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Franklin

Coffee
Shop/
Co‐Working
Facility

Prepared
for:
Franklin,
WI
Economic
Development
Commission
Prepared
by:
John
Michlig,
Commissioner

May
13,
2009
Table
of
Contents

Summary
 1
background
our
challenges
our
opportuniKes

Plan
Outline
 5
goal
possible
educaKonal
components
advantages:
short
term
advantages:
long
term

Co‐Working
Facility
 8
definiKons:
what
is
a
co‐working
facility?

IncenKves
&
ConfiguraKons:
PossibiliKes
 10
opKons

“GeneraKon
Y”
 11
staKsKcs,
facts
and
expectaKons
ready
for
2012?

Freelance/”Free
Agent”/CreaKve
Class 
 14
staKsKcs,
facts
and
expectaKons

Contacts/Outreach
 16

Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility

Summary

background
Former
Sea[le
mayor
Paul
Schell
said,
success
lies
in
"crea<ng
a
place
where

the
crea<ve
experience
can
flourish."
Beyond
subsidizing
companies,
stadiums,

and
retail
centers,
communiKes
need
to
be
open
to
diversity
and
invest
in
the

kinds
of
lifestyle
opKons
and
ameniKes
people
of
all
ages
really
want.


One
of
the
biggest
challenges
facing
suburban
communiKes
today
is
the
task
of

reconciling
the
desire
to
create
vital
public
space
‐‐
which
in
turn
encourages

commercial
investment
and
development
‐‐
with
the
sprawled,
disconnected

and
near‐arbitrary
nature
of
typical
suburban
growth
pa[erns.
Franklin
is
not

alone
in
having
to
deal
with
“pu_ng
the
pieces
together”;
communiKes
across

the
country
are
taking
steps
to
re‐assess
and
rehabilitate
their
situaKon.

In
order
for
Franklin
to
grow
and
evolve
in
a
sustainable
manner,
the
city
must

recognize
the
economic
realiKes
of
posKndustrial
America.
The
primary
resource

that
desirable
businesses
search
for
when
looking
for
a
community
within
which

to
take
root
is
a
well‐educated,
digitally‐enabled,
crea<ve,
and
mo<vated

workforce.


That
digitally‐enabled
workforce,
in
turn,
is
less
dependent
upon
geography,

making
the
quali<es
of
individual
places
maFer
much
more
in
loca<onal

decisions.


Opinion
polls
and
markeKng
studies
in
recent
years
make
it
clear
that
members

of
the
emergent
“Genera<on
Y”
(children
of
Boomers
born
between
1979
and

1996)
have
expecta<ons
that
should
give
us
pause:


• 77%
plan
to
live
in
an
urban
core


Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility
 1
• 70%
do
not
think
they
will
move
to
the
suburbs
when
they
have
kids,
sta<ng

a
preference
for
the
convenience
and
connec<vity
of
healthy,
walkable,

mixed‐use
communi<es.1


This
enormous
market
will
begin
buying
homes
‐‐
i.e
making
their
living
choices

‐‐
in
just
over
two
years.

And
let’s
not
forget
about
older
Americans.
Already,
more
than
half
of

nondrivers
over
65
simply
stay
home
because
their
transportaKon
choices
are

limited.
71%
of
older
households
would
prefer
to
live
within
walking
distance
of

transit. 2

There
is
every
indicaKon
that
we
need
to
make
adjustments
to
prepare
our

community
for
the
needs
of
young
and
old.

our
challenges
It’s
no
secret
that
suburban
development
is
most
oeen
directed
by
private

developer
opportuniKes
rather
than
actual
uKlity
to
the
city
and/or
consistency

with
a
master
plan.
This
leads
to
a
lack
of
true
“community
gathering
points”

that
would
encourage
mulK‐purpose,
mulK‐generaKonal
community
interacKon.

• Franklin
has
never
had
any
sort
of
“downtown”
or
central
gathering
point;
in

fact,
city
leaders
have
long
disagreed
on
where
the
“city
center”
is
located.


• Franklin
is
extremely
vehicle‐dependent
and
lacks
the
sort
of
walkable
public

ameni<es
for
which
residents
have
asked.

1
2008
material:
“GeneraKon
Y
in
the
Marketplace”:www.rclco.com/generalpdf/

general_Aug2720081149_ULI‐_08‐27‐08.pdf;
pre‐2000
data:
Ellen
Newborne
and
Kathleen
Ker‐
win,
“GeneraKon
Y,”
Business
Week,
Feb.
15,
1999.

2
Linda
Bailet,
“Aging
Americans
Stranded
without
OpKons,”
Surface
Transporta7on
Policy
Project


(April
2004)

Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility
 2
• The
<ght
city
budget,
coupled
with
the
percep<on
of
high
property
taxes,

makes
crea<on
of
community‐building
ameni<es
low
on
the
city’s
priority

list.

• It’s
crucial
that
the
city
aFract
and
retain
core
talent
that
will
in
turn
aFract

non‐pollu<ng
industries
and
posi<ve
commercial
development;
however,

the
city
currently
lacks
facili<es,
features
and
tools
desirable
to
young

“knowledge
workers”
and
other
elements
of
the
economically
significant

“Crea<ve
Class,”
who
can
and
will
choose
where
they
want
to
live
based

upon
these
ameni<es.

• Greenfield’s
Borders
and
Barnes
&
Noble
bookstores
o_en
become
the
de

facto
“third
place”
for
Franklin
residents
seeking
a
place
to
work
and
linger

(and
spend)
outside
of
their
home.

• The
city’s
senior
popula<on
is
ill‐served
as
commercial
and
social
ameni<es

can
be
reached
only
by
vehicle.

• Franklin
needs
to
dis<nguish
itself
in
the
very
near
future
from
neighboring

suburbs
in
order
to
aFract
further
investment
and
seFlement
by
the
next

genera<on
of
homebuyers
and
consumers.

• The
Franklin
Public
Library
gets
its
funding
through
circula<on,
and
there
is

currently
no
nearby
commercial
aFrac<on
to
drive
foot
traffic
to
the
library.

• MATC
has
a
dis<nct
image
problem
in
Franklin
as
we
feel
no
interac<on
with

the
school
while
at
the
same
<me
paying
taxes
to
support
the
ins<tu<on.

our
opportuni<es
The
city
has
purchased
property
on
Drexel
Avenue
that
sits
between
Fire
StaKon

1
and
the
Public
Library
(henceforth
referred
to
as
the
“Park
Parcel”).
It’s

situated
in
a
unique
mulK‐purpose
area,
with
a
public
park
creaKng
a
buffer

between
the
space
in
quesKon
and
nearby
residenKal
areas.

• The
Franklin
Public
Library
is
a
truly
well‐used
and
well‐appreciated
public

space.

Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility
 3
• A
public
park
(Lions
Legend
Park)
is
next
to
the
Library
and
south
of
the
Park

Parcel.

• A
single‐family
subdivision
with
connec<ve
paths
is
just
beyond
the
park,

crea<ng
an
easily
traversed,
natural
transect.

• Condos
stand
on
the
other
park
border,
providing
access
for
mul<ple

socioeconomic
types.


• City
Hall,
where
senior
meals
are
served,
is
in
the
same
area.


• Senior
apartments
are
beyond
the
apartments
and,
though
somewhat
far

from
the
Park
Parcel,
are
connected
by
sidewalks
and
paths
to
the
library

and
park.



• The
Park
Parcel
is
segregated
from
the
balance
of
Lions
Legend
Park
by
a
tree

line
and
the
water
tower;
therefor,
using
it
for
a
purpose
that
is
not
strictly

playground‐related
will
not
break
con<nuity
of
the
parkland.

• The
new
Franklin
OfficeMax
reports
beFer
than
expected
business;
Franklin

and
surrounding
communi<es
are
already
homes
to
a
great
many
home‐
office
professionals
who
would
gravitate
to
a
coffee
shop/co‐working
space.

Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility
 4
Plan
Outline

goal
Facilitate
creaKon
of
a
COFFEE
HOUSE
and
CO‐WORKING
FACILITY
located
in
the

area
of
Lions
Legend
Park
and
the
Public
Library,
enhancing
the
commercial
and

community‐level
a[racKveness
of
the
area
while
at
the
same
Kme
encouraging

likewise
development
elsewhere
in
the
city.

• The
city
of
Franklin
would
rezone
the
parcel
from
parkland
to
commercial.


• The
building
would
be
two
stories
minimum,
built
right
up
to
the
sidewalk

(no
setback)
on
at
least
one
side.


• No
drive‐thru.


• Courtyard
in
back
that
segues
into
the
park.


Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility
 5
possible
educa<onal
components
• The
city
partners
with
Milwaukee
Area
Technical
College;
the
students,
as

part
of
MATC
curriculum,
run
the
coffee
shop,
handling
everything
from

accoun<ng
to
marke<ng
to
grinding
beans.


• Franklin
High
School
can
also
be
involved,
as
students
can
work
there
for

credit.

• If
and
when
we
begin
concrete
plans
for
the
site
and
building,
the
above

ins<tu<ons
along
with
UW‐Milwaukee
can
submit
plans
and
ideas,
following

the
progress
of
the
project
step‐by‐step.

• The
city
can
contract
with
a
placement
agency
(Independence
First,
for

instance)
for
differently‐abled
persons
so
they
can
work
side‐by‐side
‐‐
and

on
equal
foo<ng
‐‐
with
high
school
and
college
students.
The
benefits
to
all

sides
of
this
interac<on
are
clear.

advantages:
short
term
• The
project
acts
as
a
"development
laboratory,"
wherein
the
city
can
show

by
example
what
sort
of
development
is
desirable.
Along
the
way,
we'll

undoubtedly
expose
flaws
in
the
developer‐city
process
and
rela<onship

that
can
be
addressed
as
they
appear.

• Developers
who
have
been
hesitant
to
propose
complicated
(but
desirable)


“high‐end”
projects
to
the
city
because
of
perceived
difficul<es
in
dealing

with
the
planning
process
will
be
encouraged
by
our
overt
effort
to

streamline
the
en<re
“development
pipeline.”


• The
project
will
bring
together
the
talents
and
passions
of
the
community:

local
cra_smen
and
contractors
pitching
in;
crea<ve
minds
devising
site

plans
and
architecture;
business
leaders
dona<ng
assets
and
money;
etc.

• In
tough
economic
<mes,
planning
and
possibly
building
a
community/
commercial
asset
like
this
acts
as
a
potent
symbol
of
our
confidence
in

Franklin.


Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility
 6
• The
effort
will
generate
posi<ve
ongoing
publicity
for
the
City
of
Franklin’s

forward‐looking
ac<on.

advantages:
long
term
• At
long
last,
a
vibrant,
mul<‐use
city
center
with
excellent
community
space

will
emerge.
Franklin
will
finally
have
a
"third
place"
for
people
to
lounge,

work,
surf
the
net,
read
and
meet.
(No
more
losing
residents
[and
dollars]
to

Borders
and
Barnes
&
Noble
in
Greenfield.)

• We
will
excite
local
imagina<on
about
the
real
possibility
for
further
change,

hopefully
encouraging
further
desirable
and
“nonstandard”
development

and
partnerships
in
the
area.

• The
facility
will
be
an
educa<onal
asset
to
MATC
and
Franklin
High
School.
• Open
space
next
to
the
cafe/workspace
can
be
used
for,
among
other

events,
monthly
or
bi‐monthly
Farmers'
Markets
coordinated
with
market

events
held
in
St.
Mar<ns.

• The
co‐working
facili<es
‐‐
both
paid‐by‐the‐week/month/year
space
and

free
work
areas
‐‐
will
be
popular
with
a
growing
corps
of
"free
agents,"

newly
freelance,
and
mobile
workers,
who
will
spread
word
of
the
asset.

• An
informal
mee<ng
place
close
to
city
hall
will
become
available.

• The
free
Wi‐Fi
here
combined
with
the
Wi‐Fi
“clouds”
at
city
hall
and
the

library
will
make
Lion’s
Legend
Park
a
promotable
Free
Wi‐Fi
zone,
and

Franklin
takes
a
step
toward
marke<ng
itself
as
a
tech‐friendly
city.

• The
library
will
see
increased
traffic
and
circula<on.


• If
we
combine
par<cipa<on
of
Franklin
High
School,
MATC
and
a
job

placement
agency
for
differently‐abled
individuals,
we’ll
create
an
excellent

opportunity
for
crea<ng
posi<ve
interac<ons.

• It'll
be
a
new
stop
for
residents
of
Waterford
and
Burlington
on
their
way
to

and
from
the
freeway.

Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility
 7
Co‐Working
Facility

defini<ons:
what
is

a
co‐working

facility?
A
Co‐Working
facility
is

a
cafe‐like
community/
collaboraKon
space
for

persons
who
work

outside
of
tradiKonal

office
environments.
It

provides
individual
work
spaces
as
well
as
meeKng
areas
and
rooms;
wi‐fi
is

generally
provided
as
well.

Because
there’s
an
enKre
thriving
industry
feeding
laptops,
netbooks,
messenger

bags,
portable
filing
systems,
etc.
to
a
growing
market
of
office‐less
workers,

there’s
no
need
to
provide
much
more
than
a
comfortable
space.

The
communal
Co‐Working
space
is
fairly
well
integrated
into
the
coffee
shop/
cafe
porKon
of
the
building,
making
very
li[le
disKncKon
between
cafe
tables

and
work
spaces
on
one
floor,
with,
for
example,
more
private
areas
on
a
second

floor.

There
are
many,
many
pricing
models
for
Co‐Working
spaces.
Of
course,
the

“communal”
open
areas
should
be
free;
perhaps
a
cafe
purchase
is
required
for

wi‐fi
access.
There
may
even
be
a
free
communal
room
for
meeKngs
available
by

sign‐up.

A
“paid
Ker”
of
office
spaces
is
also
possible,
featuring
private
small
office

spaces
with
a
lockable
door
and
access
to
Xerox,
fax
and
printer
faciliKes.
They


Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility
 8
can
be
paid
for
in
flexible
increments:
weekly,
monthly,
quarterly,
yearly
‐‐
even

daily.


A
Co‐Working
facility
is
not
as
quiet
as
a
library.
It’s
designed
and
laid
out
to

encourage
useful
interacKon
among
those
who
desire
it
and
a
producKve

“privacy
shell”
for
others
who
need
to
focus.
proper
layout
and
design
is
crucial,

and
we’ll
need
to
pay
very
close
a[enKon
to
this
aspect
of
the
facility.

Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility
 9
Incentives
&

Configurations:

Possibilities

op<ons
In
these
challenging
economic
Kmes,
the
City
of
Franklin
will
need
to
be
flexible

in
construcKng
incenKves
for
a
franchise,
developer,
partner,
or
any
combinaKon

of
same.
These
are
just
a
few
suggesKons;
nothing
is
off
the
table.

• Given
the
educa<onal
component,
corporate
sponsorship
and
grants
are
not

at
all
out
of
the
ques<on:
OfficeMax,
FedEx/Kinkos,
Starbucks,
Dunn
Bros.,

Starbucks,
Northwestern
Mutual
Founda<on,
etc.
A
community/
educa<onal/economic
development
effort
like
this
is
something
great
to
be

associated
with.

• The
city
could
create
a
comprehensive
building
design
and
site
plan
that
can

be
used
to
sell
the
“non‐standard
configura<on”
to
a
mainstream

commercial
developer
who
otherwise
would
not
have
had
the
opportunity

to
exploit
a
great
loca<on.

• An
incubator
arrangement
could
be
set
up:
low
or
no
rent;
etc.

• Make
it
a
non‐profit
en<ty
basically
run
by
MATC.

Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility
 10
“Generation
Y”

sta<s<cs,
facts
and
expecta<ons
• Driven
by
convenience,
connec<vity,
and
a
healthy
work‐life
balance
to

maintain
rela<onships

• 1/3
will
pay
more
to
walk
to
shops,
work,
and
entertainment
• 2/3
say
that
living
in
a
walkable
community
is
important

• More
than
1/2
of
Gen
Y
would
trade
lot
size
for
proximity
to
shopping
or
to

work

• Even
among
families
with
children,
1/3
or
more
are
willing
to
trade
lot
size

and
“ideal”
homes
for
walkable,
diverse
communi<es

• Even
in
the
suburbs
the
majority
of
Gen
Y
prefer
characteris<cs
of
urban

places,
par<cularly
walkable
environments

• Over
half
report
that
having
a
community
and
home
designed
to
meet

certain
"green"
objec<ves
plays
an
important
role
in
their
purchase
or

ren<ng
decision.


• Work‐life
balance
or
work‐life
blend
is
important
to
Gen
Y;
Their
work
will

blend
with
other
parts
of
their
lives—they’ll
work
from
home,
enroll
their

kids
in
their
company’s
in‐house
day
care,
and
enjoy
portable
careers

Given
their
penchant
for
community
involvement
as
well
as
their
requirement
of

work/life
balance,
feedback
from
Gen
Y
on
the
types
of
ameniKes
they
desire
in

their
communiKes
may
not
come
as
a
surprise.
The
most
sought‐aeer
ameniKes

include:

• Library;

• Restaurant
or
café;

Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility
 11
• Main
street
village;

• Recycling
center;
and

• Fitness
center.

Source:
Robert
Charles
Lessor
&
Co.
Real
Estate
Advisors:
Genera7on
Y
in
the
Market‐
place,
URBAN
LAND
INSTITUTE
–
YOUNG
LEADERS
PANEL
‐
AUGUST
2008

Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility
 12
ready
for
2012?

Genera<on
Y
will
soon
emerge
as
dominant
economic
group.

Source:
Robert
Charles
Lessor
&
Co.
Real
Estate
Advisors:
Genera7on
Y
in
the
Market‐
place,
URBAN
LAND
INSTITUTE
–
YOUNG
LEADERS
PANEL
‐
AUGUST
2008

GRADUATES WILL START ENTERING THE RENTAL MARKET


IN 2009; THE LARGE WAVE OF BUYING WILL BEGIN IN 2012
WAVE OF GEN Y
4,200,000
4,100,000

4,000,000
3,900,000

3,800,000
This group will
3,700,000
begin purchasing
3,600,000 in 2012

3,500,000
3,400,000
00

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20
20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20
Number of 22-Year Olds

RCLCO consumer research shows:


! 41% of Generation Y plan to rent for at least three years
! 77% of Generation Y plan to live in an urban core
NOTE: Number of 22-year olds is based upon birth rate and does not factor in death rates and migration.
SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility
 13
Freelance/”Free

Agent”/Creative
Class


sta<s<cs,
facts
and

expecta<ons
Not
limited
by
age,
freelance

professionals
now
make
up
more

than
a
quarter
of
the
U.S.
working

populaKon,
or
26%,
according
to
a

survey
by
human
resources

consulKng
firm
Kelly
Services,
Inc,

up
from
19%
in
20063.

• “The
Crea<ve
Class”:

Socioeconomic
class
(arguably

cons<tu<ng
a
dis<nct
social

class)
that
economist
and
social

scien<st
Dr.
Richard
Florida,4
a

professor
and
head
of
the
Mar<n
Prosperity
Ins<tute
at
the
Rotman
School

of
Management
at
the
University
of
Toronto,
believes
are
a
key
driving
force

for
economic
development
of
post‐industrial
ci<es
in
the
USA.

3
SOURCE:
CNNMoney.com


h[p://money.cnn.com/2009/05/04/news/economy/freelance_workers/index.htm?postversion=2
009050403

4
Books
by
Richard
Florida:
The
Rise
of
the
Crea7ve
Class
(2002),
Ci7es
and
the
Crea7ve
Class


(2004),
and
The
Flight
of
the
Crea7ve
Class
(2007)

Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility
 14
Florida
describes
the
'CreaKve
Class'
as
40
million
workers
‐
30
percent
of
the

U.S.
workforce,
and
breaks
the
class
into
two
broad
secKons,
derived
from

Standard
OccupaKon
ClassificaKon
(SOC)
codes
data
sets:

• Super‐Crea<ve
Core:
This
comprises
about
twelve
percent
of
all
U.S.

jobs.
This
group
is
deemed
to
contain
a
wide
range
of
occupa<ons
(e.g.

science,
engineering,
educa<on,
computer
programming,
research)
with

arts,
design,
and
media
workers
making
a
small
subset.
Those
belonging

to
this
group
are
considered
to
“fully
engage
in
the
crea<ve

process”
(Florida,
2002,
p.69).
The
Super‐Crea<ve
Core
is
considered

innova<ve,
crea<ng
commercial
products
and
consumer
goods.
Their

primary
job
func<on
is
to
be
crea<ve
and
innova<ve.
“Along
with

problem
solving,
their
work
may
entail
problem
finding”
(Florida,
2002,

p.69).

• Crea<ve
Professionals:
These
professionals
are
the
classic
knowledge‐
based
workers
and
include
those
working
in
healthcare,
business
and

finance,
the
legal
sector,
and
educa<on.
They
“draw
on
complex
bodies

of
knowledge
to
solve
specific
problems”
using
higher
degrees
of

educa<on
to
do
so
(2002).

Florida
concludes
that
the
creaKve
class
is
the
core
force
of
economic
growth
in

our
future
economy,
and
is
expected
to
add
more
than
10
million
jobs
in
the

next
decade.

Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility
 15
Contacts/Outreach

Contact Context
Franklin
Fire
 Use
of
space
adjacent
to
Fire
StaKon
1:
Will
they
expand
EAST
or
WEST?

Department What
are
their
needs?
Franklin
Library SCHEDULED:
Michlig
to
present
concept
and
explore
cooperaKve

opportuniKes
at
5/27/09
Library
Board
MeeKng
MATC Possible
direct
curriculum:
Run
and
manage
coffee
shop.
Franklin
High
School/
 Possible
direct
curriculum:
Run
and
manage
coffee
shop.
Franklin
School
Board
UW‐Milwaukee Invite
students
to
submit
design
proposals.
SCORE Service
Core
of
ReKred
Professionals:
Possible
mentoring
and
input
on

business
plan.
Franklin
Plan
Staff Design
and
site
plan
logisKcs
and
execuKon.
Visioning
materials.
South
Suburban
 InteracKon
with
possible
local
ownership.
Chamber
of

Commerce
Park
Department Re‐zoning
of
the
“Park
Plot”
will
be
required.
Northwestern
 Possible
grant.
Mutual
FoundaKon
Local
Press
(Journal
 Manage
disseminaKon
of
informaKon.
SenKnel/NOW/
Franklin
CiKzen)
MSOE Gather
informaKon
about
their
experience
running
the
Blatz
Building

Cafe.
Owner
of
Dunn
Bros. Insight
into
business
challenges;
possible
partner.

Independence
First Determine
interest
in
placing
workers
in
the
facility.

Coffee
Shop/Co‐Working
Facility
 16

Related Interests