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Lesson

Plan

Topic area: Stage of Learner: Syllabus Pages:
Risk vs Challenge Stage 4 28 - 29
Date: Location Booked: Lesson Number: 1 / 8

Time: 60 minutes Total Number of students: Printing/preparation
24

Outcomes Assessment Students learn about Students learn to
Syllabus outcomes Lesson assessment Exploring risk explore the concept of
risk by investigating the
positive and negative following:
Informal formative risk
4.6 describes the nature of assessment settings or what is a reasonable
health and analyses how health circumstances in which degree of risk?
issues may impact on young risk taking occurs why do people take
people Research task factors influencing risks?
submitted via ICT risk-taking influence of gender on
outcomes of risk risk behaviour
4.7 identifies the consequences behaviour
of risk behaviours and describes debate the positive and
strategies to minimise harm negative outcomes of
engaging in risk
behaviours


strategies to minimise
harm acquiring describe strategies to
knowledge safe minimise harm in each of
attitudes, eg concern the following real life
for others, impunity, situations when:
responsibility travelling alone at night
developing personal at a party feeling
skills, eg conflict depressed experiencing
resolution, assertive unwanted sexual contact
behaviour, problem being offered or using
solving, refusal skills drugs in water
safe and supportive environments exposed
environments, eg to the sun as a
school, community, pedestrian, passenger
family and peer support and user of wheeled
networks recognising, devices
assessing and explain how potential
responding to risk for harm can be increased
situations as the result of an
interaction of factors, eg
peers, alcohol use and
road safety
recognise potentially
unsafe situations and
respond by
demonstrating personal
skills: to counteract the
influence of others to
influence others to
modify their behaviour






Cross Curriculum themes & General capabilities Explicit subject specific concepts and skills

- ICT - Communicating
- Literacy - Decision-making
- Numeracy - Interacting
- ATSI history and culture - Planning



Quality Teaching Elements (lesson focus) Highlight the appropriate areas
Intellectual Quality 1.1 Deep knowledge 1.4 Higher-order thinking
This refers to pedagogy focused on producing deep understanding of 1.2 Deep 1.5 Metalanguage
important, substantive concepts, skills and ideas. Such pedagogy treats understanding 1.6 Substantive
knowledge as something that requires active construction and requires 1.3 Problematic communication
students to engage in higher-order thinking and to communicate knowledge
substantively about what they are learning.
Quality Learning Environment 2.1 Explicit quality 2.4 Social Support
This refers to pedagogy that creates classrooms where students and criteria 2.5 Students self
teachers work productively in an environment clearly focused on 2.2 Engagement regulation
learning. Such pedagogy sets high and explicit expectations and develops 2.3 High 2.6 Student direction
positive relationships between teacher and students and among Expectations
students.
Significance 3.1 Background 3.4 Inclusivity
This refers to pedagogy that helps make learning more meaningful and knowledge 3.5 Connectedness
important to students. Such pedagogy draws clear connections with 3.2 Cultural 3.6 Narrative
students prior knowledge and identities, with contexts outside of the knowledge
classroom, and with multiple ways of knowing all cultural perspective. 3.3 Knowledge
integration

How the quality teaching elements you have identified are achieved within the lesson.

Teaching Indicators of presence in the lesson


element
1.6 Substantive Students are required to communicate and cooperate with their peers in multiple activities
communication including the class brainstorm, think pair share and research task.

2.5 students In the research task students complete and submit their task with their partner requiring
self regulation minimal teacher supervision and/or assistance.
3.2 Cultural Students required to research a binge drinking prevention strategy focused on Indigenous
knowledge Australians.
Time Teaching and learning actions Organisation Centred
T/S
0-10 Activity 1a- Paper toss Teacher: Have T
This game is used to have students consider, What is a reasonable degree of tables set in
risk? grouping
The paper toss point system rewards students taking risk successfully and positions.
penalises unsuccessful risk taking. Students should strategies to earn the
maximum amount of points in their 3 attempts. [] Table
: - 2 students

Teacher sets up a bin and measures out 1m, 2m, 3m and 4m. :[]: :[] :
:[] : : [] :
Students each create a paper ball :[]: : [] :
1m shot into the bin 1 points
2m shot into the bin 2 points Maintains
etc. orderly game
Rule If you miss you lose 1 point. Each student
should line up
for their
Organisation option- throw. (Order)
More than one
student can
throw at a
Bin 1m 2m 3m 4m students time (Time-
0 0000000 saving)
[ ] l l 0 l l 0000000
0 0000000 Student
scribe(s) keeps
Pedagogical model Direct Instruction score tally in a
table.
CCT/GC Numeracy
Students are
C/S Decision-making, Planning allowed 3
throws each

Student:
Engages in
game

Resources:
Bin, marking
tape, x 24
paper
White board,
Marker

10- Students remain standing Teacher: S
15 Direct
Activity 1b -Think, pair, share. students
thinking using
This activity builds on the result from Paper toss. It allows students to provided
discover and share what they thought the most effective risk taking strategy questions.
to win the game.

What is a reasonable degree of risk? Student: Work
collaborative
Students are given 1 minutes to think with partner.
2 minutes to share with partner Contribute to
class
Class shares answers for 3 minutes discussion


Students are to debate the positive and negative outcomes of engaging in Resources:
risk behaviours. Time keeping
device
Pedagogical model Cooperative learning, Inquiry-based learning

CCT/GC Literacy

C/S - Interacting, Communicating
15- Activity 1c Paper toss 2 Teacher: T/S
25 Maintains
Same rules and Organisation as above orderly game
Each student
In this activity students are actively involved in constructing and using should line up
learned knowledge of risk and strategy to review and refine their for their
performance. throw. (Order)
More than one
student can
Pedagogical model Inquiry-based learning throw at a
time (Time-
CCT/GC Numeracy saving)

C/S Decision-making, Planning Student
scribe(s) keeps
score tally in a
table.




Resources:
Bin, marking
tape, x 24
paper
White board,
Marker

25- Activity 2 - Mind Map /Brainstorm Teacher: T/S
35 (RISK vs CHALLENGE) Begins mind
map
This activity builds on the Introduction activity. The teacher initiates a whole
class discussion regarding: Students are
given the
What is Risk? option of
Does Gender affect risk taking? Results from paper toss writing on the
Is there positive and negative risk. white board or
choosing a
class scribe(s)
Students are to contribute to white board

Pedagogical model Inquiry-based learning Chooses
students to
CCT/GC Literacy contribute to
mind map and
C/S Interacting maintains
class order.


Student: Can
contribute to
white board
OR pick a class
scribe(s)

Resources:
White board,
Markers

35- Activity 3 - Research Task Teacher: Write S
58 questions on
This is a cooperative learning activity to open students up to known board for
information regarding binge drinking and existing strategies to prevent it. students to
refer to.
In pairs students are to search for an existing prevention strategy relating to
Binge drinking. Students are given the option to focus on Indigenous Student:
Australians or young people. Engages in
research task
Students are required to answer the following: with partner
Organisation details;
Target audience: Resources:
Consequences of risk behaviour / how it is impacting Indigenous people? X 12 laptops
Prevention strategy the organisation is promoting to minimise/avoid risk

Hand in Via Google Docs for informal formative assessment

Helpful link for struggling students -
https://educationstandards.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/nesa/about/news/news-
stories/news-stories-detail/pdhpe-drug-education


Pedagogical model Cooperative learning

CCT/GC ICT, ATSI history and culture, Literacy

C/S Planning, Interacting, Communicating


58- Students pack up laptop and dismissed. Teacher:
60 Student:
Resources:

Reflection
What have I learned about the teaching and learning process when preparing this lesson?

In preparing this lesson I understand time management will be a major factor. In order to minimise
this, I have allowed to students to remain standing while engaging in the think-pair-share activity.
This will also prevent them having to get settled in their seats before standing up again to initiate
paper toss 2. I have also included a class table organisation so as to maximise the space in the
classroom and prepare for the cooperative learning task.


How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording
4.6 Research task
4.7 Research task




Other considerations

Complete the table blow by inserting the AISTL graduate standards that you are demonstrating
and indicates the evidence from this lesson that should comply with the standard.


Graduate Evidence within this lesson
Standards
2.4 Understand Students have the option to complete their research task with a focus on
and respect the ATSI community.
Aboriginal and
Torres Strait
Islander people
to promote
reconciliation
between
Indigenous and
non-Indigenous
Australians

2.6 Information Students are utilising laptops and submitting their work via Google docs.
and
Communication
Technology
(ICT)

3.3 Use Demonstrating both teacher and student-centred learning activities
teaching
strategies

2.5 Literacy and Utilising a numerical point system in the paper toss activity, In conjunction
numeracy with multiple literacy tasks. E.g. research task & think-pair-share.
strategies


WHS
What are the key risk issues that may appear for and need to be reduced/eliminated in this lesson?
Using your syllabus and support documents as well as other WHS policy- Outline the key WHS
considerations that are to be applied in this lesson?
To ensure the safe and ethical use of ICT. Tuck all chairs in and keep bags under tables to
avoid trip hazards while students are moving around the room in paper toss.








References (In APA)
You must list all references that you have used for the content and resources of this lesson in this
space.

Resources Attached:
You must list all the resources that you have created or found in this space.


































Lesson Plan

Topic area: Stage of Learner: Syllabus Pages:
Risk vs Challenge 4 28-29
Date: Location Booked: Lesson Number: 2 /8

Time: 60 minutes Total Number of students Printing/preparation
24

Outcomes Assessment Students learn about Students learn to
Syllabus outcomes Lesson assessment
drug use describe the short-term
the classification of and long-term effects of:
Formative drugs, eg stimulants, misuse of prescribed
4.6 describes the nature of assessments depressants, and non-prescribed
health and analyses how health hallucinogens medications
issues may impact on young reasons people use tobacco
people and do not use drugs alcohol
Kahoot quiz influences on drug cannabis
use
4.7 identifies the consequences short-term and long- analyse influences and
of risk behaviours and describes term effects of drugs on reasons why people
strategies to minimise harm Binge drinking health and wellbeing choose to use or not use
campaign prevalence and drugs
Observation of patterns of adolescent
group progression drug use explore the
legal and economic relationship between the
consequences person, the drug and the
effects of other environment in
peoples drug use determining the impact
of drug use


-Exploring risk

settings or
circumstances in which
risk taking occurs why do people take
factors influencing risks?
risk-taking


Cross Curriculum themes & General capabilities Explicit subject specific concepts and skills

- ICT - Communicating
- Literacy - Interacting
- Numeracy - Planning
- Problem-solving

Quality Teaching Elements (lesson focus) Highlight the appropriate areas
Intellectual Quality 1.1 Deep knowledge 1.4 Higher-order thinking
This refers to pedagogy focused on producing deep understanding of 1.2 Deep 1.5 Metalanguage
important, substantive concepts, skills and ideas. Such pedagogy treats understanding 1.6 Substantive
knowledge as something that requires active construction and requires 1.3 Problematic communication
students to engage in higher-order thinking and to communicate knowledge
substantively about what they are learning.
Quality Learning Environment 2.1 Explicit quality 2.4 Social Support
This refers to pedagogy that creates classrooms where students and criteria 2.5 Students self
teachers work productively in an environment clearly focused on 2.2 Engagement regulation
learning. Such pedagogy sets high and explicit expectations and develops 2.3 High 2.6 Student direction
positive relationships between teacher and students and among Expectations
students.
Significance 3.1 Background 3.4 Inclusivity
This refers to pedagogy that helps make learning more meaningful and knowledge 3.5 Connectedness
important to students. Such pedagogy draws clear connections with 3.2 Cultural 3.6 Narrative
students prior knowledge and identities, with contexts outside of the knowledge
classroom, and with multiple ways of knowing all cultural perspective. 3.3 Knowledge
integration

How the quality teaching elements you have identified are achieved within the lesson.

Teaching Indicators of presence in the lesson


element
1.6 Substantive Students are regularly engaged in group conversations in order to work cooperatively on
communication their presentations. This Tasks requires students to communicate their understanding in an
elaborate and substantive fashion.

2.6 Students In the group presentation task students must demonstrate initiative and require minimal
self regulation teacher supervision and/or assistance.

3.4 Inclusivity The presentation tasks require the participation of all students across the social and
cultural backgrounds represented in the classroom. In addition, the presentation objectives
require all students to equally contribute.

Time Teaching and learning actions Organisation Centred
T/S
0 - 35 Activity 1 Interactive body- Create a question S
Teacher: Have tables set in
*Students This ICT activity is used to build students content grouping positions.
should knowledge in regards to alcohol and its effects on
submit overall life. [] Table : - 2 students
questions
within Students are to use interacting website to learn :[]: :[] : : [] :
10 -20 effects of alcohol on individual body parts. E.g. :[]: :[] : : [] :
minutes liver, kidney.
-Marks attendance while
http://www.talkaboutalcohol.com/interactive- students are using website.
body/
-Creates a Kahoot and
Students can also visit the about alcohol & binge inputs student questions
drinking articles in this website:
Student: Use interactive
http://druginfo.sl.nsw.gov.au/alcohol website(S)

Resources:
In pairs, students are to create a question that x24 Laptops
will be in the following Kahoot quiz. On
completion they are to give this question to the
teacher who will create a Kahoot.

Pedagogical model - Cooperative learning
CCT/GC - ICT, Literacy
C/S Interacting, Communicating
0-35 Activity 1b Kahoot! Teacher: Provides students T/S
with Kahoot quiz number.
*May Class will engage in Kahoot quiz individually and
finish test their knowledge.
earlier if
so, move If multiple students get the question wrong Student: Play quiz game
onto next teacher begins class discussion on why they
activity chose that answer not the correct one.
Resources: x24 laptops


Informal formative Assessment

Pedagogical model - Cooperative learning

CCT/GC - ICT, Numeracy

C/S Interacting, Communicating
Activity 2- Create your own binge drinking Teacher: Monitors group S
35-55 campaign! progress and provides
assistance
Students are to work cooperatively to create a
prevention strategy targeting binge drinking. Informal formative
Students are given their own choice of target assessment observation
audience (Indigenous Australians, Young people,
etc) and their own choice of presentation style
(prezi, powerpoint, role play) Students must Student: Begin researching
incorporate some form of ICT. and planning campaign

Students are grouped with their table of 4. 6
groups of 4
Resources: x24 laptops
They are begin planning and creating a 4 minute
presentation aimed to prevent Binge drinking in
young people.


Presentation objectives: (Also found in peer
marking rubric)

1. Long and short term effects of Binge
drinking (e.g. health, economic, legal,
relationships)
2. Influences why young people choose to
binge drink (e.g. Peer pressure, social
status)
3. Strategies to prevent/reduce binge
drinking in young people (e.g. Policies,
legislation, organisations)
4. Equal contribution between group
members

Pedagogical model - Cooperative learning


CCT/GC - ICT, Literacy

C/S Interacting, Communicating, Problem-
solving, planning


55-60 Concluding activity Quick revision Teacher: T

Students answer one thing they have learned in Student:
todays lesson before they are allowed to leave.

Pedagogical model - Direct instruction Resources:
C/S Communicating,



Reflection
What have I learned about the teaching and learning process when preparing this lesson?

In preparing this lesson the focus is on ICT and student-centred cooperative learning. I understand
timing is difficult to determine with multiple student-centred activities, as such I have left the time
schedule flexible and offered suggestions in the time column. The seating plan from lesson one is
expected to be maintained and students will use these tables as grouping for their campaign. This
should avoid time wasting and any complaints as students are free to choose to sit with their peers.


How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording
4.6 Kahoot quiz
4.7 Observing Binge drinking campaign progress




Other considerations

Complete the table blow by inserting the AISTL graduate standards that you are demonstrating
and indicates the evidence from this lesson that should comply with the standard.

Graduate Evidence within this lesson


Standards
2.6 Information Students are using laptops and creating presentations
and
Communication
Technology
(ICT)

3.3 Use Demonstrating both student and teacher centred learning activities
teaching
strategies

5.1 Assess Students are assessed Via Kahoot
student
learning

WHS
What are the key risk issues that may appear for and need to be reduced/eliminated in this lesson?
Using your syllabus and support documents as well as other WHS policy- Outline the key WHS
considerations that are to be applied in this lesson?

To ensure the safe and ethical use of ICT. Tuck all chairs in and keep bags under tables to
avoid trip hazards while students are moving around the room.




Lesson Plan

Topic area: Stage of Learner: Syllabus Pages:
Risk vs Challenge 4 28-29
Date: Location Booked: Lesson Number: 3 /8

Time: 60 minutes Total Number of students Printing/preparation
24

Outcomes Assessment Students learn about Students learn to
Syllabus outcomes Lesson assessment drug use describe the short-term
the classification of and long-term effects of:
Formative drugs, eg stimulants, misuse of prescribed
4.6 describes the nature of assessments depressants, and non-prescribed
health and analyses how health hallucinogens medications
issues may impact on young reasons people use tobacco
people and do not use drugs alcohol
Binge drinking influences on drug cannabis
campaign use
4.7 identifies the consequences short-term and long- analyse influences and
of risk behaviours and describes term effects of drugs on reasons why people
strategies to minimise harm health and wellbeing choose to use or not use
prevalence and drugs
Kahoot quiz patterns of adolescent
drug use explore the
4.15 Devises, legal and economic relationship between the
applies and monitors plans to consequences person, the drug and the
achieve short term and long effects of other environment in
term goals. peoples drug use determining the impact
of drug use

Explore the concept of
Exploring risk risk by investigating the
following:
positive and negative
risk what is a reasonable
settings or degree of risk?
circumstances in which why do people take
risk taking occurs risks?
factors influencing influence of gender on
risk-taking risk behaviour
outcomes of risk
behaviour debate the positive and
negative outcomes of
engaging in risk
behaviours

Cross Curriculum themes & General capabilities Explicit subject specific concepts and skills
- Communicating
- ICT - Interacting
- Literacy - Planning
- Numeracy - Problem-solving



Quality Teaching Elements (lesson focus) Highlight the appropriate areas
Intellectual Quality 1.1 Deep knowledge 1.4 Higher-order thinking
This refers to pedagogy focused on producing deep understanding of 1.2 Deep 1.5 Metalanguage
important, substantive concepts, skills and ideas. Such pedagogy treats understanding 1.6 Substantive
knowledge as something that requires active construction and requires 1.3 Problematic communication
students to engage in higher-order thinking and to communicate knowledge
substantively about what they are learning.
Quality Learning Environment 2.1 Explicit quality 2.4 Social Support
This refers to pedagogy that creates classrooms where students and criteria 2.5 Students self
teachers work productively in an environment clearly focused on 2.2 Engagement regulation
learning. Such pedagogy sets high and explicit expectations and develops 2.3 High 2.6 Student direction
positive relationships between teacher and students and among Expectations
students.
Significance 3.1 Background 3.4 Inclusivity
This refers to pedagogy that helps make learning more meaningful and knowledge 3.5 Connectedness
important to students. Such pedagogy draws clear connections with 3.2 Cultural 3.6 Narrative
students prior knowledge and identities, with contexts outside of the knowledge
classroom, and with multiple ways of knowing all cultural perspective. 3.3 Knowledge
integration

How the quality teaching elements you have identified are achieved within the lesson.

Teaching Indicators of presence in the lesson


element
1.6 Substantive Students are regularly engaged in group conversations in order to work cooperatively on
communication their presentations. This Tasks requires students to communicate their understanding in an
elaborate and substantive fashion.

2.1 Explicit Students are provided presentation objectives that are in the peer assessment rubric.
quality criteria These are to be met for a group to be successful.

3.4 Inclusivity The presentation tasks require the participation of all students across the social and
cultural backgrounds represented in the classroom. In addition, the presentation objectives
require all students to equally contribute.




Time Teaching and learning actions Organisation Centred
T/S
0-25 Binge Drinking Campaign Continued Teacher: Organise students into S
group tables
Students are given time to finalise their
presentations and record their presentation Mark attendance
with their group.

Presentation objectives: (Also found in peer
marking rubric) Student: Continue group work and
submit finished video to teacher
1. Long and short term effects of Binge
drinking (e.g. health, economic, Resources:
legal, relationships) x 24 Laptops
2. Influences why young people choose X 6 Video recorder
to binge drink (e.g. Peer pressure,
social status)
3. Strategies to prevent/reduce binge
drinking in young people (e.g.
Policies, legislation, organisations)
4. Equal contribution between group
members

Pedagogical Model Cooperative learning

CCT/GC ICT & Literacy

C/S Interacting, Communicating, Problem-
solving, planning
25- Activity 1 Self assessment S
30 Teacher: views presentations and
This is an Assessment regarding the Uses peer marking rubric to assess
students ability to work cooperatively as each group
part of a team. This is focused on the skill
outcomes Interacting and Communicating in Student: Complete and hand in self
the Syallbus. assessment

Rubric attached in resources Resources:
x 1 laptop and 6 presentations for
Skill outcomes teacher

X 6 peer marking rubric for teacher
Pedagogical Model Direct instruction
X 24 self assessment rubric
CCT/GC Literacy & Numeracy

C/S Interacting, Communicating.







30- Activity 2 Peer Assessment & Feedback Teacher: View presentations and S
50 Uses peer marking rubric to assess
Student groups are each given one peer each group
marking assessment rubric and another
groups presentation at random. Student: Peer mark and submit
rubric to teacher.
Students are to watch the presentation as a
group and provide group feedback using
rubric. Resources:
X 12 Peer marking rubric (one each
On completion, each group chooses a group, 6 for teacher)
speaker and scribe to write the total score White board, marker.
on the white board and read their feedback
comments.

Pedagogical model Cooperative learning
CCT/GC Literacy & Numeracy
C/S Communicating, Interacting
50- Activity 3 OPTIONAL IF TIME PERMITS Teacher: Provides students with T/S
60 Concluding kahoot! Kahoot Number

This is a small quiz relating to alcohol and Student: Engage in Kahoot quiz
binge drinking to ensure students have individually.
acquired the basic content knowledge.
Resources:
X24 Laptops

Formative assessment Kahoot quiz -
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/2ad4ddd6-
Pedagogical model Direct Instruction 8e50-40eb-8d05-6ae7c8689db7

CCT/GC ICT




















Reflection
What have I learned about the teaching and learning process when preparing this lesson?

In preparing this lesson the focus is on student-centred and cooperative learning. Due to the
peer marking and group activity, there may be debate/conflict between individuals or groups
and this should be addressed by the teacher. In this lesson the teacher is also responsible for
using the peer marking rubric to mark each presentation, I understand this may take time
hence I have scheduled it in during the 30 minutes of self and peer assessments. This is to
ensure groups have marked justly and final results are fair. Again, I understand time will be
a factor with this type of student-centred lesson, Therefore I have made the final Kahoot
OPTIONAL determined if the class completes the previous activities in time.


How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording
4.6 Kahoot / Binge drinking campaign
4.7 Binge drinking campaign
4.15 Binge drinking campaign



Other considerations

Complete the table blow by inserting the AISTL graduate standards that you are
demonstrating and indicates the evidence from this lesson that should comply with the
standard.


Graduate Evidence within this lesson
Standards
2.6 Information Using Laptops and video recorders to create and present their campaigns
and
Communication
Technology
(ICT)

2.5 Literacy and Utilising a numerical point system in peer and self assessment in
numeracy conjunction with oral and visual literacy in presentations
strategies

5.1 Assess Students are self assessed, peer assessed and assessed via Kahoot.
student
learning





WHS
What are the key risk issues that may appear for and need to be reduced/eliminated in this
lesson? Using your syllabus and support documents as well as other WHS policy- Outline the
key WHS considerations that are to be applied in this lesson?

To ensure the safe and ethical use of ICT. Tuck all chairs in and keep bags under tables to
avoid trip hazards while students are moving around the room.








Resources Attached:
You must list all the resources that you have created or found in this space.



Student Group Presentation Peer Assessment Rubric


STRONG SATISFACTORY WEAK

Points 3 2 1
Organisation (Logical
and easy to follow)
Delivery ( Posture,
gestures, eye
contact, voice)
Use of ICT (Was this
presentation
engaging?)
Long and short term
effects
Strategies to
prevent
Influences

Group members
equal contribution

Total Points: _____________












Student Cooperative Learning Self Assessment Rubric.

STRONG SATISFACTORY WEAK

Points 3 2 1
Motivation/
Participation
(Reliable to
participate and
remain engaged)
Quality of work (My
work reflects my
best efforts)
Preparedness
(Materials and
homework)
Interaction with
others (respectful,
listened to all group
members)
Role flexibility(easily
moved between
leader and follower)

Total Points: _____________























Justification

This lesson sequence focuses on two main pedagogical approaches, Inquiry-based
learning and Cooperative learning.

Inquiry-based learning is a constructivist approach to education where the overall
goal for students is to make meaning (LEQ, 2017). This is a broad pedagogical
approach which enables student to find and use information rather than remember
and repeat it (LEQ, 2017). Vygotskys zone of proximal development is the gap
between what adolescents can accomplish alone and what they are capable of doing
if guided by an adult or a more competent peer (Arnett, 2014). An Inquiry-based
learning is the appropriate pedagogy to support students in reaching the zone of
proximal development and increase student learning gains (Bruner, 2009; Wass &
Golding, 2014). Guided discovery is an inquiry-based learning strategy utilised in
the Think-pair-share activity relating to Paper toss. This activity requires students to
organise their thoughts individually, before comparing their ideas with their
immediate peers (Bamiro, 2015). Students will be actively involved in constructing
their own understanding of risk-taking through hands-on experiences, social
interaction, questioning and formative assessment (LEQ, 2017). Students are given
the opportunity to share, revise and refine their risk-taking strategies in Paper toss
and then implement their new knowledge at the second identical task. This is
effectively steering students into the zone of proximal development by allowing
students to learn from more competent peers and be guided toward a more
productive strategy (Arnett, 2014; Wass & Golding, 2014). The knowledge and skills
students develop is relevant and can be related to other life circumstances such as
sex and drug use. Bamiro (2015) found the use of guided discovery and think-pair-
share strategies to have great potential for improving student achievement.





Cooperative learning is the utilisation of small groups so that students work together
to maximise their own and each other's learning (Johnson, 2014). Cooperative
learning activities encourage a student-centred approach to teaching and supports
the development of transferable learning skills such as critical thinking (UOS, 2017).
Providing students with the opportunity to think for themselves and compare
thought processes with peers, forces students to confront differences of opinion and
inspires the development of higher level cognitive skills (UOS, 2017). Additionally,
Johnson (2014) states the cooperative learning pedagogical approach has been
extensively researched with wide-ranging variables and retains a strong validity. This
lesson sequence has incorporated multiple cooperative learning activities that
requires student to develop and apply their communication and interaction skills.
Students are to work and learn together to achieve their common goal, for example,
create a preventative campaign on binge drinking (Hertz-Lazarowitz et al, 2013). This
is a self-regulated learning activity in which students are accountable for their own
learning processes. They are responsible for setting group goals, allocating individual
roles, monitoring progression, reflecting and sustaining motivation (English &
Kitsantas, 2013). This activity supports student direction as students are exercising
direction on the manner in which they create and present their campaign (Ludwig &
Gore, 2003). Evans & Boucher (2015) support, stating student choice and autonomy
are associated with various positive effects across a range of academic outcomes
including engagement and intrinsic motivation.












Student differentiation involves the teacher demonstrating knowledge and
understanding to meet the specific learning needs of a full range of students (AITSL,
2017). Differentiation in the classroom ensures all students are engaged and
challenged to learn regardless of their diversity (Tomlinson, 2014). This lesson
sequence caters to all student needs through the variety of learning activities and
pedagogical approaches. NESA (2017) states differentiation provides teaching,
learning and assessment for learning experiences that cater for the diversity of
learners. Utilising Kahoot as an informal formative assessment is a clear example of
differentiation the lesson sequence. A formative assessment involves collecting
evidence of students achievements while they are in the process of learning
(Crawley et al, 2014). The application of a class discussion during the informal
assessment allows students to discuss with peers and the teacher why they have
chosen their answer and receive immediate feedback.

Nesa (2017) states, teacher/student dialogue around activities is beneficial for
diverse student learners. This type of formative assessment and feedback enables a
strong teacher/student dialogue and enables students to see assessment as part of
the learning process. Students are given the opportunity to revise and improve their
skills/knowledge, prior to a summative assessment (Suol, 2016; Shute & Kim, 2014).
Additionally, Gillies (2014) found cooperative learning to promote interpersonal
relationships with students with diverse learning needs and those from different
cultural and ethnic backgrounds. This activity is a flexible teaching, learning and
assessment strategy that provides an appropriate level of challenge and engagement
for all students (NESA, 2017).


Student differentiation is also evident in the application of cross-curriculum themes
and general capabilities throughout the lesson sequence. Incorporating curriculum
content with the knowledge, skills, behaviours and dispositions that are the cross-
curriculum priorities, will assist students to live and work successfully in the twenty-
first century (ACARA, 2017). Literacy, numeracy, ICT and ATSI history and culture
have been implemented in this lesson sequence to add depth and richness to
student learning in content elaborations (ACARA, 2017).

Literacy involves students using and modifying language for different purposes in a
range of contexts (ACARA, 2017). In this lesson sequence students are required to
read, speak, write, create and orally present a variety of visual and digital texts.
Queensland (2006) suggests student learn more effectively using various literacy
techniques across multiple content areas. In conjunction with the range of literacy
skills, students are learning to use ICT effectively and appropriately to access, create
and communicate information and work collaboratively (ACARA, 2017). Literacy and
ICT priorities are evident in the research task, use of internet sources and the binge
drinking prevention campaign. The use of ICT in these student-centred learning
activities can both inspire and engage student learning (Willmot, Bramhall & Radley,
2012). Numeracy is evident in the peer/self assessment rubrics and the point system
used in Paper toss. This inclusion provides students the opportunity to recognise
the importance of mathematical knowledge in the wider world and encourage them
to use their skills broadly (ACARA, 2017). Finally, the ATSI history and culture is
evident in the research task when students are given the choice to study an existing
binge drinking strategy aimed at Indigenous Australians. This knowledge and
understanding will enrich the student learning experience and broaden their
understanding of Indigenous Australians in todays society (ACARA, 2017).


The aim of this lesson sequence is to draw on evidence-based pedagogy to teach
students relevant curriculum content and a variety of transferable skills that are
applicable to their lives.


















References

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