July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub 13 RDA: Group to meet Aug. 9 to assess

Photo submitted

Hannah Klapperich-Mueller leads a group of workshop participants

Shakespeare in the Park

A traveling theater group performed a Shakespeare classic at Lake Kegonsa State Park July 15. The group, Summit Players Theatre, is performing a stripped-down, 75-minute showing of “The Comedy of Errors” at state parks across Wisconsin this summer. Before the show, which had 48 people in the audience, the group offered acting lessons during a workshop, which had 13 participants.

ConnectStoughton.com July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub 13 RDA: Group to meet Aug. 9 to assess

Photo submitted

From left, Michael Nicholas and Joe Picchetti perform in “The Comedy of Errors” at Kegonsa State Park.

Legals

NOTICE OF

PUBLIC HEARING

The City of Stoughton Planning Commission will hold a Public Hear- ing on Monday, August 14, 2017 at 6:00 o’clock p.m., or as soon after as the mat- ter may be heard, at the Public Safety Building, Second Floor, 321 S. Fourth Street, Stoughton, Wisconsin, 53589, to review a proposed amendment to the City of Stoughton Municipal Code of Ordi- nances. The proposed ordinance amend- ment is to consider removal of Appendix F, Procedural Checklists, including all references within Chapter 78, of the City of Stoughton Zoning Ordinance, Dane County, Wisconsin. The ordinance amendment is pro- posed to remove Appendix F to allow staff to convert the procedural check- list to an application format and make changes when necessary without going through an ordinance amendment. Addi- tionally, the appendix is not consistent with other parts of the zoning ordinance. For questions regarding this notice please contact Michael Stacey, Zoning Administrator at 608-646-0421. The proposed amendment may be viewed at http://stoughtoncitydocs.com/ planning-commission Published July 20 and 27, 2017 WNAXLP

* * *

CITY OF STOUGHTON 381 E. MAIN STREET, STOUGHTON, WI 53589 ORDINANCE OF THE COMMON COUNCIL

Approving a General Development Plan for Outlot 1 and Lots 3 and 4, CSM No. 14057, and Lots 5 and 7, CSM No.

14058.

(Part of Kettle Park West Commer- cial Center) Committee Action: Planning Com- mission recommends approval 6 - 0 Fiscal Impact: None File Number: O-7-2017 Date Intro- duced: June 27, 2017

Second Reading: July 11, 2017 RECITALS

A.

Kettle Park West, LLC (“the Appli-

cant”) has requested approval of a new

General Development Plan for Outlot 1

and Lots 3 and 4 of Certified Survey Map

No. 14057, and Lots 5 and 7 of Certified

Survey Map No. 14058 (the “Property”).

B.

The Property is currently zoned

Planned Development and is subject to a previously approved General Develop- ment Plan that includes the Property and

other lands in the Kettle Park West Com- mercial Center Development.

C.

The Zoning Administrator has de-

termined, pursuant to Section 78-914(1) (a) of the City of Stoughton Municipal

Code (the “City Code”), that the most comparable standard zoning district ap- plicable to the proposed Planned Devel- opment is Planned Business (PB).

D.

The Applicant has submitted a

proposed General Development Plan (the

“GDP”) attached as Exhibit A to this Or- dinance.

E.

On June 12, 2017, the City of

Stoughton Planning Commission held a public hearing regarding the application to approve the GDP, which was preced- ed by the publication of a class 2 notice under chapter 985 of the Wisconsin Stat- utes.

F.

On June 12, 2017, the Planning

Commission recommended approving

the GDP.

G.

The Common Council determines

that approving the GDP is consistent with

the spirit and intent of the City’s Zoning Code, has the potential for producing

significant community benefits in terms

of environmental and aesthetic design, promotes the public health, safety and

general welfare of the City, and allows appropriate use of the Property. ORDINANCE

The Common Council of the City of

Stoughton, Dane County, Wisconsin do ordain as follows:

1.

The recitals set forth above are

material to and are incorporated in this

ordinance as if set forth in full.

2.

The General Development Plan is

approved pursuant to section 78-914 of the City Code and Wis. Stat. § 62.23(7)(d).

3.

Neither this ordinance nor the

GDP constitute City approval of any

plans or specifications for any public

improvements referred to in the GDP, including utility improvements, street improvements, and other public improve-

ments. Plans and specifications for all

public improvements to be constructed

within the Property shall be approved by the City, separately from the approval

of the GDP, and in accordance with the City’s ordinances and policies relating to the design, approval and construction of public improvements.

4.

No part of the Property may be

developed until a Specific Implementa- tion Plan (SIP) has been submitted and

approved for that part of the Property.

Specific Implementation Plans may be

approved in phases, for parts of the Prop- erty. However, Planned Development

zoning and the GDP, and any approved SIP, shall expire for any part of the Prop- erty that is not fully developed within ten

years of the date of adoption of this or-

dinance, and the zoning classification of

such property shall revert to RH District.

5.

The Property shall be developed

and used in full compliance with all

standards and requirements in Chapter 78 of the City Code that apply to lands zoned Planned Business, except those

standards and requirements that are ex-

pressly modified in the approved GDP, or that are expressly modified in an ap-

proved Specific Implementation Plan for

all or part of the Property. Chapter 78 of

the City Code, the GDP, and approved SIPs, constitute the zoning regulations for the Property, and may be enforced as

any other zoning regulation in the City of Stoughton. A copy of the General Devel-

opment Plan and any approved Specific

Development Plan shall be maintained

and kept on file by the City Clerk.

6.

This ordinance shall take effect

upon publication. Council Adopted: July 11, 2017

Mayor Approved: July 11, 2017 Attest: July 11, 2017 Published: July 27, 2017

WNAXLP

* * *

NOTICE OF

PUBLIC HEARING

The Common Council of the City of Stoughton, Dane County, Wisconsin, will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 at 7:00 o’clock p.m., or as soon hereafter as the matter may be

heard, in the Council Chambers, Public

Safety Building, 2nd Floor, 321 South Fourth Street, Stoughton, Wisconsin, to consider special assessments for sidewalks, driveways, aprons, carriage walks, and curb and gutter for the follow-

ing projects:

Giles Street from Henry Street to Morris Street to include the following parcels:

Parcel #:, Street Address:

281-0511-043-5191-6, 120 N Henry St 281-0511-043-5202-2, 1117 Giles St 281-0511-043-5213-9, 1109 Giles St 281-0511-043-5224-6, 1101 Giles St 281-0511-043-5325-4, 1100 Giles St 281-0511-043-5336-1, 1108 Giles St 281-0511-043-5347-8, 1116 Giles St 281-0511-043-5358-5, 1124 Giles St

within the City of Stoughton and

levying of special assessments to pay for same. Please Note: If you have any ques- tions regarding this notice and/or special

assessments, please contact Director of

Planning & Development Rodney Scheel at 873-6619

Lana Kropf, City Clerk

Published: July 27, 2017 WNAXLP

* * *

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

The City of Stoughton Landmarks Commission will hold a Public Hearing on Thursday, August 10, at 7:00 o’clock

p.m., or as soon after as the matter may

be heard, in the Council Chambers, Pub- lic Safety Building, 321 S. Fourth Street,

Second Floor, Stoughton, Wisconsin,

53589, to consider designating 501 E. South Street, historically known as the

Moline Plow Company Factory (Highway

Trailer Building) as a Local Landmark property. For questions regarding this notice

please contact the City Zoning Adminis- trator at 608-646-0421 Information related to this request can be viewed at: http://stoughtoncity- docs.com/landmarks-commission/ Published: July 27, 2017 WNAXLP

* * *

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS INVITATION TO BID

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Stoughton for the furnishing of

labor, services, materials and equipment for the construction of the proposed project known as Nordic Ridge – Park (“Project”), together with necessary in- cidentals on the enclosed plans. All bids shall be clearly marked with the name of the project. Bids will be received until 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, August 15th, 2017, and will

then be opened and read aloud at the City of Stoughton, 381 E. Main Street, Stough- ton, Wisconsin 53589. Plans may be obtained at the City of

Stoughton. A bid bond or certified check, pay- able to the City of Stoughton in the

amount of five percent (5%) of the bid

must accompany each bid as a guaran- tee that if the bid is accepted, the bidder will execute the contract and furnish

payment and performance bonds within ten (10) days after the award of the con- tract. In case the bidder fails to execute the contract and furnish the payment and performance bonds within the time limit set forth above, the amount of the certi-

fied check or bid bond shall be forfeited

to the owner as liquidated damages. The City retains the right to reject any or all bids, to waive any informality in bidding and to accept any bid deemed to

be in the best interest of the City. Published: July 27 and August 3, 2017 WNAXLP

* * *

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

The

City of Stoughton Planning

Commission

will

hold

a

Public

Hear-

ing on Monday, August 14, 2017 at 6:00

o’clock p.m., or as soon after as the matter may be heard, in the Council Chambers, Public Safety Building, 321 S. Fourth Street, Second Floor, Stoughton, Wisconsin, 53589, to consider the pro- posed rezoning of the following parcels of land located at 1009 W. Main Street, Stoughton, WI., owned by the Dhillon Petroleum LLC, from PD – Planned De- velopment to PD – Planned Development (General Development Plan) to construct an addition to the existing principal build- ing including other site improvements, in the City of Stoughton, Dane County, WI, more fully described:

1009 W. Main Street: parcel number:

281/0511-071-0905-2; LOT 1 CSM 14227 CS96/239&244-4/21/2016 F/K/A LOTS 19 & 20 I M JULSETH ADDN & PRT VAC WEST ST DESCR AS SEC 7-5-11 PRT NE1/4NE1/4 (0.535 ACRES) For questions related to this notice contact Michael Stacey at 608-646-0421. Information related to this request can be found at http://stoughtoncitydocs. com/planning-commission/ Michael Stacey Zoning Administrator Published: July 27 and August 3, 2017 WNAXLP

* * *

NOTICE

C.N.R Storage holds a lien on and in- tends to sell the personal property owned by Keith Stenjem stored in Unit #217 on July 31, 2017 at 9:00 am at 1457 Oak Opening Dr., Stoughton, WI 53589. A brief and general description of items stored: couch, chair, bedroom furniture, living room table, craft mate- rials including Stamping pads. Wedding dress, personal and household items. Terms of the sale CASH. Items may be viewed at 8:45 am on the day of sale. All items sold as is whereas with no war- ranties expressed or implied. Unit must be cleaned out by the end of the date of sale. Sale subject to adjournment. Published: July 20 and 27, 2017 WNAXLP

* * *

  • 14 July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub

Business

ConnectStoughton.com

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub Business ConnectStoughton.com Photos by Kimberly Wethal First Choice Dental

Photos by Kimberly Wethal

First Choice Dental opens new clinic

First Choice Den - tal opened a new clin -

i c i n S t o u g h t o n a t 1300 Nyg aard St. on Monday, July 17. The 12,593-square-foot build - ing is the 11th in Dane County for the company. Stoughton native Steve Dow is the dentist at the new clinic. He previous - ly worked in the Madison location on Junction Road. The of fice will offer general, family dentist - ry and restorative care as well as access to special - ists like orthodontists, endodontists, periodontists and oral surgeons, accord - ing to the company web - site. F or more information on the clinic, visit first - choicedental.com.

- Scott Girard

From left, John and Jack Olson stand by a vehicle painted with the date that John opened his body shop.

Auto: xxxx

Continued from page 1

t h e b r o t h e r s w o r k e d together, but separately – John managed the staff that was contracted for the Madison dealerships, while Jack worked up in Portage with the auctioneers. At one point, the broth - ers juggled almost 100 emplo yees – most of whom “pretty much like them still,” John joked – but have since narrowed down the staff after selling part of the business. Now, they’re back in Stoughton, two miles from where their father ran his used car lot. In their 40

years in the business, the

brothers have seen their share of success, whether it’s winning an award for one of their custom-built cars, or seeing a custom - er come back to purchase another vehicle. “We like to cater to entry-level buyers,” John said. “You know, parents want to have a safe car for their kids … Parents might buy it for themselves, and then come back for the kids.” Now primarily dealers for modern and collectible vehicles since 2005, the brothers have also come full-circle to where they started: fixing minor body

damage, building custom cars and updating older cars with items like rebuilt transmissions so they can keep up rising speed limits. In fact, working with the vintage vehicles has turned into a “specialty” for them, Jack says. “A lot of auto repair shops don’t want to (ser - vice collectible cars) be cause it ties up the vehi - cle up. You don’t get parts as f ast,” Jack said with a laugh. “(You need) a little more patience with that.”

Email Unified Newspaper Group reporter Scott De Laruelle at scott.delaruel- le@wcinet.com.

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub Business ConnectStoughton.com Photos by Kimberly Wethal First Choice Dental

Photos by Kimberly Wethal

The interior of the Olson Auto Exchange office carries a retro feel.

  • 350 Motorcycles

1993 HARLEY Davidson Low Rider FXDL Mustang seat, newer saddlebags, 100,00 miles, 25,000 on factory rebuilt motor. Andrew's EV27 cam, S & S carb, Cobra pipes. $3,000 OBO. 608-558-4534

2006 BMW X3, 3.0 SAV. A well-equipped, one owner car with 78,631 miles. BMW condition report as of 7/14/17 available.

608-938-1190

  • 402 Help Wanted, General

FAIRWAY AUTO Auction now hiring part- time lot attendant/shop help. Apply in per- son no phone calls. 999 Hwy A Edgerton, Across from Coachmans.

FAIRWAY AUTO Auction now hiring part- time office help. apply in person. No phone calls. 999 Hwy A Edgerton, across from Coachmans

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workload; Excellent interpersonal and

communication skills Strong computer skills including knowledge of MS Office (Word, Excel) Self motivation and strong work ethic Knowledge of bookkeeping concepts and practices Ability to work to independently and in a team environment Knowledge of QuickBooks preferred. Pre- vious accounting experience is a plus but willing to train the right person.This position is typically 30 to 35 hours per week. To apply, send letter of interest and resume by AUGUST 1, 2107 to:Account- ing Assistant P.O. Box 301 Stoughton, WI 53589

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  • 434 HealtH care, HuMan

services & cHild care

C.N.A / Caregivers-All Shifts. Heart- Song - A premier Senior Living Home, Belleville, WI. We offer flexible hours, competitive pay, bonuses based on expe- rience/performance. Caregivers provide assistance with activities of daily living such as grooming, hair, shower, medica- tion management, maintaining personal environment (ie) preparing and serving meals, laundry, etc.) Document/Report care provided, observations, etc. Will attend in service training, observe com- munity policies and procedures. Must be available weekends. Walk-ins welcome or call for interview. 608 290-7347 or

608-290-7346.

  • 452 General

CUSTOMER SERVICE- Country View

Veterinary Service is seeking a cheerful, motivated individual to join our customer service team 25-40 hours/week. Duties include greeting clients, answering mul- tiple phone lines, assisting doctors and technicians and other customer service tasks. Saturday rotating shifts required. Benefits for full time employees include health, retirement, paid personal days and animal care benefits. Customer service and animal experience required. Send cover letter, resume and pertinent references to office@countryviewvets. com

  • 508 cHild care & nurseries

  • 449 September in my home. I have 2 toddlers

& WareHousinG

and 2 cats. Looking for another child

driver, sHippinG

STOUGHTON CHILD Care opening

DRIVERS: AVG. $1,100 Plus Weekly! Monthly Bonuses! Medical, Dental, Vision & More! Excellent Equipment w/APU's Great Family Home-Time! 1yr CDL-A:

between 3 months and 4 years. Smoke free home. Trained in CPR and first aid. $175.00 per week. If interested call or text Lindsey 608-235-7150.

855-582-2032

DANE COUNTY’S MARKETPLACE.

The Courier Hub Classifieds. Call 873- 6671 or 835-6677.

  • 516 cleaninG services

TORNADO CLEANING SERVICES LLC- Your hometown Residential Clean- ing Company. 608-873-0333 or garth@ garthewing.com

  • 548 HoMe iMproveMent

A&B ENTERPRISES

Light Construction Remodeling No job too small

608-835-7791

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub Business ConnectStoughton.com Photos by Kimberly Wethal First Choice Dental

HALLINAN-PAINTING

WALLPAPERING

**Great-Summer-Rates** 35 + Years Professional

Interiior-Exterior

Free-Estimates References/Insured Arthur Hallinan

608-455-3377

CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon Friday for The Great Dane and Noon Monday for the Courier Hub unless changed because of holiday work schedules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or 835-6677.

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub Business ConnectStoughton.com Photos by Kimberly Wethal First Choice Dental
July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub Business ConnectStoughton.com Photos by Kimberly Wethal First Choice Dental

Increase Your sales opportunities…reach over 1.2 million households! Advertise in our Wisconsin Advertising Network System. For information call 835-6677.

A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted, local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1-855-385-8739 (CNOW)

DISH NETWORK. TV for Less, Not Less TV! FREE DVR. FREE Install (up to 6 rooms.) $49.99/mo. PLUS Hi-Speed Internet - $14.95/mo (where available.). Call 1-855-997-5088 (CNOW)

MISCELLANEOUS

Stop OVERPAYING for your prescriptions! SAVE! Call our licensed Canadian and International pharmacy, compare prices and get $25.00 OFF your first prescription! CALL 1-866- 936-8380 Promo Code CDC201725 (CNOW)

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR

THE BLIND. Free3Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, FREE - Learn more biblical information about Zionism just

All Paperwork Taken Care Of. CALL 1-855-711-0379 (CNOW)

All Things Basementy! Basement Systems Inc. Call us for all of your basement needs! Waterproofing, Finishing, Structural Repairs, Humidity and Mold Control FREE ESTIMATES! Call 1-855-781-4387 (CNOW)

**STOP STRUGGLING ON THE STAIRS** Give your life a

lift with an ACORN STAIRLIFT! Call now for $250 OFF your stairlift purchase and FREE DVD&brochure! 1-855-750-1951

(CNOW)

before Christ’s second coming. Send return address to: Dave Konkel, 3203 State Highway 17, Phelps, WI 54554 (CNOW)

SPORTING GOODS

BADGER MILITARY COLLECTIBLE & MILITARY FIREARMS SHOW: Aug 4&5, Waukesha Expo Forum, 1000 Northview Rd., Waukesha, WI. Fri 3pm-8pm, Sat 9am-4pm. $7 (14 & Under FREE). BUY/SELL/TRADE 608-752-6677 (CNOW)

GOT LAND? Our Hunters will Pay Top $$$ To hunt your land. Call foraFREE info packet&Quote. 1-866-309-1507 www. BaseCampLeasing.com (CNOW) adno=532122-01

RECOVER PAINTING Offers carpentry,

drywall, deck restoration and all forms of painting Recover urges you to join in the fight against cancer, as a portion of every job is donated to cancer research. Free estimates, fully insured, over 20 years of

experience. Call 608-270-0440.

  • 554 landscapinG, laWn, tree & Garden Work

LAWN MOWING

Residential & Commercial

Fully Insured. 608-873-7038 or 608-669-0025

POWERWASHING HOMES, businesses, sheds, free estimates! Fast and efficient. Also deck staining. GreenGro Design.

608-669-7879.

  • 601 HouseHold

FOR SALE. Frigidaire 12cu/ft freez-

er $350obo, Shark floor steam cleaner $100, Table, white w/oak trim, 4 chairs

$350.

  • 602 antiques & collectibles

COLUMBUS ANTIQUE MALL & CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS MUSEUM

"Wisconsin's Largest Antique Mall"! Customer Appreciation Week 20% DISCOUNT Aug 7-13 Enter daily 8am-4pm 78,000 SF 200 Dealers in 400 Booths Third floor furniture, locked cases Location: 239 Whitney St Columbus, WI 53925

920-623-1992

Road Reconstruction Hwy 60 & 16 in City

www.columbusantiquemall.com

  • 652 GaraGe sales

  • 400 S Academy St. 728-7/29 8am-4pm.

Must Sell, half price sale.

STOUGHTON- 2742 Lissa Lane July 27th-28th 9am-5pm July 29th 8am-1pm. Very Low Prices. HUGE MULTI-FAMILY RUMMAGE SALE. Rocker, Highchair, Bench, Kid Items, Baby Items & furniture, Baby Girl Clothes-Newborn to 18 months. Baby Toys, Kids clothing sz 7-14. Craft Supplies, Pictures, Wicker baskets, Char- coal Grill, Way too much more to List.

ConnectStoughton.com

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub

15

VERONA- 116 North Jefferson St Estate Garage Sale. Friday-Sat, 7/28-7/29. Many antiques, furniture, household goods, decorations, much more. All must go!

VERONA- 7608 Marsh View Rd Thurs- day-Saturday July 27, 28, 29 8am-3pm. Couches, Love Seats, Chairs, Bar Stools, Oak Dining Table Area Rugs, Wine Racks & Wine Accessories, Misc Kitchen Items, Microwaves, Bikes, Stroller, Pictures Fence Dog Kennel & FREE Dog House.

VINTAGE HARVEST Estate Sale 2153 Fallen Oak Trail Stoughton, WI Sat July 29th 10am- 4pm Sun July 30th 11-3pm Antiques, Collectibles, dry sink, cupboard, church pew, retro cafe tables and stools, Queen size tempurpedic mattress and adjustable base-yr old. , round oak table and chairs, side chairs, bureaus, primitive antiques and more. A fun sale with great prices for a two day sale. See updates on vintageharvest.com Terms: cash and credit card.

  • 696 Wanted to Buy

WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks. We sell used parts. Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm. Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59 Edgerton, 608-884-3114

  • 705 Rentals

GARAGE PARKING/STORAGE- Ore- gon. One stall garage space with opener for $90/mo. on S Perry Pkwy. Great for storage or an extra vehicle. Call 608-255- 7100 today!

GREENWOOD APARTMENTS

Apartments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1 & 2 bedroom units available

starting at $795 per month, includes heat, water, and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at:

139 Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575

STOUGHTON 1616 Kenilworth Ct. Large 2-BR apts available now. Pets welcome. Many feature new wood laminate flooring. $775-$825/mo. 608-831-4035. www.madtownrentals.com

VERONA 2 Bedroom Apartment $655 to $820. Available Aug 1. and Sept 1 Small 24 unit building. Includes heat, hot water, water & sewer, off-street parking, fully carpeted, dishwasher and coin operated laundry and storage in basement. Con- venient to Madison's west side. Call KC at 608-273-0228 to view your new home.

VERONA 2 Bedroom Apartment $655 to $820. Available Aug 1. and Sept 1 Small 24 unit building. Includes heat, hot water, water & sewer, off-street parking, fully carpeted, dishwasher and coin operated laundry and storage in basement. Con- venient to Madison's west side. Call KC at 608-273-0228 to view your new home.

OREGON SELF-STORAGE

10x10 through 10x25 month to month lease Call Karen Everson at 608-835-7031 or Veronica Matt at 608-291-0316

RASCHEIN PROPERTY STORAGE 6x10 thru 10x25 Market Street/Burr Oak Street in Oregon Call 608-520-0240
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-520-0240

CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon Friday for The Great Dane and Noon Monday for the Courier Hub unless changed because of holiday work schedules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or 835-6677.

UNION ROAD STORAGE 10x10 - 10x15 10x20 - 12x30 24 / 7 Access Security Lights &
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road

793 Wanted to Rent

GRANDPARENTS SEEKING tempo- rary furnished housing for the 2017-2018 school year in Oregon, WI. "House-sit- ting" references available. Must allow cats. 724-791-2716

adno=532153-01 PROGRAMMED CLEANING, INC. General Cleaners, $ 13/hr., Stoughton, WI We are looking to fill 2

adno=532153-01

PROGRAMMED CLEANING, INC.

General Cleaners, $ 13/hr., Stoughton, WI

We are looking to fill 2 General Cleaner positions in the Stoughton

area. These positions are in a clinic environment.

• M-F, 4 hours per night, start time is 5 pm with some flexibility. • Pay rate is $ 13/hr. • NO WEEKENDS! • Must be independent, reliable and detail oriented. • Must have own transportation. • No experience needed.

Apply now in person at 2001 W. Broadway, Madison, WI 53713 Mon-Fri, 9 am-5 pm Or fill out an online application at:

www.programmedcleaning.com If you have questions please call 608-222-0217.

Activity Associates If you would like to use your exceptional heath care talents to make a

Activity Associates

If you would like to use your exceptional heath care talents to make a difference in the lives of seniors and their families, Oregon Manor is the place for you. We are a 45 bed skilled nursing facility.

Potential candidates with experience in long term care or with a CNA license or RA certificates are p referred.

Please fill out an application online at

EOE

www.oregonmanor.biz.

adno=531802-01

We are looking for a Tw o Part-Time Activity
720 Associates to help with activities days/weekends.

apaRtments

ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors 55+. 1 & 2 bedroom units available starting at $795 per month. Includes heat, water and sewer. Professionally managed. Located at 300 Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589 608-877-9388

  • 730 Condos & toWnhouses FoR Rent

OREGON-AVAILABLE NOW! Beautiful 3 bedroom, 3 bath brand new condo on golf course. 2 gas fireplaces, mas-

ter suite, large kitchen

w/stainless

appliances, breakfast bar. Main floor laundry. Large, maintenance-free deck overlooking golf course. 2 car attached garage. $1950/mo+ deposit. Small pets considered. Brad 608-333-4700

  • 750 stoRage spaCes FoR Rent

ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE

10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30 Security Lights-24/7 access

BRAND NEW

OREGON/BROOKLYN

Credit Cards Accepted

CALL (608)444-2900

C.N.R. STORAGE

Located behind Stoughton Garden Center

Convenient Dry Secure

Lighted with access 24/7

Bank Cards Accepted

Off North Hwy 51 on

Oak Opening Dr. behind Stoughton Garden Center Call: 608-509-8904

DEER POINT STORAGE

Convenient location behind Stoughton Lumber. Clean-Dry Units 24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS 5x10 thru 12x25

608-335-3337

FRENCHTOWN

SELF-STORAGE

Only 6 miles South of Verona on Hwy PB. Variety of sizes available now.

10x10=$60/month

10x15=$70/month

10x20=$80/month

10x25=$90/month

12x30=$115/month

Call 608-424-6530 or

1-888-878-4244

NORTH PARK STORAGE

10x10 through 10x40, plus 14x40 with 14' door for RV & Boats. Come & go as you please.

608-873-5088

THEY SAY people don’t read those little ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you? Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or

835-6677.

Stoughton.

Work flexible part-time hours.

Do you have:

Great People Skills? Domestic Household Skills?

And, do you lik e dogs?

Call or text Holly at 608.225.5037

CNA, MH experience helpful

“Be the Change” - Ghandi

adno=532378-01

CAREERS Walk-In Interviews Friday, July 28th 9 am to 5 pm Edgerton Library 101 Albion St.
CAREERS Walk-In Interviews Friday, July 28th 9 am to 5 pm Edgerton Library 101 Albion St.
CAREERS Walk-In Interviews Friday, July 28th 9 am to 5 pm Edgerton Library 101 Albion St.
CAREERS
CAREERS

Walk-In Interviews

Friday, July 28th 9 am to 5 pm Edgerton Library 101 Albion St. Edgerton, WI

Friday, July 28th 9 am to 5 pm Edgerton Library 101 Albion St. Edgerton, WI

Hiring for our Stoughton and

Edgerton Stores

All Shifts:

Cashier, Kitchen starting at $11.50/hr

3rd Shift Premium Pay $2.00/hr

CAREERS Walk-In Interviews Friday, July 28th 9 am to 5 pm Edgerton Library 101 Albion St.

Apply online at KwikTrip.jobs

 

adno=528665-01

801 oFFiCe spaCe FoR Rent OFFICE SPACES FOR RENT In Oregon facing 15th hole on golfcourse
801
oFFiCe spaCe FoR Rent
OFFICE SPACES FOR RENT
In Oregon facing 15th hole
on golfcourse
Free Wi-Fi, Parking and
Security System
Conference rooms available
Kitchenette-Breakroom
Autumn Woods Prof. Centre
Marty 608-835-3628
883
Wanted:
Housekeeper
Residential pRopeRty
WE BUY Homes any condition. Close
quickly. Joe 608-618-1521 jssrealestate@
tds.net
Work for a company with a culture where you feel appreciated.
Join Stoughton Hospital’s award winning Environmental Services
team of Housekeepers. Our patients rank Stoughton Hospital as
970
hoRses
having the cleanest patient rooms in the state.
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
• Full-time PM's, 40 hours per week, Monday - Friday, 3:00 p.m.-
11:30 p.m.
608-882-5725
• Full or Part-time PM’s, 40 hours per week, 3:00 p.m.-11:30 p.m.,
975
livestoCk
occasional weekends, and every 3rd holiday.
DAIRY CATTLE AUCTION TAH LIVE-
STOCK WINSLOW, IL FRIDAY, JULY
28TH, 2017 1:00 PM EARLY CONSIGN-
MENTS SO FAR INCLUDE: 20 FRESH
2 YEAR OLDS INCLUDING 15 B &
W HOLSTEINS AND 3 CROSSBREDS.
ALL FRESH 10 TO 40 DAYS. UP AND
ROLLING. LOW SCC AND MILK OUT
GOOD. 11 HERD DISPERSAL STAN-
CHION MILKED COWS. 1 R &W, 1
BROWN SWISS, 9 HOLSTEINS. MOST-
LY FRESH WITH A FEW CONFIRMED
BRED BACK. LOW SCC. LOTS OF
MILK. ALSO--14 100% REGISTERED
HERD DISPERSAL COWS WITH
RECORDS. LOW SCC. ALL FRESH.
30-60 DAYS. PAPERS IN HAND. 50
YEARS OF BREEDING. HOME
RAISED. 2 TO 4YR. OLDS, FANCY AND
WELL BRED. 3 REGISTERED FRESH
HOLSTEIN HEIFERS, HOME RAISED.
PAPERS IN HAND, TOP, FANCY KIND.
6 BRED HOLSTEIN HEIFERS. 30 HOL-
STEIN HEIFERS, OPEN. 550# TO 850#.
VERY GOOD. 8 OPEN HEIFERS, 650#.
JERSEY AND CROSSBREDS. ALSO
PENDING: 30 OPEN HOLSTEIN HEIF-
ERS. 700# TO 850#. AI SIRED. ANY
QUESTIONS CALL BARN NUMBER AT
815-367-5581 OR TERRY CELL NUM-
BER 815-291 5604. I THINK COWS
WILL BE WORTH THE MONEY AND
TOP QUALITY CATTLE FOR EVERY-
ONE'S POCKETBOOK. HOPE TO SEE
YOU ALL ON SALE DAY!!CHECK OUR
WEBSITE WWW.TAHLIVESTOCK.COM
FOR FURTHER UPDATES CLOSER TO
SALE DAY AND BE SURE TO LIKE US
ON FACEBOOK!!!
• Full or Part-time Days, 40 hours per week, 7:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.,
and working every 4th weekend and holiday
Stoughton Hospital offers competitive pay, shift differentials, and
benefits. Call 608-873-2296
or email hr@stohosp.com for more details.
Equal Opportunity Employer.
Apply online at stoughtonhospital.com
adno=531685-01
IMMEDIATE FULL TIME OPENINGS FOR:
Administrative Sales Assistant
Construction Crew
Construction Estimator / Job Processor
980
maChineRy & tools
FARM FANS AB350 single phase batch
dryer, many newer parts, 2 near-new
motors. Very good condition. Also frame-
less aluminum dump trailer w/liner and
tarp. 815 369-4796
Production Draftsperson
Sawyer Saw Operator
• Semi Driver
990
FaRm: seRviCe
& meRChandise
FRITZ BARN PAINTING
We offer competitive wages based on experience, opportunities
for career growth, and a full benefit package.
Rusty roofs, metal buildings, grain bins.
Free-estimate. 608-221-3510
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
Cleary Building Corp. is proud to be an Equal
Opportunity Employer with a smoke-free/drug-free work
place. Pre-employment substance abuse testing and
background checks are performed.
Veterans are encouraged to apply.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
Please apply online at www.workforcleary.com
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Courier Hub unless
changed because of holiday work
schedules. Call now to place your ad,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
Or apply in person at:
190 Paoli St.
Verona, WI 53593
adno=532429-01
$100.00 Sign On Bonus If Hired!!! (Paid after 90 days of employment) OPEN INTERVIEWS! THURSDAY, JULY

$100.00 Sign On Bonus If Hired!!!

(Paid after 90 days of employment)

OPEN INTERVIEWS! THURSDAY, JULY 27, 2017, 9:00 A.M. TO 4:00 P.M. at 2762 County Road N and I - 90, Cottage Grove, WI 53527

(Currently under remodeling and road construction)

Road Ranger a Travel Center/ Truck Stop company is hiring for the following positions:

  • - Cashier who can work 2 nd /3 rd shift Full-Time 36 + hours a week.

  • - Maintenance Worker who can work 1 st /2 nd shift Full-Time 36 + hours a week.

  • - Subway Assistant Manager who can work 2 nd shift Full-Time 36 + hours a week.

  • - Subway Sandwich Artist who can work 1 st /2 nd shift Full-Time 36 + hours a week.

  • - Subway Sandwich Artist who can work 2 nd shift Part-Time 24-36 hours a week.

You must be able to smile, have fun, maintain the store inside and out, run a register, count money, prepare food product and sandwiches, supervise/ motivate others, do side duties and most importantly provide Great Customer Service. This position does have physical requirements that require you to able to lift, bend, reach, sweep, mop, work in the cold, work in the heat, work with cleaning chemicals and stand for 8 hours. We offer: Starting Wage of $11.00 per hour, Your wage can be higher based on experience, Bonus Potential, Full/Part Time Benefi ts, Holiday Premium Pay and Advancement Opportunities! If you like working in a customer friendly, fast paced, high energy and fun environment then this is your opportunity to

join a growing company!

Stop in for your Interview on Thursday, 7/27/2017

APPLY AT: WWW.ROADRANGERUSA.COM

Road Ranger is an E.O.E.

adno=532012-01

16

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub

ConnectStoughton.com

Street: Roof, wall failures from water damage force ‘indefinite’ closing of blocks

Continued from page 1

Authority by Steve Mar- Pohl, of Insite Consulting Architects. The RDA had hired Mar-Pohl to investi - gate the century-old build - ing in May to consider its s uitability for rehabilita - tion. Mar-Pohl had previ - ously used a drone to con - duct a detailed inspection that produced hundreds of photos of the brick build - ing. In the report, Mar -Pohl recommended closing East South Street to traffic and pedestrians because of “failures in roof and exte - rior wall systems” from w ater intrusion. “Extended lack of main - tenance has resulted in t otal building envelope failures in roof and exteri - or wall systems,” Mar-Pohl wrote. Mayor Donna Olson told the Hub a two-block section of the street will remain closed until the Common Council decides

what remediation needs to take place and completes safety improvements. “We just don’t know how long it will take at this time,” Olson said. “We spoke with our insur - ance carrier, and they said ha ving a report like that means you take action right away.” In March, the RDA vot - ed to demolish the build - ing to clear the site for re development. The build - ing is located in the city’s 12-acre riverfront redevel - opment area. A week later, the Com - mon Council voted to block the demolition. It later reversed the vote and decided instead to save a small building, known as the blacksmith shop, within the larger Highway Trailer complex. The city’s Landmarks Commission is in the pro - cess of designating the entire four -story building a local landmark, which would provide protections

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com Street: Roof, wall failures from water damage force ‘indefinite’

Photo by Amber Levenhagen

East South Street, near the Highway Trailer building, is closed indefinitely.

against its destruction. That decision would not need council approval. The building would have to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places

to qualify for federal tax credits to either rehab or demolish the building.” Despite its dangerous condition, Mar-Pohl’s report said the building

could be saved. It estimat - ed a cost of at least $2.25 million to restore the build - ing shell, with a demoli - tion cost at of $1 million to $1.2 million.

Contact Bill Livick at bill. livick@wcinet.com

Journal: Community came together to help find soldier’s stolen journal from time in Iraq

Continued from page 1

were magnificent things that I was a part of, like trying to help the commu - nity over there, and the friendships I made between my army brothers and the friendships I made with civilians.” Knowing how import - ant the journal is to her husband, Christensen’ s wife, Nina Nevins, quickly sprang into action, putting up posters around the city, and a picture on Facebook, which was shared over 20,000 times. VFW Post 328 offered a cash reward for its return and was organizing a search of the neighborhood when it was suddenly returned to his mailbox three days later, with an anonymous, hand - written letter stating it was found in back of a church on South Van Buren Street. “We came home from camping on Sunday to the journal in the field where we let our dog out back,” the letter read. “I mistook

it for a Bible so I put it in

the nook of a tree thinking whoever left it back there would come back for it. It wasn’t until Monday when I saw the flyer on Stough - ton’s police page, and it all came together.” The Stoughton Police Department had shared the poster on Facebook, and reassured Christensen that Stoughton is a great neigh - borhood, a gesture he said he appreciated after he, Nina and their two sons, Barret and Soren Chris - tensen, moved here a year ago from Colorado to be closer to family in the Madison area. Aside from this hiccup, Christensen said his time so far in Stoughton has been “amazing,” and cred - ited the quick work by his wife and countless strang - ers for getting the journal returned safely to him. “I w ould have called the police and pretty much stopped there, because in my mind what more can you do besides that and pray for the best?” he said.

“But we didn’t expect this kind of a response, I’m just so blown away. Right out - side the perimeter of my yard, there’s people that care and people that want to help and people that are worth knowing and worth the effort of getting out and knowing them. “I’m just so thankful, just beyond myself thank - ful,” he continued. “I jok - ingly said to my wife that

I w anted to have a barbe - que in my yard and have the entire city of Stoughton come eat hot dogs to show how thankful I am, but hav - ing a few thousand people in my yard w ouldn’t really be appropriate.”

Contact Amber Levenha - gen at amber.levenhagen@ wcinet.com.

The anonymous letter

“Your journal was found in the back of the church on S.

Van Buren St. We came home from camping on Sunday to the journal in the field where we let our dog out back. There was also an empty pill bottle without any labels next to the journal. When I first saw the journal, I mis- took it for a Bible so I put it in the nook of a tree think- ing whoever left it back there would come back for it. It wasn’t until Monday when I saw the flyer on Stoughton’s police page, and it all came together. When I got home,

  • I flipped through it, and sure enough it was your journal.

we walked over to your house, but no one was home, so

  • I figured a note was the next best thing.”

July 27, 2017 Stoughton Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com Street: Roof, wall failures from water damage force ‘indefinite’

Photo submitted

A photo of the poster went viral on Facebook and within three days was shared more than 20,000 times.

Ask The Stoughton
Ask The Stoughton

A. Lenders need to verify that funds were not borrowed elsewhere and therefore do not have any payments attached to them that may not be included in your loan qualification. They need to make sure gifts are actually that and that money is not being funneled back to you from the agents or sellers involved.

Q. We just bought our first home and are curious about why mortgage lenders need every single financial transaction up until the day of closing when they’ve already seen bank account that show liquid assets? Why does it matter what account it is in, if you already know we have it?

MORTGAGE BANKING

117 King St. • Stoughton, WI 53589

kathy.aiken@associatedbank.com

A. Lenders need to verify that funds were not borrowed elsewhere and therefore do not have
A. Lenders need to verify that funds were not borrowed elsewhere and therefore do not have

608-873-6755

Kathleen C. Aiken

adno=527909-01

SENIOR CARE
 

SENIOR CARE

  • Q. Should I be concerned about Glaucoma?

  • A. Glaucoma is often called “the sneak thief of sight”. This disease is the second leading cause of

blindness in the world, according to the World Health Organization. There are rarely warning signs. Once symptoms begin to show, vision loss is permanent. There is no cure. However, blindness caused by glaucoma can also be prevented, provided it is detected at an early stage. Risk factors for glaucoma increase if you are over the age of 60; are Hispanic, African American or Asian; have diabetes as a result of being obese; have family members (especially siblings) with

glaucoma; are very nearsighted.

Stephen Rudolph

Because there are rarely symptoms that indicate the presence of glaucoma, most people do not realize

FACHE, CSA

there is a problem until loss of vision occurs. By this time, it is often too late. Up to 40% of your vision

can disappear without your realizing you have glaucoma. This vision loss, while avoidable through early diagnosis, is irreversible. The only way glaucoma can be detected is by regular comprehensive eye exams, which should begin sometime about 50. It is important that you discuss with your senior loved ones how crucial it is to have regular eye exams. Find out if any of family members have glaucoma and do research to determine if other risk factors are present. Remember, early detection is critical in managing this disease and preventing complete vision loss.

5396 King James Way, Suite 210, Madison, WI 53719
5396 King James Way, Suite 210, Madison, WI 53719

5396 King James Way, Suite 210, Madison, WI 53719

(608) 442-1898 • www.comfortkeepers.com/madison-wi

 

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