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SPACE PLANNING

- COURSEWORK COMPILATION -
INTA111 WEEK 5 ASSIGNMENT 2

CATHERINE ZEMAN
FINAL COMPILATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page 3: Week 1 Assignment 1: Career Path Journal and Autobiography
Page 4: Week 1 Assignment 2: Observing How People Use Spaces
Page 5-8: Week 1 Assignment 3: Establishing Architectural Parameters and Case Study Research
Page 9-16: Week 2 Assignment 1: Programming Planning Methodologies: Prototype Sketches
Page 17-21: Week 2 Assignment 2: Criteria Matrix, Relationship Diagram and Project Statement
Page 22-33: Week 3 Assignment 1: Bubble Diagrams and Block Planning
Page 34-49: Week 3 Assignment 2: Identifying Relationships between Space and Humans
Page 50-54: Week 4 Assignment 1: Developing Rough Floor Plans
Page 55-59: Week 4 Assignment 2: Creating Rough Furniture Plans
Page 60-63: Week 5 Assignment 1: Analyzing and Revising the Rough Plan
Page 64-65: Week 5 Assignment 2: Refining the Rough Plan
INTA111 WEEK 1 ASSIGNMENT 1 --- CATHERINE ZEMAN

My interest in interior design is currently focused on the hospitality industry, specifically


restaurants and hotels. These industries seem to allow for more creative freedom;
additionally, it is exciting to think about the volume of people who would be able to
experience the design, as opposed to a private residential project.

The last four classes I took were History of Architecture, 3D Design Basics I,
Observational Drawing and Architectural Drafting. In Architectural Drafting, I learned
about measuring spaces and drawing plans; in Observational Drawing, I learned about
proportions, positioning and seeing reality instead of preconceived ideas; in 3D
Design Basics I, I learned about functional design and modeling; in History of
Architecture, I studied the major design styles of the early 19th century through present
and how they were interpreted in furniture and interior design as well. The benefits of
the drafting and 3D design course are very practical, hands on knowledge. Learning
history of design helps to make me a more informed designer by being able to
reference design styles and combine them in classic and unique ways. The skills
learned in Observational Drawing contribute to a bigger picture viewpoint; of being
able to see a room as a composition.

I have not yet taken and seminars or student workshops. I did join the ILDA last month
and receive emails from them with insightful industry related information. I have begun
researching part time and internship opportunities in the field for a few months now as
well. This month, Im interested in taking the following seminars and workshops:
Network Your Way to Success, Interior Design Students- Text and Dimensions in
AutoCAD and Art History Live!
INTA 111 week 1 assignment 2:
OBSERVING HOW PEOPLE USE SPACES
Catherine Zeman

PART 1: OBSERVING PEOPLE IN SPACE PART 2: SUMMARY OF EXPERIENCE


I chose a coffee shop to observe the people in space. I spend a lot of time
there [typically doing homework], so it was a convenient location. There
are two common traffic patterns. The first is the to-go customer: their
typical traffic flow is to enter through a corridor on the north side, cross
the room to the counter to place order, then move left to receive their
order, proceeds to creamer station and then crosses the room again and
exits. The second pattern is for a customer who is staying to work in the
space. This person enters through the corridor on the north side, pauses
to find a table; then proceeds to counter and back to seat.
I feel that the space is designed well; there is a large empty area around
the counter to allow for space for a line to form to the right of the register.
The tables are placed around the perimeter and do not interfere with
traffic flow. This loop formation would work well in any type of enter
order collect order exit oriented establishment.
The primary issue I found with the space is table congestion. In the main
seating area on the east side of the space, the tables are packed closely
together in order to optimize seating, but which makes getting in and out
of the inner tables difficult when capacity is high. I think this could be
solved without sacrificing seating space by switching out the circular
tables with rectangular ones. Also there is a bookshelf which could be
rotated right ninety degrees to better define the seating area and allow
more table space.
INTA111 W1A3

ESTABLISHING ARCHITECTURAL PARAMETERS


AND
CASE STUDY RESERACH

CATHERINE ZEMAN
PART 1 Identify Architectural Parameters
Size
- The total square footage of the space is 2437.50 square feet.
- This area is subdivided into 3 basic sections the west wing, center and east wing
- The west wing is 44x20 on the south side and x 23 on the north side = total of
977.5 sq ft
- The center area is 23x11 = 253 sqft
- The east wing is 44.25x 25 + 27x2 = total of 1161.50 sq ft.
Circulation Patterns
- Entry doors are located in the center area; which lends itself to being the
lobby/reception area
- Natural interior connection points would be the Main Exhibit Area to the west & the
meeting room, curators office and assistants office to the east
- Primary Circulation Routes: west to exhibit area; east to meeting room
- Secondary Circulation Routes: hallway east to offices
- Restrooms could be placed in west wing, north side near the existing soil stacks
- Serving Kitchen could be placed in west wing, south side near the existing soil stacks
***[exhibit room requires 650 sqft, so remainder of 327.5 sqft could be used for
restrooms]
Exit Routes:
West wing: exit doors on north & south sides
East wing: 3 sliding glass doors on north side; 2 sliding glass doors on south side
Public Entry:
Center area south side door
Planning Feature or Focal Points
None identified
Interior Zoning
Natural light available in all areas.
Positives
Lots of windows/door natural light
Lots of wall space
Negatives
- Existing window & door placement in east wing makes office layout difficult
- Narrow lobby/reception area
- Restrooms/serving kitchen on other side of building from office & meeting space
PART 2 Case Study Research
This floor plan is from the Johnson County Community College in Overland
Park, Kansas. In the Regnier Center are offices and classrooms for Continuing
Education, the Capitol Federal Conference Center, the Small Business
Development Center, the Center for Entrepreneurship, classrooms for credit
and noncredit computer applications and information technology programs, a
biotechnology laboratory suite, and offices for the college's Information Services
branch. ["Regnier Center Building Map (RC)."]

I chose the floor plan of the first floor as a comparable project. I find these
buildings to have a similar basic layout: a rectangular floor plan with a central
lobby, a west wing being used as a larger space and an east wing being used
for offices. Or, in laymans terms: party on the left, business on the right.
Obviously the Regnier Center has a larger square footage and is subdivided
more than the 2B Plan, but it seems that the primary circulation routes would
flow in the same way, as the main entry door leads into a looby wherein one
must choose to go left or right.

In the Regnier Center, there are shaded areas which are identified as Storm
Security Areas. Since it is located in Kansas, the threat of severe weather in the
form of tornados must be considered and addressed; much in the same way
that buildings in earthquake fault zones need to be earthquake-proofed. These
Storm Security Areas are the only spaces I can see within the building which do
not have natural light.

The windows are arranged in a repetitive grid pattern which allows for an easy
subdivision of equal size office spaces.

The large conference center in the west wing has entry and exit doors on all
sides, which does not allow for uninterrupted wall expanses which are often
needed for exhibit spaces. However, the space does appear large enough that
movable walls could easily be used within the space to solve that problem.
In summary, comparing these two spaces has given me insight into the
preferred spatial organizations and circulation routes of Plan 2B; as well as a
better understanding of the special requirements detailed on pages 175-176.
Tweets, JCCC. "Regnier Center Building Map (RC)." (RC). N.p., n.d.
Web & Image. 13 May 2017.
WORKS CITED <http://www.jccc.edu/about/campus/maps/buildings/rc.ht
ml>.
Week 2 Assignment 1:
Programming Planning Methodologies: Prototype Sketches
INTA111
CATHERINE ZEMAN
ENTRY/RECEPTION AREA

PROTOTYPE NO. 2:
10 x 14.5
145 sq. ft.

PROTOTYPE NO. 1
11 x 12
132 sq. ft.
KITCHEN

PROTOTYPE NO. 1
10 x 7.5
75 sq. ft.

PROTOTYPE NO. 1
8 x 8
64 sq. ft.
MEETING ROOM

PROTOTYPE NO. 1 PROTOTYPE NO. 2


12.5 x 24 19.5 x 22
300 sq. ft. 429 sq. ft.
EXHIBITION SPACE

PROTOTYPE NO. 1 PROTOTYPE NO. 2


22 x 30 22 x 30
660 sq. ft. 660 sq. ft.
OFFICES: CURATORS AND ASSISTANTS

PROTOTYPE NO. 1
12 x 18
216 sq. ft.

PROTOTYPE NO. 2
11 x 15
165 sq. ft.
WORKROOM

PROTOTYPE NO. 2
PROTOTYPE NO. 1 14 x 20.5
14.5 x 21.5 287 sq. ft.
312 sq. ft.
WEEK 2 ASSIGNMENT 1:
REVISIONS
INTA111 PROFESSOR KERDASHA
BY CATHERINE ZEMAN
ENTRY/RECEPTION AREA - REVISED

PROTOTYPE 1: PROTOTYPE 2:
11 x 12 10 x 14.5
132 sq ft 145 sq ft
KITCHEN
REVISED

PROTOTYPE 3:
10 x 10
100 sq ft
WORKROOM
REVISED

PROTOTYPE 2:
14 x 20.5
348.50
OFFICES:
CURATOR &
ASSISTANT
REVISED
CURATOR:
12 X 17
204 sq ft

ASSISTANT
11 x 15
165 sq ft
MEETING ROOM - REVISED

PROTOTYPE
21.5 x 24
526 sq ft
EXHIBITION SPACE - REVISED

PROTOTYPE
21.5 x 30
645 sq ft
W2A2:
CRITERIA MATRIX, RELATIONSHIP DIAGRAM AND PROJECT STATEMENT
INTA111 - PROFESSOR KERDASHA
CATHERINE ZEMAN
CRITERIA
MATRIX
RELATIONSHIP
DIAGRAM
PROJECT STATEMENT

A large university which has an international reputation in the social sciences, popular culture and futurism communities. The university is building a Popular
Culture Institute to engage with these international academia communities by hosting traveling exhibits and conferences. The site for the Popular Culture Institute
is located in a 1980s era suburban office park. It is a one-story structure with 2500 usable square foot and is filled with natural light from windows on all four
sides. The university would like the Institute design to include an open, flexible exhibit area, a flexible lecture/seminar room, a workroom and offices for the
curator and the administrative assistant. The meeting room and the curators office need to be acoustically private. Natural light and view are desired in all areas
and the entire facility should be barrier-free [handicap-accessible] in concept and dimension.

An empty shell with no interior walls, the space is essentially a capital T shape; the west wing is ~20 x 40; the center entry area is ~12 x 23; and the east wing
is ~35 x 44. The developers architect may allow very modest exterior changes, such door and window placement. A designer has been retained to complete
the space planning

The project must include the following areas:


Entry/reception area with seating for 3-4
Exhibit area with movable walls to accommodate up to 48 person lectures
Meeting room to accommodate up to 24 person conferences; must be a flexible space and divisible with partition
Curators office with guest seating for 3
Administrative Assistants office with guest seating for 1
Large workroom for exhibit prep and storage
BUBBLE DIAGRAMS
AND
BLOCK PLANNING
INTA111 W3A1
CATHERINE ZEMAN
BUBBLE
DIAGRAM
1
BUBBLE
DIAGRAM
2
BUBBLE
DIAGRAM
3
BUBBLE
DIAGRAM
4
BUBBLE
DIAGRAM
5
BUBBLE
DIAGRAM
6
BLOCK
DIAGRAM
1A
[BASED ON
BUBBLE DIAGRAM 1]
BLOCK
DIAGRAM
1B
[BASED ON
BUBBLE DIAGRAM 1]
BLOCK
DIAGRAM
2A
[BASED ON
BUBBLE DIAGRAM 2]
BLOCK
DIAGRAM
2B
[BASED ON
BUBBLE DIAGRAM 2]
- PART 1
BARRIER-FREE CHECKLIST

INTA111 W3A2
CATHERINE ZEMAN
BARRIER-FREE CHECKLIST
Special Needs Group Architectural Barriers in the Built Supportive Features to Overcome Related Ergonomic Clearances
Environment Barriers
1) minimum slope for ramps is best,
1) STAIRS
1) RAMP with a rise of 1 foot for every 12 feet
2) REQUIRED SPACE TO TURN IN
2) TURNING ROOM of length (1:12)
People using wheelchairs EACH ROOM
3) DOORS
3) MINIMUM DOOR WIDTH 2) 5' circumference for turning
3) 32" minimum door width [36" is
better]
1) Grab bars to support 250 lbs; 24-
to 36-inch horizontal grab bar located
behind, and 3 inches above, the back
1) BATHROOMS 1) GRAB BARS of the toilet, as well as a 30-inch
2) STAIRS 2) RAILINGS
People with ambulatory challenges
3) SLICK FLOORS 3) NON-SLIP FLOORING
horizontal bar mounted 12 inches
from the back wall beside the toilet.
2) Handrails should be oval or round,
with 1--inch hand clearance
between the rails and the wall.
1) ROUND DOORKNOBS 1) HANDLE KNOBS 2) 48" max counter depth
People with limited use of hands or arms
2) COUNTER DEPTH 2) MAX COUNTER DEPTH 48" 3) 8 lbs pressure max to push open
3) DOOR WEIGHT 3) MINIMUM DOOR WEIGHT
door

1) BRAILLE
1) SIGNS
2) CROSSWALKS 2) RAISED BUMPS ON SIDEWALKS;
3) COOKTOPS ALARM NOISE
People with limited use of sight
3) GAS - MAKE SOUND WHEN
BURNING

1) ADEQUATE LIGHTING
1) LIGHT
2) FURNITURE IN U-SHAPE; May need additional outlets to
2) SIGHT LINES
People with limited hearing
3) ALARMS
CIRCULAR TABLES accommodate electrical needs
3) FLASHING LIGHTS V SOUND
- PART 2 -
ANTHROPOMETRICS AND
ERGONOMICS

INTA111 W3A2
CATHERINE ZEMAN
PUBLIC SPACE:
YOGA CHANGING ROOM
The public space I chose to document is the womens changing area
at my yoga studio. It is a make-shift room, with heavy burlap-type
material hanging from the ceiling to define the room and provide
privacy.

(1) The entrance/exit is essentially an overlapping of these walls,


which creates a blind corner experience; people are often bumping
into one another. I think that given the malleable nature of the
boundaries, they could be widened to avoid collisions.

(2) The perimeter of the space is lined with individual chairs, which is
a good idea; the chairs provide a space to sit if needed or to put your
belongings while changing. However, the chairs are placed so close
together [typically 6-10] that it doesnt allow for any personal space;
changing clothes requires a lot of arm and leg room. I think a
solution could be to line the walls with benches instead.

(3) Another frustrating feature of the space is that the bank of lockers
is placed in the far corner this makes access to any of the lockers on
the left side of the bank very difficult as there is ALWAYS someone
changing over there. If the bank of lockers were slid over to the
center of the right wall, there would be more room to space the
chairs out and all of the lockers would be conveniently accessible. In
general, in the time span between classes, the changing room is
extremely congested and frustrating to use.
PRIVATE SPACE:
CONDO DINING ROOM

My condo has an open layout and a consequence of this is that the


dining room table is often used as a landing pad for mail, packages
and kids homework.
(1) There is an unnecessary door behind the chairs on the west side of
the table.
(2) The height of the chairs armrests butt against the table so that the
chairs on the east and west sides of the table are never able to be fully
pushed in.
(3) Other than the height of the armrests, the seat height of the chairs is
nicely proportional to the table height.
(4) The hanging light fixture is placed at the correct height to provide
task lighting, but not to interfere with headspace.
(5) There is ample space between chairs so that no one feels crowded.
(6) The table comes with two glass extensions which can be mounted of
brass brackets which pull out from the ends of the table. While this is a
nice feature, there is no way to place three chairs on each side of the
table where a table leg wouldnt be intruding into the middle of a
guests chair.
- PART 3 -
DESIGN THEORY:
GESTALT & WAYFINDING

INTA111 W3A2
CATHERINE ZEMAN
GESTALT THEORY
- DEFINITION -

Gestalt Theory refers to the concept of the human beings tendency to create a unified whole out of separate
objects or ideas.

There are main principles of Gestalt Theory:


Similarity
Continuation
Closure
Proximity
Figure/Ground
Symmetry and order
["The Designer's Guide to Gestalt Theory.]
GESTALT THEORY
- A P P L I C AT I O N TO I N T E R I O R D E S I G N -

The application of Gestalt Theory to Interior Design is quite straightforward:


the concept of a room or area inside a larger space can be created utilizing these
principles.
Examples would include:
Grouping similar things in close proximity
Use of symmetry to define space
Visual closure can be made without actual walls or doors
GESTALT THEORY
- EXAMPLES IN INTERIOR DESIGN -

The implied shape of


a circle is created by
the round sofa and
placement of round
chairs. The chairs
are spaced apart, but
imply a continuation
of the shape.

[<http://freshome.com/2014/09/09/how-your-interior-design-is-influencing-your-subconscious/>]
GESTALT THEORY
- EXAMPLES IN INTERIOR DESIGN -

Color, pattern and


symmetry are used
to create a cohesive
area in what appears
to be a long, narrow
room.

[<http://www.mindvalleyinsights.com/the-secret-rules-of-design/>]
INFORMATION DESIGN WAYFINDING
- DEFINTION -

Information Design Theory in regards to Wayfinding explores how a complex


environment can be navigated through thoughtful design.
Examples of common complex environments are:
Hospitals
Airports
Universities/schools
Office buildings
INFORMATION DESIGN WAYFINDING
- A P P L I C AT I O N TO I N T E R I O R D E S I G N -

While the problem of Wayfinding should ideally be initially addressed at the architectural level, there are many
solutions available at the Interior Design intersection as well. Bright-colored signage using drawings and
numbers is a very simple strategy. This negates the potential challenge of a language barrier.
The study of the science of Wayfinding has also found:
Some wayfinding/design facts:
People get lost less often when hallways meet at right angles
Staircases can aid understanding if they allow users to see into other parts of a building
When different sections of a structure have unique appearances, people are less likely to get lost
Visitors expect that each floor in a building is laid out in essentially the same way. When this is not the case,
it can be confusing
Adults find cool blue spaces easier to navigate than warm red spaces
["Architecture and Interior Design Can Support Wayfinding - Interior Design.]
INFORMATION DESIGN WAYFINDING
- EXAMPLES IN INTERIOR DESIGN -

Color is used as
an alternative to
arrows to lead
the person
navigating the
space in the right
direction.

<https://segd.org/what-wayfinding>.
INFORMATION DESIGN WAYFINDING
- EXAMPLES IN INTERIOR DESIGN -

The large graphic


symbols used for
restaurant, stairs
and telephone are
all universally
understandable
symbols.

[<http://www.2020projects.co.uk/?attachment_id=3827>]
WORKS CITED

Staff, Creative Bloq. "The Designer's Guide to Gestalt Theory." Creative Bloq. Creative Bloq ART AND DESIGN
INSPIRATION, 27 July 2015. Web. 26 May 2017. <http://www.creativebloq.com/graphic-design/gestalt-
theory-10134960>.
"How Your Interior Design Is Influencing Your Subconscious." Freshome.com. N.p., 19 July 2016. Image. 26 May 2017.
<http://freshome.com/2014/09/09/how-your-interior-design-is-influencing-your-subconscious/>.
"The Secret Rules of Design (How It Can Grow Your Business)." Mindvalley Insights. N.p., 11 Sept. 2014. Image. 26 May
2017. <http://www.mindvalleyinsights.com/the-secret-rules-of-design/>.
"Architecture and Interior Design Can Support Wayfinding - Interior Design." Healthcare Facilities Today. N.p., n.d. Web. 26
May 2017. <http://www.healthcarefacilitiestoday.com/posts/Architecture-and-interior-design-can- support-wayfinding-
-4983>.
Roux, Clive. "What Is Wayfinding?" Clive Roux. N.p., 23 Mar. 2014. Image. 26 May 2017. <https://segd.org/what-
wayfinding>.
"2020 Projects Interior Design Graphics & Branding Signage & Wayfinding Events & Exhibitions Visitor Experience Furniture.003
2020 Projects Interior Design Graphics & Branding Signage & Wayfinding Events & Exhibitions
Visitor Experience Furniture.003."Your Vision, Brought to Life with Creative Thinking and Practical Know-how. N.p., n.d.
Image. 26 May 2017. <http://www.2020projects.co.uk/?attachment_id=3827>.
DEVELOPING ROUGH
FLOOR PLANS
INTA111 W4A1
CATHERINE ZEMAN
BARRIER-FREE APPLICATIONS
- DOCUMENT LIST -
1. 2 means of egress required in rooms or spaces seating 30+ people
2. 32 minimum width door clearance
3. 36 minimum width bathroom door clearance
4. 36 minimum width hallway
5. 60 minimum 180 degree turn radius
6. 24 maximum countertop depth
7. 18 door clearance on pull side; 12 door clearance on push side
1
SCHEMATIC
PLAN 1

2 2 2
1
7 7 7 4
7 72
5 3 5
2
7 3 2
5 3 747
4 7
2
7
3 5
5 6
6
5 3
5 5
27
73
SCHEMATIC
3
5 7
3 7 72
6
PLAN
4
6 2
5
2
2 7 4 7 7 7 4 7 2
7
2 2 7

7 1

7
1
CREATING ROUGH
FURNITURE PLANS
INTA111 W4 A2
CATHERINE ZEMAN
FURNITURE SIZES
ROOM ITEM DIMENSIONS NOTES ROOM ITEM DIMENSIONS
ENTRY/RECEPTION DESK 4'6" x 2 needs pedestal drawers WORKROOM WORKBENCH 72" X 36" X 36"
bench 90"L x 2' W seats 3-4 SHELVES 6' X 2' X 8"
literature rack 3'x 5' x 4"D wall mounted STORAGE AREA 56" W X 28" D
bulletin board 4' x 5' wall mounted marker board wall 2'X2'
MEETING ROOM credenza 4' x 3' x 3' STORAGE AREA 3'X 3'X 6'
projection screen 6'w ceiling recessed WORKTABLE 78" W X 42" D X 36" H
marker board wall 6' x 5' WORKBENCH STOOLS 2' X 14"
EXHIBIT AREA Projection screen 8' Wall mounted LUMBER STORAGE 48" X 30"
PROJECTOR CEILING MOUNTED PORTABLE COATRACKS 60" W X 18"D X 58"H
CHAIRS 2'X2' C KITCHEN SINGLE BOWL SINK 25" W
CURATOR'S OFFICE DESK 6' X 3' REFRIGERATOR 32" W X 30" X 65" H
DESK 5' X 2' WARMING OVEN 30"W X 24" X 29" H
LATERAL FILES 6' X 3' MICROWAVE 30" X 15" X 16"
BOOKSHELVES 4' x 3' x 1' COMMERCIAL COFFEE URN 16"X 17" X 19"
DESK CHAIR 2'X2' COUNTER SPACE 12 SQ FT
GUEST CHAIRS 2'X2' 3 RESTROOMS LAVATORIES
ADMIN ASSISTANT DESK 5' X 2' URINAL 40" X 30"
DESK 6' X 2' TOILET STALL - ADA 56"X 60" MIN
LATERAL FILES 6' X 4' TOILET STALL 36" X 66"
BOOKSHELVES 3'X4' X 1'
DESK CHAIR 2'X2'
GUEST CHAIR 2'X2' 1
SCHEMATIC
FURNITURE
PLAN
1
SCHEMATIC
FURNITURE
PLAN
2
ANALYZING AND REVISING
THE ROUGH PLAN
INTA111 W5A2
CATHERINE ZEMAN
PART 1:

MARK
UP
ROUGH
PLAN
PART 2:

REVISE
ROUGH
PLAN
REFINING
THE ROUGH PLAN
INTA111 Week 5 Assignment 2 [Part 1]
CATHERINE ZEMAN
REFINED
ROUGH
PLAN

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