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Lecture (8)
on
Incompressible Viscous
Flow

Fayoum University
By
Dr. Emad M. Saad
Mechanical Engineering Dept.
Faculty of Engineering
Fayoum University

Faculty of Engineering 2016 - 2017


Mechanical Engineering Dept.
Incompressible Viscous Flows
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Two-dimensional flow problems may easily be solved by potential flow


approach as was explained in the previous lectures.
In order to use the ideal fluid assumption for the flow of real fluids,
shearing stress that occurs during the fluid motion should be so small to
affect the motion. Since shearing stress may be calculated by Newtons
viscosity law by = du/dy, two conditions should be supplied to have
small shearing stresses as;
a) The viscosity of the fluid must be small: the fluids as water, air,
and etc can supply this condition. This assumption is not valid for
oils.

Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Incompressible Viscous Flows
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b. Velocity gradient must be small: This assumption cannot be easily


supplied because the velocity of the layer adjacent to the surface is
zero. In visualizing the flow over a boundary surface it is well to
imagine a very thin layer of fluid adhering to the surface with a
continuous increase of velocity of the fluid. This layer is called as
viscous sub-layer.

Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Incompressible Viscous Flows
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Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Incompressible Viscous Flows
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We look here at three cases:

(1) Flow between parallel plates due to a moving upper

wall,

(2) Flow between parallel plates due to pressure gradient,

(3) Flow between concentric cylinders when the inner one

rotates.

Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Couette Flow between a Fixed and a Moving Plate
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Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Couette Flow between a Fixed and a Moving Plate
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Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Couette Flow between a Fixed and a Moving Plate
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Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Couette Flow between a Fixed and a Moving Plate
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Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Couette Flow with an Applied Pressure Gradient between a Fixed and a Moving Plate
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Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Couette Flow with an Applied Pressure Gradient between a Fixed and a Moving Plate
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Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Couette Flow with an Applied Pressure Gradient between a Fixed and a Moving Plate
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Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Couette Flow with an Applied Pressure Gradient between a Fixed and a Moving Plate
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Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Couette Flow with an Applied Pressure Gradient between a Fixed and a Moving Plate
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Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Couette Flow with an Applied Pressure Gradient between a Fixed and a Moving Plate
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Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Couette Flow with an Applied Pressure Gradient between a Fixed and a Moving Plate
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Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Couette Flow with an Applied Pressure Gradient between a Fixed and a Moving Plate
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Maximum and minimum velocities


The quantitative description of non-dimensional velocity distribution across the
channel, depicted by Eq. (9), is shown in the following figure

Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Couette Flow with an Applied Pressure Gradient between a Fixed and a Moving Plate
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Maximum and minimum velocities

Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


Couette Flow with an Applied Pressure Gradient between a Fixed and a Moving Plate
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Maximum and minimum velocities

Lecture (8) Fluid Mechanics II 2nd year Mechanical Dept.


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