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Tekla Structural Designer

2016i

Engineer’s Handbooks

September 2016

© 2016 Trimble Solutions Corporation – part of Trimble Navigation Ltd.

Table of Contents

Wind Modeling Handbook

 

1

 

1

1

Scope

1

Limitations

3

Basic Steps

of the wind

modeling process

6

Applying Wall

Panels and Roof Panels

7

Applying

Wall Panels

7

Applying

Roof Panels

8

BS 6399-2 Wind Wizard

 

9

 

9

Method page

 

9

 

9

Using the BS6399-2 Wind Wizard with other data

13

Method page

 

13

Other

13

14

Other Hybrid Wind Data page

 

14

Results page

15

Creating Wind Zones on the Building

 

17

BS6399-2 Wind Zones

17

User Modification of Zones

22

Creating Wind Loadcases

22

Load Decomposition on to Roof and Wall Panels

23

Roof Panels

23

Wall Panels ........................................................................................................................

23

References ................................................................................................................................

23

Stability Requirements Handbook

25

25

Global second-order effects

 

25

 

25

25

27

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Sway sensitivity assessment (BS)

28

28

How do I assess the worst elastic critical load factor for the building?

28

Twist

29

29

30

Global imperfections

30

30

Solver Model Handbook

31

Solver models

31

31

31

Solver Model used for 1st Order Non Linear

33

Solver Model used for 2nd Order Linear

33

Solver Model used for 2nd Order Non Linear

34

Solver Model used for 1st Order Vibration

34

Solver Model used for 2nd Order Buckling

35

Solver model used for Grillage Chasedown

35

Solver

model

used

for

36

Refresh Solver Model

37

Analysis objects

37

Solver elements for concrete

38

Concrete column physical and solver models

39

Concrete

column

physical model

39

Concrete

column

solver

39

Concrete beam physical and solver models

40

Concrete

beam

physical model

40

 

41

Rigid offsets

42

Rigid

zones

42

Application of Rigid Zones

43

43

Rigid Zones Example 2 - pin ended beam

47

Solver elements for steel and other materials

49

Steel column physical and solver models

49

Table of Contents

Steel column physical model

49

Steel

column

49

Steel beam physical and solver models

51

Steel beam physical model

51

Steel beam solver elements

53

54

Steel

brace

physical model

54

Steel

brace

solver elements

55

Inactive steel braces

55

 

55

Input method for

A and V Braces

55

Solver elements for concrete walls

55

Concrete

wall

physical model

55

Concrete

wall

solver model

56

 

58

58

58

59

Alternative model for wall openings

59

Concrete wall extensions

 

61

Use of concrete wall extensions

61

Concrete wall extension examples

62

Releases

 

66

Column Releases

67

Wall Releases

 

67

Beam Releases

67

Brace Releases

68

Supports....................................................................................................................................

68

Support degrees of freedom

69

 

Non linear spring supports

69

Partial fixity of column bases

70

Rigid diaphragms

 

71

 

73

73

74

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Model validation

76

Load decomposition

76

Global imperfections

78

Pattern Loading

79

79

79

FE Chasedown Analysis

80

Sway sensitivity

81

Member design

82

Design Review

83

Comparison of solver models used in Static Analysis-Design

83

Seismic Analysis and Design Handbook

87

Introduction to Seismic Analysis and Design

87

Definitions

87

Overview

90

91

Vertical and Horizontal Irregularities

91

Torsion

92

92

92

Response Spectrum Analysis Method

92

Seismic Drift

94

Limitations of

94

95

Available SFRS types

95

Available SFRS types

95

96

97

Special Moment Frames - assigning connection types at steel beam ends

97

Validation of the SFRS

97

98

98

98

98

99

Table of Contents

Seismic analysis and seismic design ...............................................................................100 ELF seismic analysis and seismic design ....................................................................100 RSA seismic analysis and seismic design ...................................................................101 ASCE7 Seismic Wizard ...........................................................................................................102 Eurocode EN1998-1:2004 Seismic Wizard .........................................................................102 Concrete Design Handbook .....................................................................................................103 General design parameters (concrete) ..............................................................................103 Autodesign (concrete) .......................................................................................................103 Design and detailing groups (concrete) .........................................................................104 Why use concrete design and detailing groups? .......................................................104 What happens in the group design process? ............................................................104 Concrete design group requirements ........................................................................105 Detailing group requirements .....................................................................................105 Group management ......................................................................................................107 How is grouped design and detailing de-activated for concrete members? ........108 Nominal cover ....................................................................................................................108 Assume cracked .................................................................................................................108 Reinforcement Parameters ..............................................................................................109 Reinforcement Parameters ..........................................................................................109 Concrete beam design ..........................................................................................................109 Concrete beam design properties ..................................................................................109 Autodesign (concrete beam) ........................................................................................109 Deflection control ..........................................................................................................109 Use of beam flanges ......................................................................................................109 Longitudinal reinforcement .............................................................................................112 Bar layers ........................................................................................................................112 Longitudinal Reinforcement Shapes Library .............................................................114 Longitudinal Reinforcement Patterns Library ...........................................................115 Longitudinal Reinforcement Regions ..........................................................................118 Relationship between Reinforcement Patterns and Design Regions ....................119 Shear reinforcement .........................................................................................................121 Shear Reinforcement Shapes Library .........................................................................121 Shear Reinforcement Patterns Library .......................................................................122 Shear Reinforcement Regions .....................................................................................122 Concrete column design .......................................................................................................123

ix

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Concrete column design properties ...............................................................................123 Autodesign (concrete column) .....................................................................................124 Section .............................................................................................................................124 Slenderness ....................................................................................................................125 Stiffness ...........................................................................................................................126 Load reductions .............................................................................................................126 Stacks and reinforcement lifts .........................................................................................126 Column design forces .......................................................................................................127 Concrete wall design .............................................................................................................127 Concrete wall design properties ......................................................................................127 Autodesign (concrete walls) .........................................................................................128 Slenderness ....................................................................................................................128 Stiffness ...........................................................................................................................128 Reinforcement ................................................................................................................129 Load reductions .............................................................................................................129 Stacks and reinforcement lifts .........................................................................................129 Wall design forces ..............................................................................................................130

Concrete slab

design .............................................................................................................131

Concrete slab design properties .....................................................................................131 Autodesign (concrete slab) ...........................................................................................131 Decomposition ...............................................................................................................131 Slab on beam design parameters ...............................................................................132 Slab reinforcement ........................................................................................................133 Flat slab design procedure ...............................................................................................134 Flat slab design example ..............................................................................................135 Set up Pattern Loading .................................................................................................135 Design All .........................................................................................................................136 Consider Deflection (for Flat slabs) .............................................................................137 Select a Level ..................................................................................................................137 Add Patches ....................................................................................................................138 Design Panels .................................................................................................................138 Review/Optimise Panel Design ....................................................................................139 Design Patches ...............................................................................................................140 Review/Optimise Patch Design ....................................................................................140

Add and Run Punching Checks ....................................................................................141

Table of Contents

Create Drawings and Quantity Estimations ...............................................................141 Print Calculations ...........................................................................................................142 Slab on beam design procedure .....................................................................................142 Slab on beam design example .....................................................................................142 Set up Pattern Loading .................................................................................................143 Design All .........................................................................................................................144 Select a Level ..................................................................................................................144 Add Beam and Wall Top Patches .................................................................................144 Design Panels .................................................................................................................145 Review/Optimise Panel Design ....................................................................................146 Design Beam and Wall Patches ...................................................................................147 Review/Optimise Beam and Wall Patch Design ........................................................148 Create Drawings and Quantity Estimations ...............................................................148 Print Calculations ...........................................................................................................148 Performing concrete structure design ...............................................................................149 Pre-design considerations ............................................................................................149 Gravity design .................................................................................................................149 Full design .......................................................................................................................149 Reviewing concrete structure design .................................................................................150 How do I view results for a single concrete member (without re-selecting steel)? .150 How do I re-select steel for a single concrete member and then view its results? .150 Interactive concrete member design .................................................................................151 Interactive concrete beam design ...................................................................................151 How do I open the Interactive Beam Design Dialog? ...............................................151 Overview of the Interactive Beam Design Dialog ......................................................151 How do I change the bar pattern? ...............................................................................154 Interactive concrete column design ................................................................................154 How do I open the Interactive Column Design Dialog? ............................................155 Overview of the Interactive Column Design Dialog ..................................................155 How do I arrange bars in the Interactive Column Design Dialog? ..........................158 Interactive concrete wall design ......................................................................................160 How do I open the Interactive Wall Design Dialog? ..................................................161 Overview of the Interactive Wall Design Dialog ........................................................161 Steel Design Handbook ............................................................................................................165 General design parameters .................................................................................................165

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Material type ......................................................................................................................165 Autodesign (steel) ..............................................................................................................165 Design Section Order ........................................................................................................166 Size Constraints..................................................................................................................167 Gravity only design ............................................................................................................167 Design groups ....................................................................................................................168

Instability factor .................................................................................................................169 Steel beam design .................................................................................................................169 Steel beam scope ...............................................................................................................169

Steel

beam

limitations and assumptions .......................................................................170

Steel

beam

design properties ..........................................................................................171

Fabrication ......................................................................................................................171 Section .............................................................................................................................172 Restraints ........................................................................................................................172

Web Openings to SCI P068 ...........................................................................................172 Deflection Limits ............................................................................................................173 Camber ............................................................................................................................174

Natural

frequency ..........................................................................................................174

Seismic .............................................................................................................................175 Composite beam design .......................................................................................................175 Composite beam scope ....................................................................................................175 Composite beam loading .................................................................................................176 Concrete slab ......................................................................................................................177 Precast concrete planks ....................................................................................................177 Composite beam design properties ...............................................................................177 Properties common to composite and non-composite beams ..............................177 Allow non-composite design ........................................................................................177 Floor construction ..........................................................................................................178 Effective width calculations ..........................................................................................179 Metal deck .......................................................................................................................180 Stud strength ..................................................................................................................180 Transverse reinforcement ............................................................................................181 Connector layout ...............................................................................................................182 Auto-layout for Perpendicular decks ..........................................................................182

Auto-layout for Parallel decks ......................................................................................184

Table of Contents

Manual Stud Layout .......................................................................................................184 Steel column design ..............................................................................................................188 Steel column scope ...........................................................................................................188 Limitations for sloping columns ......................................................................................188 Steel column design properties .......................................................................................188 Simple Columns .............................................................................................................189 Section .............................................................................................................................189 Restraints ........................................................................................................................189 Load Reductions.............................................................................................................190 Splice and Splice offset .................................................................................................190 Web Openings ................................................................................................................192 Seismic .............................................................................................................................192 Steel brace design .................................................................................................................192 Steel brace scope ...............................................................................................................192

Input method for A and V Braces ....................................................................................193 Steel brace design properties ..........................................................................................193 Section .............................................................................................................................193 Compression ..................................................................................................................193 Tension ............................................................................................................................194 Steel truss design ..................................................................................................................195

Steel truss

scope ................................................................................................................195

Steel truss design properties ...........................................................................................196 Steel joist design ....................................................................................................................196 Standard types ...................................................................................................................196 Special Joists .......................................................................................................................197 Joist Girders ........................................................................................................................197 Joist Analytical Properties .................................................................................................197 Performing steel structure design ......................................................................................197 Gravity design .................................................................................................................197 Full design .......................................................................................................................198 Individual member design ...................................................................................................198 How do I view the design results for the analysed section? .......................................198 How do I quickly check an alternative section size? .....................................................199 How do I quickly design a new section size? .................................................................199

Foundation Design Handbook ................................................................................................201

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Isolated foundation design ..................................................................................................201 Overview of the isolated foundation analysis model ...................................................201 Association with member supports ............................................................................201 Analysis types .................................................................................................................202 Design forces and checks .............................................................................................202 Pad base and strip base design procedures .................................................................203

Pad base design

example .............................................................................................204

Apply bases under supported columns .....................................................................204 Auto-size bases individually for loads carried ...........................................................205 Apply grouping to rationalize pad base sizes ............................................................206 Review/Optimise Base Design .....................................................................................208 Create Drawings and Quantity Estimations ...............................................................208 Print Calculations ...........................................................................................................209 Pile cap design procedures ..............................................................................................209 Pile cap design example ...............................................................................................209 Apply pile caps under supported columns ................................................................210

Auto-size pile caps individually for loads carried ......................................................210 Apply grouping to rationalize pile cap sizes ...............................................................212 Review/Optimise Pile Cap Design ................................................................................213 Create Drawings and Quantity Estimations ...............................................................213 Print Calculations ...........................................................................................................214 Mat foundation design .........................................................................................................214 Overview of the mat foundation analysis model ..........................................................214 Analysis Types ................................................................................................................214

Soil

Structure Interaction ..............................................................................................214

Soil Parameters ..............................................................................................................215 Mat foundation design procedure ..................................................................................217 Mat foundation design example .................................................................................218 Create the mat, (either with ground springs, or discreet supports) ......................218 Model validation ............................................................................................................219 Perform the model analysis .........................................................................................220 Check foundation Bearing Pressure and Deformations ..........................................220 Re-perform member design .........................................................................................221 Open an appropriate view in which to design the mat ............................................221

Add Patches ....................................................................................................................222

xiv

Table of Contents

Design Mats ....................................................................................................................223 Review/Optimise Mat Design .......................................................................................223 Design Patches ...............................................................................................................224 Review/Optimise Patch Design ....................................................................................225 Add and Run Punching Checks ....................................................................................225 Create Drawings and Quantity Estimations ...............................................................226 Print Calculations ...........................................................................................................227 Vibration of Floors to SCI P354 Handbook ............................................................................229 Introduction to Floor Vibration (P354)................................................................................229 Scope .......................................................................................................................................230 Limitations and Assumptions ..............................................................................................230 Design Philosophy .................................................................................................................231 General ................................................................................................................................231 Dynamic Excitation ............................................................................................................232 Required Performance ......................................................................................................233 Provided Performance ......................................................................................................233 Provided Performance ..........................................................................................................234 System Frequency .............................................................................................................234 Modal Mass ........................................................................................................................237 Mode Shape Factor ...........................................................................................................239 Resonance Build-up Factor ..............................................................................................239 Response Acceleration ......................................................................................................240 Response Acceleration ..................................................................................................240 Response Factor ................................................................................................................241 Vibration Dose Values .......................................................................................................241 Input Requirements ..............................................................................................................242 General ................................................................................................................................242 Data Derived from Tekla Structural Designer ...............................................................243 User Input Data ..................................................................................................................244 References ..............................................................................................................................246

Wind Modeling Handbook

This handbook describes the wind modelling components of Tekla Structural Designer (collectively referred to as the ‘Wind Modeller’) which allow you to perform a wind loading assessment on the wall and roof panels in your building model. The resulting wind loads are distributed back to the members for structural analysis and design.

The Wind Wizard is not currently available for the AS:1170.2 wind code variant.

The Wind Wizard is not currently available for the AS:1170.2 wind code variant.

Introduction to Wind Modeling

Design Codes and References

Unless explicitly stated all calculations in the BS 6399-2 Wind Modeller are in accordance with the relevant sections BS 6399-2:1997 incorporating Amendment 1 and corrigendum No. 1. (Ref. 4) It is essential that you have a copy of this code with you while assessing wind on any structure.

Your attention is particularly drawn to BS6399-2:1997 – Clause 1.1. For building shapes which are not covered by the Standard you will need to seek specialist advice.

We would recommend having the following books to hand when using the software:

Wind Loading - a practical guide to BS 6399-2 Wind Loads on buildings. (Ref. 7) Wind and Loads on buildings: Guide to Evaluating Design Wind Loads to BS6399- 2:1997. (Ref. 8)

Unless explicitly noted otherwise, all clauses, figures and tables referred to in this handbook are from reference 4.

Scope

Tekla Structural Designer can assess and apply wind loading to your model in advance of analysis and design.

It can determine:

main wind parameters

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

zone wind pressures on wall and roof panels pressure coefficients for each zone wind pressures on each zone wind loads and loadcases/combinations for your structure

The model has to be ‘clothed’ in wall panels and roof panels. Wind is ‘applied’ intelligently to this building envelope within the scope below and the limitations clearly laid out in the next section.

It is assumed that the wind loads are developed to assess the overall stability of the structure and for member design. The wind loads have not been specifically developed for the design of cladding and fixings.

You can, should you wish, use Tekla Structural Designer purely for wind assessment – by setting

You can, should you wish, use Tekla Structural Designer purely for wind assessment – by setting up a model of consisting only of wall panels and roof panels (no members) the software can determine the wind loading on the building envelope.

 

In the main, BS6399-2:1997 addresses rectilinear buildings. In order to develop a tool for engineers, we have extended this capability to address non-rectilinear buildings using the standard method. For more information, please refer to reference 7 (section 2.5.3.2.4, page 82 and 2.5.4.3.3 pages 89-90).

The scope of BS 6399-2 Wind Modeller encompasses:

Enveloping the building with wall panels and roof panels is undertaken in Tekla Structural Designer in the normal manner. There is only limited validation of the envelope defined (for example connected wall panels must have consistent normal directions). The onus is on you to model the building shape as completely and as accurately as you determine necessary.

Choice of method:

BS6399-2:1997 - Standard Method - Standard effective wind speeds with standard pressure coefficients,

BS6399-2:1997 – Hybrid Method - Directional effective wind speeds with standard pressure coefficients.

Basic Wind Speed and Dynamic pressure is determined.

Having defined wall panels and roof panels (defaults are standard wall, flat or monopitch roof depending on the slope), you are able to specify the type in more detail e.g. multi-bay, monopitch / duopitch etc.).

The main wind parameters, are calculated for you but conservatively, (for example Crosswind Breadth, B, is determined for the enclosing rectangle of the whole building). Wherever possible other parameters are determined conservatively, but you are able to override the values should you need to.

Wind Modeling Handbook

Given the above, zoning is semi-automatic, (not attempted for roofs with more than 4 sides which are defaulted to single conservative coefficient), with full graphical feedback.

Load decomposition is fully automatic where valid, (wall panels and roof panels need to be fully supported in the direction of span).

Limitations

Throughout the development of the Wind Modeller extensive reference has been made to the and we consider it advisable that you are fully familiar with these before using the software.

In addition, because wind loading is complex and its application to general structures even more so, it is essential that you read and fully appreciate the following limitations in the software:

Geometry

You should seek specialist advice for building shapes that are not covered by Clause 1.1 of

You should seek specialist advice for building shapes that are not covered by Clause 1.1 of BS6399-2:1997

Open sided buildings are beyond scope. Free standing walls and sign boards are not considered. Parapets and free-standing canopies are not considered. Exposed members are not considered, for example lattices, trusses ...... Barrel-vault roofs and domes are not considered.

Dominant Openings are not explicitly handled – Clause 2.6.2. However, you can use Table 17 to calculate the necessary C pi values and manually apply to a loadcase or individual zone loads.

Loaded Areas

The difference between the loaded area of wall panels and roof panels defined at the centre-line rather than the sheeting dimension is ignored.

Wind Direction

All outward faces within 60 degs of being perpendicular to wind direction - loads applied as windward normal to face. All inside faces within 60 degs to wind direction - loads applied as leeward normal to face. All other faces considered as side.

Orthogonal wind directions at the definition of the user.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Code Specific Limitations

Beneficial Loads

No automatic reduction is made for beneficial load. When you edit the Zone Load Data for a wind direction, having generated wind load cases, there is an option to allow for beneficial loads.

Wind loading on wall panels

Automatic zoning applies to all wall panels subject to the limitations described below:

Wall panels that are more than 15° from the vertical are outside the scope – Clause

2.4.1.5.

The inset storey clause 2.4.4.2 b) is not implemented. You can edit the zones manually according to your engineering judgement to include zone E if you consider this necessary.

Wall panels of internal wells are not automatically identified – Clause 2.4.3.2a. You can manually edit the zones to apply the roof coefficient to the wall panels.

Wind loading on roof panels

Automatic zoning only applies to all triangular roof panels and quadrilateral roof panels that are not concave, i.e. all of the internal angles < 180°

The inset storey clauses 2.5.1.7 a) and b) are not implemented. In clause a) the software sets H r and H equal conservatively. You are obviously able to edit the zones manually according to your engineering judgement to include the further zones indicated in Figure 18 should you consider this necessary.

It should be noted that in Table 8 for curved and mansard eaves, the zones start from edge of horizontal roof and not from the edge of the feature.

Special care should be taken for winds blowing on duopitch with slopes that differ by more than 5°. If the wind is blowing on the steeper slope (that is that the less steep slope is downwind of ridge), the downwind slope should be set to be a flat roof with mansard at eaves for this wind direction.

Mansard and Multipitch Roofs are not detected automatically, However, you can manually apply the relevant roof type, apex type and bay position parameters for each appropriate wind direction to match the requirements of Figure 22 and Figure 23 - see Creating Wind Zones on the Building.

Roof Overhangs are not explicitly handled. It is suggested that you should define two separate roof panels - one forming the overhang and the other covering the inside of the building. You can then define C pi values manually to either have the same coefficient as the adjacent wall, (Clause 2.5.8.2 Small Overhangs), or as an open sided building (Clause 2.6.3).

Additional wind loads

There may be situations when you perceive a need to manually define loads that can not be determined automatically. You can do this by defining additional wind load cases

Wind Modeling Handbook

to contain these loads and then include these with the relevant system generated loads in design combinations in the normal way.

Load decomposition on to concrete walls

All wall panel loads are decomposed into loads on columns. In a building that contains unmeshed concrete walls, the analytical model of the wall consists partly of a ‘mid-pier’ vertical column at the centre of the wall, hence wind wall panel loads will be decomposed onto the mid-pier column.

This decomposition on to the mid pier column could in certain cases result in an averaging of the wind pressure profile that removes the localised pressure increase at the corners of the building.

The example below illustrates the problem and provides an alternative model as a workaround:

Physical model of concrete wall

Physical model of concrete wall

Although not shown here, wind wall panels are also added to all four faces of the building.

Wind zones

Wind zones

The zones are generated on the wind wall panel faces.

Resulting stepped wind pressure on wind wall panel faces

Resulting stepped wind pressure on wind wall panel faces

Highest pressure occurs in Zone A, lesser pressure exists in other zones

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Wind pressure decomposed on to the concrete wall

Wind pressure decomposed on to the concrete wall

Stepped pressure gradient is averaged over the face of the wall and then decomposed on to the ‘mid-pier’ column at it’s centre. Hence only a single point load is applied at each floor level.

Alternative Model

Alternative Model

Define two adjacent concrete walls, making the first as wide as wind zone A. This results in a more accurate decomposition of the wind load, reflecting the stepped profile of the wind pressure.

Basic Steps of the wind modeling process

There is a simple process to follow when you want to model wind loads. The basic steps are detailed below.

  • 1. Define the structure including all the wall panels and roof panels that will carry the wind loading.

In order to get the best results from wind modelling you should ensure that you define

In order to get the best results from wind modelling you should ensure that you define the largest possible sizes for the wall and roof elements. The results you obtain may be compromised if you define many small elements rather than one large one.

 
In complex models you must ensure the outward face of each wall is set correctly, as

In complex models you must ensure the outward face of each wall is set correctly, as this is important for determining the wind direction relative to the wall. The front and back faces of the wind walls are assigned different colours (controlled via Settings > Scene) but if you are struggling to distinguish between them you can also switch on the Local Axes for Wind Panels via Scene

   

Wind Modeling Handbook

 

Content. If the outward face of a wall is set incorrectly it can be reversed from the Edit toolbar.

   
  • 2. We recommend that you perform an analysis and design at this stage for the gravity loading only, but this is not essential.

  • 3. Run the Wind Wizard to define the information required for the wind analysis of the structure. The wind wizard automatically determines the wind zoning and external pressure coefficients for the roofs and walls.

  • 4. Confirm the wind zones - If necessary review the Roof Properties and use the Roof Type options to change the roof type if required - if the type is changed you will also have to run Update Zones. (See Reviewing wind zones and wind zone loads in the User Guides).

  • 5. Define the wind loadcases you want to consider. Tekla Structural Designer can calculate details for standard loadcases automatically. You can easily define the information for other loadcases yourself.

  • 6. Combine the wind loadcases with the other loadcases you have defined for your structure to create the design combinations you need to consider.

  • 7. Perform the analysis and design of the structure.

Applying Wall Panels and Roof Panels

All the calculations for wind depend on the geometry and inter-connectivity of the wall panels and roof panels that envelope the building. You must therefore define the model, together with its wall and roof panels before you can start to calculate the wind loading.

Whilst defining the model’s wall and roof panels, it is essential that you define the largest planar surfaces possible for these if you want to get the best results from the software. If you ignore this advice, then the calculation of the reference height can be unconservative.

Applying Wall Panels

A single wall panel is determined to be a single planar surface. The outward face is vitally important for determining the wind direction relative to the wall, that is windward or leeward.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

It is recommended that you check the outward faces are as you intend by ensuring they all shaded in the same colour (the one assigned to ‘Wind Wall - Front’ in Settings > Scene). The inward faces will all be shaded in a different colour. To correct any mistakes, choose the Reverse command (located on the Edit toolbar) and then click once on a wall panel to switch its direction. Note that connected wall panels are checked to ensure that the normal directions are consistent whenever automatic zoning is carried out, for example at the end of the Wind Wizard. If there is a problem it is indicated on the Wind

tab of the Project Workspace, with affected panels being marked thus: (

Engineers Handbooks (BS) It is recommended that you check the outward faces are as you intend

).

Once a wall panel has been placed the following additional panel properties can be specified:

Rotation angle - defines the span direction, 0° is horizontal and 90° is vertical. Is a parapet wall - you can indicate whether the wall panel is a parapet or not.

If a building face comprises a parapet above a wall, you should not attempt to model

If a building face comprises a parapet above a wall, you should not attempt to model this as a single wall panel. It should be input as an upper and lower panel, with the upper panel being set as a parapet.

   

Gap - where the gap to the adjacent building is not consistent due to the shapes of the buildings it is up to you to decide whether to specify the average or worst-case gap. The default gap is 1000 m which effectively give no funnelling. A zero gap value explicitly means ignore funnelling, for example where this building and the adjacent one are sheltered by upwind buildings

Solidity - If you set the wall panel as a parapet, then you also need to indicate the Solidity of the parapet. (Wall panels that are not parapets automatically adopt a solidarity of 1.0).

Decompose to Member - for wall panels that are not parapets, you can indicate how the wall load is decomposed on to supporting members. See Load Decomposition on to Roof and Wall Panels.

To set this information as you require, select the wall panels and then use the Properties Window to make changes.

Applying Roof Panels

A single roof panel is determined to be a single planar surface. The orientation of a roof panel is automatically determined when placed based upon the slope vector – the line of maximum roof slope.

Initially the roof type is set to ‘Default’. This is interpreted as Flat if the roof slope < 5 degrees, otherwise it is interpreted as Monopitch. You should select the roof panel and then use the Properties Window to adjust the roof type as necessary for all other situations (i.e. For Duopitch, Hip Main, Hip Gable or Mansard).

The span direction is also set in the Properties Window, this is defined as an angle, where 0° is parallel to the X axis and 90° is parallel to the Y axis.

BS 6399-2 Wind Wizard

Wind Modeling Handbook

To access this configuration of the Wind Wizard the Wind Loading Code has to be set to BS 6399-2.

Once the wall and roof panels are in place, you use the Wind Wizard to define sufficient site information to calculate the effective wind speeds and dynamic pressures for the required wind directions and heights around the building, (that is the Reference Height (H r ) for each wall panel or roof panel).

The wind speed calculations are automated, the data source for the calculations is either:

taken directly from the BREVe database, which is based upon the Ordnance Survey data of Great Britain,

input directly.

It should be noted that BS6399-2:1997 recommends that the Standard Method requires assessment of orthogonal load cases for wind directions normal to the faces of the building. The wizard permits you to create wind load for any wind direction and thus it is up to you to create those loads for the directions most appropriate to your structure.

Using the BS6399-2 Wind Wizard with BREVe data

Method page

This page allows you to specify the method that you want to use to calculate the wind loading on the building, and the source of the wind data.

There are two calculation methods available:

Standard, which uses standard effective wind speeds with standard pressure coefficients,

Hybrid, which uses directional effective wind speeds with standard pressure coefficients.

Assuming you have are going to specify the site data using BREVe Grid Ref data there are two options for the source of the wind data:

BREVe - UK National Grid Ref., BREVe - Irish Grid Ref.

BREVe location page

This page allows you to define the location of the site using the BREVe database, and to define various options to be considered in the wind analysis. Once you have retrieved the data for a site from the BREVe database you can edit these to take account of your local knowledge of the site.

Building details

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Grid Ref.

This shows the grid reference of the site which you have picked through BREVe, irrespective of the method you use to define the site location.

Site Altitude, A

You are able to override the altitude determined by BREVe by entering a value directly here.

Air Density

You need to enter air density at the site.

Ground Level in model

If for some reason, the level 0.0m in the Tekla Structural Designer model does not correspond to the ground level, for example you have used a site datum rather than a building datum, then this field allows you to set the appropriate value so that the reference heights for the wind can be calculated correctly.

Orientation of building known

If you know the orientation of the building with respect to North, then you can define this information by checking this box. You can then define a value which relates the building direction axes of your Tekla Structural Designer model to geographic north.

If you want to use the Hybrid method, then you must know and define the building orientation.

For the Standard method, the orientation is not essential. If you don't define the building's orientation then North is not shown in graphics views and all the S d values are set to 1.0.

Orientation of North

The orientation of North is defined using the same convention as is applied to the orientation of the Building Direction Arrows.

This can best be understood by reference to a couple of examples:

In the first example the building axes are aligned in the default directions (Dir 1 = 0° = Global X), and the orientation of North has been set to 315°.

The resulting relation between the building axes and North is as shown below:

Wind Modeling Handbook

Wind Modeling Handbook In the second example the building direction has been input with Dir 1

In the second example the building direction has been input with Dir 1 = 30° and the orientation of North has been set to 250°

In this case the building axes are related to North as shown below:

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Engineers Handbooks (BS) Consider Topography If you check this box, then BREVe uses the topographic data

Consider Topography

If you check this box, then BREVe uses the topographic data it recovers for the site and determines the Altitude Factor S a in accordance with Clause 2.2.2.2.3. Otherwise the topographic data is ignored and S a is calculated in accordance with Clause

2.2.2.2.2.

In theory the topography could be significant for some directions and not for

In theory the topography could be significant for some directions and not for

Consider Obstructions

With this box checked, BREVe uses the obstruction data it recovers for the site and determines the Effective Height H e as defined in Clause 1.7.3.3. Otherwise the obstructions are ignored and H e is taken as H r - see Clause 1.7.3.2.

BREVe information

Using BREVe, there are 2 methods available for you to define the site location:

Site By Ref ...

You can define the grid reference of the site.

Wind Modeling Handbook

You define this either as a national grid reference, or by specifying the Easting and Northing information for the site. There are several Internet based tools available which allow you to determine the Ordnance Survey grid reference from a postcode or given location, for example www.streetmap.co.uk or www.multimap.co.uk,

Site By Map ... You can pick the site from a Land / Town Map, You can pick the site from a Orography Map. You can pick the site from a ground roughness Category Map,

The site data is analysed fully by BREVe. Parameters are either set automatically but conservatively (Safe parameters within a 1 km square).

Next Click Next to go to the .

Using the BS6399-2 Wind Wizard with other data

Method page

This page allows you to specify the method that you want to use to calculate the wind loading on the building, and the source of the wind data.

There are two calculation methods available:

Standard, which uses standard effective wind speeds with standard pressure coefficients,

Hybrid, which uses directional effective wind speeds with standard pressure coefficients.

The remaining topics in this section assume you have chosen to enter the site data manually (Other).

Other Location page

This page allows you to define the site details when information is not available from the BREVe database, for instance if it is located outside of the UK.

Altitude

You need to enter the basic altitude that you want to use for the site directly. This is the altitude of your model’s base.

Air Density

You need to enter air density at the site.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Ground Level in model

If for some reason, the level 0.0m in the Tekla Structural Designer model does not correspond to the ground level, for example a site datum may have been used rather than a building datum, then this field allows you to set the appropriate value so that the reference heights can be calculated correctly.

Other Standard Wind Data page

If you select the Standard Method and Other Data Source, then the next page of the Wizard allows you to enter the wind data yourself.

Basic Wind Speed

You need to enter the basic wind speed at the site.

Ground Roughness

The following settings are available:

Sea – this setting is for sites where the distance to sea is between 0 and 1 km, (see Clause 1.7.2), it is not for offshore sites.,

Country – the worst case must be for wind blowing across open ground, there is no need to specify data for upwind buildings or distance in town,

Town – for this category you need to specify data for upwind buildings and distance to the edge of the town, so the relevant fields are active. If you want to ignore obstructions, then you need to enter a zero value for H o For this category, the ‘Upwind distance from edge of town to site’ can not be greater than the ‘Upwind distance from sea to site’.

Consider Topography / Altitude Factor, S a

When this box is checked, you need to use your own topographic data and determine the Altitude Factor S a in accordance with Clause 2.2.2.2.3. Otherwise S a is calculated in accordance with Clause 2.2.2.2.2 and you are not able to override it.

Season factor

You need to enter the season factor (default 1.0).

Probability factor

You need to enter the probability factor (default 1.0).

Next Click Next to go to the .

Other Hybrid Wind Data page

Wind Modeling Handbook

If you select the Hybrid Method and Other Data Source then the next page of the Wizard allows you to enter the data for ground roughness and obstructions yourself. However, most of the data is then dependent on the wind direction, so you must also make your choice of wind directions on this page.

Direction

Initially there are 4 orthogonal wind directions relative to the Tekla Structural Designer axes, (not geographical North), but you are able to update these using the Dir. buttons and / or changing the direction value as required. (Note: Minimum 1° difference between directions). At least one direction must be defined.

Each row of the grid operates in a similar manner to the relevant fields of the Other Standard Wind Data page

Consider Topography / Altitude Factor, S a

reference 8 (section 4.10, page 26) essentially recommends using the Standard Method approach to topography even for the Hybrid Method. So, when calculating the Terrain and Building Factor, S b , we ignore the effects of topography, that is we take S h = 0.

When the box is checked, you need to use your own topographic data and determine the Altitude Factors S a as defined in Clause 2.2.2.2.3. Otherwise S a is calculated as defined in Clause 2.2.2.2.2 and you are not able to override it.

In theory the topography could be significant for some directions and not for

In theory the topography could be significant for some directions and not for

Season factor

You need to enter the season factor (default 1.0).

Probability factor

You need to enter the probability factor (default 1.0).

Next Click Next to go to the .

Results page

The final page of the Wizard is a summary of the results - peak velocity pressure ranges.

BREVe Standard Method

Initially this method creates 4 orthogonal wind directions relative to the Tekla Structural Designer axes, (not geographical North). Except for the Hybrid Method with Other Data,

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

you can update the wind directions either by using the ‘Dir.’ buttons or by changing the direction value as required.

Separately, for each relevant parameter of the Standard Method, BREVe determines the worst case over all its 30° sectors. If the orientation of the building is not known, then S d is taken as 1.0 for all directions. Otherwise we determine the worst case S d for each direction. You can not override the system value in either case.

The worst case S d is based on splitting the difference to the next direction, with a minimum of ±15° and maximum of ±45°. Within these ranges S d is interpolated.

For each reference height in the model, we then calculate the site wind speed (V s using equation 8) and thus the effective wind speed (V e using equation 12) and the dynamic pressure (q s using equation 1) for each direction. When calculating actual loads on walls and roofs, we use the q s value for the relevant reference height, but the Results page only shows the maximum values for each direction.

The Vortex view shows the effective wind speed calculated for each reference height for each 30° sector. Since a single worst case value is used for each parameter, the speeds for different sectors only differ due to S d provided that the orientation of the building is known.

BREVe Hybrid Method

In this case, BREVe uses the directional method to determine the parameters required to calculate V s using equation 8, for each height in the building at 30° intervals, (0° to 330°) taking the diagonal dimension `a' as the default 5.0m. (The size effect factor is applied when determining individual loads). We then use equation 27 to determine V e and equation 16 for q s .

For each required wind direction the worst case V e is used for each height, based on splitting the difference to the next direction, with a maximum of ±45 degrees. Within these ranges V e is not interpolated.

Theoretically, it is possible for a quadrant to use different 30° directions for each height, so the critical wind direction is not displayed in the summary.

The Vortex view shows the effective wind speed calculated for each reference height for each 30° sector.

Other Standard Method

The calculation of V e and q s are very similar to the BREVe Standard Method, (see above), except that the worst case data has been entered by you, and this page allows you to enter your own values for S d .

As there is no data for each 30° sector, the Vortex view only shows the effective wind speed calculated for each reference height for each direction.

Other Hybrid Method

Wind Modeling Handbook

The calculation of V e and q s are be very similar to the BREVe Hybrid Method, (see above), except that the data has been entered by you for each direction only so a direct calculation can be performed instead of taking the worst case over a range of sectors. Also this page allows you to enter your own values for S d .

As there is no data for each 30° sector, the Vortex view only shows the effective wind speed calculated for each reference height for each direction.

Finishing the Wind Wizard

When you click ‘Finish’, the Wind Wizard generates the wind zones for the entire building for each of the specified wind directions.

Before moving on you should take a moment to inspect the Wind Model status on the Project Workspace> Status tab, in order to check that no have been encountered.

Related topics Creating Wind Zones on the Building

Creating Wind Zones on the Building

At the end of the Wind Wizard, the system creates default zones for all the walls and roof panels for each of the defined wind directions.

If any errors have occurred in this process, a red cross appears next to Pressure Zones in the Project Workspace.

BS6399-2 Wind Zones

Basic Geometry

The basic building geometry is assessed as follows:

Reference Height (H r ) – is taken as the difference between highest point on wall or roof panel and ground level.

Wall height (H) – is taken as the difference between highest and lowest points on the wall panel.

These definitions apply to wall panels without parapets and the actual parapets. Wall panels with parapets above them will take their highest point from the parapet. See the diagram below.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Engineers Handbooks (BS) • Roof height (H) – is taken as the difference between highest point

Roof height (H) – is taken as the difference between highest point on wall or roof panel and ground level. This definition does not handle the upper roof of inset storey but is conservative and only affects the scaling dimension, b - see Clause

2.5.1.7.

The Building Breadth, B is calculated from the smallest enclosing rectangle around the whole building (considered over all roof and wall panels only) for the given direction. You can override the calculated value in case the Tekla Structural Designer model does not include the whole building.

Wind Modeling Handbook

Wind Modeling Handbook Wall Zones Wall Type We assess each wall panel to determine if it

Wall Zones

Wall Type

We assess each wall panel to determine if it is a windward, leeward or side wall. We classify the type of wall dependent on θ:

Wind Modeling Handbook Wall Zones Wall Type We assess each wall panel to determine if it

• θ ≤ 60 deg – Windward,

• θ ≥ 120 deg - Leeward, Other walls are classed as Side.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Windward Walls Windward walls have a single zone, Table 5 is used with interpolation for D/H.

Leeward Walls Leeward walls have a single zone, Table 5 is used.

Side Walls

Side walls are assessed for recesses (narrow or wide), irregular flushed faces, downwind re-entrant corners. In all cases, side walls have the relevant number of zones. Table 5 is used.

Roof Zones

Roof zones are automatically generated where possible for each wind direction. In essence each roof panel is assessed in its own right based on its properties. The interconnectivity of touching roof panels is not generally considered.

Direction

Internally the roof slope vector (line of maximum slope) is determined from the normal vector, with its direction always giving a positive slope angle, i.e. the roof slope vector must always point up the slope.

We calculate the angle between the wind direction and projection of roof slope vector onto horizontal plane (θ in range -180° to +180°).

Engineers Handbooks (BS) Windward Walls Windward walls have a single zone, Table 5 is used with

Automatic Zoning

Automatic zoning normally only applies to all triangular roof panels and quadrilateral roof panels that are not concave, that is that all of the internal angles < 180°. However, additionally, it only applies to Hip Gable roofs if they are triangular, and Hip Main roofs

Wind Modeling Handbook

if they are quadrilateral. Further, Downwind Slope Hip Gables must not have 2 upwind corners.

Wind Modeling Handbook if they are quadrilateral. Further, Downwind Slope Hip Gables must not have 2

Dimensions

All zone dimensions are specified in plan.

Flat Roofs

See BS 6399 Clause 2.5.1, Figure 16 and Table 8.

Monopitch Roofs

See BS 6399 Clause 2.5.2.3, Figure 19 and Table 9.

Duopitch Roofs

See BS 6399 Clause 2.5.2.4, Figure 20 and Table 10.

Hip Gable

See BS 6399 Clause 2.5.3, Figure 21 and Table 11.

Hip Main

See BS 6399 Clause 2.5.3, Figure 21 and Table 11.

Mansard Roofs

If you manually set the connected roof types to Mansard, then the program will correctly identify the special cases in BS6399 Figures 17c, 22a and 22b, and use the correct tables and values. See BS 6399 Clauses 2.5.1.6.2 & 2.5.4

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Multi-bay Roofs

We allow you to interpret BS 6399 Clause 2.5.5 and Figure 23 as you think appropriate and manually define the roof types and sub-types accordingly. You also have the ability to manually set the multi-bay position for each roof panel for each wind direction:

Not Multi-Bay - for this wind direction (conservative default), Upwind Bay – first bay of many for this wind direction, Second Bay – for this wind direction, Third or more Bay – for this wind direction.

Where the reduction applies, the values of all coefficients are reduced according to Table 12.

Non-Automatic Zoning

Where automatic zoning does not apply, the system creates a single zone covering the entire roof as follows:

Flat – B, Monopitch – B, Duopitch – B for upwind, F for downwind, B for side, Hip Gable – B for upwind, G for downwind, I for side, Hip Main – B for upwind, F for downwind, I for side.

User Modification of Zones

This is not possible in the first release of the software.

Initially the expectation is that only “Expert” users may want to make changes to the actual zone layouts or other data.

Whenever you edit the zones for a wall or roof item, please note that the zone layout will not be updated to reflect changes elsewhere in the model, you must make any necessary changes yourself.

Creating Wind Loadcases

It is not practical to automatically determine critical combinations and thus required wind loadcases, therefore you control the generation of appropriate Wind Loadcases manually. This is achieved via the Wind Loadcases dialog (accessed from the Load toolbar.

The Auto button on the dialog provides various options to control the number of loadcases before they are generated (its intention being to prevent generation of very large numbers of loadcases). Alternatively you can create loadcases manually using the Add button.

Wind Modeling Handbook

You then specify which direction the loadcase will be created for and set default values for all the zone loads generated in the loadcase.

Once generated these loadcases are standard load cases so you can include them in combinations in the normal manner.

Try to use engineering judgement to identify the critical loadcases so that the number of load combinations that need to be considered can be minimized.

Load Decomposition on to Roof and Wall Panels

Roof Panels

The direction of the one way decomposition of the wind zone loads to roof members is as specified by the span direction of the roof panel. All types of elements (except bracing and cold rolled members) are considered during the load decomposition.

Wall Panels

Wall load decomposition depends on the setting of the ‘DecomposeToMember’ wall panel parameter:

The default setting for this parameter is ‘No’ and results in nodal loads on the supporting members. This setting is generally appropriate to avoid lateral loads on simple beams.

Setting ‘DecomposeToMember’ to ‘Yes’ allows the generation of UDL's on portal stanchions and gable posts without the need to model side rails.

Irrespective of the setting of this parameter, the initial decomposition of wind zone loads to wall members is similar to the roof decomposition. Again all types of elements are considered except bracing and cold rolled members.

If ‘DecomposeToMember’ is set to ‘No’ a second decomposition stage is undertaken:

Full/partial UDLs and VDLs on elements (lengths of beams/columns between nodes) are distributed back to nodes as if the elements were simply supported at either end.

The final nodal load is the sum of all incoming element loads.

This second stage is always performed if the members supporting the wall are concrete walls, irrespective

This second stage is always performed if the members supporting the wall are concrete walls, irrespective of the ‘DecomposeToMember’ setting.

   

References

  • 1. ASCE/SEI 7-10. Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures. ASCE,

2010. ISBN: 978-0-7844-1085-1.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

  • 2. Kishor C. Mehta and James M. Delahay (2004). Guide to the Use of the Wind Load Provisions of ASCE 7-02. ASCE Press. ISBN: 0-7844-0703-7. British Standards Institution (25/04/05). Eurocode 1: Actions on structures - Part 1-4: General actions - Wind actions. BS EN 1991-1-4:2005.

  • 3. British Standards Institution (September 2008). UK National Annex to Eurocode 1: Actions on structures. NA to BS EN 1991-1-4:2005.

  • 4. British Standards Institution (July 2002). Loading for Buildings – Part 2: Code of practice for wind loads. BS6399-2:1997.

  • 5. British Standards Institution. Background information to the National Annex to BS EN 1991-1-4 and additional guidance. PD 6688 - 1-4:2009.

  • 6. Cook, N.J. Designers' Guide to EN 1991-1-4. Euro Code 1 : Actions on Structures, General Actions Part 1-4 : Wind actions. Thomas Telford, London. ISBN 978-0-7277-

3152-4.

  • 7. Cook, N.J. (1999). Wind Loading - a practical guide to BS 6399-2 Wind Loads on buildings. Thomas Telford, London. ISBN: 0 7277 2755 9.

  • 8. Bailey, C.G. (2003). Guide to Evaluating Design Wind Loads to BS6399-2:1997.SCI Publication P286.

  • 9. BREVe software package version 3. Copyright © 2009 CSC (UK) Ltd; BRE Ltd; Ordnance Survey.

Stability Requirements Handbook

Introduction to stability requirements

The analysis and design process has to allow for the differences between a theoretical mathematical model of a building and a more realistic representation. For example, buildings are not truly vertical when first built nor do they remain so when subject to load. These are called Stability Requirements and are from four sources:

  • 1. Global second-order effects to allow for deformation of the structure under load,

  • 2. Member second-order effects to allow for deformation of the members under load,

  • 3. Global imperfections - additional second order effects due to the structure not being built plumb and square,

  • 4. Member imperfections - additional second order effects due to initial lack of straightness of the member.

There are various methods of allowing for each of these and they can be different for steel and concrete. There is also some variation based on country code.

It will be found in the foregoing that,

Global second-order effects can be ignored when the building is 'non-sway' - the opposite being 'sway sensitive',

Member second-order effects can be ignored when the member is 'non-slender' (concrete) - the opposite being 'slender' - or is intrinsically allowed for in the design equations (steel),

Global imperfections are provided for by Notional Horizontal Forces

Member imperfections are allowed for directly in design (concrete) or is intrinsically allowed for in the design equations (steel).

Global second-order effects

Global second-order effects can be ignored when the building is 'non-sway', but must be considered if the building is 'sway sensitive'.

Choice of analysis type (BS)

First or second order analysis?

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

You have the choice of three analysis types on the Analysis page of the Design Options dialog. These are,

First-order (Elastic) analysis, Amplified forces (k amp ) method (uses first-order analysis), Second-order analysis.

First-order (Elastic) analysis

For both steel and concrete, first-order analysis is only acceptable providing that second order effects are small enough to be ignored. - see A practical approach to setting the analysis type.

Amplified forces (k amp ) method

Both steel and concrete can use the amplified forces method to determine second- order effects although for steel this does have restrictions on use (regular frameworks with λ cr > 4).

If the amplified forces method is selected you must also indicate which formula to use for determining the amplification factor,

If the structure is clad and if the stiffening effect of cladding is not taken into account explicitly:

k amp = λ cr /(1.15λ cr - 1.5)

If the structure is unclad or clad with a direct allowance made for the stiffening effect:

k amp = λ cr /(λ cr - 1)

During the design process for both steel and concrete members, the member end forces from the analysis of the lateral loadcases are amplified by the 'appropriate' value of k amp . Since the analysis is first-order this is carried out as part of summing the load effects from each loadcase (multiplied by their appropriate load factor given in the design combination). The 'appropriate' value is the worse of k amp,Dir1 and k amp,Dir2 based on the worst value of λ cr for all stacks in the building,

The k amp results are summarised for each column in both directions. These can be viewed as follows:

  • 1. Open a Review View, and select Tabular Data from the Review toolbar.

  • 2. Select ‘k amp ’ from the View Type drop list on the Review toolbar.

  • 3. The k amp results in both directions are tabulated for each column in the building.

Full second-order analysis

Full second-order analysis is not restricted to regular frameworks, but requires λ cr > 2. The accuracy of determination of the second-order effects for concrete structures is dependent upon a reasonable estimation of the concrete long term properties. This is a

Stability Requirements Handbook

significant issue for both the amplified forces method and second-order analysis. It is therefore important that appropriate member type specific modification factors have been specified - see Modification Factors.

A practical approach to setting the analysis type

Unless λ cr is greater than 10 (in which case second-order effects can be ignored), it is essential that your final design utilizes one of the second-order analysis approaches. During the initial sizing process you may however choose to run a first-order analysis. Proceeding in this way you can obtain sections and an overall building performance with which you are satisfied, before switching to P-analysis.

Note: If the rigorous second-order (P-) analysis approach is used during the initial sizing process, you may find that it can be more sensitive to parts of your model that lack stiffness.

The following approach to setting the analysis type is suggested:

  • 1. On the Analysis page of the Design Options dialog, initially set the analysis type to First-order analysis.

  • 2. Perform Design All (Gravity) using first-order analysis in order to size members for the gravity loads.

  • 3. Once the members are adequately sized for the gravity combinations obtain a figure for the building’s elastic critical load factor, λ cr (See: How do I assess the worst elastic critical load factor for the building?)

  • 4. If the λ cr that has been determined is greater than 10 you can continue to perform Design All (Static) with the analysis type set to First-order analysis.

  • 5. If λ cr is less than 10 you will need to proceed with one of the second-order approaches - and if it is very low (i.e. less than 2.0) some remodelling is required:

• Either, refine the design until λ cr is greater than 2.0 to make the structure suitable for a final design using the full second-order approach, (which is the only method permitted if the structure contains non-linear members such as tension only braces - see below),

Or, in order to use the amplified forces (k amp ) approach, refine the design further until λ cr is greater than 4.0.

  • 6. When a suitable λ cr has been achieved change the analysis type to the full second- order, or the amplified forces method as appropriate. (If the k amp approach is selected you must also indicate which formula to use for determining the amplification factor, This will depend on whether the structure is clad or not and if the cladding is taken into account explicitly or not.)

  • 7. With the analysis type still set to the full second-order, or the k amp approach perform Design All (Static).

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

If you use the k amp approach be aware that BS5950-1:2000 classes certain structures outside the scope of this method. e.g. tied portals, or structures containing tension only braces. For such structures, you would need to ensure that λ cr is greater than 2.0, and use the full second-order analysis approach for the static design.

Sway sensitivity assessment (BS)

Calculation of the elastic critical load factor

In order to determine whether a building is 'non-sway' or 'sway sensitive', Tekla Structural Designer calculates the elastic critical buckling load factor, λ cr . It is calculated in the same manner for steel and concrete. The approach adopted is that for each loadcase containing gravity loads (Dead, Imposed, Roof Imposed, Snow) a set of Notional Horizontal Forces (NHF) are determined. It uses 0.5% of the vertical load at the column node applied horizontally in two orthogonal directions separately (Direction 1 and Direction 2). From a first order analysis of the NHF loadcases the deflection at each storey node in every column is determined for both Direction 1 and Direction 2. The difference in deflection between the top and bottom of a given storey (storey drift) for all the loadcases in a particular combination along with the height of that storey provides a value of λ cr for that combination as follows,

λ cr =h/(200 * δ s ) Where h= the storey height

δ s =the storey drift in the appropriate direction (1 or 2) for the particular column under the current combination of loads

Note that within each column’s properties, a facility is provided to exclude particular column stacks from

Note that within each column’s properties, a facility is provided to exclude particular column stacks from the lambda crit check calculations to avoid spurious results associated with very small stack lengths.

   

How do I assess the worst elastic critical load factor for the building?

To determine the sway sensitivity for the building as a whole, the worst stack (storey) in the worst column throughout the building in both directions has to be identified - this can be done as follows:

  • 1. On completion of the analysis, open a Review View and select Tabular Data from the Review toolbar.

  • 2. Select ‘Sway’ from the View Type drop list on the Review toolbar.

  • 3. The elastic critical load factor in both directions (λ Dir1 & λ Dir2 ) is tabulated for each column in the building.

  • 4. Make a note of the smallest λ value from all of the columns in either direction.

Stability Requirements Handbook

If there are a lot of columns in the building - in order to quickly determine

If there are a lot of columns in the building - in order to quickly determine the smallest elastic critical load factor in each direction, simply click on the λDir1 header until the columns are arranged in increasing order of λDir1, then repeat for λDir2.

 

In BS 5950-1:2000 a building can be considered as 'non-sway' when λ cr ≥ 10 else it is 'sway sensitive' and (global) second-order effects must be taken into account.

Note however that you are not restricted in your choice of analysis type irrespective of the value of λ cr (it is your call, although we will warn you about it).

Twist

A ‘measure’ of twist is also tabulated for each column - this indicates the degree to which if you push the column one way, how much it moves orthogonally as well. If you have a building where the 'lateral load resisting system' is not well dispersed then pushing one way can cause significant movement in the other direction.

The twist is reported as a ratio of: distance moved in the direction of loading/absolute distance moved.

When a column node moves in X and Y then the 'total' deflection is SQRT( delta_x^2

When a column node moves in X and Y then the 'total' deflection is SQRT( delta_x^2 + delta_y^2) in other words the diagonal of the triangle and not either of the sides. So if a node moves say 10mm in X and 2mm in Y, its diagonal i.e. absolute deflection in this plane is SQRT(100 + 4) = 10.198. Hence its twist is what it should have been with just X loading i.e. 10mm divided into what it actually moved i.e. 10.198. So Twist = 1.0198.

 

Modification Factors

You specify the modification factors to be applied for each of the different materials from the Modification Factors page of the Analysis Options dialog. (which is located on the Analyse toolbar).

These factors also vary according to the member types, (and in the case of concrete members whether they are cracked or not).

For concrete members in particular, design codes can require that analysis stiffness adjustment factors are applied since the appropriate properties to use in analysis are load and time dependent.

For various other investigations it is also possible that you will want to apply an adjustment to material properties. One suggested example is the assessment of structures subject to corrosion. Another classic requirement in this regard relates to torsion, it is common engineering practice to assume that if it will work without assuming any torsional strength, then torsion can be ignored.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Although default modification factors for each material are provided in the settings sets to reflect the design code being worked to, you should check that these are appropriate for your particular analysis model.

If you make changes to any of these factors, analysis must be repeated.

Member second-order effects

These are dealt with as part of the design of members.

For steel this is incorporated in the design routines for all members (beams, columns, braces).

Similarly for concrete, much of the calculation is carried out as part of the design. However, in order to assess the 'effective length' of the member (columns and walls) the incoming members at the top and bottom of the column stack or wall panel are identified and their properties established.

Global imperfections

These are typically represented by the application of .

Member imperfections

Solver Model Handbook

This handbook looks at the solver models created during analysis and also considers specific properties and modelling techniques related to them.

Solver models

If you have performed more than one analysis type on the structure, then (providing the geometry and loading have not changed between runs), each solver model and set of results is retained. You can show results for each analysis type without having to re- analyse.

Changes to mesh size or uniformity do not constitute a change in the geometry. Hence, if different meshes have been applied for each analysis, you can review the different solver models by opening a Solver View and then choosing the model required from the right click menu.

Working Solver Model

The Working Solver Model shows the model in its form prior to any analysis.

Although 1D elements and solver nodes are displayed, 2D elements are not (even when you have chosen to mesh slabs/walls). This is because 2D elements are only formed at the point of analysis.

Solver Model used for 1st Order Linear

This solver model is in the form of a 3D Building Analysis model.

Any FE meshes in this solver model are formed using the mesh parameters in place for the most recent run of 1st order linear analysis.

If the analysis has yet to be run, the current mesh parameters are applied.

Running any other analysis type after changes to either geometry or loading will prevent you from displaying results for this model.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Results are still displayed for the ‘old’ solver model until the working solver model is updated

Results are still displayed for the ‘old’ solver model until the working solver model is updated to reflect the changes (by running an analysis). Changes to mesh size or uniformity do not cause the working solver model to be updated: consequently if you run an analysis with certain mesh parameters, then a second analysis type with different mesh parameters, both sets of results can be displayed.

   

3D Building Analysis model

Engineers Handbooks (BS) Results are still displayed for the ‘old’ solver model until the working solver

The 3D building analysis model consists a mix of 1D analysis elements and FE meshes as follows:

beams and columns are modelled as 1D analysis elements walls are either ‘mid-pier’ analysis elements, or FE meshes slabs (optionally) form rigid diaphragms in floors

Solver Model Handbook

1-way slabs have their loads decomposed on to supporting members at a preliminary stage of the analysis.

2-way slabs are (typically) not meshed, in which case they will also have their loads decomposed on to supporting members at a preliminary stage of the analysis - see:

Load decomposition 2-way slabs (optionally) can be meshed

Recommended for special cases, typically where slabs participate in the lateral load stability system, e.g. transfer slabs

supports are user defined

2-way slabs meshed

Optionally you can choose to mesh all 2-way slabs – making a fully meshed model (both walls and floors) possible.

This is generally not recommended as it will inevitably increase the model size, (and potentially the time to solve for large models), although it might be considered that a fully meshed model behaves more ‘correctly’ where slabs are considered to be part of the lateral load resisting system of the structure.

It is more likely that you will choose to mesh specific floor levels only (e.g. transfer levels), keeping other levels unmeshed.

Solver Model used for 1st Order Non Linear

This solver model is in the form of a 3D Building Analysis model.

Any FE meshes in this solver model are formed using the mesh parameters in place for the most recent run of 1st order non-linear analysis.

If the analysis has yet to be run, the current mesh parameters are applied. Running any other analysis type after changes to either geometry or loading will prevent you from displaying results for this model.

Results are still displayed for the ‘old’ solver model until the working solver model is updated

Results are still displayed for the ‘old’ solver model until the working solver model is updated to reflect the changes (by running an analysis). Changes to mesh size or uniformity do not cause the working solver model to be updated: consequently if you run an analysis with certain mesh parameters, then a second analysis type with different mesh parameters, both sets of results can be displayed.

   

Solver Model used for 2nd Order Linear

This solver model is in the form of a 3D Building Analysis model.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Any FE meshes in this solver model are formed using the mesh parameters in place for the most recent run of 2nd order linear analysis.

If the analysis has yet to be run, the current mesh parameters are applied. Running any other analysis type after changes to either geometry or loading will prevent you from displaying results for this model.

Results are still displayed for the ‘old’ solver model until the working solver model is updated

Results are still displayed for the ‘old’ solver model until the working solver model is updated to reflect the changes (by running an analysis). Changes to mesh size or uniformity do not cause the working solver model to be updated: consequently if you run an analysis with certain mesh parameters, then a second analysis type with different mesh parameters, both sets of results can be displayed.

   

Solver Model used for 2nd Order Non Linear

This solver model is in the form of a 3D Building Analysis model.

Any FE meshes in this solver model are formed using the mesh parameters in place for the most recent run of 2nd order non-linear analysis.

If the analysis has yet to be run, the current mesh parameters are applied. Running any other analysis type after changes to either geometry or loading will prevent you from displaying results for this model.

Results are still displayed for the ‘old’ solver model until the working solver model is updated

Results are still displayed for the ‘old’ solver model until the working solver model is updated to reflect the changes (by running an analysis). Changes to mesh size or uniformity do not cause the working solver model to be updated: consequently if you run an analysis with certain mesh parameters, then a second analysis type with different mesh parameters, both sets of results can be displayed.

   

Solver Model used for 1st Order Vibration

Any FE meshes in this solver model are formed using the mesh parameters in place for the most recent run of 1st order vibration analysis.

If the analysis has yet to be run, the current mesh parameters are applied.

Running any other analysis type after changes to either geometry or loading will prevent you from displaying results for this model.

Solver Model Handbook

Results are still displayed for the ‘old’ solver model until the working solver model is updated

Results are still displayed for the ‘old’ solver model until the working solver model is updated to reflect the changes (by running an analysis). Changes to mesh size or uniformity do not cause the working solver model to be updated: consequently if you run an analysis with certain mesh parameters, then a second analysis type with different mesh parameters, both sets of results can be displayed.

   

Solver Model used for 2nd Order Buckling

Any FE meshes in this solver model are formed using the mesh parameters in place for the most recent run of 2nd order buckling analysis.

If the analysis has yet to be run, the current mesh parameters are applied. Running any other analysis type after changes to either geometry or loading will prevent you from displaying results for this model.

Results are still displayed for the ‘old’ solver model until the working solver model is updated

Results are still displayed for the ‘old’ solver model until the working solver model is updated to reflect the changes (by running an analysis). Changes to mesh size or uniformity do not cause the working solver model to be updated: consequently if you run an analysis with certain mesh parameters, then a second analysis type with different mesh parameters, both sets of results can be displayed.

   

Solver model used for Grillage Chasedown

In grillage chasedown a 3D sub model is formed for each floor and the columns connected to it.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Engineers Handbooks (BS) The sub models are analysed sequentially for gravity loads, starting at the top

The sub models are analysed sequentially for gravity loads, starting at the top level and working down. Support reactions from each level are transferred to the level below.

Engineers Handbooks (BS) The sub models are analysed sequentially for gravity loads, starting at the top

Two-way slabs are only meshed in grillage sub-models at those levels where they have been set as meshed for 3D Building Analysis. For all other slabs Load decomposition is carried out prior to the analysis.

Solver model used for FE Chasedown

Solver Model Handbook

FE chasedown is similar to grillage chasedown, with 3D sub models being formed at each level; the one difference being that in the FE chasedown the two-way slabs are always meshed.

Solver Model Handbook FE chasedown is similar to grillage chasedown, with 3D sub models being formed

Refresh Solver Model

The solver model currently displayed is updated to reflect changes that have occurred in the working solver model since the last analysis. The 2D element mesh is also updated to reflect the current mesh parameters. Previous analysis results are also erased for this solver model.

Analysis objects

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

A separate solver model is created for each analysis type performed, each solver model consisting of analysis objects with properties that reflect those specified in the physical model.

Object

 

Description

Solver

A 1D analysis object created between two solver nodes.

element

Releasesare applied at the end of a solver element where these have been specified in the physical model

Rigid offsetsare applied at the ends of solver elements where required in order to make connections to other solver elements.

Rigid zones are optionally applied at the ends of solver elements to more accurately model the zone where two concrete members connect.

Two solver elements are created from each physical member (column stack, or beam span) so that

Two solver elements are created from each physical member (column stack, or beam span) so that a solver node exists at mid span/stack for the p-delta analysis.

Solver

Meshes of 2D finite elements are created in the solver

element 2D

models where they have been specified for concrete walls and 2 way spanning slabs.

Solver node

Solver nodes are created at defined points in a solver model on the basis of solver element and finite element connectivity.

Solver nodes are created at:

The ends and solver elements The corners of finite elements

Rigid

Optionally created from one way and two way slabs and

diaphragm

roof panels - in this type of diaphragm all the solver nodes in the plane of the diaphragm are constrained to move together in the plane of the diaphragm.

Semi-rigid

Optionally created from one way spanning slab panels only

diaphragm

- in this type of diaphragm all the solver nodes in the plane of the diaphragm are seed nodes of a quadrilateral/triangular finite element mesh.

In Tekla Structure Designer semi rigid diaphragms cannot be created from two way slabs.

In Tekla Structure Designer semi rigid diaphragms cannot be created from two way slabs.

Solver elements for concrete members

Solver Model Handbook

Concrete column physical and solver models

Concrete column physical model

A single concrete column can be created over several storey heights (stacks) and can start and finish at any level. Different column sections can be defined in each stack, and the column is not restricted to being co-linear between stacks.

The creation of continuous concrete columns in this way, (as opposed to defining a new column at each storey) does not have any significance for analysis or design purposes, but is ultimately important for detailing purposes.

The physical location of the column is a determined from the alignment snap points and offsets specified in the column properties, and the insertion point(s) picked.

Solver Model Handbook Concrete column physical and solver models Concrete column physical model A single concrete
For concrete columns the alignment snap points and offsets are structurally significant as they will also

For concrete columns the alignment snap points and offsets are structurally significant as they will also have an effect on the Concrete column solver elements.

 

Concrete column solver elements

The solver elements for each column stack are always located at the stack centroid - thus they do not necessarily coincide with the insertion line used to position the column

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

originally. If the centroid position shifts from one stack to the next a ‘rigid offset’ is created automatically to connect the solver elements. Similar rigid offsets are also created as required to connect incoming beams into the column centroids.

Engineers Handbooks (BS) originally. If the centroid position shifts from one stack to the next a
To see solver elements, solver nodes and rigid offsets: open a Solver View, and then in

To see solver elements, solver nodes and rigid offsets: open a Solver View, and then in Scene Content check ‘1D Elements> Geometry & RigidOffset’ and ‘Solver Nodes> Geometry’.

   

As a consequence of this method of modeling, you are freer to simplify the grid layout in order to create the structure more effectively, and then employ column offsets to position each column exactly, knowing that during analysis the program automatically assumes the column is located at its centroid as shown in the plan view.

Concrete beam physical and solver models

Concrete beam physical model

Concrete beam members consist of one or more beam spans. Although a single beam member is created, this does not prohibit different beam sections from being defined in each span.

Solver Model Handbook

The physical location of the beam is a determined from the alignment snap points and offsets specified in the beam properties, and the insertion points picked.

Solver Model Handbook The physical location of the beam is a determined from the alignment snap
For concrete beams:

For concrete beams:

  • - The minor snap points and offsets are structurally significant and have an effect on the Concrete beam solver elements.

 
  • - The major snap points and offsets are not structurally significant.

 

Concrete beam solver elements

In the minor direction beam solver elements are always located at the centre of each beam section - as beam widths or minor offsets may vary, this may result in the introduction of lateral ‘rigid offsets’ to make the connection between spans.

In the major direction beam solver elements are created at the same level as the insertion line used to position the beam.

Solver Model Handbook The physical location of the beam is a determined from the alignment snap

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

To see solver elements, solver nodes and rigid offsets: open a Solver View, and then in

To see solver elements, solver nodes and rigid offsets: open a Solver View, and then in Scene Content check ‘1D Elements> Geometry & RigidOffset’ and ‘Solver Nodes> Geometry’.

   

Rigid offsets

Rigid offsets are automatically applied to the start and end of solver elements as required to ensure that the analysis model is properly connected.

This will occur whenever Concrete beam solver elements or Concrete column solver elementsare not co-linear. A typical example of this occurs when concrete edge beams are aligned to be flush with the face of the supporting columns, as shown below:

To see rigid offsets: open a Solver View, and then in Scene Content ensure that ‘1D
To see rigid offsets: open a Solver View, and then in Scene Content ensure that
‘1D Elements> RigidOffsets’ is checked’.

Rigid zones

Design codes allow engineers to assume parts of concrete beams / columns are rigid, leading to more efficient designs.

Tekla Structural Designer uses Rigid Zones to cater for this where columns and beams are connected and where beams are connected to other beams.

Solver Model Handbook

Columns can have rigid zones when they are the supporting or supported member, but beams will

Columns can have rigid zones when they are the supporting or supported member, but beams will only have rigid zones when they are the supported member.

   

Application of Rigid Zones

In most situations in order to get an efficient design you would want rigid zones to be applied - however a Rigid zones not applied option is also provided in Model Settings for cases where you don’t want to use them.

For example, you might choose not to apply them if you encounter problems with short members and rigid zones which cannot be overcome by modifying the physical model.

When rigid zones are not applied, the position of releases in analysis model is affected, and member start and end points for design are also adjusted.

When applied, rigid zones are created at concrete column/beam connections. The proportion of the zone which is modelled as rigid (the thick black line shown below) is specified as a percentage, the remaining portion of the rigid zone (the red line inside the rigid zone) remains elastic. The proportion of the rigid zone that is rigid can vary between 0 - 100%

Solver Model Handbook Columns can have rigid zones when they are the supporting or supported member,

As shown above, the elastic portion of the rigid zone is aligned with the central span solver element.

There is a significant difference between Rigid Zones Not Applied and Rigid Zones Applied with 0% rigidity. The total elastic length of a member is the same in the two models, but the position of releases and start/end of design members will be different.

Rigid zones should not be confused with rigid offsets which are used to ensure that the analysis model is properly connected, i.e. it is possible to have rigid offsets in the model even if rigid zones are turned off.

Rigid Zones Example 1 - fixed ended beam

Consider the following 2 span beam supported on columns and loaded with a udl:

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Engineers Handbooks (BS) Rigid Zones Not Applied The analysis model is simply constructed from the solver

Rigid Zones Not Applied

The analysis model is simply constructed from the solver elements with rigid offsets applied as necessary to connect the beam solver elements to the column solver elements.

Engineers Handbooks (BS) Rigid Zones Not Applied The analysis model is simply constructed from the solver

Solver Model Handbook

The resulting beam bending moment diagram is as follows:

Solver Model Handbook The resulting beam bending moment diagram is as follows: Rigid Zones Applied (default

Rigid Zones Applied (default 50%)

Rigid Zones are activated via Model Settings, and this is also where the percentage of rigidity of the zones can be specified. Initially for this example it will be left at the default of 50%.

The revised solver model is as shown below, note the rigid zones that have been formed where the columns and beams connect:

Solver Model Handbook The resulting beam bending moment diagram is as follows: Rigid Zones Applied (default

The beam bending moment diagram for the revised model is as shown below.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Engineers Handbooks (BS) The above diagram was generated from a Results View to illustrate that a
The above diagram was generated from a Results View to illustrate that a ‘gap’ is formed

The above diagram was generated from a Results View to illustrate that a ‘gap’ is formed in the diagram where there are rigid zones. It should be noted that when the same result is displayed in a Load Analysis View the gap is removed, leaving only the non-rigid length of the member displayed.

 

We might expect the extra stiffness introduced at the supports to increase the hogging moments and reduce the sagging moments, however because the element end forces are now reported at the rigid zone boundaries (rather than the ends of the solver elements) - in this example the main effect is that the hogging moment over the central column support is substantially reduced.

Rigid Zones Applied (100%)

To investigate the effect of the percentage rigidity an additional run is made with the percentage rigidity increased to 100%. The bending moment diagram that results is shown below:

Engineers Handbooks (BS) The above diagram was generated from a Results View to illustrate that a

As expected the extra stiffness introduced at the supports increases the hogging moments and reduce the sagging moments in comparison to the run at 50%.

Rigid Zones Applied (0%)

If the percentage rigidity is reduced to 0% the bending moment is as shown below:

Solver Model Handbook

Solver Model Handbook If this result is compared to the run in which rigid zones were

If this result is compared to the run in which rigid zones were not applied, it is clear that although the sagging moments are identical, the hogging moments that are reported are not the same. This is because, although the total elastic length of a member is the same in the two models, the position of the start and end of design members is different (being taken at the rigid zone boundaries when applied).

Rigid Zones Example 2 - pin ended beam

When rigid zones are applied to a pin ended member, the end release is shifted from the end of the solver element to the rigid zone boundary.

To illustrate this effect the model illustrated in Rigid Zones Example 1 - fixed ended beamis modified to have pinned connections introduced at the two remote ends of the beam.

Rigid Zones Not Applied

The analysis model is constructed from the solver elements with rigid offsets applied to connect the beam and column solver elements. Releases are formed at the two remote ends of the beam solver elements.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Engineers Handbooks (BS) The beam bending moment diagram is as follows: Rigid Zones Applied (0%) For

The beam bending moment diagram is as follows:

Engineers Handbooks (BS) The beam bending moment diagram is as follows: Rigid Zones Applied (0%) For

Rigid Zones Applied (0%)

For comparison, rigid zones are then introduced, (with 0% rigidity in order to keep the total elastic length of the beams the same in both models).

Because the releases are moved to the rigid zone boundaries, this has the effect of reducing the moments in the beams.

Engineers Handbooks (BS) The beam bending moment diagram is as follows: Rigid Zones Applied (0%) For

Solver Model Handbook

Solver elements for steel and other materials

Steel column physical and solver models

Steel column physical model

A single steel column can be created over several storey heights (stacks) and can start and finish at any level. Different column sections can be defined in each stack, (provided a splice is defined at the change point).

Each steel column stack is placed on an insertion line between points, but its geometry is drawn to reflect the major and minor snap points (and any offsets) specified in the column properties.

Major snap and offset

Solver Model Handbook Solver elements for steel and other materials Steel column physical and solver models

Minor snap and offset

Solver Model Handbook Solver elements for steel and other materials Steel column physical and solver models
The alignment snap points and offsets have no effect on the Steel column solver elements .

The alignment snap points and offsets have no effect on the Steel column solver elements.

 

Steel column solver elements

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Each steel column solver element is created between its insertion points. Its position NOT being affected by major and minor snap points or offsets.

Column solver model example

Consider the two stack column shown in the Structure View below. The same alignment (major snap: bottom, minor snap: left) has been applied to both stacks, but the section size reduces. Consequently, although the insertion lines for the two stacks are co-linear, the centroids of the two sections are not co-linear.

Engineers Handbooks (BS) Each steel column solver element is created between its insertion points. Its position

In the Solver View it can be seen that the solver elements for each stack are co-linear, (coinciding with the insertion lines).

Solver Model Handbook

Solver Model Handbook This is different to the approach adopted for a Concrete column solver elements
This is different to the approach adopted for a Concrete column solver elements (in which the

This is different to the approach adopted for a Concrete column solver elements (in which the alignment snap points and offsets are structurally significant).

   

Steel beam physical and solver models

Steel beam physical model

Steel beam members can be defined as single span, or continuous over multiple spans. If continuous, although a single beam member is created, this does not prohibit different beam sections from being defined in each span.

Each steel beam span is placed on an insertion line between points, but its geometry is drawn to reflect:

the major and minor snap points (and any offsets) specified in the beam properties. the level ‘type’ specified in the construction level dialog

Major snap and offset

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Engineers Handbooks (BS) Minor snap and offset Construction level ‘type’ 52

Minor snap and offset

Engineers Handbooks (BS) Minor snap and offset Construction level ‘type’ 52

Construction level ‘type’

Solver Model Handbook

Solver Model Handbook • When the level type is set to T.O.S (top of steel), each

When the level type is set to T.O.S (top of steel), each beam is displayed according to the alignment snap points and offsets specified.

When the level type is set to S.S.L (structural slab level), each beam is in addition lowered by the slab thickness specified in the construction level dialog.

The alignment snap points and offsets and the construction level type have no effect on the

The alignment snap points and offsets and the construction level type have no effect on the Steel beam solver elements.

 

Steel beam solver elements

Each steel beam solver element is created between its insertion points. Its position NOT being affected by:

major and minor snap points and offsets the level ‘type’ specified in the construction level dialog the section size

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Engineers Handbooks (BS) This is a different approach to that adopted for a Concrete beam solver
This is a different approach to that adopted for a Concrete beam solver elements .

This is a different approach to that adopted for a Concrete beam solver elements.

 
To see solver elements and solver nodes: open a Solver View, and then in Scene Content

To see solver elements and solver nodes: open a Solver View, and then in Scene Content check ‘1D Elements> Geometry’ and ‘Solver Nodes> Geometry’.

 

Steel brace physical and solver models

Steel braces are single span members with pinned end connections, that are only able to resist axial compression and tension.

Element loads can not be applied directly to the brace itself and moments due to self weight loading are ignored.

Steel brace physical model

Solver Model Handbook

Each steel brace is placed on an insertion line between points, with its geometry being drawn to reflect the major and minor snap points (and any offsets) specified in the brace properties.

The alignment snap points and offsets have no effect on the Steel brace solver elements .

The alignment snap points and offsets have no effect on the Steel brace solver elements.

 

Steel brace solver elements

Each steel brace solver element is created between its insertion points. Its position NOT being affected by:

major and minor snap points and offsets the section size

Inactive steel braces

Individual steel braces can be made inactive in the solver model by unchecking the ‘Active’ box in the brace properties.

Tension only and compression only braces

Once a steel brace has been placed its properties can be edited if required to specify that it is ‘Tension only’ or ‘Compression only’.

Tension only and Compression only members are non-linear elements and therefore require non-linear analysis. If linear

Tension only and Compression only members are non-linear elements and therefore require non-linear analysis. If linear analysis is performed they will be treated as linear elements.

 

Input method for A and V Braces

A and V Braces should be modeled using special tools which can be found on the 'Steel Brace' drop list in the 'Steel' section on the 'Model' tab.

Although it is also possible to model the exact same brace arrangement using individual elements created using the simple 'Steel Brace' command, it is important to note that whilst the Notional Loads \ EHFs (Equivalent Horizontal Forces) calculated for models built using the A or V Brace tools are correct, this is not the case when the A or V braces are built up out of individual brace members. In this latter case, elements of the vertical loads that are supported by the bracing system are 'lost' and are not included in the Notional Load \ EHF calculations with the result that the calculated Notional Loads \ EHFs are not correct.

Solver elements for concrete walls

Concrete wall physical model

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Concrete walls can be created over several storey heights, and can start and finish at any level. Although a single wall is created, this does not prohibit different thicknesses from being defined in each panel, (in which case the panels will be set back on one or both faces, depending on the alignment that has been specified).

The creation of continuous wall in this way, (as opposed to defining a new wall at each storey) does not have any significance for analysis or design purposes, but is ultimately important for detailing purposes.

The physical location of the wall is a determined from the alignment and offsets specified in the wall properties, and the insertion points picked.

For walls the alignment and offsets are not structurally significant as they will have no effect

For walls the alignment and offsets are not structurally significant as they will have no effect on the solver model.

   
Engineers Handbooks (BS) Concrete walls can be created over several storey heights, and can start and

Concrete wall solver model

The types of solver element created will depend on whether a meshed or mid-pier model is selected.

Solver Model Handbook

For both model types, horizontal ‘wall beam’ solver elements are introduced are mainly to collect slab mesh nodes and line elements. For meshed walls this allows the wall meshing to be independent of slab meshing.

Solver elements for each wall panel are always located along the insertion line used to position the wall originally, irrespective of any alignment offsets that have been specified.

Meshed concrete wall solver model

To see solver elements, solver nodes and 2D elements: open a Solver View, and then in
To see solver elements, solver nodes and 2D elements: open a Solver View, and
then in Scene Content check ‘1D Elements> Geometry’, ‘2D Elements>
Geometry’ and ‘Solver Nodes> Geometry’.

Midpier concrete wall solver model

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Engineers Handbooks (BS) Wall openings and extensions Concrete wall openings Limitations of wall openings 1. If

Wall openings and extensions

Concrete wall openings

Limitations of wall openings

  • 1. If you have specified a door or window opening in a wall panel you must model the wall using FE elements, otherwise a ‘Walls with openings have a mid-pier’ validation error is displayed and the analysis will not proceed.

  • 2. Assuming the wall has been modelled using FE elements, the analysis will still not proceed if you have applied a wind wall panel over the top of the wall. In this situation a ‘Panel is not surrounded by load carrying members’ validation error is displayed. This error can only be cleared by deleting the openings from the affected walls.

  • 3. Given that the analysis has been able to complete; a ‘Panel contains openings - these are ignored in design’ warning will always be issued when a wall containing openings is designed. When you encounter this warning, as well as taking stock of the design implications; you need also to consider if the analysis model is appropriate, as potentially it may not reflect your original intention. In certain situations the Alternative model for wall openings may prove to be a better solution.

Solver Model Handbook

Analysis model applied to meshed wall panels with openings

If an opening is introduced in a meshed wall, the properties of the ‘lintel’ wall beam directly above the opening are automatically adjusted in order to prevent the panel being unrealistically stiff. The adjustments that are applied are as follows:

wall beam properties in the lintel use the lintel depth (h 2 ), rather than the panel depth (h 1 )

Solver Model Handbook Analysis model applied to meshed wall panels with openings If an opening is

wall beam nodes in the lintel are removed from the slab diaphragm

Solver Model Handbook Analysis model applied to meshed wall panels with openings If an opening is

Modeling in this way the lintel becomes less stiff resulting in improved wall results when subject to gravity and lateral loading.

Alternative model for wall openings

If the presence of an opening would form a beam like strip above or below the opening, you are advised to create separate wall panels to each side of the opening and then model the strip between the panels with a connecting beam ('coupling beam').

This method can be demonstrated by considering the below example, consisting of a two storey wall with a large opening at each level.

If the openings were to be created as a window and door the resulting model would be as shown:

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Engineers Handbooks (BS) However, by separating the wall into discrete panels and inserting coupling beams you

However, by separating the wall into discrete panels and inserting coupling beams you obtain an alternative model as below:

Solver Model Handbook

Solver Model Handbook Such an idealisation enables the panels either side of the openings to be

Such an idealisation enables the panels either side of the openings to be designed for their respective forces and enables the strips between the openings to be designed as beams.

Of course, this approach will require some additional detailing, but that would have been the case anyway had the openings been added and subsequently ignored by the design.

Concrete wall extensions

Use of concrete wall extensions

Wall extensions (End 1/End 2) are applied in order to remove physical overlaps with adjoining walls and columns without compromising the integrity of the underlying analysis model.

Negative extensions can be created automatically where appropriate. Extensions can also be defined manually if required, in which case they can be input with either positive or negative values:

A positive extension extends the wall length beyond its insertion point. A negative extension trims the wall back from the insertion point.

The example below shows the effect of a positive extension at end 1 and a negative extension at end 2.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Engineers Handbooks (BS) Although the length of the wall used in the analysis model (L )

Although the length of the wall used in the analysis model (L wall ) is unchanged, the wall length that is used in the design, quantity reporting and drawings changes to L wall,d

Concrete wall extension examples

The view below illustrates some examples where wall extensions can be applied.

Solver Model Handbook

Solver Model Handbook 1. Where wall end does not match architectural grid - not created automatically.
  • 1. Where wall end does not match architectural grid - not created automatically.

Although this case could be catered for by using construction lines, it is both quicker to create and easier to edit by manually applying wall extensions.

  • 2. Where wall end overlaps a column - a negative extension can be applied automatically.

  • 3. Where two wall ends meet - a negative extension can be applied automatically.

  • 4. Where a wall end meets another wall part way along its length- a negative extension can be applied automatically.

Wall and column overlap

Consider case 2 above, where the wall ends overlap the columns.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Engineers Handbooks (BS) If negative extensions are not automatically applied you will see an overlap of

If negative extensions are not automatically applied you will see an overlap of the wall with the columns (as shown on the left). Potentially you could attempt to ‘fix’ this by creating extra construction lines or grids on the faces of the columns and then reinsert the wall between the faces. Although this looks better, the analysis model shown below is poor as the wall panels are dis-continuous and poorly connected to the columns.

Engineers Handbooks (BS) If negative extensions are not automatically applied you will see an overlap of

If negative wall extensions are employed instead, the analysis model is much better.

Wall overlaps with another wall Solver Model Handbook Now consider cases 3 and 4 in the

Wall overlaps with another wall

Solver Model Handbook

Now consider cases 3 and 4 in the case study, where two walls overlap.

Wall overlaps with another wall Solver Model Handbook Now consider cases 3 and 4 in the

If negative extensions are not automatically applied you will see the overlap of walls (as shown above left). The main problem with this is that from a design point of view the concrete overlaps would result in a duplication of reinforcement in the overlapped areas.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Potentially you could attempt to ‘fix’ this by creating extra construction line or grid on the right hand face of the vertical wall and then reinsert the horizontal walls to this new line (as shown above right). Although this looks better, the analysis model shown below is very poor. The wall panels are completely disconnected from each other, this model will not resist lateral load in anything like the same way.

Engineers Handbooks (BS) Potentially you could attempt to ‘fix’ this by creating extra construction line or

However by once again employing negative wall extensions, the overlaps are removed from the design whilst still retaining the correct analysis model.

Engineers Handbooks (BS) Potentially you could attempt to ‘fix’ this by creating extra construction line or

Releases

End releases are applied by editing member properties in the physical model. They cannot be edited directly in solver views.

Column Releases

Solver Model Handbook

The fixity at the top and bottom of each column stack can be set as:

Free end - only applicable to the top end of top-most stack and the bottom end of the bottom-most stack

Fixed - in both directions (i.e. encastré, all degrees of freedom fixed)

Pinned - in both directions (i.e. a pinned connection is created between the stack above and the stack below)

User defined - (i.e. fixed in one direction but pinned in the other)

User Defined

The User defined option (i.e. pinned in one direction but fixed in the other) is not available in the Properties Window and can only be specified as follows:

  • 1. Right click the column to display the context menu.

  • 2. Choose Edit

  • 3. From the Column Property Dialog open the Releases page and choose the stack to edit.

  • 4. Uncheck the My or Mz degree of freedom at the desired end as required.

Wall Releases

Walls can be released about the minor axis at the top and bottom of each panel as follows:

Fixed - Encastré, all degrees of freedom fixed.

Continuous (incoming members pinned) - A fully fixed connection is created between the wall panel above and the wall panel below. Incoming members and incoming slabs are pinned to the wall.

Pinned - A pinned connection is created between the wall panel above and the wall panel below.

The ‘Pinned’ option should be used with caution as it may result in a mechanism during

The ‘Pinned’ option should be used with caution as it may result in a mechanism during the analysis.

   

Beam Releases

Releases at the two ends of a beam span can be set as follows:

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Fully fixed (free end) - Denotes a cantilever end. It is achieved by checking the ‘Free end’ box. (In a single span beam this box can only be checked if the opposite end is fully fixed.)

Pin - Pinned to the support or supporting member. This means pinned about the major and minor axes of the section but fixed torsionally.

Moment - Major axis moment connection, and pinned about the minor axis. Fully fixed - Encastré, all degrees of freedom fixed.

Continuous - This setting is automatically applied when a continuous beam is created and effectively creates a non-editable fully fixed connection between the spans of the continuous member. The connection can only be edited by splitting the beam.

User defined - This setting appears if the connection is pinned for major axis bending (My released) but remains fixed for minor axis bending (Mz).

In addition to the above release options you are also able to apply a torsional release at either end by checking the appropriate box. Similarly an axial release can be applied to beams of all materials apart form concrete.

User Defined

The User defined option is not available in the Properties Window and can only be specified as follows:

  • 1. Right click the beam to display the context menu.

  • 2. Choose Edit

  • 3. From the Beam Property Dialog open the Releases page.

  • 4. Check the Mz and uncheck the My degree of freedom at the desired end as required.

Brace Releases

Braces can only be connected to supports or to the supporting structure via pinned connections. A torsional release can be applied at one end if required. If the brace connects into a beam (e.g. an A brace) an axial end release can be specified at one end to prevent vertical load from the beam being carried by the brace.

An option is provided to include force eccentricity moment.

Supports

Solver Model Handbook

Columns and walls have supports automatically placed underneath them, unless they are placed directly upon existing elements which provide a means of support (e.g. transfer beams or transfer slabs).

Supports can also be placed manually at other locations.

If the default supports are inappropriate, they can be changed, simply by box selecting the supports that require editing and then adjusting the support degrees of freedom displayed in the Properties Window.

Supports can be edited in both physical model views and solver model views.

Support degrees of freedom

Each support has six possible degrees of freedom:

translational (Fx, Fy, and Fz) rotational (Mx, My, and Mz)

Wall supports and manually placed supports default to fully fixed, whereas column supports default to being rotationally free in Mx & My.

The options for a support that is rotationally free in Mx or My are:

Release Spring Linear Spring Non-linear Nominally pinned Nominally fixed

The options for a support that is rotationally free in Mz are:

Release Spring Linear Spring Non-linear

The options for a support that is translationally free in Fx, Fy, or Fz are:

Release Spring Linear Spring Non-linear

Non linear spring supports

For non-linear supports, two spring stiffnesses are required one each for the positive and negative direction of action.

In addition an upper limit should be defined to set a cap on the force or moment that can be supported.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Compression only ground spring

A compression only ground spring would be defined translationally in z only as follows:

Type: Spring Non-Linear Stiffness -ve: 0 Fmax -ve (tension): 0 Stiffness -+e: your choice of ground spring stiffness value Fmax +ve (compression): your choice of capacity

Partial fixity of column bases

Two additional types of rotational linear spring are provided to allow partial fixity to be modelled, these are:

Nominally pinned Nominally fixed

These are specifically provided for supports under columns (of any material), but will result in a validation error if placed under walls (meshed or mid-pier), or if they are used for any other supports.

The support stiffness is based on the column properties (E*I/L) E = Young’s Modulus of the column I = relevant bending stiffness (Ixx or Iyy) of the column

L = distance from the support to the first column point (stack) that is on a Construction Level checked as a Floor in the Levels dialogue, i.e. combined length of all the stacks until a floor is found.

Where no Floor has been defined above a support then L is taken as total length

Where no Floor has been defined above a support then L is taken as total length of column.

   

Partial fixity spring stiffness is thus calculated as follows for each of the two bending releases Mx and My:

Nominally pinned (spring stiffness) - x% * 4 * E*I/L (default x% = 10%) Nominally fixed (spring stiffness) - x% * 4 * E*I/L (default x% = 100%)

Solver Model Handbook

Solver Model Handbook Since the spring stiffness is dependent upon stack height and column stiffness (E

Since the spring stiffness is dependent upon stack height and column stiffness (E and I), the spring stiffness will change if any changes are made to column stack height, column E or I values.

In addition, since for steel, Auto Design can change the column size (and hence I value) the spring stiffness will change with any change in column size.

Rigid diaphragms

In a typical building lateral resistance is provide at a few discrete points and it is assumed that applied lateral loads will be distributed to the lateral load resisting systems via floor diaphragm action. Within Tekla Structural Designer rigid diaphragm modeling is achieved using diaphragm constraints.

A diaphragm constraint will maintain exact relative positioning of all nodes that it constrains, i.e. the distance between any two nodes constrained by a diaphragm will never change, therefore no axial load will develop in any member that lies in the plane of a diaphragm between any two constrained nodes.

Static Analysis and Design Handbook

This handbook describes the automated processes that take place when you perform a static analysis and design of your building.

Definitions

Various terms referred to in the analysis-design processes are listed below:

Term

Head Code

Description

Braced

All

The member contributes little or no stiffness to the lateral load resisting system (LLRS).

Bracing

All

The member is part of the LLRS.

Drift

All

The absolute horizontal deflection of a column or the relative deflection of two floors within a building when it is usually called ‘interstorey drift’.

Elastic critical buckling load factor

BS

Determined from a sway stability analysis and used to determine the sway sensitivity of the structure.

First-order analysis

All

Linear elastic analysis that takes no account of the effect on the forces due to deformations of the structure.

Non slender

All

The member length is sufficiently small that flexural (strut) buckling is unlikely to occur, second-order effects (P- δ) are small enough to ignore and, in the limit, the full squash load can be realized.

Non-sway

All

The global second-order effects (P- Δ) are small enough to be ignored.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Notional Horizontal Forces

BS

NHF's are calculated as 0.5% of vertical Dead and Imposed loads. These are sometimes referred to as Notional Loads.

P-Delta analysis

BS

Analysis that allows for the presence of second-order effects - referred to in this documentation as Second-order analysis, either:

· by using the Amplified Forces Method, (Kamp) or

· by a rigorous method using a two step iterative approach.

Slender

All

The member length is of such magnitude that member second-order effects (P- δ) must be taken into account and flexural buckling will be the failure mode.

Sway sensitive

All

The global second-order effects are significant and must be taken into account.

Summary of Static Analysis-Design Processes

Members can be pre-sized for gravity combinations by running Design (Gravity), but a design that satisfies the code requirements can only be achieved by running Design (Static).

Irrespective of whether you run Design Steel (Static), Design Concrete (Static), or Design All (Static), the same basic steps are required:

The below analysis-design processes run from start to finish without user intervention - you should therefore

The below analysis-design processes run from start to finish without user intervention - you should therefore ensure ‘Design Options’ are configured correctly before they are initiated.

 

No.

Process

Description

Exclusions

1

Model validation

Run to detect any design issues which might exist.

 

2

Load

Decomposition of slab loads on to

 

decomposition

supporting members.

Static Analysis and Design Handbook

3

Global

Notional Horizontal Forces are

 

imperfections

determined to cater for global imperfections (additional second order effects due to the structure not being built plumb and square). They are also used in seismic design to establish the base shears.

4

Pattern Loading

Continuous Beam Lines are formed and then load patterns established.

 

5

3D Building

A traditional frame analysis of the

 

Analysis

entire 3D model, with an option to mesh floors.

6

Grillage

Requirements: Only performed if

Not performed for:

Chasedown

concrete members exist.

Design Steel

Analysis

For a series of 3D sub models each containing the members between two horizontal planes, floors only being meshed at those levels where they have also been meshed in 3D Building Analysis. The complete series of models is chased down from top to bottom so loads are carried from the level above to the level below.

(Gravity) Design Steel (Static)

7

FE Chasedown

Requirements: Only performed if two-

Not performed for:

Analysis

way slabs exist.

Design Steel

For a series of 3D sub models each containing the members between two horizontal planes with fully meshed floors. The complete series of models is chased down from top to bottom so loads are carried from the level above to the level below. The results are always used for slab design and optionally used for beam, column and wall design.

(Gravity) Design Steel (Static)

8

Sway sensitivity

Sway sensitivity is checked and design forces amplified automatically if required.

 

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

9

Member design

Member design is performed

Not performed:

according to the selected analysis- design process.

Concrete slab design

Steel members and concrete walls only

Concrete members and walls only Steel and concrete members and walls For:

Gravity combinations only, or All combinations

10

Design Review

At the end of the combined analysis- design process the pass/fail status and utilisation ratio of each beam, column and wall can be reviewed graphically.

 

Model validation

Validation is a check on your structure which must be performed before it can be analysed and designed. Validation checks all elements in your structure for a wide range of conditions. If any condition is not satisfied then Tekla Structural Designer tells you. Two types of validation message can be displayed.

Errors

Error messages prevent the analysis from continuing until appropriate corrective action is taken.

Warnings

Although warning messages do not prevent the analysis process from continuing, it is very important that these messages are reviewed to decide whether any action is warranted.

In the combined analysis-design process, model validation is followed by Load decomposition

Load decomposition

Static Analysis and Design Handbook

Load decomposition of slab loads on to supporting members is performed where necessary, prior to analysis. It is not restricted to beam and slab models, as it is also useful for decomposing flat slab loads onto columns.

Whether decomposition is performed or not will depend on the analysis model, the slab properties and the mesh setting.

1 way slab loads are always decomposed for each analysis model considered.

2 way slab loads are decomposed for 3D building analysis and grillage chasedown models unless the option to Mesh 2-way Slabs in 3D Analysis has been applied.

2 way slab loads are not decomposed for the FE chasedown model

Static Analysis and Design Handbook Load decomposition of slab loads on to supporting members is performed

1-way slab load decomposition

The loads on one-way slabs are always decomposed prior to analysis, (irrespective of the analysis model type).

2-way slab load decomposition

In the 3D building analysis and grillage chasedown models, whether the loads on two- way slabs are decomposed or not will depend on the mesh setting:

By default 2-way slabs are not meshed in the building model, in which case the loads on two-way slabs are always decomposed prior to analysis.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

If the ‘Mesh 2-way slabs in 3D Analysis’ option has been checked, it is then not necessary to decompose the loads on two-way slabs prior to analysis.

FE chasedown is the only analysis type for which 2-way slab load decomposition is never required prior to analysis.

In those cases where two-way slab decomposition is required, a separate decomposition model is formed at each floor level.

Engineers Handbooks (BS) • If the ‘Mesh 2-way slabs in 3D Analysis’ option has been checked,

A sophisticated FE (rather than yield-line) model is applied, which caters for irregular slabs, openings and any loading.

In the combined analysis-design process, load decomposition is followed by Global imperfections

Global imperfections

Following a first-order analysis of all gravity loadcases, the forces at the nodes at the top/bottom of each column stack/wall panel are resolved vertically. A proportion of the vertical load is determined which gives the value of the horizontal load at each point. The proportion is code dependent.

These horizontal loads are applied to the nodes in a particular direction (Direction 1 or Direction 2 or both) as specified in an individual design combination.

In the combined analysis-design process, equivalent horizontal force application is followed by Pattern Loading

Pattern Loading

Static Analysis and Design Handbook

If combinations of pattern load exist then the pattern loading is automatically generated prior to analysis.

In the combined analysis-design process, pattern loading is followed by 3D Building Analysis

3D Building Analysis

A traditional frame analysis of the complete structure is always the first analysis performed. This analysis generates a first set of results for the design of beams, columns and walls.

First Order or Second Order Analysis

You can control whether a first, or a second order 3D Building Analysis is run by making the appropriate selection on the Analysis page of the Design Options dialog. The actual options that are presented will vary depending on the design code being worked to.

Linear or Non Linear Analysis

The choice of linear or non-linear analysis is made automatically:

if the model has entirely linear properties a linear analysis is performed, else if any non-linear properties are detected a non-linear analysis is performed.

In the combined analysis-design process, 3D Building Analysis is followed by Grillage Chasedown Analysis

Grillage Chasedown Analysis

We know from experience that 3D building analysis on its own does not give the gravity results engineers have traditionally used or want - staged construction analysis reduces but doesn’t resolve this. Therefore, the combined analysis design process will also automatically undertake a grillage chasedown analysis. (provided concrete beams exist).

The Solver model used for Grillage Chasedown emulates a traditional analysis and establishes an alternative second set of design forces for beams, columns and walls.

It is important to note however that the chasedown analysis procedure is only valid for gravity loads. The chasedown analysis results for any lateral loading case (wind / seismic ELF / EHF) or from the direct analysis of any combination that includes a lateral loading case are not valid.

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Therefore in order to generate the design forces mentioned above, the chasedown analysis results are merged with the building analysis combination results as follows:

  • 1. Start with the building analysis combination result

  • 2. Identify all gravity cases used in the combination and the relevant load factor

  • 3. For each included gravity loadcase:

Subtract the 1st order linear building analysis result multiplied by the relevant load factor

Add the chasedown result multiplied by the relevant load factor

  • 4. For results with Imposed load reduction, subtract the relevant % of the chasedown result for each reducible loadcase.

Following this procedure means that chasedown analysis of lateral loading cases or combinations is not required.

This procedure is only applied to beam, column, and wall-line results, but not to 2D nodal

This procedure is only applied to beam, column, and wall-line results, but not to 2D nodal results. For this reason it is not possible to calculate or display 2D element chasedown results for combinations that include lateral load cases.

 

In the combined analysis-design process, grillage chasedown analysis will either be

followed by FE Chasedown Analysis (if it is required), or by an assessment of Sway sensitivity

FE Chasedown Analysis

The Solver model used for FE Chasedown is generated as part of the combined analysis

and design process if the model contains flat slabs, or slabs on beams - the results from this analysis being required for the design of these slabs.

The same results can also be used to generate a third set of design forces for the chosen member types, (provided you have chosen in the Design Options dialog to design the concrete beams, columns, or walls for FE Chasedown results).

Engineers Handbooks (BS) Therefore in order to generate the design forces mentioned above, the chasedown analysis

It is important to note however that the chasedown analysis procedure is only valid for gravity loads. The chasedown analysis results for any lateral loading case (wind / seismic ELF / EHF) or from the direct analysis of any combination that includes a lateral loading case are not valid.

Therefore in order to generate the design forces mentioned above, the chasedown analysis results are merged with the building analysis combination results as follows:

Static Analysis and Design Handbook

  • 1. Start with the building analysis combination result

  • 2. Identify all gravity cases used in the combination and the relevant load factor

  • 3. For each included gravity loadcase:

Subtract the 1st order linear building analysis result multiplied by the relevant load factor

Add the chasedown result multiplied by the relevant load factor

  • 4. For results with Imposed load reduction, subtract the relevant % of the chasedown result for each reducible loadcase.

Following this procedure means that chasedown analysis of lateral loading cases or combinations is not required.

This procedure is only applied to beam, column, and wall-line results, but not to 2D nodal

This procedure is only applied to beam, column, and wall-line results, but not to 2D nodal results. For this reason it is not possible to calculate or display 2D element chasedown results for combinations that include lateral load cases.

 

A significant consideration when opting to design for the FE chasedown results is that the slabs will tend to carry a significant proportion of the load direct to the columns.

Consequently, for beam design in particular, it is unlikely that an FE chasedown could result in a more critical set of design forces than would be already catered for by the Grillage chasedown.

If duplicate levels have been specified in the Construction Levels dialog separate sub models are created

If duplicate levels have been specified in the Construction Levels dialog separate sub models are created and analysed for the source and every duplicate level. This ensures that the increasing load carried by the vertical members in the lower sub models is catered for. In turn this can cause small differences in the analysis results (and consequently the design) for these sub models.

   

In the combined analysis-design process, FE chasedown analysis is followed by an assessment of Sway sensitivity

Sway sensitivity

In order to determine whether the structure is 'non-sway' or 'sway sensitive', the elastic critical load factor is calculated.

If the structure is determined as 'non-sway', first-order analysis results can be used for both steel and concrete design.

If it is 'sway sensitive' then (global) second-order effects must be taken into account, either by:

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

amplified forces method (uses first-order analysis), second-order analysis.

Both steel and concrete can use the amplified forces method to determine second- order effects although for steel this does have restrictions on use (regular frameworks with α cr > 3). Full second-order analysis is preferred for steelwork and can also be used for concrete.

In the combined analysis-design process, sway sensitivity is followed by Member design

Member design

The final step in the combined analysis-design process is member design for all members for all available sets of design forces.

Steel Member Design Forces

The 3D Building Analysis results are the only results set used in steel member design.

Concrete Member Design Forces

Engineers Handbooks (BS) • amplified forces method (uses first-order analysis), • second-order analysis. Both steel and

Up to three sets of analysis results will exist for concrete member design as follows:

3D Building Analysis results will always be used to design all beams, columns and walls. Grillage Chasedown results will exist for gravity loadcases if the model contains any concrete beams, in which case they will also be used to design all beams, columns and walls.

Static Analysis and Design Handbook

FE Chasedown results for gravity loadcases will also exist if the model contains 2- way spanning slabs. Concrete beams can be designed for this set of results by checking the ‘Design Beams for FE Chasedown analysis results’ box under Design > Design Options > Concrete > Beam > General Parameters

Columns and walls can also be designed for this set of results by checking similar boxes on their respective General Parameters pages.

Reset Autodesign

On completion of your chosen design process, the original member design mode assigned to each member can either be retained or updated. (For example, you might typically reset auto-designed steel members into check mode if they have a pass status.) The action that is taken is controlled via Design Options > Autodesign.

In the combined analysis-design process, member design is automatically followed by

Design Review

Design Review

On completion of the combined-analysis and design process the Review View and Review toolbar open automatically.

In this view a colour coded version of the model is displayed so that design status and various other parameters can be graphically interrogated and/or modified.

Comparison of solver models used in Static Analysis- Design

The following table summarises the three analysis models used in the design process:

 

3D Building Analysis

Grillage Chasedown

FE Chasedown

Examples /

Gravity and Lateral

‘Beam & Slab’

Flat slab and ‘Beam

When useful?

analysis (Notional/Wind/Seismic)

buildings

& Slab’ buildings

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

Special Features

Pattern loading

Mimics traditional

Pattern loading

Mimics traditional

Automatic EC2 sway sensitivity assessment and sway amplification

design approach (sub-frame analysis)

design approach (isolated floor analysis)

Automatically centralised analysis wires (improved rigid offsets / rigid zones)

Slab Pattern loading

Option to mesh slabs in the 3D analysis

Benefits

Member Design considers sway and differential axial deformation effects.

Member design based on traditional sub frame is considered

Member design based on traditional sub frame is considered

Caters for slabs that contribute to the lateral load resisting system

simultaneously with the 3D Building Analysis

simultaneously with the 3D Building Analysis

Irregular slab panel design automatically catered for

Analysis Model

3D model of entire building:

series of 3D sub models:

series of 3D sub models:

either meshed 2-way slabs,

all column and wall stacks immediately

all column and wall stacks immediately

or, slab loads decomposed to beams

above and below the sub-model

above and below the sub-model

either meshed 2- way slabs,

all 2-way slabs meshed

or, slab loads decomposed to beams

Analysis

Whole model in one pass

Each sub model

Each sub model

Method

sequentially from top to bottom – chasing member loads down

sequentially from top to bottom – chasing member loads down

Analysis Type

First order First order - K amp Second order - P-D

First order

First order

Static Analysis and Design Handbook

Supports

External supports as defined by the user

Ends of members above/below each sub model are automatically supported

Ends of member above/below eac sub model are automatically supported

Loading

Gravity and Lateral Loads

Gravity Loads only

Gravity Loads on

Forces for

     

design

RC Slab

Yes– All Combs

No forces

Yes – All Gravity l cases

RC Beam

Yes– All Combs

Yes – All Gravity load cases

Optional – All Gr load cases

RC Column

Yes– All Combs

Yes – All Gravity load cases

Optional – All Gr load cases

RC Wall

Yes– All Combs

Yes – All Gravity load cases

Optional – All Gr load cases

Steel/Composite

Yes – All Combs except

Not required

Not required

Members

patterns

Foundation

Yes – All Combs except

Yes – All Gravity load

Yes – All Gravity l

design

patterns

cases

cases

Seismic Analysis and Design Handbook

This handbook describes Tekla Structural Designer’s seismic analysis and design capability, which is available both for ASCE7 and Eurocode EN1998-1.

Introduction to Seismic Analysis and Design

The below topics provide a simplified outline of how seismic analysis and design forces are determined for a building.

Definitions

Various terms used in Tekla Structural Designer’s seismic processes are described below:

Code Spectra

The spectra specified in a country’s loading and design codes for use in ELF and RSA analysis.

Site Specific Spectra

User defined spectra for ELF and RSA which are required for locations which use another country's loading and design codes where the code spectra are not relevant.

Base Shear Combination

Also referred to as the Effective Seismic Weight Combination or the Seismic Inertia Combination. This combination is used for Vibration Analysis, and in the calculation of base shears, during the Seismic Analysis Process. This combination is created and modified by the Seismic Wizard only.

RSA Seismic Combination

These combinations are created by the Combination Generator at the end of the Seismic Wizard, but can also be modified in the standard Combination dialog. They

Engineers Handbooks (BS)

consist of 3 kinds of loadcases: Static, RSA Seismic and RSA Torsion. The Effective Seismic Weight Combination is not included in this category of combination.

Static Loadcase

Standard loadcases, e.g. ‘Self weight - excluding slabs’, ‘Dead’, etc., and derived cases for NHF/EHF, but no patterns.

RSA Seismic Loadcase

Two loadcases, i.e. ‘Seismic Dir1’ and ‘Seismic Dir2’, which cannot be edited. These are created at the end of the Seismic Wizard. being derived from information supplied in the Seismic Wizard and the results of the Vibration Analysis. No actual loads are available for graphical display.

RSA Torsion Loadcase

These cases