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Published by the Tahoma Audubon Society: Connecting people with nature since 1969. Vol. 41 No. 4
Published by the Tahoma Audubon Society: Connecting people with nature since 1969.
Vol. 41 No. 4
April 2010

Overseas in Pierce County:

Published by the Tahoma Audubon Society: Connecting people with nature since 1969. Vol. 41 No. 4

By Diane Yorgason-Quinn

Stunning sky phenomenon; crepuscular rays. Photo/Lindsay Raab
Stunning sky phenomenon; crepuscular rays.
Photo/Lindsay Raab

It was the stunningly bright morning of March

6, 2010, and Faye McAdams Hands and I were

Excited at

about to board a ship for a new land.

the prospect, we pulled up to the Steilacoom ferry dock and found our hosts, Lindsay Raab and her team of Seabird Surveyors, Govinda Rosling, Maureen Thompson, and Sam Sadosky, and proceeded to let ourselves be swept away! Feeling very honored to be allowed to barge in on an important and exciting research project, we headed toward that as yet unknown to us green isle, Anderson Island. This Citizen Science project, the Puget Sound Seabird Survey (PSSS) is in its second year. Tahoma Audubon is partnering with Seattle Audubon to conduct the only volunteer land- based multi-month survey in the Puget Sound, the germ of what will grow into a much larger project soon! If you want to know more or if you want to become part of this project, check out the website for the Puget Sound Seabird

See "Anderson Island” on page 6

}

Thais Bock, 1917-2010 }

By Adele Freeland

Thais was born in Pennsylvania on September 1, 1917. Soon af- terwards, the family moved to Mt. Vernon, Ohio, where she began tak- ing piano lessons at the age of six. Although she was a talented young musician, times were hard and her parents found that they had to dis- continue her lessons – but Thais’ pi- ano teacher kept her on as a “no-fee” pupil because of her talent. Thais and her mother, Mae Dora Web- ster, enjoyed playing Haydn and Beethoven duets on the piano together. Moving to the San Francisco Bay area in 1943, Thais met and married James Bock. The two of them relocated to Federal Way in the 1960s. They had two children, Djana (presently of Lynnwood), and James (Tennessee). Here in Washington, Thais volunteered with the Seattle Symphony, attended concerts with friends,

Published by the Tahoma Audubon Society: Connecting people with nature since 1969. Vol. 41 No. 4

and took advanced piano lessons at the Cornish School of the Arts, University of Puget Sound, and Pa- cific Lutheran University. A lifelong student of music, she practiced and played every day right up until her final illness. After her husband’s death in 1964, Thais tried going back to “being a

secretary,” which she had done once before for a few years, but hated it so much, she decided to take the plunge and try to make a living teaching piano. She purchased her dream piano, a Steinway baby-grand, began with just a handful of students, and went on to teach full- time for the next 30 years, until 1998. Thais organized two recitals for her students each year, one in June and the other at Christ- mas. Her daughter Djana recalls the Christ- mas programs as some of the most enjoyable

See "Thais Bock” on page 11

Birdathon 2010 is here! Come join the fun!

Birdathon 2010 is here! Come join the fun! Late April is the official start of Birdathon,

Late April is the official start of Birdathon, Tahoma Audubon’s annual fundraiser. We invite you to join us as a birder this year and go on one or more of our exciting field trips listed on page 11. Being a Birdathon participant is EASY, and you don’t need to know a thing about birds. Just a desire to get outside and have fun with fun people to support YOUR Audubon! Since we make every effort to keep our education and conservation programs affordable so anyone can participate, we use the money raised during Birdathon to help offset some of the program costs. Birdathon proceeds are also used to help cover the costs of printing the Towhee, and many other valuable projects here at Tahoma Audubon. Without Birdathon, many of our programs would simply disappear!

See "Birdathon” on page 9

Don't miss the April Membership Meeting Feathered Architects: The Fascinating World of Bird Nests with Idie
Don't miss the April Membership Meeting
Feathered Architects: The Fascinating World of Bird Nests with Idie Ulsh
From eagles to hummingbirds, Idie Ulsh will explore with us how and where birds
make nests, nest configurations and relate interesting facts about their construction.
She has photographed the nests of more than 30 species, with an emphasis on song
birds. Idie is well known for her bird and butterfly programs. She has recently com-
pleted an in-depth, three-year study of bird nests and is eager to share her findings.
She is a past president of Seattle Audubon, founder of the Washington Butterfly
Association, freelance nature photographer and an independent college counselor. In
addition to her own photos, she will include photos from University of Puget Sound
Slater Museum, Cornell Lab of Ornithology and many local photographers who have
contributed to this unique and fun program.
Friday, April 9, 7:30pm – 9:00pm at Tacoma Nature Center, 1919 S. Tyler Street.
Idie Ulsh
In this issue: 25 Years Ago Birdathon field trips BirdSongs Calendar Education Environment Matters Executive Director's
In this issue:
25 Years Ago
Birdathon field trips
BirdSongs
Calendar
Education
Environment Matters
Executive Director's corner
Field trips
New Members
page 8
page 9
page 8
page 12
page 4
page 3
page 2
page 5
page 2

executive director’s Corner

executive director’s Corner Climate change threatens hundreds of species The State of the Birds: 2010 Reporty an Flint Executive Director bryanflint@tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Kr y stal K y er Conservation Coordinator kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org 253-232-9978 Ste p hanie Swaim Education Coordinator StephSwaim@tahomaaudubon.org 253-327-9480 Cami Kesin g er Develo p ment Coordinator ckesinger @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Graham Taylor Volunteer Coordinator 253-565-1884 gtaylor@tahomaaudubon.org Education Intern kbenton @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-1884 Tahoma Audubon Board Officers John Garner President Marjorie Shea Vice President Jane Brosius Secretary Kathleen Nelson Treasurer Tahoma Audubon Board Members 2010 Thelma Gilmur Ione Clagett Dick Carkner Melissa Paulson Dan Sherman Bill Smith Peggy L. Kopf Tanja Scott Darby Veeck Charles Griffin The Towhee is a publication of the Tahoma Audubon Society . The Tahoma Audubon Society was chartered in 1969. TAS advo- cates for the protection of wildlife and promotes conservation through education and activities that enrich its member’s experiences in and with the natural world. The Towhee is published monthly, ten times a year, with combined Jul/Aug and Dec/Jan issues. Submissions of articles and photographs of birds, bird lore, natural history, conservation, and environmental education are reviewed and considered for inclusion by the editor. Copy is due by the 15th of the month and may be sent by e-mail, disk, or typed. E-mail submissions to editor@tahomaaudubon.org. Editors : David Cohn, David Lev Mailing : Vera & John Cragin and Winfield Giddings Design & Layout : Robert Kelton: robert_kelton@ mac.com Printing : Consolidated Press Page 2 www.tahomaaudubon.org April 2010 e N v iro N M e N t Matters Enhance wildlife habitat in your backyard Food. Water. Shelter. Breeding and Nesting. These are the essential habitat components necessary for sur- vival on earth. Where any one of those components are lacking, you are likely to see much less diversity of wildlife. Whether you live in a downtown condo or near the forested foothills of the largest mountain in the con- tiguous United States, there are actions you can take to create and enhance habitat for wildlife right in your own backyard (or windowsill). These actions range from simple and cheap to expensive and time-consum- ing. Let’s focus on just a few of the easier actions. If you live in a condo or apartment or have next to no yard, consider doing one of the following: ♦ Put up a hummingbird feeder, suet or seed feeder to attract birds, especially in winter months when food is scarce ♦ Plant flowers and native plants in pots or hanging containers that attract wildlife and provide food and shelter from predators ♦ Add a water feature like a bird bath or small fountain; be sure to clean frequently ♦ Have a pet? After grooming, put fir outside for birds to use in nests If you have a yard, consider additional actions: ♦ Compost yard waste on site by creating a shelter of woody debris pile perfect for birds and small critters ♦ Plant a variety of native plants, being sure to include plants in all the different layers: small flowering plants, shrubs, and trees ♦ Put up a bat box or bird nest box in your yard ♦ Practice natural yard care techniques, cutting down on use of toxins and recycling organic materials ♦ Build a beautiful and functional rain garden to maintain storm water on site ♦ Install a larger water feature like a pond with a stream that reuses the water If you spend time in your neighborhood park, you may have noticed a lot of invasive plant species. Our parks need your help! Consider joining a volunteer group in adopting a site to restore or grab your family and friends, church group, co-workers or youth group and make it a fun and rewarding, team-building com- munity service project. Take a couple of these actions and try them today – in honor of Earth Day – and make it a habit, everyday! Here are some handy local resources if you are inter- ested in any of the above ideas: Rain Gardens Workshops : Stewardship Partners and Stream Team are holding free work- shops this spring throughout Pierce County. Call 253- 845-2973 for dates, locations, and to reg- ister. Nominate your- self for a free rain garden if you live in Eatonville or Puyallup. Visit: Contact Krystal at 253-232-9978. www.stweardship- Or kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org parnters.org for more information. Bird Nest Boxes, Bat Boxes, Ponds, and Native Plants : visit Adriana Hess Audubon Center to see a demonstration of the possibilities of converting your backyard into a wildlife sanctuary, and for access to resources and information. Natural Yard Care & Composting Workshops : Tacoma Pierce County Health Department is offering free ‘natural yard care’ workshops this spring around Pierce County. Contact Geoff Rinehart at 253-798- 4587 for dates, locations, and registration. The Green Tacoma Partnership is dedicated to maintaining and restoring our urban natural areas with the support of volunteers like you! To learn more abou t volunteering in our parks and open spaces visit: www.greentacoma.org or give me a call at 253- 232-9978. Earth Day on the Bay! Join Citizens for a Healthy Bay for Earth Day 2010 and donate a day to the Bay! This year’s annual Earth Day project will be held at Middle Waterway. There will be a variety of hands-on and educational activities suitable for all ages. Urban Forester Ramie Pierce will be on hand to give out a free tree and TAGRO potting mix to the first 50 participants. Come join us! When: Saturday, April 17, 2010 Time: 9:30 am to 2:30 pm Where: Middle Waterway, 711 E. 11 St. Tacoma, next to Stellar Industrial Supply Morning snacks, drinks and lunch will be provided! Please RSVP for this event by April 9. Call or email Jeanine Riss: jriss@healthybay.org, 253-383-2429. Our sponsors: YES on ProP.1: Parks & Recreation Maintenance Levy By Krystal Kyer Tacoma’s parks are exceptional. We are blessed with a diversity of parks, recreational and educational programs, more so than in most cities our size. In fact, the district maintains over 2,700 acres of parks space across the city. Parks and educational facilities such as Tacoma Nature Center, Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium, Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, and Fort Nisqually Living History Museum are regional attractions that exemplify the best Tacoma has to offer. This, no doubt, is due to the legacy of our parks’ fore- fathers and the ongoing support for parks by the current generation of Tacomans. Thanks to a voter-approved bond measure in 2005, parks across the city are in the process of being revitalized with new equipment, facili- ties, public art and safe playgrounds. These tax dollars are going a long way to make needed improvements. However, parks still face many challenges. One is the rising cost of parks maintenance and operations (M&O). With decreased funds and increased costs due to infla- tion, our parks district faces a declining M&O budget. Just like many of us, parks have dug deep into their pockets, cutting back and spending down reserves. In difficult economic times, we’ve seen a rise in parks usage, with 2009 seeing a record high. The lesson: we need our parks now more than ever. There have not been any additional funds for M&O since the 1990 voter-approved levy lid life – twenty years ago! I-747, which passed in 2001, has further decreased financial resources by limiting property taxes. Levy dol- lars account for nearly 50 percent of the annual opera- tions and maintenance funding. In response, “…Metro Parks Tacoma has cut $2 million in expenses this year through staff reductions, freezing pay rates and increas- ing our dependence on volunteers and partnerships to help take care of our parks,” according to Jack Wilson, MPT’s Executive Director. Consequently, this January parks commissioners made the necessary decision to go to the voters and ask for your tax dollar support to continue to provide the current level of services and variety of programs available to parks district users. This means taking care of the basics: grounds maintenance, play- ground safety, children’s programming, keeping restrooms open, recreational sports and much more. The Metro Parks board, leadership, and staff have proven that they are accountable and responsive to the needs of the public by successfully implementing over thirty 2005 parks bonds projects within budget and in a timely manner, and are on the road to completing all projects by 2014. Projects like renovation of Stewart Heights sports complex, new playground equipment citywide, and the Chinese Reconciliation Park are just a few examples of what makes Tacoma a vibrant, healthy, and diverse place to live, work, and play. It would be wasteful and irresponsible to allow these new facilities and resources to deteriorate over time due to lack of maintenance. In 2005, the community strongly supported funding these parks improvements. In 2010, the community should come together in support of maintaining these jewels of our urban community by passing the first levy lid lift in twenty years. Doing so will ensure that tax dol- lars already spent are not wasted, and it will help pre- serve resources and extend the lifespan of new facilities long into the future. That’s a win-win situation that our children will thank us for. Tacoma’s parks system contributes immensely to the quality of life and livability in this urban region of Pierce County. We take pride in our parks, and it shows! Let’s continue to show that pride by funding our parks main- tenance and operations. On Mar. 11, Tahoma Audubon’s Board voted to endorse Prop.1, and we urge you to join us Apr. 27 by voting YES to keep our parks clean, green and safe. Learn more about Prop.1 by visiting www.neighbors- forparks.org or calling 253-229-9373. Disclosure: Krystal Kyer, Tahoma Audubon’s Conservation Coordinator staff also serves on the Park Board of Commissioners. April 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 3 " id="pdf-obj-1-7" src="pdf-obj-1-7.jpg">

Climate change threatens hundreds of species

The State of the Birds: 2010 Report on Climate Change,

follows a comprehensive report released a year ago show- ing that that nearly a third of the nation’s 800 bird species are endangered, threatened or in significant decline. The report, a collaboration of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife

Service and experts from the nation’s leading conservation organizations, shows that climate changes will have an increasingly disruptive effect on bird species in all habitats, with oceanic and Hawaiian birds in greatest peril. Key findings from the “State of the Birds” climate change report include:

• Oceanic birds are among the most vulnerable species because they don’t raise many young each year; they face challenges from a rapidly changing marine ecosystem; and they nest on islands that may be flooded as sea levels rise. All 67 oceanic bird species, such as petrels and alba- trosses, are among the most vulnerable birds on Earth to climate change. • Hawaiian birds such as endangered species Puaiohi and ’Akiapōlā’au already face multiple threats and are increasingly challenged by mosquito-borne diseases and invasive species as climate change alters their native habitats.

• Birds in coastal, arctic/alpine, and grassland habitats, as well as those on Caribbean and other Pacific islands show intermediate levels of vulnerability; most birds in aridlands, wetlands, and forests show relatively low vulnerability to climate change. • For bird species that are already of conservation con- cern such as the golden-cheeked warbler, whooping crane, and spectacled eider, the added vulnerability to climate change may hasten declines or prevent recovery. • The report identified common bird species such as the American oystercatcher, common nighthawk, and north- ern pintail that are likely to become species of conserva- tion concern as a result of climate change. The report is the product of a collaborative effort as part of the U.S. North American Bird Conservation Initiative, between federal and state wildlife agencies, and scientific and conservation organizations including partners from the American Bird Conservancy, Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Klamath Bird Observatory, National Audubon Society, The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, The Nature Conservancy, U.S.D.A. Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Geological Survey.

When the recent earthquake hit Chile in March, I was sit- ting on the third floor of a hotel on the west coast of Mexico for a pleasant vacation. The porch of the hotel room literally sat above the beach, giving one the impression of actu- ally being out over the water. The Brown Pelicans and Magnificent Frigatebird where flying at eye level, and the thought of tsunami came to mind. While CNN was covering tsunami warnings for Hawaii, there was no news of the west coast of Mexico. For the next three days the water was a little choppier, but luckily no giant wave came and washed over the third floor of my hotel. I was safe from nature’s wrath. Unfortunately, a new report indicates that birds may not come out so well from man’s effect on nature.

and Returning Members

welco M e to New

February 16, 2010 to March 15, 2010

Chapter New and Returning:

Annette Dolores Pinkerton, Ruth

Carlson, Dale & Dorris Richards, Kelly & Mark Stave, Marjoire Shae & Bill Richards, Susan Greenwood, Cindy Mish, Dennis Weeks, Mary Siegenthaler, Mary Kun, Lynn Cawthra, Mera Neufeldt, David & Veronica Kulman, Karin Harris, Wayne Knight.

Chapter & Joint Renewals with National, Recruited through Tahoma Audubon Society:

Diane Kerlin, Diane Christensen, Keith

Palmquist, Roger & Rita Indrebo, Debbie Vinyard, Lynne Glad.

Introductory, Recruited through Tahoma Audubon Society:

Nathaniel Bushley, Laura & Jeff Barber,

Lorinda Cox, Dick Dorsett.

Introductory, Recruited through National Audubon Society:

James Barr, Norman Becker, Fern Bolyard, Lorrie Carr, Rachel Clemmer, Lisa Cosgrove, Patricia Crockett, Grace Cunningham, Bonnie Donough, Michael Downs, Rebecca Felt, Lisa Flesher, Joanne Gilkison, Carla Gramlich, Janice Herbrand, Nancy Jones, Diane Jones, Betty Karr, Freda Kiser, Sue Ellen Knieper, John Koehler, Arlene Leschack, Dixie Lowman, Donna May, Barbara McCoy, Claudia Messenger, Robert

Miller, Ross Minckler, Alice Onacki, Niel Mullen, Kalli Priidik, Jean Prout, Colleen Rogan, David Sailer, Ruth Sammons, Barbara Schaetti, Marion Shufelt, Elaine Smillie, Isabelle Smith, Dale Subitch, E. Taylor, Terry Smith, Tanya Thompson, Margit T h o r v a l d s o n , Ingrid Walker, K. Wetzel, Gordon White, Robin Wilson, Michael Workman, Margaret Zahl, Janet Pool, Jeanne Dryfoos, Patsy Dunnington, Lynda Flanagan, Janet Harper, Hilary Klein, Keith Palmquist, Clyde Praye, Leo Ross, L.S. Stosalovich, Maude Valentine, Edward Clegg, Judd & Sally Day, R.B. Tillerson. When renewal time comes: A month before your membership is expiring, we will send you a reminder to renew. Please renew through us, not through National Audubon. They do not give us a share of renewal dues, hence we are unable to support a membership with the Towhee for you. You will not get a to- whee newsletter if you renew through national. National will send you packs of renewal notices---ignore them! We ask you to renew here through us for a Chapter Only membership or a Joint membership which includes a Chapter Membership and a National one. If you have questions, call Thelma Gilmur, Membership Chair, 253-564-8210.

executive director’s Corner Climate change threatens hundreds of species The State of the Birds: 2010 Reporty an Flint Executive Director bryanflint@tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Kr y stal K y er Conservation Coordinator kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org 253-232-9978 Ste p hanie Swaim Education Coordinator StephSwaim@tahomaaudubon.org 253-327-9480 Cami Kesin g er Develo p ment Coordinator ckesinger @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Graham Taylor Volunteer Coordinator 253-565-1884 gtaylor@tahomaaudubon.org Education Intern kbenton @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-1884 Tahoma Audubon Board Officers John Garner President Marjorie Shea Vice President Jane Brosius Secretary Kathleen Nelson Treasurer Tahoma Audubon Board Members 2010 Thelma Gilmur Ione Clagett Dick Carkner Melissa Paulson Dan Sherman Bill Smith Peggy L. Kopf Tanja Scott Darby Veeck Charles Griffin The Towhee is a publication of the Tahoma Audubon Society . The Tahoma Audubon Society was chartered in 1969. TAS advo- cates for the protection of wildlife and promotes conservation through education and activities that enrich its member’s experiences in and with the natural world. The Towhee is published monthly, ten times a year, with combined Jul/Aug and Dec/Jan issues. Submissions of articles and photographs of birds, bird lore, natural history, conservation, and environmental education are reviewed and considered for inclusion by the editor. Copy is due by the 15th of the month and may be sent by e-mail, disk, or typed. E-mail submissions to editor@tahomaaudubon.org. Editors : David Cohn, David Lev Mailing : Vera & John Cragin and Winfield Giddings Design & Layout : Robert Kelton: robert_kelton@ mac.com Printing : Consolidated Press Page 2 www.tahomaaudubon.org April 2010 e N v iro N M e N t Matters Enhance wildlife habitat in your backyard Food. Water. Shelter. Breeding and Nesting. These are the essential habitat components necessary for sur- vival on earth. Where any one of those components are lacking, you are likely to see much less diversity of wildlife. Whether you live in a downtown condo or near the forested foothills of the largest mountain in the con- tiguous United States, there are actions you can take to create and enhance habitat for wildlife right in your own backyard (or windowsill). These actions range from simple and cheap to expensive and time-consum- ing. Let’s focus on just a few of the easier actions. If you live in a condo or apartment or have next to no yard, consider doing one of the following: ♦ Put up a hummingbird feeder, suet or seed feeder to attract birds, especially in winter months when food is scarce ♦ Plant flowers and native plants in pots or hanging containers that attract wildlife and provide food and shelter from predators ♦ Add a water feature like a bird bath or small fountain; be sure to clean frequently ♦ Have a pet? After grooming, put fir outside for birds to use in nests If you have a yard, consider additional actions: ♦ Compost yard waste on site by creating a shelter of woody debris pile perfect for birds and small critters ♦ Plant a variety of native plants, being sure to include plants in all the different layers: small flowering plants, shrubs, and trees ♦ Put up a bat box or bird nest box in your yard ♦ Practice natural yard care techniques, cutting down on use of toxins and recycling organic materials ♦ Build a beautiful and functional rain garden to maintain storm water on site ♦ Install a larger water feature like a pond with a stream that reuses the water If you spend time in your neighborhood park, you may have noticed a lot of invasive plant species. Our parks need your help! Consider joining a volunteer group in adopting a site to restore or grab your family and friends, church group, co-workers or youth group and make it a fun and rewarding, team-building com- munity service project. Take a couple of these actions and try them today – in honor of Earth Day – and make it a habit, everyday! Here are some handy local resources if you are inter- ested in any of the above ideas: Rain Gardens Workshops : Stewardship Partners and Stream Team are holding free work- shops this spring throughout Pierce County. Call 253- 845-2973 for dates, locations, and to reg- ister. Nominate your- self for a free rain garden if you live in Eatonville or Puyallup. Visit: Contact Krystal at 253-232-9978. www.stweardship- Or kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org parnters.org for more information. Bird Nest Boxes, Bat Boxes, Ponds, and Native Plants : visit Adriana Hess Audubon Center to see a demonstration of the possibilities of converting your backyard into a wildlife sanctuary, and for access to resources and information. Natural Yard Care & Composting Workshops : Tacoma Pierce County Health Department is offering free ‘natural yard care’ workshops this spring around Pierce County. Contact Geoff Rinehart at 253-798- 4587 for dates, locations, and registration. The Green Tacoma Partnership is dedicated to maintaining and restoring our urban natural areas with the support of volunteers like you! To learn more abou t volunteering in our parks and open spaces visit: www.greentacoma.org or give me a call at 253- 232-9978. Earth Day on the Bay! Join Citizens for a Healthy Bay for Earth Day 2010 and donate a day to the Bay! This year’s annual Earth Day project will be held at Middle Waterway. There will be a variety of hands-on and educational activities suitable for all ages. Urban Forester Ramie Pierce will be on hand to give out a free tree and TAGRO potting mix to the first 50 participants. Come join us! When: Saturday, April 17, 2010 Time: 9:30 am to 2:30 pm Where: Middle Waterway, 711 E. 11 St. Tacoma, next to Stellar Industrial Supply Morning snacks, drinks and lunch will be provided! Please RSVP for this event by April 9. Call or email Jeanine Riss: jriss@healthybay.org, 253-383-2429. Our sponsors: YES on ProP.1: Parks & Recreation Maintenance Levy By Krystal Kyer Tacoma’s parks are exceptional. We are blessed with a diversity of parks, recreational and educational programs, more so than in most cities our size. In fact, the district maintains over 2,700 acres of parks space across the city. Parks and educational facilities such as Tacoma Nature Center, Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium, Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, and Fort Nisqually Living History Museum are regional attractions that exemplify the best Tacoma has to offer. This, no doubt, is due to the legacy of our parks’ fore- fathers and the ongoing support for parks by the current generation of Tacomans. Thanks to a voter-approved bond measure in 2005, parks across the city are in the process of being revitalized with new equipment, facili- ties, public art and safe playgrounds. These tax dollars are going a long way to make needed improvements. However, parks still face many challenges. One is the rising cost of parks maintenance and operations (M&O). With decreased funds and increased costs due to infla- tion, our parks district faces a declining M&O budget. Just like many of us, parks have dug deep into their pockets, cutting back and spending down reserves. In difficult economic times, we’ve seen a rise in parks usage, with 2009 seeing a record high. The lesson: we need our parks now more than ever. There have not been any additional funds for M&O since the 1990 voter-approved levy lid life – twenty years ago! I-747, which passed in 2001, has further decreased financial resources by limiting property taxes. Levy dol- lars account for nearly 50 percent of the annual opera- tions and maintenance funding. In response, “…Metro Parks Tacoma has cut $2 million in expenses this year through staff reductions, freezing pay rates and increas- ing our dependence on volunteers and partnerships to help take care of our parks,” according to Jack Wilson, MPT’s Executive Director. Consequently, this January parks commissioners made the necessary decision to go to the voters and ask for your tax dollar support to continue to provide the current level of services and variety of programs available to parks district users. This means taking care of the basics: grounds maintenance, play- ground safety, children’s programming, keeping restrooms open, recreational sports and much more. The Metro Parks board, leadership, and staff have proven that they are accountable and responsive to the needs of the public by successfully implementing over thirty 2005 parks bonds projects within budget and in a timely manner, and are on the road to completing all projects by 2014. Projects like renovation of Stewart Heights sports complex, new playground equipment citywide, and the Chinese Reconciliation Park are just a few examples of what makes Tacoma a vibrant, healthy, and diverse place to live, work, and play. It would be wasteful and irresponsible to allow these new facilities and resources to deteriorate over time due to lack of maintenance. In 2005, the community strongly supported funding these parks improvements. In 2010, the community should come together in support of maintaining these jewels of our urban community by passing the first levy lid lift in twenty years. Doing so will ensure that tax dol- lars already spent are not wasted, and it will help pre- serve resources and extend the lifespan of new facilities long into the future. That’s a win-win situation that our children will thank us for. Tacoma’s parks system contributes immensely to the quality of life and livability in this urban region of Pierce County. We take pride in our parks, and it shows! Let’s continue to show that pride by funding our parks main- tenance and operations. On Mar. 11, Tahoma Audubon’s Board voted to endorse Prop.1, and we urge you to join us Apr. 27 by voting YES to keep our parks clean, green and safe. Learn more about Prop.1 by visiting www.neighbors- forparks.org or calling 253-229-9373. Disclosure: Krystal Kyer, Tahoma Audubon’s Conservation Coordinator staff also serves on the Park Board of Commissioners. April 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 3 " id="pdf-obj-1-60" src="pdf-obj-1-60.jpg">
The Pierce County Chapter of The National Audubon Society Located in University Place's Adriana Hess Wetlandy an Flint Executive Director bryanflint@tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Kr y stal K y er Conservation Coordinator kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org 253-232-9978 Ste p hanie Swaim Education Coordinator StephSwaim@tahomaaudubon.org 253-327-9480 Cami Kesin g er Develo p ment Coordinator ckesinger @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Graham Taylor Volunteer Coordinator 253-565-1884 gtaylor@tahomaaudubon.org Education Intern kbenton @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-1884 Tahoma Audubon Board Officers John Garner President Marjorie Shea Vice President Jane Brosius Secretary Kathleen Nelson Treasurer Tahoma Audubon Board Members 2010 Thelma Gilmur Ione Clagett Dick Carkner Melissa Paulson Dan Sherman Bill Smith Peggy L. Kopf Tanja Scott Darby Veeck Charles Griffin " id="pdf-obj-1-63" src="pdf-obj-1-63.jpg">

The Pierce County Chapter of The National Audubon Society

Located in University Place's Adriana Hess Wetland Park

Office hours 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Front desk 253-565-9278

  • 2917 Morrison Rd W University Place, WA 98466

Tahoma Audubon Staff

Bryan Flint

Executive Director

253-565-9129

Krystal Kyer

Conservation Coordinator

253-232-9978

Stephanie Swaim

Education Coordinator

253-327-9480

Cami Kesinger

Development Coordinator

253-565-9129

Graham Taylor

Volunteer Coordinator

253-565-1884

gtaylor@tahomaaudubon.org

Ken Benton

Education Intern

253-565-1884

Tahoma Audubon Board Officers

John Garner

President

Marjorie Shea

Vice President

Jane Brosius

Secretary

Kathleen Nelson

Treasurer

Tahoma Audubon Board Members 2010

Thelma Gilmur

Ione Clagett

Dick Carkner

Melissa Paulson

Dan Sherman

Bill Smith

Peggy L. Kopf

Tanja Scott

Darby Veeck

Charles Griffin

The Towhee is a publication of the Tahoma Audubon Society.

The Tahoma Audubon Society was chartered in 1969. TAS advo- cates for the protection of wildlife and promotes conservation through education and activities that enrich its member’s experiences in and with the natural world.

The Towhee is published monthly, ten times a year, with combined Jul/Aug and Dec/Jan issues. Submissions of articles and photographs of birds, bird lore, natural history, conservation, and environmental education are reviewed and considered for inclusion by the editor. Copy is due by the 15th of the month and may be sent by e-mail,

disk, or typed. E-mail submissions to editor@tahomaaudubon.org. Editors: David Cohn, David Lev Mailing: Vera & John Cragin and Winfield Giddings Design & Layout: Robert Kelton: robert_kelton@ mac.com Printing: Consolidated Press

Page 2

www.tahomaaudubon.org

April 2010

e N v iro N M e N t Matters

executive director’s Corner Climate change threatens hundreds of species The State of the Birds: 2010 Reporty an Flint Executive Director bryanflint@tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Kr y stal K y er Conservation Coordinator kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org 253-232-9978 Ste p hanie Swaim Education Coordinator StephSwaim@tahomaaudubon.org 253-327-9480 Cami Kesin g er Develo p ment Coordinator ckesinger @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Graham Taylor Volunteer Coordinator 253-565-1884 gtaylor@tahomaaudubon.org Education Intern kbenton @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-1884 Tahoma Audubon Board Officers John Garner President Marjorie Shea Vice President Jane Brosius Secretary Kathleen Nelson Treasurer Tahoma Audubon Board Members 2010 Thelma Gilmur Ione Clagett Dick Carkner Melissa Paulson Dan Sherman Bill Smith Peggy L. Kopf Tanja Scott Darby Veeck Charles Griffin The Towhee is a publication of the Tahoma Audubon Society . The Tahoma Audubon Society was chartered in 1969. TAS advo- cates for the protection of wildlife and promotes conservation through education and activities that enrich its member’s experiences in and with the natural world. The Towhee is published monthly, ten times a year, with combined Jul/Aug and Dec/Jan issues. Submissions of articles and photographs of birds, bird lore, natural history, conservation, and environmental education are reviewed and considered for inclusion by the editor. Copy is due by the 15th of the month and may be sent by e-mail, disk, or typed. E-mail submissions to editor@tahomaaudubon.org. Editors : David Cohn, David Lev Mailing : Vera & John Cragin and Winfield Giddings Design & Layout : Robert Kelton: robert_kelton@ mac.com Printing : Consolidated Press Page 2 www.tahomaaudubon.org April 2010 e N v iro N M e N t Matters Enhance wildlife habitat in your backyard Food. Water. Shelter. Breeding and Nesting. These are the essential habitat components necessary for sur- vival on earth. Where any one of those components are lacking, you are likely to see much less diversity of wildlife. Whether you live in a downtown condo or near the forested foothills of the largest mountain in the con- tiguous United States, there are actions you can take to create and enhance habitat for wildlife right in your own backyard (or windowsill). These actions range from simple and cheap to expensive and time-consum- ing. Let’s focus on just a few of the easier actions. If you live in a condo or apartment or have next to no yard, consider doing one of the following: ♦ Put up a hummingbird feeder, suet or seed feeder to attract birds, especially in winter months when food is scarce ♦ Plant flowers and native plants in pots or hanging containers that attract wildlife and provide food and shelter from predators ♦ Add a water feature like a bird bath or small fountain; be sure to clean frequently ♦ Have a pet? After grooming, put fir outside for birds to use in nests If you have a yard, consider additional actions: ♦ Compost yard waste on site by creating a shelter of woody debris pile perfect for birds and small critters ♦ Plant a variety of native plants, being sure to include plants in all the different layers: small flowering plants, shrubs, and trees ♦ Put up a bat box or bird nest box in your yard ♦ Practice natural yard care techniques, cutting down on use of toxins and recycling organic materials ♦ Build a beautiful and functional rain garden to maintain storm water on site ♦ Install a larger water feature like a pond with a stream that reuses the water If you spend time in your neighborhood park, you may have noticed a lot of invasive plant species. Our parks need your help! Consider joining a volunteer group in adopting a site to restore or grab your family and friends, church group, co-workers or youth group and make it a fun and rewarding, team-building com- munity service project. Take a couple of these actions and try them today – in honor of Earth Day – and make it a habit, everyday! Here are some handy local resources if you are inter- ested in any of the above ideas: Rain Gardens Workshops : Stewardship Partners and Stream Team are holding free work- shops this spring throughout Pierce County. Call 253- 845-2973 for dates, locations, and to reg- ister. Nominate your- self for a free rain garden if you live in Eatonville or Puyallup. Visit: Contact Krystal at 253-232-9978. www.stweardship- Or kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org parnters.org for more information. Bird Nest Boxes, Bat Boxes, Ponds, and Native Plants : visit Adriana Hess Audubon Center to see a demonstration of the possibilities of converting your backyard into a wildlife sanctuary, and for access to resources and information. Natural Yard Care & Composting Workshops : Tacoma Pierce County Health Department is offering free ‘natural yard care’ workshops this spring around Pierce County. Contact Geoff Rinehart at 253-798- 4587 for dates, locations, and registration. The Green Tacoma Partnership is dedicated to maintaining and restoring our urban natural areas with the support of volunteers like you! To learn more abou t volunteering in our parks and open spaces visit: www.greentacoma.org or give me a call at 253- 232-9978. Earth Day on the Bay! Join Citizens for a Healthy Bay for Earth Day 2010 and donate a day to the Bay! This year’s annual Earth Day project will be held at Middle Waterway. There will be a variety of hands-on and educational activities suitable for all ages. Urban Forester Ramie Pierce will be on hand to give out a free tree and TAGRO potting mix to the first 50 participants. Come join us! When: Saturday, April 17, 2010 Time: 9:30 am to 2:30 pm Where: Middle Waterway, 711 E. 11 St. Tacoma, next to Stellar Industrial Supply Morning snacks, drinks and lunch will be provided! Please RSVP for this event by April 9. Call or email Jeanine Riss: jriss@healthybay.org, 253-383-2429. Our sponsors: YES on ProP.1: Parks & Recreation Maintenance Levy By Krystal Kyer Tacoma’s parks are exceptional. We are blessed with a diversity of parks, recreational and educational programs, more so than in most cities our size. In fact, the district maintains over 2,700 acres of parks space across the city. Parks and educational facilities such as Tacoma Nature Center, Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium, Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, and Fort Nisqually Living History Museum are regional attractions that exemplify the best Tacoma has to offer. This, no doubt, is due to the legacy of our parks’ fore- fathers and the ongoing support for parks by the current generation of Tacomans. Thanks to a voter-approved bond measure in 2005, parks across the city are in the process of being revitalized with new equipment, facili- ties, public art and safe playgrounds. These tax dollars are going a long way to make needed improvements. However, parks still face many challenges. One is the rising cost of parks maintenance and operations (M&O). With decreased funds and increased costs due to infla- tion, our parks district faces a declining M&O budget. Just like many of us, parks have dug deep into their pockets, cutting back and spending down reserves. In difficult economic times, we’ve seen a rise in parks usage, with 2009 seeing a record high. The lesson: we need our parks now more than ever. There have not been any additional funds for M&O since the 1990 voter-approved levy lid life – twenty years ago! I-747, which passed in 2001, has further decreased financial resources by limiting property taxes. Levy dol- lars account for nearly 50 percent of the annual opera- tions and maintenance funding. In response, “…Metro Parks Tacoma has cut $2 million in expenses this year through staff reductions, freezing pay rates and increas- ing our dependence on volunteers and partnerships to help take care of our parks,” according to Jack Wilson, MPT’s Executive Director. Consequently, this January parks commissioners made the necessary decision to go to the voters and ask for your tax dollar support to continue to provide the current level of services and variety of programs available to parks district users. This means taking care of the basics: grounds maintenance, play- ground safety, children’s programming, keeping restrooms open, recreational sports and much more. The Metro Parks board, leadership, and staff have proven that they are accountable and responsive to the needs of the public by successfully implementing over thirty 2005 parks bonds projects within budget and in a timely manner, and are on the road to completing all projects by 2014. Projects like renovation of Stewart Heights sports complex, new playground equipment citywide, and the Chinese Reconciliation Park are just a few examples of what makes Tacoma a vibrant, healthy, and diverse place to live, work, and play. It would be wasteful and irresponsible to allow these new facilities and resources to deteriorate over time due to lack of maintenance. In 2005, the community strongly supported funding these parks improvements. In 2010, the community should come together in support of maintaining these jewels of our urban community by passing the first levy lid lift in twenty years. Doing so will ensure that tax dol- lars already spent are not wasted, and it will help pre- serve resources and extend the lifespan of new facilities long into the future. That’s a win-win situation that our children will thank us for. Tacoma’s parks system contributes immensely to the quality of life and livability in this urban region of Pierce County. We take pride in our parks, and it shows! Let’s continue to show that pride by funding our parks main- tenance and operations. On Mar. 11, Tahoma Audubon’s Board voted to endorse Prop.1, and we urge you to join us Apr. 27 by voting YES to keep our parks clean, green and safe. Learn more about Prop.1 by visiting www.neighbors- forparks.org or calling 253-229-9373. Disclosure: Krystal Kyer, Tahoma Audubon’s Conservation Coordinator staff also serves on the Park Board of Commissioners. April 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 3 " id="pdf-obj-1-254" src="pdf-obj-1-254.jpg">

Enhance wildlife habitat in your backyard

Food. Water. Shelter. Breeding and Nesting. These are the essential habitat components necessary for sur- vival on earth. Where any one of those components are lacking, you are likely to see much less diversity of wildlife. Whether you live in a downtown condo or near the forested foothills of the largest mountain in the con- tiguous United States, there are actions you can take to create and enhance habitat for wildlife right in your own backyard (or windowsill). These actions range from simple and cheap to expensive and time-consum- ing. Let’s focus on just a few of the easier actions. If you live in a condo or apartment or have next to no yard, consider doing one of the following:

Put up a hummingbird feeder, suet or seed feeder to attract birds, especially in winter months when food is scarce

Plant flowers and native plants in pots or hanging containers that attract wildlife and provide food and shelter from predators

Add a water feature like a bird bath or small fountain; be sure to clean frequently

Have a pet? After grooming, put fir outside for birds to use in nests

If you have a yard, consider additional actions:

Compost yard waste on site by creating a shelter of woody debris pile perfect for birds and small critters

Plant a variety of native plants, being sure to include plants in all the different layers: small

executive director’s Corner Climate change threatens hundreds of species The State of the Birds: 2010 Reporty an Flint Executive Director bryanflint@tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Kr y stal K y er Conservation Coordinator kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org 253-232-9978 Ste p hanie Swaim Education Coordinator StephSwaim@tahomaaudubon.org 253-327-9480 Cami Kesin g er Develo p ment Coordinator ckesinger @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Graham Taylor Volunteer Coordinator 253-565-1884 gtaylor@tahomaaudubon.org Education Intern kbenton @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-1884 Tahoma Audubon Board Officers John Garner President Marjorie Shea Vice President Jane Brosius Secretary Kathleen Nelson Treasurer Tahoma Audubon Board Members 2010 Thelma Gilmur Ione Clagett Dick Carkner Melissa Paulson Dan Sherman Bill Smith Peggy L. Kopf Tanja Scott Darby Veeck Charles Griffin The Towhee is a publication of the Tahoma Audubon Society . The Tahoma Audubon Society was chartered in 1969. TAS advo- cates for the protection of wildlife and promotes conservation through education and activities that enrich its member’s experiences in and with the natural world. The Towhee is published monthly, ten times a year, with combined Jul/Aug and Dec/Jan issues. Submissions of articles and photographs of birds, bird lore, natural history, conservation, and environmental education are reviewed and considered for inclusion by the editor. Copy is due by the 15th of the month and may be sent by e-mail, disk, or typed. E-mail submissions to editor@tahomaaudubon.org. Editors : David Cohn, David Lev Mailing : Vera & John Cragin and Winfield Giddings Design & Layout : Robert Kelton: robert_kelton@ mac.com Printing : Consolidated Press Page 2 www.tahomaaudubon.org April 2010 e N v iro N M e N t Matters Enhance wildlife habitat in your backyard Food. Water. Shelter. Breeding and Nesting. These are the essential habitat components necessary for sur- vival on earth. Where any one of those components are lacking, you are likely to see much less diversity of wildlife. Whether you live in a downtown condo or near the forested foothills of the largest mountain in the con- tiguous United States, there are actions you can take to create and enhance habitat for wildlife right in your own backyard (or windowsill). These actions range from simple and cheap to expensive and time-consum- ing. Let’s focus on just a few of the easier actions. If you live in a condo or apartment or have next to no yard, consider doing one of the following: ♦ Put up a hummingbird feeder, suet or seed feeder to attract birds, especially in winter months when food is scarce ♦ Plant flowers and native plants in pots or hanging containers that attract wildlife and provide food and shelter from predators ♦ Add a water feature like a bird bath or small fountain; be sure to clean frequently ♦ Have a pet? After grooming, put fir outside for birds to use in nests If you have a yard, consider additional actions: ♦ Compost yard waste on site by creating a shelter of woody debris pile perfect for birds and small critters ♦ Plant a variety of native plants, being sure to include plants in all the different layers: small flowering plants, shrubs, and trees ♦ Put up a bat box or bird nest box in your yard ♦ Practice natural yard care techniques, cutting down on use of toxins and recycling organic materials ♦ Build a beautiful and functional rain garden to maintain storm water on site ♦ Install a larger water feature like a pond with a stream that reuses the water If you spend time in your neighborhood park, you may have noticed a lot of invasive plant species. Our parks need your help! Consider joining a volunteer group in adopting a site to restore or grab your family and friends, church group, co-workers or youth group and make it a fun and rewarding, team-building com- munity service project. Take a couple of these actions and try them today – in honor of Earth Day – and make it a habit, everyday! Here are some handy local resources if you are inter- ested in any of the above ideas: Rain Gardens Workshops : Stewardship Partners and Stream Team are holding free work- shops this spring throughout Pierce County. Call 253- 845-2973 for dates, locations, and to reg- ister. Nominate your- self for a free rain garden if you live in Eatonville or Puyallup. Visit: Contact Krystal at 253-232-9978. www.stweardship- Or kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org parnters.org for more information. Bird Nest Boxes, Bat Boxes, Ponds, and Native Plants : visit Adriana Hess Audubon Center to see a demonstration of the possibilities of converting your backyard into a wildlife sanctuary, and for access to resources and information. Natural Yard Care & Composting Workshops : Tacoma Pierce County Health Department is offering free ‘natural yard care’ workshops this spring around Pierce County. Contact Geoff Rinehart at 253-798- 4587 for dates, locations, and registration. The Green Tacoma Partnership is dedicated to maintaining and restoring our urban natural areas with the support of volunteers like you! To learn more abou t volunteering in our parks and open spaces visit: www.greentacoma.org or give me a call at 253- 232-9978. Earth Day on the Bay! Join Citizens for a Healthy Bay for Earth Day 2010 and donate a day to the Bay! This year’s annual Earth Day project will be held at Middle Waterway. There will be a variety of hands-on and educational activities suitable for all ages. Urban Forester Ramie Pierce will be on hand to give out a free tree and TAGRO potting mix to the first 50 participants. Come join us! When: Saturday, April 17, 2010 Time: 9:30 am to 2:30 pm Where: Middle Waterway, 711 E. 11 St. Tacoma, next to Stellar Industrial Supply Morning snacks, drinks and lunch will be provided! Please RSVP for this event by April 9. Call or email Jeanine Riss: jriss@healthybay.org, 253-383-2429. Our sponsors: YES on ProP.1: Parks & Recreation Maintenance Levy By Krystal Kyer Tacoma’s parks are exceptional. We are blessed with a diversity of parks, recreational and educational programs, more so than in most cities our size. In fact, the district maintains over 2,700 acres of parks space across the city. Parks and educational facilities such as Tacoma Nature Center, Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium, Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, and Fort Nisqually Living History Museum are regional attractions that exemplify the best Tacoma has to offer. This, no doubt, is due to the legacy of our parks’ fore- fathers and the ongoing support for parks by the current generation of Tacomans. Thanks to a voter-approved bond measure in 2005, parks across the city are in the process of being revitalized with new equipment, facili- ties, public art and safe playgrounds. These tax dollars are going a long way to make needed improvements. However, parks still face many challenges. One is the rising cost of parks maintenance and operations (M&O). With decreased funds and increased costs due to infla- tion, our parks district faces a declining M&O budget. Just like many of us, parks have dug deep into their pockets, cutting back and spending down reserves. In difficult economic times, we’ve seen a rise in parks usage, with 2009 seeing a record high. The lesson: we need our parks now more than ever. There have not been any additional funds for M&O since the 1990 voter-approved levy lid life – twenty years ago! I-747, which passed in 2001, has further decreased financial resources by limiting property taxes. Levy dol- lars account for nearly 50 percent of the annual opera- tions and maintenance funding. In response, “…Metro Parks Tacoma has cut $2 million in expenses this year through staff reductions, freezing pay rates and increas- ing our dependence on volunteers and partnerships to help take care of our parks,” according to Jack Wilson, MPT’s Executive Director. Consequently, this January parks commissioners made the necessary decision to go to the voters and ask for your tax dollar support to continue to provide the current level of services and variety of programs available to parks district users. This means taking care of the basics: grounds maintenance, play- ground safety, children’s programming, keeping restrooms open, recreational sports and much more. The Metro Parks board, leadership, and staff have proven that they are accountable and responsive to the needs of the public by successfully implementing over thirty 2005 parks bonds projects within budget and in a timely manner, and are on the road to completing all projects by 2014. Projects like renovation of Stewart Heights sports complex, new playground equipment citywide, and the Chinese Reconciliation Park are just a few examples of what makes Tacoma a vibrant, healthy, and diverse place to live, work, and play. It would be wasteful and irresponsible to allow these new facilities and resources to deteriorate over time due to lack of maintenance. In 2005, the community strongly supported funding these parks improvements. In 2010, the community should come together in support of maintaining these jewels of our urban community by passing the first levy lid lift in twenty years. Doing so will ensure that tax dol- lars already spent are not wasted, and it will help pre- serve resources and extend the lifespan of new facilities long into the future. That’s a win-win situation that our children will thank us for. Tacoma’s parks system contributes immensely to the quality of life and livability in this urban region of Pierce County. We take pride in our parks, and it shows! Let’s continue to show that pride by funding our parks main- tenance and operations. On Mar. 11, Tahoma Audubon’s Board voted to endorse Prop.1, and we urge you to join us Apr. 27 by voting YES to keep our parks clean, green and safe. Learn more about Prop.1 by visiting www.neighbors- forparks.org or calling 253-229-9373. Disclosure: Krystal Kyer, Tahoma Audubon’s Conservation Coordinator staff also serves on the Park Board of Commissioners. April 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 3 " id="pdf-obj-1-281" src="pdf-obj-1-281.jpg">

flowering plants, shrubs, and trees Put up a bat box or bird nest box in your yard Practice natural yard care techniques, cutting down on use of toxins and recycling organic materials Build a beautiful and functional rain garden to maintain storm water on site Install a larger water feature like a pond with a stream that reuses the water If you spend time in your neighborhood park, you may have noticed a lot of invasive plant species. Our parks need your help! Consider joining a volunteer group in adopting a site to restore or grab your family and friends, church group, co-workers or youth group and make it a fun and rewarding, team-building com- munity service project. Take a couple of these actions and try them today – in honor of Earth Day – and make it a habit, everyday! Here are some handy local resources if you are inter- ested in any of the above ideas:

Rain Gardens Workshops: Stewardship Partners

and Stream Team are holding free work- shops this spring throughout Pierce County. Call 253- 845-2973 for dates, locations, and to reg- ister. Nominate your- self for a free rain

garden if you live in Eatonville or Puyallup. Visit:

Contact Krystal at 253-232-9978.
www.stweardship- Or kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org

parnters.org for more information. Bird Nest Boxes, Bat Boxes, Ponds, and Native Plants: visit Adriana Hess Audubon Center to see a demonstration of the possibilities of converting your backyard into a wildlife sanctuary, and for access to resources and information. Natural Yard Care & Composting Workshops:

Tacoma Pierce County Health Department is offering free ‘natural yard care’ workshops this spring around Pierce County. Contact Geoff Rinehart at 253-798- 4587 for dates, locations, and registration. The Green Tacoma Partnership is dedicated to maintaining and restoring our urban natural areas with

the support of volunteers like you! To learn more about volunteering in our parks and open spaces

visit: www.greentacoma.org or give me a call at 253-

232-9978.

executive director’s Corner Climate change threatens hundreds of species The State of the Birds: 2010 Reporty an Flint Executive Director bryanflint@tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Kr y stal K y er Conservation Coordinator kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org 253-232-9978 Ste p hanie Swaim Education Coordinator StephSwaim@tahomaaudubon.org 253-327-9480 Cami Kesin g er Develo p ment Coordinator ckesinger @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Graham Taylor Volunteer Coordinator 253-565-1884 gtaylor@tahomaaudubon.org Education Intern kbenton @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-1884 Tahoma Audubon Board Officers John Garner President Marjorie Shea Vice President Jane Brosius Secretary Kathleen Nelson Treasurer Tahoma Audubon Board Members 2010 Thelma Gilmur Ione Clagett Dick Carkner Melissa Paulson Dan Sherman Bill Smith Peggy L. Kopf Tanja Scott Darby Veeck Charles Griffin The Towhee is a publication of the Tahoma Audubon Society . The Tahoma Audubon Society was chartered in 1969. TAS advo- cates for the protection of wildlife and promotes conservation through education and activities that enrich its member’s experiences in and with the natural world. The Towhee is published monthly, ten times a year, with combined Jul/Aug and Dec/Jan issues. Submissions of articles and photographs of birds, bird lore, natural history, conservation, and environmental education are reviewed and considered for inclusion by the editor. Copy is due by the 15th of the month and may be sent by e-mail, disk, or typed. E-mail submissions to editor@tahomaaudubon.org. Editors : David Cohn, David Lev Mailing : Vera & John Cragin and Winfield Giddings Design & Layout : Robert Kelton: robert_kelton@ mac.com Printing : Consolidated Press Page 2 www.tahomaaudubon.org April 2010 e N v iro N M e N t Matters Enhance wildlife habitat in your backyard Food. Water. Shelter. Breeding and Nesting. These are the essential habitat components necessary for sur- vival on earth. Where any one of those components are lacking, you are likely to see much less diversity of wildlife. Whether you live in a downtown condo or near the forested foothills of the largest mountain in the con- tiguous United States, there are actions you can take to create and enhance habitat for wildlife right in your own backyard (or windowsill). These actions range from simple and cheap to expensive and time-consum- ing. Let’s focus on just a few of the easier actions. If you live in a condo or apartment or have next to no yard, consider doing one of the following: ♦ Put up a hummingbird feeder, suet or seed feeder to attract birds, especially in winter months when food is scarce ♦ Plant flowers and native plants in pots or hanging containers that attract wildlife and provide food and shelter from predators ♦ Add a water feature like a bird bath or small fountain; be sure to clean frequently ♦ Have a pet? After grooming, put fir outside for birds to use in nests If you have a yard, consider additional actions: ♦ Compost yard waste on site by creating a shelter of woody debris pile perfect for birds and small critters ♦ Plant a variety of native plants, being sure to include plants in all the different layers: small flowering plants, shrubs, and trees ♦ Put up a bat box or bird nest box in your yard ♦ Practice natural yard care techniques, cutting down on use of toxins and recycling organic materials ♦ Build a beautiful and functional rain garden to maintain storm water on site ♦ Install a larger water feature like a pond with a stream that reuses the water If you spend time in your neighborhood park, you may have noticed a lot of invasive plant species. Our parks need your help! Consider joining a volunteer group in adopting a site to restore or grab your family and friends, church group, co-workers or youth group and make it a fun and rewarding, team-building com- munity service project. Take a couple of these actions and try them today – in honor of Earth Day – and make it a habit, everyday! Here are some handy local resources if you are inter- ested in any of the above ideas: Rain Gardens Workshops : Stewardship Partners and Stream Team are holding free work- shops this spring throughout Pierce County. Call 253- 845-2973 for dates, locations, and to reg- ister. Nominate your- self for a free rain garden if you live in Eatonville or Puyallup. Visit: Contact Krystal at 253-232-9978. www.stweardship- Or kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org parnters.org for more information. Bird Nest Boxes, Bat Boxes, Ponds, and Native Plants : visit Adriana Hess Audubon Center to see a demonstration of the possibilities of converting your backyard into a wildlife sanctuary, and for access to resources and information. Natural Yard Care & Composting Workshops : Tacoma Pierce County Health Department is offering free ‘natural yard care’ workshops this spring around Pierce County. Contact Geoff Rinehart at 253-798- 4587 for dates, locations, and registration. The Green Tacoma Partnership is dedicated to maintaining and restoring our urban natural areas with the support of volunteers like you! To learn more abou t volunteering in our parks and open spaces visit: www.greentacoma.org or give me a call at 253- 232-9978. Earth Day on the Bay! Join Citizens for a Healthy Bay for Earth Day 2010 and donate a day to the Bay! This year’s annual Earth Day project will be held at Middle Waterway. There will be a variety of hands-on and educational activities suitable for all ages. Urban Forester Ramie Pierce will be on hand to give out a free tree and TAGRO potting mix to the first 50 participants. Come join us! When: Saturday, April 17, 2010 Time: 9:30 am to 2:30 pm Where: Middle Waterway, 711 E. 11 St. Tacoma, next to Stellar Industrial Supply Morning snacks, drinks and lunch will be provided! Please RSVP for this event by April 9. Call or email Jeanine Riss: jriss@healthybay.org, 253-383-2429. Our sponsors: YES on ProP.1: Parks & Recreation Maintenance Levy By Krystal Kyer Tacoma’s parks are exceptional. We are blessed with a diversity of parks, recreational and educational programs, more so than in most cities our size. In fact, the district maintains over 2,700 acres of parks space across the city. Parks and educational facilities such as Tacoma Nature Center, Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium, Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, and Fort Nisqually Living History Museum are regional attractions that exemplify the best Tacoma has to offer. This, no doubt, is due to the legacy of our parks’ fore- fathers and the ongoing support for parks by the current generation of Tacomans. Thanks to a voter-approved bond measure in 2005, parks across the city are in the process of being revitalized with new equipment, facili- ties, public art and safe playgrounds. These tax dollars are going a long way to make needed improvements. However, parks still face many challenges. One is the rising cost of parks maintenance and operations (M&O). With decreased funds and increased costs due to infla- tion, our parks district faces a declining M&O budget. Just like many of us, parks have dug deep into their pockets, cutting back and spending down reserves. In difficult economic times, we’ve seen a rise in parks usage, with 2009 seeing a record high. The lesson: we need our parks now more than ever. There have not been any additional funds for M&O since the 1990 voter-approved levy lid life – twenty years ago! I-747, which passed in 2001, has further decreased financial resources by limiting property taxes. Levy dol- lars account for nearly 50 percent of the annual opera- tions and maintenance funding. In response, “…Metro Parks Tacoma has cut $2 million in expenses this year through staff reductions, freezing pay rates and increas- ing our dependence on volunteers and partnerships to help take care of our parks,” according to Jack Wilson, MPT’s Executive Director. Consequently, this January parks commissioners made the necessary decision to go to the voters and ask for your tax dollar support to continue to provide the current level of services and variety of programs available to parks district users. This means taking care of the basics: grounds maintenance, play- ground safety, children’s programming, keeping restrooms open, recreational sports and much more. The Metro Parks board, leadership, and staff have proven that they are accountable and responsive to the needs of the public by successfully implementing over thirty 2005 parks bonds projects within budget and in a timely manner, and are on the road to completing all projects by 2014. Projects like renovation of Stewart Heights sports complex, new playground equipment citywide, and the Chinese Reconciliation Park are just a few examples of what makes Tacoma a vibrant, healthy, and diverse place to live, work, and play. It would be wasteful and irresponsible to allow these new facilities and resources to deteriorate over time due to lack of maintenance. In 2005, the community strongly supported funding these parks improvements. In 2010, the community should come together in support of maintaining these jewels of our urban community by passing the first levy lid lift in twenty years. Doing so will ensure that tax dol- lars already spent are not wasted, and it will help pre- serve resources and extend the lifespan of new facilities long into the future. That’s a win-win situation that our children will thank us for. Tacoma’s parks system contributes immensely to the quality of life and livability in this urban region of Pierce County. We take pride in our parks, and it shows! Let’s continue to show that pride by funding our parks main- tenance and operations. On Mar. 11, Tahoma Audubon’s Board voted to endorse Prop.1, and we urge you to join us Apr. 27 by voting YES to keep our parks clean, green and safe. Learn more about Prop.1 by visiting www.neighbors- forparks.org or calling 253-229-9373. Disclosure: Krystal Kyer, Tahoma Audubon’s Conservation Coordinator staff also serves on the Park Board of Commissioners. April 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 3 " id="pdf-obj-1-329" src="pdf-obj-1-329.jpg">

Earth Day on the Bay!

Join Citizens for a Healthy Bay for Earth Day 2010 and donate a day to the Bay! This year’s annual Earth Day project will be held at Middle Waterway. There will be a variety of hands-on and educational activities suitable for all ages. Urban Forester Ramie Pierce will be on hand to give out a free tree and TAGRO potting mix to the first 50 participants. Come join us!

executive director’s Corner Climate change threatens hundreds of species The State of the Birds: 2010 Reporty an Flint Executive Director bryanflint@tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Kr y stal K y er Conservation Coordinator kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org 253-232-9978 Ste p hanie Swaim Education Coordinator StephSwaim@tahomaaudubon.org 253-327-9480 Cami Kesin g er Develo p ment Coordinator ckesinger @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Graham Taylor Volunteer Coordinator 253-565-1884 gtaylor@tahomaaudubon.org Education Intern kbenton @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-1884 Tahoma Audubon Board Officers John Garner President Marjorie Shea Vice President Jane Brosius Secretary Kathleen Nelson Treasurer Tahoma Audubon Board Members 2010 Thelma Gilmur Ione Clagett Dick Carkner Melissa Paulson Dan Sherman Bill Smith Peggy L. Kopf Tanja Scott Darby Veeck Charles Griffin The Towhee is a publication of the Tahoma Audubon Society . The Tahoma Audubon Society was chartered in 1969. TAS advo- cates for the protection of wildlife and promotes conservation through education and activities that enrich its member’s experiences in and with the natural world. The Towhee is published monthly, ten times a year, with combined Jul/Aug and Dec/Jan issues. Submissions of articles and photographs of birds, bird lore, natural history, conservation, and environmental education are reviewed and considered for inclusion by the editor. Copy is due by the 15th of the month and may be sent by e-mail, disk, or typed. E-mail submissions to editor@tahomaaudubon.org. Editors : David Cohn, David Lev Mailing : Vera & John Cragin and Winfield Giddings Design & Layout : Robert Kelton: robert_kelton@ mac.com Printing : Consolidated Press Page 2 www.tahomaaudubon.org April 2010 e N v iro N M e N t Matters Enhance wildlife habitat in your backyard Food. Water. Shelter. Breeding and Nesting. These are the essential habitat components necessary for sur- vival on earth. Where any one of those components are lacking, you are likely to see much less diversity of wildlife. Whether you live in a downtown condo or near the forested foothills of the largest mountain in the con- tiguous United States, there are actions you can take to create and enhance habitat for wildlife right in your own backyard (or windowsill). These actions range from simple and cheap to expensive and time-consum- ing. Let’s focus on just a few of the easier actions. If you live in a condo or apartment or have next to no yard, consider doing one of the following: ♦ Put up a hummingbird feeder, suet or seed feeder to attract birds, especially in winter months when food is scarce ♦ Plant flowers and native plants in pots or hanging containers that attract wildlife and provide food and shelter from predators ♦ Add a water feature like a bird bath or small fountain; be sure to clean frequently ♦ Have a pet? After grooming, put fir outside for birds to use in nests If you have a yard, consider additional actions: ♦ Compost yard waste on site by creating a shelter of woody debris pile perfect for birds and small critters ♦ Plant a variety of native plants, being sure to include plants in all the different layers: small flowering plants, shrubs, and trees ♦ Put up a bat box or bird nest box in your yard ♦ Practice natural yard care techniques, cutting down on use of toxins and recycling organic materials ♦ Build a beautiful and functional rain garden to maintain storm water on site ♦ Install a larger water feature like a pond with a stream that reuses the water If you spend time in your neighborhood park, you may have noticed a lot of invasive plant species. Our parks need your help! Consider joining a volunteer group in adopting a site to restore or grab your family and friends, church group, co-workers or youth group and make it a fun and rewarding, team-building com- munity service project. Take a couple of these actions and try them today – in honor of Earth Day – and make it a habit, everyday! Here are some handy local resources if you are inter- ested in any of the above ideas: Rain Gardens Workshops : Stewardship Partners and Stream Team are holding free work- shops this spring throughout Pierce County. Call 253- 845-2973 for dates, locations, and to reg- ister. Nominate your- self for a free rain garden if you live in Eatonville or Puyallup. Visit: Contact Krystal at 253-232-9978. www.stweardship- Or kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org parnters.org for more information. Bird Nest Boxes, Bat Boxes, Ponds, and Native Plants : visit Adriana Hess Audubon Center to see a demonstration of the possibilities of converting your backyard into a wildlife sanctuary, and for access to resources and information. Natural Yard Care & Composting Workshops : Tacoma Pierce County Health Department is offering free ‘natural yard care’ workshops this spring around Pierce County. Contact Geoff Rinehart at 253-798- 4587 for dates, locations, and registration. The Green Tacoma Partnership is dedicated to maintaining and restoring our urban natural areas with the support of volunteers like you! To learn more abou t volunteering in our parks and open spaces visit: www.greentacoma.org or give me a call at 253- 232-9978. Earth Day on the Bay! Join Citizens for a Healthy Bay for Earth Day 2010 and donate a day to the Bay! This year’s annual Earth Day project will be held at Middle Waterway. There will be a variety of hands-on and educational activities suitable for all ages. Urban Forester Ramie Pierce will be on hand to give out a free tree and TAGRO potting mix to the first 50 participants. Come join us! When: Saturday, April 17, 2010 Time: 9:30 am to 2:30 pm Where: Middle Waterway, 711 E. 11 St. Tacoma, next to Stellar Industrial Supply Morning snacks, drinks and lunch will be provided! Please RSVP for this event by April 9. Call or email Jeanine Riss: jriss@healthybay.org, 253-383-2429. Our sponsors: YES on ProP.1: Parks & Recreation Maintenance Levy By Krystal Kyer Tacoma’s parks are exceptional. We are blessed with a diversity of parks, recreational and educational programs, more so than in most cities our size. In fact, the district maintains over 2,700 acres of parks space across the city. Parks and educational facilities such as Tacoma Nature Center, Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium, Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, and Fort Nisqually Living History Museum are regional attractions that exemplify the best Tacoma has to offer. This, no doubt, is due to the legacy of our parks’ fore- fathers and the ongoing support for parks by the current generation of Tacomans. Thanks to a voter-approved bond measure in 2005, parks across the city are in the process of being revitalized with new equipment, facili- ties, public art and safe playgrounds. These tax dollars are going a long way to make needed improvements. However, parks still face many challenges. One is the rising cost of parks maintenance and operations (M&O). With decreased funds and increased costs due to infla- tion, our parks district faces a declining M&O budget. Just like many of us, parks have dug deep into their pockets, cutting back and spending down reserves. In difficult economic times, we’ve seen a rise in parks usage, with 2009 seeing a record high. The lesson: we need our parks now more than ever. There have not been any additional funds for M&O since the 1990 voter-approved levy lid life – twenty years ago! I-747, which passed in 2001, has further decreased financial resources by limiting property taxes. Levy dol- lars account for nearly 50 percent of the annual opera- tions and maintenance funding. In response, “…Metro Parks Tacoma has cut $2 million in expenses this year through staff reductions, freezing pay rates and increas- ing our dependence on volunteers and partnerships to help take care of our parks,” according to Jack Wilson, MPT’s Executive Director. Consequently, this January parks commissioners made the necessary decision to go to the voters and ask for your tax dollar support to continue to provide the current level of services and variety of programs available to parks district users. This means taking care of the basics: grounds maintenance, play- ground safety, children’s programming, keeping restrooms open, recreational sports and much more. The Metro Parks board, leadership, and staff have proven that they are accountable and responsive to the needs of the public by successfully implementing over thirty 2005 parks bonds projects within budget and in a timely manner, and are on the road to completing all projects by 2014. Projects like renovation of Stewart Heights sports complex, new playground equipment citywide, and the Chinese Reconciliation Park are just a few examples of what makes Tacoma a vibrant, healthy, and diverse place to live, work, and play. It would be wasteful and irresponsible to allow these new facilities and resources to deteriorate over time due to lack of maintenance. In 2005, the community strongly supported funding these parks improvements. In 2010, the community should come together in support of maintaining these jewels of our urban community by passing the first levy lid lift in twenty years. Doing so will ensure that tax dol- lars already spent are not wasted, and it will help pre- serve resources and extend the lifespan of new facilities long into the future. That’s a win-win situation that our children will thank us for. Tacoma’s parks system contributes immensely to the quality of life and livability in this urban region of Pierce County. We take pride in our parks, and it shows! Let’s continue to show that pride by funding our parks main- tenance and operations. On Mar. 11, Tahoma Audubon’s Board voted to endorse Prop.1, and we urge you to join us Apr. 27 by voting YES to keep our parks clean, green and safe. Learn more about Prop.1 by visiting www.neighbors- forparks.org or calling 253-229-9373. Disclosure: Krystal Kyer, Tahoma Audubon’s Conservation Coordinator staff also serves on the Park Board of Commissioners. April 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 3 " id="pdf-obj-1-336" src="pdf-obj-1-336.jpg">

When: Saturday, April 17, 2010 Time: 9:30 am to 2:30 pm Where: Middle Waterway, 711 E. 11 th St. Tacoma, next to Stellar Industrial Supply

Morning snacks, drinks and lunch will be provided! Please RSVP for this event by April 9. Call or email Jeanine Riss: jriss@healthybay.org, 253-383-2429.

Our sponsors:

executive director’s Corner Climate change threatens hundreds of species The State of the Birds: 2010 Reporty an Flint Executive Director bryanflint@tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Kr y stal K y er Conservation Coordinator kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org 253-232-9978 Ste p hanie Swaim Education Coordinator StephSwaim@tahomaaudubon.org 253-327-9480 Cami Kesin g er Develo p ment Coordinator ckesinger @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Graham Taylor Volunteer Coordinator 253-565-1884 gtaylor@tahomaaudubon.org Education Intern kbenton @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-1884 Tahoma Audubon Board Officers John Garner President Marjorie Shea Vice President Jane Brosius Secretary Kathleen Nelson Treasurer Tahoma Audubon Board Members 2010 Thelma Gilmur Ione Clagett Dick Carkner Melissa Paulson Dan Sherman Bill Smith Peggy L. Kopf Tanja Scott Darby Veeck Charles Griffin The Towhee is a publication of the Tahoma Audubon Society . The Tahoma Audubon Society was chartered in 1969. TAS advo- cates for the protection of wildlife and promotes conservation through education and activities that enrich its member’s experiences in and with the natural world. The Towhee is published monthly, ten times a year, with combined Jul/Aug and Dec/Jan issues. Submissions of articles and photographs of birds, bird lore, natural history, conservation, and environmental education are reviewed and considered for inclusion by the editor. Copy is due by the 15th of the month and may be sent by e-mail, disk, or typed. E-mail submissions to editor@tahomaaudubon.org. Editors : David Cohn, David Lev Mailing : Vera & John Cragin and Winfield Giddings Design & Layout : Robert Kelton: robert_kelton@ mac.com Printing : Consolidated Press Page 2 www.tahomaaudubon.org April 2010 e N v iro N M e N t Matters Enhance wildlife habitat in your backyard Food. Water. Shelter. Breeding and Nesting. These are the essential habitat components necessary for sur- vival on earth. Where any one of those components are lacking, you are likely to see much less diversity of wildlife. Whether you live in a downtown condo or near the forested foothills of the largest mountain in the con- tiguous United States, there are actions you can take to create and enhance habitat for wildlife right in your own backyard (or windowsill). These actions range from simple and cheap to expensive and time-consum- ing. Let’s focus on just a few of the easier actions. If you live in a condo or apartment or have next to no yard, consider doing one of the following: ♦ Put up a hummingbird feeder, suet or seed feeder to attract birds, especially in winter months when food is scarce ♦ Plant flowers and native plants in pots or hanging containers that attract wildlife and provide food and shelter from predators ♦ Add a water feature like a bird bath or small fountain; be sure to clean frequently ♦ Have a pet? After grooming, put fir outside for birds to use in nests If you have a yard, consider additional actions: ♦ Compost yard waste on site by creating a shelter of woody debris pile perfect for birds and small critters ♦ Plant a variety of native plants, being sure to include plants in all the different layers: small flowering plants, shrubs, and trees ♦ Put up a bat box or bird nest box in your yard ♦ Practice natural yard care techniques, cutting down on use of toxins and recycling organic materials ♦ Build a beautiful and functional rain garden to maintain storm water on site ♦ Install a larger water feature like a pond with a stream that reuses the water If you spend time in your neighborhood park, you may have noticed a lot of invasive plant species. Our parks need your help! Consider joining a volunteer group in adopting a site to restore or grab your family and friends, church group, co-workers or youth group and make it a fun and rewarding, team-building com- munity service project. Take a couple of these actions and try them today – in honor of Earth Day – and make it a habit, everyday! Here are some handy local resources if you are inter- ested in any of the above ideas: Rain Gardens Workshops : Stewardship Partners and Stream Team are holding free work- shops this spring throughout Pierce County. Call 253- 845-2973 for dates, locations, and to reg- ister. Nominate your- self for a free rain garden if you live in Eatonville or Puyallup. Visit: Contact Krystal at 253-232-9978. www.stweardship- Or kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org parnters.org for more information. Bird Nest Boxes, Bat Boxes, Ponds, and Native Plants : visit Adriana Hess Audubon Center to see a demonstration of the possibilities of converting your backyard into a wildlife sanctuary, and for access to resources and information. Natural Yard Care & Composting Workshops : Tacoma Pierce County Health Department is offering free ‘natural yard care’ workshops this spring around Pierce County. Contact Geoff Rinehart at 253-798- 4587 for dates, locations, and registration. The Green Tacoma Partnership is dedicated to maintaining and restoring our urban natural areas with the support of volunteers like you! To learn more abou t volunteering in our parks and open spaces visit: www.greentacoma.org or give me a call at 253- 232-9978. Earth Day on the Bay! Join Citizens for a Healthy Bay for Earth Day 2010 and donate a day to the Bay! This year’s annual Earth Day project will be held at Middle Waterway. There will be a variety of hands-on and educational activities suitable for all ages. Urban Forester Ramie Pierce will be on hand to give out a free tree and TAGRO potting mix to the first 50 participants. Come join us! When: Saturday, April 17, 2010 Time: 9:30 am to 2:30 pm Where: Middle Waterway, 711 E. 11 St. Tacoma, next to Stellar Industrial Supply Morning snacks, drinks and lunch will be provided! Please RSVP for this event by April 9. Call or email Jeanine Riss: jriss@healthybay.org, 253-383-2429. Our sponsors: YES on ProP.1: Parks & Recreation Maintenance Levy By Krystal Kyer Tacoma’s parks are exceptional. We are blessed with a diversity of parks, recreational and educational programs, more so than in most cities our size. In fact, the district maintains over 2,700 acres of parks space across the city. Parks and educational facilities such as Tacoma Nature Center, Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium, Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, and Fort Nisqually Living History Museum are regional attractions that exemplify the best Tacoma has to offer. This, no doubt, is due to the legacy of our parks’ fore- fathers and the ongoing support for parks by the current generation of Tacomans. Thanks to a voter-approved bond measure in 2005, parks across the city are in the process of being revitalized with new equipment, facili- ties, public art and safe playgrounds. These tax dollars are going a long way to make needed improvements. However, parks still face many challenges. One is the rising cost of parks maintenance and operations (M&O). With decreased funds and increased costs due to infla- tion, our parks district faces a declining M&O budget. Just like many of us, parks have dug deep into their pockets, cutting back and spending down reserves. In difficult economic times, we’ve seen a rise in parks usage, with 2009 seeing a record high. The lesson: we need our parks now more than ever. There have not been any additional funds for M&O since the 1990 voter-approved levy lid life – twenty years ago! I-747, which passed in 2001, has further decreased financial resources by limiting property taxes. Levy dol- lars account for nearly 50 percent of the annual opera- tions and maintenance funding. In response, “…Metro Parks Tacoma has cut $2 million in expenses this year through staff reductions, freezing pay rates and increas- ing our dependence on volunteers and partnerships to help take care of our parks,” according to Jack Wilson, MPT’s Executive Director. Consequently, this January parks commissioners made the necessary decision to go to the voters and ask for your tax dollar support to continue to provide the current level of services and variety of programs available to parks district users. This means taking care of the basics: grounds maintenance, play- ground safety, children’s programming, keeping restrooms open, recreational sports and much more. The Metro Parks board, leadership, and staff have proven that they are accountable and responsive to the needs of the public by successfully implementing over thirty 2005 parks bonds projects within budget and in a timely manner, and are on the road to completing all projects by 2014. Projects like renovation of Stewart Heights sports complex, new playground equipment citywide, and the Chinese Reconciliation Park are just a few examples of what makes Tacoma a vibrant, healthy, and diverse place to live, work, and play. It would be wasteful and irresponsible to allow these new facilities and resources to deteriorate over time due to lack of maintenance. In 2005, the community strongly supported funding these parks improvements. In 2010, the community should come together in support of maintaining these jewels of our urban community by passing the first levy lid lift in twenty years. Doing so will ensure that tax dol- lars already spent are not wasted, and it will help pre- serve resources and extend the lifespan of new facilities long into the future. That’s a win-win situation that our children will thank us for. Tacoma’s parks system contributes immensely to the quality of life and livability in this urban region of Pierce County. We take pride in our parks, and it shows! Let’s continue to show that pride by funding our parks main- tenance and operations. On Mar. 11, Tahoma Audubon’s Board voted to endorse Prop.1, and we urge you to join us Apr. 27 by voting YES to keep our parks clean, green and safe. Learn more about Prop.1 by visiting www.neighbors- forparks.org or calling 253-229-9373. Disclosure: Krystal Kyer, Tahoma Audubon’s Conservation Coordinator staff also serves on the Park Board of Commissioners. April 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 3 " id="pdf-obj-1-346" src="pdf-obj-1-346.jpg">
executive director’s Corner Climate change threatens hundreds of species The State of the Birds: 2010 Reporty an Flint Executive Director bryanflint@tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Kr y stal K y er Conservation Coordinator kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org 253-232-9978 Ste p hanie Swaim Education Coordinator StephSwaim@tahomaaudubon.org 253-327-9480 Cami Kesin g er Develo p ment Coordinator ckesinger @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129 Graham Taylor Volunteer Coordinator 253-565-1884 gtaylor@tahomaaudubon.org Education Intern kbenton @tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-1884 Tahoma Audubon Board Officers John Garner President Marjorie Shea Vice President Jane Brosius Secretary Kathleen Nelson Treasurer Tahoma Audubon Board Members 2010 Thelma Gilmur Ione Clagett Dick Carkner Melissa Paulson Dan Sherman Bill Smith Peggy L. Kopf Tanja Scott Darby Veeck Charles Griffin The Towhee is a publication of the Tahoma Audubon Society . The Tahoma Audubon Society was chartered in 1969. TAS advo- cates for the protection of wildlife and promotes conservation through education and activities that enrich its member’s experiences in and with the natural world. The Towhee is published monthly, ten times a year, with combined Jul/Aug and Dec/Jan issues. Submissions of articles and photographs of birds, bird lore, natural history, conservation, and environmental education are reviewed and considered for inclusion by the editor. Copy is due by the 15th of the month and may be sent by e-mail, disk, or typed. E-mail submissions to editor@tahomaaudubon.org. Editors : David Cohn, David Lev Mailing : Vera & John Cragin and Winfield Giddings Design & Layout : Robert Kelton: robert_kelton@ mac.com Printing : Consolidated Press Page 2 www.tahomaaudubon.org April 2010 e N v iro N M e N t Matters Enhance wildlife habitat in your backyard Food. Water. Shelter. Breeding and Nesting. These are the essential habitat components necessary for sur- vival on earth. Where any one of those components are lacking, you are likely to see much less diversity of wildlife. Whether you live in a downtown condo or near the forested foothills of the largest mountain in the con- tiguous United States, there are actions you can take to create and enhance habitat for wildlife right in your own backyard (or windowsill). These actions range from simple and cheap to expensive and time-consum- ing. Let’s focus on just a few of the easier actions. If you live in a condo or apartment or have next to no yard, consider doing one of the following: ♦ Put up a hummingbird feeder, suet or seed feeder to attract birds, especially in winter months when food is scarce ♦ Plant flowers and native plants in pots or hanging containers that attract wildlife and provide food and shelter from predators ♦ Add a water feature like a bird bath or small fountain; be sure to clean frequently ♦ Have a pet? After grooming, put fir outside for birds to use in nests If you have a yard, consider additional actions: ♦ Compost yard waste on site by creating a shelter of woody debris pile perfect for birds and small critters ♦ Plant a variety of native plants, being sure to include plants in all the different layers: small flowering plants, shrubs, and trees ♦ Put up a bat box or bird nest box in your yard ♦ Practice natural yard care techniques, cutting down on use of toxins and recycling organic materials ♦ Build a beautiful and functional rain garden to maintain storm water on site ♦ Install a larger water feature like a pond with a stream that reuses the water If you spend time in your neighborhood park, you may have noticed a lot of invasive plant species. Our parks need your help! Consider joining a volunteer group in adopting a site to restore or grab your family and friends, church group, co-workers or youth group and make it a fun and rewarding, team-building com- munity service project. Take a couple of these actions and try them today – in honor of Earth Day – and make it a habit, everyday! Here are some handy local resources if you are inter- ested in any of the above ideas: Rain Gardens Workshops : Stewardship Partners and Stream Team are holding free work- shops this spring throughout Pierce County. Call 253- 845-2973 for dates, locations, and to reg- ister. Nominate your- self for a free rain garden if you live in Eatonville or Puyallup. Visit: Contact Krystal at 253-232-9978. www.stweardship- Or kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org parnters.org for more information. Bird Nest Boxes, Bat Boxes, Ponds, and Native Plants : visit Adriana Hess Audubon Center to see a demonstration of the possibilities of converting your backyard into a wildlife sanctuary, and for access to resources and information. Natural Yard Care & Composting Workshops : Tacoma Pierce County Health Department is offering free ‘natural yard care’ workshops this spring around Pierce County. Contact Geoff Rinehart at 253-798- 4587 for dates, locations, and registration. The Green Tacoma Partnership is dedicated to maintaining and restoring our urban natural areas with the support of volunteers like you! To learn more abou t volunteering in our parks and open spaces visit: www.greentacoma.org or give me a call at 253- 232-9978. Earth Day on the Bay! Join Citizens for a Healthy Bay for Earth Day 2010 and donate a day to the Bay! This year’s annual Earth Day project will be held at Middle Waterway. There will be a variety of hands-on and educational activities suitable for all ages. Urban Forester Ramie Pierce will be on hand to give out a free tree and TAGRO potting mix to the first 50 participants. Come join us! When: Saturday, April 17, 2010 Time: 9:30 am to 2:30 pm Where: Middle Waterway, 711 E. 11 St. Tacoma, next to Stellar Industrial Supply Morning snacks, drinks and lunch will be provided! Please RSVP for this event by April 9. Call or email Jeanine Riss: jriss@healthybay.org, 253-383-2429. Our sponsors: YES on ProP.1: Parks & Recreation Maintenance Levy By Krystal Kyer Tacoma’s parks are exceptional. We are blessed with a diversity of parks, recreational and educational programs, more so than in most cities our size. In fact, the district maintains over 2,700 acres of parks space across the city. Parks and educational facilities such as Tacoma Nature Center, Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium, Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, and Fort Nisqually Living History Museum are regional attractions that exemplify the best Tacoma has to offer. This, no doubt, is due to the legacy of our parks’ fore- fathers and the ongoing support for parks by the current generation of Tacomans. Thanks to a voter-approved bond measure in 2005, parks across the city are in the process of being revitalized with new equipment, facili- ties, public art and safe playgrounds. These tax dollars are going a long way to make needed improvements. However, parks still face many challenges. One is the rising cost of parks maintenance and operations (M&O). With decreased funds and increased costs due to infla- tion, our parks district faces a declining M&O budget. Just like many of us, parks have dug deep into their pockets, cutting back and spending down reserves. In difficult economic times, we’ve seen a rise in parks usage, with 2009 seeing a record high. The lesson: we need our parks now more than ever. There have not been any additional funds for M&O since the 1990 voter-approved levy lid life – twenty years ago! I-747, which passed in 2001, has further decreased financial resources by limiting property taxes. Levy dol- lars account for nearly 50 percent of the annual opera- tions and maintenance funding. In response, “…Metro Parks Tacoma has cut $2 million in expenses this year through staff reductions, freezing pay rates and increas- ing our dependence on volunteers and partnerships to help take care of our parks,” according to Jack Wilson, MPT’s Executive Director. Consequently, this January parks commissioners made the necessary decision to go to the voters and ask for your tax dollar support to continue to provide the current level of services and variety of programs available to parks district users. This means taking care of the basics: grounds maintenance, play- ground safety, children’s programming, keeping restrooms open, recreational sports and much more. The Metro Parks board, leadership, and staff have proven that they are accountable and responsive to the needs of the public by successfully implementing over thirty 2005 parks bonds projects within budget and in a timely manner, and are on the road to completing all projects by 2014. Projects like renovation of Stewart Heights sports complex, new playground equipment citywide, and the Chinese Reconciliation Park are just a few examples of what makes Tacoma a vibrant, healthy, and diverse place to live, work, and play. It would be wasteful and irresponsible to allow these new facilities and resources to deteriorate over time due to lack of maintenance. In 2005, the community strongly supported funding these parks improvements. In 2010, the community should come together in support of maintaining these jewels of our urban community by passing the first levy lid lift in twenty years. Doing so will ensure that tax dol- lars already spent are not wasted, and it will help pre- serve resources and extend the lifespan of new facilities long into the future. That’s a win-win situation that our children will thank us for. Tacoma’s parks system contributes immensely to the quality of life and livability in this urban region of Pierce County. We take pride in our parks, and it shows! Let’s continue to show that pride by funding our parks main- tenance and operations. On Mar. 11, Tahoma Audubon’s Board voted to endorse Prop.1, and we urge you to join us Apr. 27 by voting YES to keep our parks clean, green and safe. Learn more about Prop.1 by visiting www.neighbors- forparks.org or calling 253-229-9373. Disclosure: Krystal Kyer, Tahoma Audubon’s Conservation Coordinator staff also serves on the Park Board of Commissioners. April 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 3 " id="pdf-obj-1-348" src="pdf-obj-1-348.jpg">
YES on ProP.1: Parks & Recreation Maintenance Levy By Krystal Kyer Tacoma’s parks are exceptional. We
YES on ProP.1:
Parks & Recreation
Maintenance Levy
By Krystal Kyer
Tacoma’s parks are exceptional. We
are blessed with a diversity of parks,
recreational and educational programs,
more so than in most cities our size. In
fact, the district maintains over 2,700
acres of parks space across the city.
Parks and educational facilities such as
Tacoma Nature Center, Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium,
Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, and Fort Nisqually Living
History Museum are regional attractions that exemplify
the best Tacoma has to offer.
This, no doubt, is due to the legacy of our parks’ fore-
fathers and the ongoing support for parks by the current
generation of Tacomans. Thanks to a voter-approved
bond measure in 2005, parks across the city are in the
process of being revitalized with new equipment, facili-
ties, public art and safe playgrounds. These tax dollars
are going a long way to make needed improvements.
However, parks still face many challenges. One is the
rising cost of parks maintenance and operations (M&O).
With decreased funds and increased costs due to infla-
tion, our parks district faces a declining M&O budget.
Just like many of us, parks have dug deep into their
pockets, cutting back and spending down reserves. In
difficult economic times, we’ve seen a rise in parks
usage, with 2009 seeing a record high. The lesson: we
need our parks now more than ever.
There have not been any additional funds for M&O
since the 1990 voter-approved levy lid life – twenty years
ago! I-747, which passed in 2001, has further decreased
financial resources by limiting property taxes. Levy dol-
lars account for nearly 50 percent of the annual opera-
tions and maintenance funding. In response, “…Metro
Parks Tacoma has cut $2 million in expenses this year
through staff reductions, freezing pay rates and increas-
ing our dependence on volunteers and partnerships to
help take care of our parks,” according to Jack Wilson,
MPT’s Executive Director.
Consequently, this January parks commissioners
made the necessary decision to go to the voters and ask
for your tax dollar support to continue to provide the
current level of services and variety of
programs available to parks district
users. This means taking care of the
basics: grounds maintenance, play-
ground safety, children’s programming,
keeping restrooms open, recreational
sports and much more.
The Metro Parks board, leadership,
and staff have proven that they are
accountable and responsive to the needs of the public
by successfully implementing over thirty 2005 parks
bonds projects within budget and in a timely manner,
and are on the road to completing all projects by 2014.
Projects like renovation of Stewart Heights sports
complex, new playground equipment citywide, and the
Chinese Reconciliation Park are just a few examples of
what makes Tacoma a vibrant, healthy, and diverse
place to live, work, and play. It would be wasteful and
irresponsible to allow these new facilities and resources
to deteriorate over time due to lack of maintenance.
In 2005, the community strongly supported funding
these parks improvements. In 2010, the community
should come together in support of maintaining these
jewels of our urban community by passing the first levy
lid lift in twenty years. Doing so will ensure that tax dol-
lars already spent are not wasted, and it will help pre-
serve resources and extend the lifespan of new facilities
long into the future. That’s a win-win situation that our
children will thank us for.
Tacoma’s parks system contributes immensely to the
quality of life and livability in this urban region of Pierce
County. We take pride in our parks, and it shows! Let’s
continue to show that pride by funding our parks main-
tenance and operations. On Mar. 11, Tahoma Audubon’s
Board voted to endorse Prop.1, and we urge you to join
us Apr. 27 by voting YES to keep our parks clean, green
and safe.
Learn more about Prop.1 by visiting www.neighbors-
forparks.org or calling 253-229-9373.
Disclosure: Krystal Kyer, Tahoma Audubon’s
Conservation Coordinator staff also serves on
the Park Board of Commissioners.

April 2010

www.tahomaaudubon.org

Page 3

e d ucatio N Matters

e d ucatio N Matters stephanieSWAIM Education Coordinator <a href=Call Steph @ 253 - 327 - 9480. Or StephSwaim@tahomaaudubon.org Building habitat with Osprey Club The temperature hovered around 45 degrees while a light rain hung in mid-air, completely saturating the atmosphere. Gray clouds reached as far as the eye could see. Yes, it was a gloomy day in Milton, but nothing would keep the OSPREY Club indoors on this day. Today they would plant… rain or shine. Columbia Junior High. A special thanks also goes out to Diane Kerlin of the North Pierce County Community Coalition, who put us in contact with Mr. Ross. If it were not for the cooperation of everyone involved, this tremen- dous opportunity for the students of both schools would not have been made possible. With continued support, I am sure that this year’s native plant garden is only the beginning of great things to come. Tahoma Audubon’s 11th Annual Young Student Bird Drawing Contest Who Can Enter: Pierce County students in 2nd -7th grades (7-14 yrs old) Three age categories: grades 2-3; grades 4-5; grades 6-7 How to Enter: Submissions must be postmarked or delivered by 05/17/10 to: Tahoma Audubon Adriana Hess Audubon Center 2917 Morrison Rd West, University Place, WA 98466 Rules: Available with entry form at www. TahomaAudubon.org For more information e-mail kbenton@TahomaAudubon.org or (253) 565-1884 • Winners will be notified by 06/01/10. • Awards & prizes presented to the winners at the June 11 membership meeting of Tahoma Audubon at Tacoma Nature Center. Everyone welcome! • Winners will be recognized in the July Towhee. Draw or paint one of these birds in its native habitat: Red-necked Grebe American Kestrel Clark’s Nutcracker Evening Grosbeak Armed with shovels, spades, and an unwavering determination, ten students from Surprise Lake Middle School and Columbia Jr. High braved the weather to begin the installation of their native plant demonstration garden. Students broke off into teams, planting evergreen huckleberry, red flowering currant and beaked hazelnut, and various other plants. They shrugged off the rain and spent two hours in the dirt in front of Surprise Lake Middle School. By the end, they had planted over 100 individual plants. Providing habitat for birds, butterflies, squirrels and other wildlife, this garden will be a shining example of how OSPREY Club is pro- moting respect for the environment in the youth of Pierce County. OSPREY Club could not function without help from members of the community. It takes dedicated host teach- ers like Kent Ross of Surprise Lake and Cindy Swenson of class Schedule April Adriana Hess Photography class Mon Apr 5 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM Location: Adriana Hess Park An adult program encouraging people to appreciate nature and how they can incorporate it into their photography. Call Dixie Harris for details 564-6373. Budding Scientists “The Marine Scene” Wed Apr 14 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM and 3:15 PM to 4:45 PM Location: Adriana Hess Audubon Center Ages 5-7, $9.00 per student Young homeschoolers and other children begin science and nature exploration through games, walks, and crafts. Register at least two days prior: 253- 591-6439. Beginning Homeschool Science “It’s a Salty Life” Thu Apr 15 9:30 AM to 11:30 and 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Homeschool students explore science through hands-on experiments and activities. Register Early - classes fill quickly! Contact Margie for more information at 591 -6439 or marjories@ tacomaparks.com . Beginning science students should be able to add and subtract numbers. Nature Alphabet “Y is for You” Fri Apr 16 1:30 PM to 2:30 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Preschoolers explore different nature topics through stories, hands-on activities, nature walks and crafts at the Tacoma Nature Center. Adult participation is reccommended, children under four require an adult present. Please note alternating times. Register by the saturday before class. 253-591- 6439. Advanced Birder’s Class Tue Apr 20 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM Tue Apr 27 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center. Ken Brown, Instructor Intermediate Homeschool Science “Tidepools to Deep Waters” Thu Apr 22, 2010 from 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM and 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Register Early - these classes fill quickly! Note - topics are repeated during the month, so select class appropriate for your child’s knowledge and abilities. Contact Margie with questions or for more information at 591 - 6 439 or marjories@tacomaparks.com . Ages 10-12, $12 per student. Intermediate Science Students should be able to multiply and divide numbers, add and subtract fractions. Nature Storytime “Salty Waters” Thu Apr 22 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM Location: Adriana Hess Center, U.P. Ages 2-6, $6 per child, $3 Audubon member, free to adults and U.P residents. Join us as we explore the park at the Adriana Hess Audubon center in University Place with naure stories based on the current theme. Adults are welcome with the children. This a wonderful grandparent/ grandchild activity! Space is limited to the first 20 registered guests (adults and children). call 253-591-6439 to register. Homeschool Advanced Science “Marine Ecosystems” Thu Apr 29 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM Lab Fri Apr 30 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Homeschool students explore science through hands-on experiments and activities. Register Early - these classes fill quickly! Note - topics are repeated during the month, so select class appropriate for your child’s knowledge and abilities. Contact Margie with questions or for more information at 591 -6439 or marjories@tacomaparks. com . Ages 12-15, $15 per student. Older homeschool students will continue their science studies with challenging and engaging experiments and activities. To participate in this class, students should be able to calculate avereages, percentages, and solve simple equations. Sumi Painting Class for youth Thu Apr 29, from 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Ages 8-15, $12 per student Learn to paint using the ancient Asian brush stroke technique of sumi-e. All materials are provided and participants will take home several finished pieces. Class taught by members of the Puget Sound Sumi Artists. PRE- REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. call 253-591-6439. Nature alphabet “Z is for Zebra” Fri Apr 30 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Preschoolers explore different nature topics through stories, hands-on activities, nature walks and crafts at the Tacoma Nature Center. Adult participation is recommended, children under four require an adult present. Please note alternating times. Register by the Saturday before class. 253-591-6439. May Adriana Hess Photography Class Mon May 3 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM An adult program encouraging people to appreciate nature and how they can incorporate it into their photography. Call Dixie Harris for details 564-6373. Advanced Birder’s Class Tue May 4 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM Tue May 11 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM Tue May 18 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM Tue May 25 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center. Ken Brown, Instructor Budding Scientists “Yard Guardians” Wed May 12, 2010 from 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM and 3:15 PM to 4:45 PM Location: Adriana Hess Audubon Center Ages 5-7, $9.00 per student Young homeschoolers and other children begin science and natre exploration through games, walks, and crafts. Register at least two days prior - 253- 591-6439. Beginning Homeschool Science “City Critters” Thu May 13 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM and 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Homeschool students explore science through hands-on experiments and activities. Register Early - these classes Class schedule continued on next page. Page 4 www.tahomaaudubon.org April 2010 field trips and Events April Weekly Bird Walks at Nisqually Wed Apr 7 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM Wed Apr 14 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM Wed Apr 21 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM Wed Apr 28 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM Location : Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge. Leader: Phil Kelley. Bring : Good walking shoes or boots, raingear, water, snacks, and $3 for entry fee unless you have a pass. Scopes are welcome. Meet : At the Visitor’s Center Pond Overlook. Directions : Take I-5 south from Tacoma and exit to Nisqually NWR at exit 114. Take a right at the light. Sign-up : Call or email Phil Kelley to confirm details. Phil Kelley, Lacey, (360) 459-1499, scrubjay323@aol.com. Sage Grouse Lek Fieldtrip Sat April 10 3:00 PM to Sun April 11 7:00 PM Yakima Training Center, Yakima/Kittitas /Douglas County. Le ader : Ryan Wiese, 206-730-3485, rwiese@ wamail.net . Meet : I-5 & SR 512 Park N Ride, 10617 S Tacoma Way. Join me in a quest to find Greater Sage Grouse, Long- eared Owl, and other early spring arrivals on the East Side. After meeting up on Saturday we will drive to our hotel and rendezvous. Before dawn Sunday, we arrive at a Sage Grouse Lek to hopefully see these resplendent birds perform their elaborate courtship ritual. Bring sack lunches for Sun. Expect to return about 7:00 pm on Sun. I can assist in making hotel arrangements for Sat. night or suggest nearby camping. Send email address and phone number as details may change depending on best chances to find target species. Limit of 15 people. If limit is reached there will be a waiting list. Bring scopes if you have them. Call (253) 565-9278. Morse Wildlife Preserve Open Trails Apr 11 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM Location: Morse Wildlife Preserve rules Call TAS to register (253-565-9278). Some trips are people lim- ited out of necessity. Notify TAS 24 hours in advance if you cannot come. Field trip leaders put in a lot of time and planning and no-shows disrupt field trips. More than 3 no-shows a year can result in revoking opportunity to participate. Arrive at the meeting place early. No pets are allowed. Be prepared for seasonal weather. Bring lunch, drinks and snacks if the field trip is scheduled past mid-day. All passengers divide total carpooling expenses. Current guide- lines are 20 cents a mile per car, not including driver. Beginners are always welcome. Have fun. Explore this natural treasure as you walk the trails and discover the beauty of the five habitat zones in the preserve. Located in Graham, the preserve has the following special open dates. Call 253-591-6439 for more information. Bird Walk at Adriana Hess Wetland Park Mon Apr 12 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM. Enjoy a guided bird walk through the park! Ft. Lewis Birding Field Trip (pending permission) Sat April 17 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM Location : End of 176th Street (Area 9). More info will be made available soon. Leader is Betty Jones Ohop Creek Field Trip Sun Apr 18 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM Location: Ohop Creek Join volunteers on a field trip to a site undergoing major habitat restoration on Ohop Creek, near Eatonville, WA. Volunteers will share their species identification skills and collect data using NatureMapping. No training required, but helpful. Registrat ion is available by c alling 360-832-7166 or emailing reserve@nwtrek.org Plant Walk at Adriana Hess Wetland Park Mon Apr 19 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM Enjoy a guided plant walk through the park! Family Walk at Adriana Hess Park Sun Apr 25 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM A family program to encourage families to appreciate the park by providing information and opportunities with a guided walking tour. Call Dixie Harris for details 564-6373 May Weekly Bird Walks at Nisqually Wed May 5 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM Wed May 12 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM Wed May 19 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM See details in previous month Morse Wildlife Preserve Open Trails Sun May 9 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM Location: Morse Wildlife Preserve Explore this natural treasure as you walk the trails and discover the beauty of the five habitat zones in the preserve. Located in Graham, the preserve has the following special open dates. Call 253-591-6439 for more information. Plant Walk at Adriana Hess Wetland Park Mon May 17 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM Enjoy a guided plant walk through the park! You are invited to the Wenas Campout - May 28-31, 2010 For decades Audubon families have been camp- ing over Memorial Day weekend at the Wenas Creek Campground. Officially named the Hazel Wolf Wenas Creek Bird Sanctuary, it’s located SW of Ellensburg, in an “Im- portant Bird Area” and has been assured of protective status. The free, “primitive” campground along the north fork of Wenas Creek has exceptional opportuni- ties for birding, botanizing and enjoying spring in the eastern foothills of the Cascades. There are wonderful field trips scheduled, and there will be an old-fashioned campfire in our “approved” fire-pit device each evening. We have a program item or two, singing, story telling and recapping the sight- ings of the day. Please visit the Wenas Website, beautifully done by Webmaster Michael Hobbs. You’ll see Hazel Wolf’s familiar smiling face and get lots of downloadable in- formation about our campout: http://www.wenasau- dubon.org. There're checklists of birds, and wildflowers, outline of field trips and program, directions to the camp- ground, and lots of photos. For people who don’t “do websites,” contact me and I’ll send you printed information. Bring friends & family, and join us at Wenas Memo- rial Day Weekend for as many days and/or nights as you want to stay - May 28-31, 2010. See you there, Helen Engle, hengle@iinet.com, 253- 564-3112. class Schedule Class schedule continued from previous page. fill quickly! Note - topics are repeated during the month, so select class appropriate for your child’s knowledge and abilities. Contact MArgie with questio ns or for more information at 59 1- 6439 or marjories@tacomaparks.com . Beginning science students should be able to add and subtract numbers. Nature Alphabet “A is for Amazing Animals” Fri May 14 1:30 PM to 2:30 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Preschoolers explore different nature topics through stories, hands-on activities, nature walks and crafts at the Tacoma Nature Center. Adult participation is recommended, children under four require an adult present. Please note alternating times. Register by the Saturday before class. 253-591-6439. Intermediate Homeschool Science “Living in the City” Thu May 20 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM and 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Homeschool students explore science through hands-on experiments and activities. Register Early - these classes fill quickly! Note - topics are repeated during the month, so select class appropriate for your child’s knowledge and abilities. Contact Margie with questio ns or for more information at 59 1- 6439 or marjories@tacomaparks.com . Ages 10-12, $12 per student. Intermediate Science Students should be able to multiply and divide numbers, add and subtract fractions. Nature Storytime: “Between the Sidewalk and the Porch” Thu May 27 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM Location: Adriana Hess Center, U.P. Ages 2-6, $6 per child, $3 Audubon member, free to adults and U.P residents. Join us as we explore the park at the Adriana Hess Audubon Center in University Place with nature stories based on the current theme. Adults are welcome with the children. This is a wonderful grandparent/ grandchild activity! Space is limited to the first 20 registered guests (adults and children). call 253-591-6439 to register. Homeschool Advanced Science “Urban Ecosystems” Thu May 27, from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM Lab Fri May 28 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Homeschool students explore science through hands-on experiments and activities. Register Early - these classes fill quickly! Note - topics are repeated during the month, so select class appropriate for your child’s knowledge and abilities. Contact Margie with questions or for more information at 591 -6439 or marjories@tacomaparks. com . Ages 12-15, $15 per student. Older homeschool students will continue their science studies with challenging and engaging experiments and activities. To participate in this class, students should be able to calculate averages, percentages, and solve simple equations. Nature Alphabet “B is for Butterflies” Fri May 28 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Preschoolers explore different nature topics through stories, hands-on activities, nature walks and crafts at the Tacoma Nature Center. Adult participation is reccommended, children under four require an adult present. Please note alternating times. Register by the saturday before class. 253-591- 6439. April 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 5 " id="pdf-obj-2-7" src="pdf-obj-2-7.jpg">
stephanieSWAIM Education Coordinator
stephanieSWAIM
Education Coordinator

Building habitat with Osprey Club

The temperature hovered around 45

degrees while a light rain hung in mid-air, completely saturating the atmosphere. Gray clouds reached as far as the eye could see. Yes, it was a gloomy

day in Milton, but

nothing would keep

the OSPREY Club

indoors on this day. Today they would

plant… rain or shine.

Columbia Junior High. A special thanks also goes out to Diane Kerlin of the North Pierce
Columbia Junior High. A special thanks also goes out to
Diane Kerlin of the North Pierce County Community
Coalition, who put us in contact with Mr. Ross. If it were
not for the cooperation of everyone involved, this tremen-
dous opportunity for the students of both schools would not
have been made possible.
With continued support, I am sure that this year’s native
plant garden is only the beginning of great things to come.
Tahoma Audubon’s 11th Annual Young Student Bird Drawing Contest
Who Can Enter: Pierce County students in 2nd
-7th grades (7-14 yrs old) Three age categories:
grades 2-3; grades 4-5; grades 6-7
How to Enter: Submissions must be postmarked
or delivered by 05/17/10 to:
Tahoma Audubon
Adriana Hess Audubon Center
2917 Morrison Rd West, University Place, WA 98466
Rules: Available with entry form at www.
TahomaAudubon.org For more information e-mail
kbenton@TahomaAudubon.org or (253) 565-1884
• Winners will be notified by 06/01/10.
• Awards & prizes presented to the winners at the
June 11 membership meeting of Tahoma Audubon
at Tacoma Nature Center. Everyone welcome!
• Winners will be recognized in the July Towhee.
Draw or paint one of these birds in its native habitat:
Red-necked Grebe
American Kestrel
Clark’s Nutcracker
Evening Grosbeak

Armed with shovels, spades, and an unwavering determination, ten students from Surprise Lake Middle School and Columbia Jr. High braved the weather to begin the installation of their native plant demonstration garden. Students broke off into teams, planting evergreen huckleberry, red flowering currant and beaked hazelnut, and various other plants. They shrugged off the rain and spent two hours in the dirt in front of Surprise Lake Middle School. By the end, they had planted over 100 individual plants. Providing habitat for birds, butterflies, squirrels and other wildlife, this garden will be a shining example of how OSPREY Club is pro- moting respect for the environment in the youth of Pierce County. OSPREY Club could not function without help from members of the community. It takes dedicated host teach- ers like Kent Ross of Surprise Lake and Cindy Swenson of

class Schedule

April
April

Adriana Hess Photography class

Mon Apr 5 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM

Location: Adriana Hess Park An adult program encouraging people to appreciate nature and how they can incorporate it into their photography. Call Dixie Harris for details 564-6373.

Budding Scientists

“The Marine Scene”

Wed Apr 14

10:30 AM to 12:00 PM

and 3:15 PM to 4:45 PM Location: Adriana Hess Audubon Center Ages 5-7, $9.00 per student Young homeschoolers and other children begin science and nature exploration through games, walks, and crafts. Register at least two days prior: 253-

591-6439.

Beginning Homeschool Science “It’s a Salty Life”

Thu Apr 15 9:30 AM to 11:30 and 1:00

PM to 3:00 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Homeschool students explore science

through hands-on experiments and activities. Register Early - classes fill quickly! Contact Margie for more information at 591-6439 or marjories@ tacomaparks.com. Beginning science

students

should

be able to add and

subtract numbers.

Nature Alphabet “Y is for You”

Fri Apr 16 1:30 PM to 2:30 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Preschoolers explore different nature topics through stories, hands-on activities, nature walks and crafts at the Tacoma Nature Center. Adult

participation is reccommended, children under four require an adult present. Please note alternating times. Register by the saturday before class. 253-591-

6439.

Advanced Birder’s Class

Tue Apr 20 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

Tue Apr 27 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center. Ken Brown, Instructor

Intermediate Homeschool Science “Tidepools to Deep Waters”

Thu Apr 22, 2010 from 9:30 AM to

11:30 AM and 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Register Early - these classes fill quickly! Note - topics are repeated during the month, so select class appropriate for your child’s knowledge and abilities. Contact Margie with questions or for more information at 591-6439 or marjories@tacomaparks.com. Ages 10-12, $12 per student. Intermediate Science Students should be able to multiply and divide numbers, add and subtract fractions.

Nature Storytime “Salty Waters”

Thu Apr 22 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM Location: Adriana Hess Center, U.P. Ages 2-6, $6 per child, $3 Audubon member, free to adults and U.P residents. Join us as we explore the park at the Adriana Hess Audubon center in University Place with naure stories based on the current theme. Adults are welcome with the children. This a wonderful grandparent/ grandchild activity! Space is limited to the first 20 registered guests (adults and children). call 253-591-6439 to register.

Homeschool Advanced Science “Marine Ecosystems”

Thu Apr 29 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM Lab Fri Apr 30 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM

Location: Tacoma Nature Center Homeschool students explore science through hands-on experiments and activities. Register Early - these classes fill quickly! Note - topics are repeated during the month, so select class appropriate for your child’s knowledge and abilities. Contact Margie with questions or for more information at 591-6439 or marjories@tacomaparks. com. Ages 12-15, $15 per student. Older homeschool students will continue their science studies with challenging and engaging experiments and activities. To participate in this class, students should be able to calculate avereages, percentages, and solve simple equations.

Sumi Painting Class for youth

Thu Apr 29, from 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Ages 8-15, $12 per student Learn to paint using the ancient Asian brush stroke technique of sumi-e. All materials are provided and participants will take home several finished pieces. Class taught by members of the Puget Sound Sumi Artists. PRE- REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. call

253-591-6439.

Nature alphabet “Z is for Zebra”

Fri Apr 30 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Preschoolers explore different nature topics through stories, hands-on activities, nature walks and crafts at the Tacoma Nature Center. Adult participation is recommended, children under four

require an adult present. Please note alternating times. Register by the Saturday before class. 253-591-6439.

May
May

Adriana Hess Photography Class

Mon May 3 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM

An adult program encouraging people to appreciate nature and how they can incorporate it into their photography. Call Dixie Harris for details 564-6373.

Advanced Birder’s Class

Tue May 4 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM Tue May 11 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

Tue May 18 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM Tue May 25 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center. Ken Brown, Instructor

Budding Scientists “Yard Guardians”

Wed May 12, 2010 from 10:30 AM to

12:00 PM and 3:15 PM to 4:45 PM Location: Adriana Hess Audubon Center Ages 5-7, $9.00 per student Young homeschoolers and other children begin science and natre exploration through games, walks, and crafts. Register at least two days prior - 253-

591-6439.

Beginning Homeschool Science “City Critters”

Thu May 13 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM and

1:00 PM to 3:00 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Homeschool students explore science through hands-on experiments and activities. Register Early - these classes

Class schedule continued on next page.

Page 4

www.tahomaaudubon.org

April 2010

field trips and Events

April
April

Weekly Bird Walks at Nisqually

Wed Apr 7 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM

Wed Apr 14 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM Wed Apr 21 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM Wed Apr 28 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM Location: Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge. Leader:

Phil Kelley. Bring: Good walking shoes or boots,

raingear, water, snacks, and $3 for entry fee unless you have a pass. Scopes are welcome. Meet: At the Visitor’s Center Pond Overlook. Directions: Take I-5 south from Tacoma and exit to Nisqually NWR at exit

  • 114. Take a right at the light. Sign-up: Call or email

Phil Kelley to confirm details. Phil Kelley, Lacey, (360) 459-1499, scrubjay323@aol.com.

Sage Grouse Lek Fieldtrip

Sat April 10 3:00 PM to Sun April 11 7:00 PM Yakima Training Center, Yakima/Kittitas/Douglas

County. Leader: Ryan Wiese, 206-730-3485, rwiese@ wamail.net. Meet: I-5 & SR 512 Park N Ride, 10617 S Tacoma Way. Join me in a quest to find Greater Sage Grouse, Long- eared Owl, and other early spring arrivals on the East Side. After meeting up on Saturday we will drive to our hotel and rendezvous. Before dawn Sunday, we arrive at a Sage Grouse Lek to hopefully see these resplendent birds perform their elaborate courtship ritual. Bring sack lunches for Sun. Expect to return about 7:00 pm on Sun. I can assist in making hotel arrangements for Sat. night or suggest nearby camping. Send email address and

phone number as details may change depending on best

chances to find target species. Limit of 15 people. If limit is reached there will be a waiting list. Bring scopes if you have them. Call (253) 565-9278.

Morse Wildlife Preserve Open Trails

Apr 11 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM Location: Morse Wildlife Preserve

rules
rules
 

Call TAS to register (253-565-9278). Some trips are people lim- ited out of necessity.

Notify TAS 24 hours in advance if you cannot come. Field trip leaders put in a lot of time and planning and no-shows disrupt field trips. More than 3 no-shows a year can result in revoking opportunity to participate.

Arrive at the meeting place early.

No pets are allowed.

Be prepared for seasonal weather.

Bring lunch, drinks and snacks if the field trip is scheduled past mid-day.

All passengers divide total carpooling expenses. Current guide- lines are 20 cents a mile per car, not including driver.

Beginners are always welcome.

Have fun.

Explore this natural treasure as you walk the trails and discover the beauty of the five habitat zones in the preserve. Located in Graham, the preserve has the following special open dates. Call 253-591-6439 for more information.

Bird Walk at Adriana Hess Wetland Park

Mon Apr 12 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM. Enjoy a guided bird walk through the park!

Ft. Lewis Birding Field Trip (pending permission)

Sat April 17 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM Location: End of 176th Street (Area 9). More info will be made available soon. Leader is Betty Jones

Ohop Creek Field Trip

Sun Apr 18 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM Location: Ohop Creek

Join volunteers on a field trip to a site undergoing major habitat restoration on Ohop Creek, near Eatonville, WA. Volunteers will share their species identification skills and collect data using NatureMapping. No training required, but helpful. Registration is available by calling 360-832-7166 or emailing reserve@nwtrek.org

Plant Walk at Adriana Hess Wetland Park

Mon Apr 19 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM Enjoy a guided plant walk through the park!

Family Walk at Adriana Hess Park

Sun Apr 25 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM A family program to encourage families to appreciate the park by providing information and opportunities with a guided walking tour. Call Dixie Harris for details

564-6373

May
May

Weekly Bird Walks at Nisqually

Wed May 5 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM Wed May 12 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM Wed May 19 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM See details in previous month

Morse Wildlife Preserve Open Trails

Sun May 9 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM Location: Morse Wildlife Preserve Explore this natural treasure as you walk the trails and discover the beauty of the five habitat zones in the preserve. Located in Graham, the preserve has the following special open dates. Call 253-591-6439 for more information.

Plant Walk at Adriana Hess Wetland Park

Mon May 17 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM Enjoy a guided plant walk through the park!

You are invited to the Wenas Campout - May 28-31, 2010

For decades Audubon families have been camp- ing over Memorial Day weekend at the Wenas Creek Campground. Officially named the Hazel Wolf Wenas Creek Bird Sanctuary, it’s located SW of Ellensburg, in an “Im- portant Bird Area” and has been assured of protective status. The free, “primitive” campground along the north fork of Wenas Creek has exceptional opportuni- ties for birding, botanizing and enjoying spring in the eastern foothills of the Cascades.

There are wonderful field trips scheduled, and there will be an old-fashioned campfire in our “approved” fire-pit device each evening. We have a program item or two, singing, story telling and recapping the sight- ings of the day. Please visit the Wenas Website, beautifully done by Webmaster Michael Hobbs. You’ll see Hazel Wolf’s familiar smiling face and get lots of downloadable in- formation about our campout: http://www.wenasau- dubon.org.

There're checklists of birds, and wildflowers, outline of field trips and program, directions to the camp- ground, and lots of photos. For people who don’t “do websites,” contact me and I’ll send you printed information. Bring friends & family, and join us at Wenas Memo- rial Day Weekend for as many days and/or nights as you want to stay - May 28-31, 2010. See you there, Helen Engle, hengle@iinet.com, 253-

564-3112.

class Schedule

Class schedule continued from previous page.

fill quickly! Note - topics are repeated during the month, so select class appropriate for your child’s knowledge and abilities. Contact MArgie with questions or for more information at 591- 6439 or marjories@tacomaparks.com. Beginning science students should be able to add and subtract numbers.

Nature Alphabet “A is for Amazing Animals”

Fri May 14 1:30 PM to 2:30 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Preschoolers explore different nature

topics through stories, hands-on activities, nature walks and crafts at the Tacoma Nature Center. Adult participation is recommended, children under four require an adult present. Please note alternating times. Register by the Saturday before class. 253-591-6439.

Intermediate Homeschool Science “Living in the City”

Thu May 20 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM and

1:00 PM to 3:00 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Homeschool students explore science through hands-on experiments and activities. Register Early - these classes fill quickly! Note - topics are repeated during the month, so select class appropriate for your child’s knowledge and abilities. Contact Margie with questions or for more information at 591- 6439 or marjories@tacomaparks.com. Ages 10-12, $12 per student. Intermediate Science Students should be able to multiply and divide numbers, add and subtract fractions.

Nature Storytime: “Between the Sidewalk and the Porch”

Thu May 27 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM Location: Adriana Hess Center, U.P. Ages 2-6, $6 per child, $3 Audubon

member, free to adults and U.P residents. Join us as we explore the park at the Adriana Hess Audubon Center in University Place with nature stories based on the current theme. Adults are welcome with the children. This is a wonderful grandparent/ grandchild activity! Space is limited to the first 20 registered guests (adults and children). call 253-591-6439 to register.

Homeschool Advanced Science “Urban Ecosystems”

Thu May 27, from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM Lab Fri May 28 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center Homeschool students explore science through hands-on experiments and activities. Register Early - these classes fill quickly! Note - topics are repeated during the month, so select class appropriate for your child’s knowledge and abilities. Contact Margie with

questions or for more information at 591-6439 or marjories@tacomaparks. com. Ages 12-15, $15 per student. Older homeschool students will continue their science studies with challenging and engaging experiments and activities. To participate in this class, students should be able to calculate averages, percentages, and solve simple equations.

Nature Alphabet “B is for Butterflies”

Fri May 28 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM

Location: Tacoma Nature Center Preschoolers explore different nature topics through stories, hands-on

activities, nature walks and crafts at the Tacoma Nature Center. Adult participation is reccommended, children under four require an adult present. Please note alternating times. Register by the saturday before class. 253-591-

6439.

April 2010

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Page 5

Glaucous-Winged Gull. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Horned Grebe showing some color on its neck as it

Glaucous-Winged Gull.

Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn

Glaucous-Winged Gull. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Horned Grebe showing some color on its neck as it

Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn

Horned Grebe showing some color on its neck as it molts into alternate plumage before leaving the Sound.

.
.

this group, but they sure are schol-

ars! It’s not enough to identify and count! Every bird had its bearings taken, direction, distance, numbers and gender (if obvious). Every member of the team had its job, and heaven forbid they be interrupted while taking bearings! All busi- ness! But when the clock wasn’t ticking, it was great fun being out there birding with them. The two official count areas were Andy’s Marine Park at 47 degrees 08’41.02”N, 122 degrees 43’54.26”W, 0 ft elevation, 504 ft; and the ferry dock at 47 degrees 10’41.88”N, 122 degrees 40.28”W, 0 ft elevation (above water on dock), 161 ft. Any other data you want, I’m sure they have it! Plus all the data on every bird is also avail- able for the asking!

The first official count area was what seemed to be a secret beach down a hidden muddy trail of a road, Andy’s Marine Park. As we made our way down the hillside to the beach, a Kingfisher and its mate circled us, inviting us down. A mir- rored tidepool awaited us and a postcard scene of Puget Sound dot- ted with birds. The data that day was big in terms of Pigeon Guillemots, already in alternate plumage, and Red-necked Grebes, a couple of which were also into their molt. It was fun find- ing all three Cormorants as well and identifying the various Gulls! This team would only look at seabirds while the clock was ticking, but when it stopped we were able to enjoy Kingfishers, Bald Eagles, Brown Creepers, Steller’s Jays and spring budding out all around us! Although it was a beautiful, sunny day, small banks of fog rolled in on us at the beach, and just as the birds on the water were being whited out, the fogbank suddenly coalesced into an arc exactly like a rainbow – but pure white! This is known as a fogbow (look it up on Wikipedia). It lasted just a minute, but held us all spellbound. Then as we headed up the hill to our cars, we came out upon fabulous crepuscular rays leading us to our cars, kind of like finding the pot of gold. It was truly

a day of atmospheric magic. After having to push both of our cars out of a mudhole (no day is perfect!), we went back to the ferry terminal, which is the second of the two Anderson Island Seabird Survey spots. Horned Grebes swam practically under us as we stood on the dock, and the Pelagic Cormorants were showing off their white breed- ing patches already! Suddenly, the waters over near Steilacoom threw up a couple of dark objects spotted by our official seabird counters! As we all found the spot with our bin- oculars, it happened again! And again! Harbor Porpoises!! Many rewards come to those who do good work! When the official count was over for the day, Lindsay and crew took us around this fabled island. There are actually a series of lakes with freshwater fowl, not what I expect- ed on this marine isle, but there they were, complete with Ring-necked Ducks and Pied-billed Grebes. We explored woodlands, streams, and lakes, and found Anderson Island to be even more wonderful than we expected! Lindsay and crew, thank you for taking on this work. You are an inspiration with your seriousness and work ethic! And thanks for introducing us to that exotic land over the water, Anderson Island!

from page 1 . .
from page 1
. .

Survey at www.seabirdsurvey.org. Lindsay and her team from Evergreen College have capably taken over the two Anderson Island sites which they cover the first Saturday every month. It was won- derful to be out counting birds with

Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn An Olympic Gull spots a morsel!

Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn

An Olympic Gull spots a morsel!

Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn The counters for the day: Govinda Rosling, Maureen Thompson, Lindsay Raab, Sam Sadosky, Faye

Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn

The counters for the day: Govinda Rosling, Maureen Thompson, Lindsay Raab, Sam Sadosky, Faye McAdams Hands, and Diane Yorgason-Quinn

Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Gull with fresh-caught minnow!

Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn

Gull with fresh-caught minnow!

Glaucous-Winged Gull. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Horned Grebe showing some color on its neck as itw w w . s e a b i r d s u r v e y . o r g . Lindsay and her team from Evergreen College have capably taken over the two Anderson Island sites which they cover the first Saturday every month. It was won- derful to be out counting birds with Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn An Olympic Gull spots a morsel! Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn The counters for the day: Govinda Rosling, Maureen Thompson, Lindsay Raab, Sam Sadosky, Faye McAdams Hands, and Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Gull with fresh-caught minnow! An amazing meteorological phenomenon, the fogbow! Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn These counters even have a bird logo etched onto their dusty vehicle by Maureen Thompson Photo/Sam Sadosky Lindsay Raab and team count little specks out on the water. Photo/Lindsay Raab Double-Crested Cormorants oblivious to the Olympics shining behind them off Anderson Island. Photo/Lindsay Raab Pigeon Guillemots, already in alternate (breeding) plumage, circle the wagons just off Anderson Island beach. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Lindsay Raab holding the Feather Award for Citizen Birding! Seabird counters at the Anderson Island Ferry Dock. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn " id="pdf-obj-3-77" src="pdf-obj-3-77.jpg">

An amazing meteorological phenomenon, the fogbow!

Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn

Glaucous-Winged Gull. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Horned Grebe showing some color on its neck as itw w w . s e a b i r d s u r v e y . o r g . Lindsay and her team from Evergreen College have capably taken over the two Anderson Island sites which they cover the first Saturday every month. It was won- derful to be out counting birds with Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn An Olympic Gull spots a morsel! Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn The counters for the day: Govinda Rosling, Maureen Thompson, Lindsay Raab, Sam Sadosky, Faye McAdams Hands, and Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Gull with fresh-caught minnow! An amazing meteorological phenomenon, the fogbow! Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn These counters even have a bird logo etched onto their dusty vehicle by Maureen Thompson Photo/Sam Sadosky Lindsay Raab and team count little specks out on the water. Photo/Lindsay Raab Double-Crested Cormorants oblivious to the Olympics shining behind them off Anderson Island. Photo/Lindsay Raab Pigeon Guillemots, already in alternate (breeding) plumage, circle the wagons just off Anderson Island beach. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Lindsay Raab holding the Feather Award for Citizen Birding! Seabird counters at the Anderson Island Ferry Dock. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn " id="pdf-obj-3-83" src="pdf-obj-3-83.jpg">

Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn

These counters even have a bird logo etched onto their dusty vehicle by Maureen Thompson

Glaucous-Winged Gull. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Horned Grebe showing some color on its neck as itw w w . s e a b i r d s u r v e y . o r g . Lindsay and her team from Evergreen College have capably taken over the two Anderson Island sites which they cover the first Saturday every month. It was won- derful to be out counting birds with Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn An Olympic Gull spots a morsel! Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn The counters for the day: Govinda Rosling, Maureen Thompson, Lindsay Raab, Sam Sadosky, Faye McAdams Hands, and Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Gull with fresh-caught minnow! An amazing meteorological phenomenon, the fogbow! Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn These counters even have a bird logo etched onto their dusty vehicle by Maureen Thompson Photo/Sam Sadosky Lindsay Raab and team count little specks out on the water. Photo/Lindsay Raab Double-Crested Cormorants oblivious to the Olympics shining behind them off Anderson Island. Photo/Lindsay Raab Pigeon Guillemots, already in alternate (breeding) plumage, circle the wagons just off Anderson Island beach. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Lindsay Raab holding the Feather Award for Citizen Birding! Seabird counters at the Anderson Island Ferry Dock. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn " id="pdf-obj-3-89" src="pdf-obj-3-89.jpg">

Photo/Sam Sadosky

Lindsay Raab and team count little specks out on the water.

Glaucous-Winged Gull. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Horned Grebe showing some color on its neck as itw w w . s e a b i r d s u r v e y . o r g . Lindsay and her team from Evergreen College have capably taken over the two Anderson Island sites which they cover the first Saturday every month. It was won- derful to be out counting birds with Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn An Olympic Gull spots a morsel! Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn The counters for the day: Govinda Rosling, Maureen Thompson, Lindsay Raab, Sam Sadosky, Faye McAdams Hands, and Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Gull with fresh-caught minnow! An amazing meteorological phenomenon, the fogbow! Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn These counters even have a bird logo etched onto their dusty vehicle by Maureen Thompson Photo/Sam Sadosky Lindsay Raab and team count little specks out on the water. Photo/Lindsay Raab Double-Crested Cormorants oblivious to the Olympics shining behind them off Anderson Island. Photo/Lindsay Raab Pigeon Guillemots, already in alternate (breeding) plumage, circle the wagons just off Anderson Island beach. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Lindsay Raab holding the Feather Award for Citizen Birding! Seabird counters at the Anderson Island Ferry Dock. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn " id="pdf-obj-3-95" src="pdf-obj-3-95.jpg">

Photo/Lindsay Raab

Double-Crested Cormorants oblivious to the Olympics shining behind them off Anderson Island.

Glaucous-Winged Gull. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Horned Grebe showing some color on its neck as itw w w . s e a b i r d s u r v e y . o r g . Lindsay and her team from Evergreen College have capably taken over the two Anderson Island sites which they cover the first Saturday every month. It was won- derful to be out counting birds with Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn An Olympic Gull spots a morsel! Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn The counters for the day: Govinda Rosling, Maureen Thompson, Lindsay Raab, Sam Sadosky, Faye McAdams Hands, and Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Gull with fresh-caught minnow! An amazing meteorological phenomenon, the fogbow! Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn These counters even have a bird logo etched onto their dusty vehicle by Maureen Thompson Photo/Sam Sadosky Lindsay Raab and team count little specks out on the water. Photo/Lindsay Raab Double-Crested Cormorants oblivious to the Olympics shining behind them off Anderson Island. Photo/Lindsay Raab Pigeon Guillemots, already in alternate (breeding) plumage, circle the wagons just off Anderson Island beach. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Lindsay Raab holding the Feather Award for Citizen Birding! Seabird counters at the Anderson Island Ferry Dock. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn " id="pdf-obj-3-101" src="pdf-obj-3-101.jpg">

Photo/Lindsay Raab

Pigeon Guillemots, already in alternate (breeding) plumage, circle the wagons just off Anderson Island beach.

Glaucous-Winged Gull. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Horned Grebe showing some color on its neck as itw w w . s e a b i r d s u r v e y . o r g . Lindsay and her team from Evergreen College have capably taken over the two Anderson Island sites which they cover the first Saturday every month. It was won- derful to be out counting birds with Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn An Olympic Gull spots a morsel! Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn The counters for the day: Govinda Rosling, Maureen Thompson, Lindsay Raab, Sam Sadosky, Faye McAdams Hands, and Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Gull with fresh-caught minnow! An amazing meteorological phenomenon, the fogbow! Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn These counters even have a bird logo etched onto their dusty vehicle by Maureen Thompson Photo/Sam Sadosky Lindsay Raab and team count little specks out on the water. Photo/Lindsay Raab Double-Crested Cormorants oblivious to the Olympics shining behind them off Anderson Island. Photo/Lindsay Raab Pigeon Guillemots, already in alternate (breeding) plumage, circle the wagons just off Anderson Island beach. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Lindsay Raab holding the Feather Award for Citizen Birding! Seabird counters at the Anderson Island Ferry Dock. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn " id="pdf-obj-3-107" src="pdf-obj-3-107.jpg">

Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn

Lindsay Raab holding the Feather Award for Citizen Birding!

Glaucous-Winged Gull. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Horned Grebe showing some color on its neck as itw w w . s e a b i r d s u r v e y . o r g . Lindsay and her team from Evergreen College have capably taken over the two Anderson Island sites which they cover the first Saturday every month. It was won- derful to be out counting birds with Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn An Olympic Gull spots a morsel! Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn The counters for the day: Govinda Rosling, Maureen Thompson, Lindsay Raab, Sam Sadosky, Faye McAdams Hands, and Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Gull with fresh-caught minnow! An amazing meteorological phenomenon, the fogbow! Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn These counters even have a bird logo etched onto their dusty vehicle by Maureen Thompson Photo/Sam Sadosky Lindsay Raab and team count little specks out on the water. Photo/Lindsay Raab Double-Crested Cormorants oblivious to the Olympics shining behind them off Anderson Island. Photo/Lindsay Raab Pigeon Guillemots, already in alternate (breeding) plumage, circle the wagons just off Anderson Island beach. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn Lindsay Raab holding the Feather Award for Citizen Birding! Seabird counters at the Anderson Island Ferry Dock. Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn " id="pdf-obj-3-113" src="pdf-obj-3-113.jpg">

Seabird counters at the Anderson Island Ferry Dock.

Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn

Page 6

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www.tahomaaudubon.org

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Just the other day ... Tahoma Audubon in April 1985 By Helen Engle Field trips abounded
Just the other day ...
Tahoma Audubon in April 1985
By Helen Engle
Field trips abounded in April 1985.
We went to the Columbia Gorge for
the spectacular scenery including
wildflowers the Gorge is famous for;
Dennis Barci led a Turkey Watching
trip in Klickitat County (a unique experi-
ence in ‘full camo’!); Carrie Graham led
Arbor Day explorations at Snake Lake; there was
Bowerman Basin shorebirding with Steve Herman,
plus a pelagic trip led by Terry Wahl.
The Nature Conservancy’s Lori Wilson adver-
tised birding by kayak in the San Juans with special
attention to their own Yellow Island whose wildflow-
ers peak in April. Cathy Jerbic led a trip to the
Yakima Firing Range to the Sage Grouse strutting
area; Nell Batker took us through the Spanaway
Woods; and Ken Brown led the Nisqually National
Wildlife refuge census trip.
We also went to the Tolt River, MacDonald county
Park with Karl Lundberg; journey to Juniper
Forest near the Tri-Cities with Howard Oswood of
North Central Audubon leading; a bus trip to
Dungeness Spit, leader Winnie Bjarke; and a
Spanaway Marsh canoe trip with Jock Beall.
Tahoma Audubon sponsored an Art Wolfe wild-
life photography presentation, filling the auditorium
at Wilson High School. Proceeds went to help
finance our education programs and
assist Carole Sheridan at our bird
clinic. Our monthly meeting at PLU’s
Ingram Hall featured speleologist Bob
Brown telling of his research project
and cave explorations in the north-
west, and of the efforts to protect and
conserve cave habitats.
Thais Bock’s “Word on Birds” reported a
Great Gray Owl up by Duvall (Scott Atkinson); a
Goshawk regularly perching on the obelisk in ‘Red
Square’ at the UW; and birders at Leadbetter Point
in Willapa National Wildlife Refuge ate lunch under
the watchful eyes of three Snowy Owls.
Our faithful campaigners were helping efforts to
preserve long Island’s western red cedar grove in
Willapa Bay. Long Island, separated by a narrow
channel from the east shore of Willapa Bay, still has
old-growth cedar, fir, hemlock and spruce on its 5,000
acres. US Fish & Wildlife Service had made a deal
with Weyerhaeuser in timber-for-land exchanges,
which transferred to the Refuge a 274-acre grove.
The USFWS would own the land, but could not afford
to pay for the cedar grove timber, and Weyerhaeuser
retained the right to begin harvesting 155 acres of
the grove surrounding the core of the island – timber
worth 5.5 to 6 million dollars. David Mumper, the
company’s forester working this trade for many
years, knows the Refuge wants the island intact. He
admits it is an impressive stand of timber.
A coalition of twelve conservation organizations
including The Wilderness Society and National
Audubon is lobbying for the federal budget to include
funds to purchase the Weyerhaeuser timber. Tahoma
Audubon is a major player because our Congressman
Norm Dicks sits on the House Interior Appropriations
Committee and we must let him know of the citizen
support for saving this unique remnant of the old-
growth forest of SW Washington.
Conservationists were rejoicing in the election of
Governor Booth Gardner who is a strong supporter
of protection for key Washington tributaries in the
Columbia Gorge and a moratorium on gorge devel-
opment until a comprehensive management plan is
adopted.
Paul Webster was Editor
of the TOWHEE, Thais
Bock wrote Word on Birds,
Walt Adams was mailing
committee chair. Leota
Moore was Tahoma
Audubon membership chair,
gladly sending complimenta-
ry issues of the newsletter to
Helen Engle
all who were interested.
from days of yore.
Feedback, comments and reminiscences welcome,
253-564-3112, Hengle@iinet.com.

A truly historic barn on the Morse Wildlife Preserve

In February the barn on the Morse Wildlife Preserve became one of 41 historic barns in Washington State to be listed on the Heritage Barn Register. In reviewing the application, the Governor’s Advisory Council on Historic Preservation was very interested in the Preserve and the joint operating agreement that fosters stewardship and environ-

mental education activities on the site. Estimated at about 100 years old, the barn is of the broken gable design. Plans call for it to be used more frequently as a shel- tered classroom, including hands- on learning tools. Inclusion of the barn on the register will allow the Morse Force to apply for state funds for restoration, when next authorized by the Legislature.

Just the other day ... Tahoma Audubon in April 1985 By Helen Engle Field trips abounded
BIRDSONGS by P hil B uly Page 8 www.tahomaaudubon.org April 2010
BIRDSONGS
by P hil B uly
Page 8
www.tahomaaudubon.org
April 2010

...

Birdathon 2010

from page 1

Or, fill out this form and return it to Tahoma Audubon Society. We will contact you with information! Happy Birding!

So, what are you waiting for!?? Join us! Once you sign up you will get everything you need before you embark on your birding extravaganza! We are also offering an informational meeting on Tuesday March 30, 2010 at 6:00pm. You can pick up your Birdathon packet then, or get them PAPERLESS THIS YEAR ONLINE at our website listed below. Here are the ways you can get more information and to register:

Call Cami Kesinger at 253-565-9129 Email ckesinger@tahomaaudubon.org Visit our website at www.tahomaaudubon.org (an environmentally friendly way to get information paperless)

... Birdathon 2010 from page 1 ✔ Or, fill out this form and return it to
Yes, I will be a birder for Birdathon 2010!!! Name __________________________________________ Phone _________________________________________ Email __________________________________________ I
Yes, I will be a birder for Birdathon 2010!!!
Name __________________________________________
Phone _________________________________________
Email __________________________________________
I can’t be a birder, but I will pledge $
Birdathon 2010!!!
for
Return this form to TAS, 2917 Morrison Road West, Universtiy Place, WA 98466
Birdatho N field trips Lakebay area near the town of Home Birdathon Field Trips 2010 When:
Birdatho N field trips
Lakebay area near the town of Home
Birdathon Field Trips 2010
When: Thursday April 29 th , 9:30a.m.to 1:00p.m.
Leaders: Homeowners Dee and Wayne Knight, and
Master Birder Melissa Sherwood
You will visit acres of woods with songbirds, fields
with ravens and shores with eagles, osprey, sandpip-
ers and herons. Two baby eagles are nesting in one
of the trees. Bring a lunch. Hosts will serve coffee
and dessert by the fireplace.
Directions: 3715 165 th KPN. Go across Narrows
Bridge, take Purdy exit. Go thru the Purdy stop light,
and through the Key Center blinking red light and 3.8
miles past that. You will see a huge billboard on the
right saying Dudley Top Apples. Pass the small
green 38 th street sign on the right and across from this
there will be signs and balloons on left at a tiny road.
Take a right past the Knight signs and balloons and
wind down a long wooded road with a steep hill. You
will see an old barn and turn left to their house. Bring
good beach shoes; we can walk quite a distance.
come for the entire day, or just Nisqually, or just
Ocean Shores. If you choose to do just Ocean
Shores, you should plan on meeting at Nisqually at
11:00a.m.so we can carpool down to Gray’s Harbor.
Meet at the Flagpole by the visitor’s center at
Nisqually NWR.
Call to sign-up 253-565-9278
Thank you to our Field Trip Leaders!
We could not do this without you!
Crescent Valley, Gig Harbor
When: Saturday May 8 th , more details will be posted
on our calendar soon!
bird areas on Sunday. Please provide email
address and phone number when you sign up in
order to coordinate lodging details and meeting
place. Email Marcus.d.roening@gsk.com for
further details.
Adriana Hess, University Place
When: Monday May 10 th , 12:00noon to 2:00p.m.
Leader: Ruth Sullivan
Join Ruth as she leads her monthly walks at Adriana
Hess Wetland Park in University Place. This small
Pt Defiance Park
When: Sunday May 16 th , 8:00a.m.to 10:00 a.m.
Leaders: Rob and Natalie McNair-Huff
park is home to dozens and dozens of bird species!
Meet at 2917 Morrison Rd W, University Place
Morse Wildlife Preserve, Graham
Foulweather Bluff
When: Saturday May 1 st , 7:00a.m.to mid-afternoon
Leader: Rolan Nelson
We’ll visit Foulweather Bluff, Point-No-Point and
the Hansville Greenway. Join us for this Birdathon
event to check out the west sound migrants that
should be passing through. We’ll see wetlands, salt-
water, forest glades and meadows. We hope to iden-
tify over 65 species. Bring rain gear and lunch or you
can buy supplies at the Hansville Store.
Meet at the Purdy Park and Ride off Highway 16
at 7:00a.m. Take Hwy 16 across Narrows Bridge
from Tacoma. Exit at SR302/Purdy off ramp and
drive straight through Purdy (3 stoplights) to
144 th . Park & Rid is just past Chevron Station.
When: Friday May 14 th , 9:00am to 11:00a.m.
Leader: Betty Jones
Walk the trails and check out the marsh, dry Douglas
fir forest, moist lowland forest, prairie and meadows.
Join Rob and Natalie for the Birdathon version of
their monthly nature walk at Point Defiance on May
16 th . They will set out on the walk at 8:00a.m.from
the Zoo parking lot and walk through the forested
trails along Five Mile Drive. The walk will be a little
over four miles. This trip will end with birding along
the ponds near the entrance and with a drive down to
Owen’s Beach.
Meet at Pt. Defiance Zoo Parking Lot at 8:00a.m.
Take a look at the pond in the marsh and the forested
wetland from the bird tower.
Ft. Lewis
Ask for directions when you sign up.
Summit to Shore: New since last newsletter!
When: Friday May 14 th and Saturday May 15 th .
Leader: Ed Pullen & Ryan Wiese
Join Ryan Wiese and Ed Pullen on a summit to shore
two half-day birdathon. We’ll drive to Snoqualmie
Summit and begin counting about 2:45. Several stops
on the way back to Tacoma. Then depending on the
When: Wednesday May 19 th , 8:00a.m.to noon
Note: Date may change depending on Ft. Lewis
permission, watch our online calendar for changes.
Leader: Charles Griffin
Join Tahoma Audubon Society Board Member
Charles Griffin as he leads the group to see an open
oak woodland area and riparian habitats found
among the prairies of the Fort Lewis Training
Grounds. Expect to identify 55-60 species.
Meet at the Roy Y Park and Ride at 8:00a.m. to
carpool to location
Titlow Park
When: Tuesday May 4 th , 10:00a.m.to 12:00noon
Leaders: Rosanne Becker and Joann Sims
Enjoy both water and songbirds at this Tacoma Park.
A variety of bird habitats will be explored including
salt water, pond and forest.
Meet at the Lodge at Titlow Park which is at the
west end of 6 th Avenue in Tacoma.
group we will retire to home and get up very early to
go to Ocean Shores to finish our birdathon there and
at stops on the way home by 2:45 Saturday, or go to
the coast to a hotel or campsite for Friday night and
start again in the AM. The choice depends on the
vigor of the group. Expect 100 + species.
Green River Watershed
Meet at the I-5 and Hwy 512 park & Ride Friday
May 14 at 1:30 PM.
McCormick Forest, Gig Harbor
Pierce County Big Day “Purdy to Paradise” on
International Migratory Bird Day
When: Saturday May 8 th , 5:15a.m.to dusk
Leader: Bruce LaBar
Starting at Purdy Spit, the trip visits Point Defiance,
McChord and other points of interest along the way
to the Mountain. We aim each year to show you that
you can find 100 species just by birding in Pierce
County. One year we identified 124!
When: Saturday May 15 th , 8:00a.m to 12:00noon
Leader: Melissa Sherwood
Explore McCormick Forest, the old growth preserve
off Bujacich Drive near Gig Harbor. Melissa
Sherwood will help you identify birds by their songs
and calls. We’ll walk through forest and up some
steep hills so wear comfortable clothes and walking
shoes, and be prepared for all weather.
When: Saturday May 22 nd , 8:00a.m.to 3:00p.m.
Leader: Greg Volkhardt and a Master Birder
This is a rare opportunity to see the protected water-
shed managed by Tacoma Water. We’ll bird in forests
and fields around Howard Hanson Lake (elevation
1200 feet) then visit Eagle Lake (elevation 2200
feet). Space is limited to the first 12 people. Bring
picture Identification as this is a restricted access
area. Bring a lunch and appropriate clothing. Be
prepared to do some walking on uneven ground.
Meet at Tacoma Public Utilities, 3628 South 35 th
Street lot A1, on the Westside of the Administration
Building at 8:00a.m. You will travel in one or two
Meet at Swede Hill Fire Station just off Hwy 16 at
vans will brought back to the parking lot at about
Burnham Drive Exit.
3:00pm.
Meet at the far end of Purdy Spit at 5:15a.m.
Tacoma to Moses Lake Overnight
Waughop Lake, Ft. Steilacoom
Nisqually NWR and/or Ocean Shores
When: Saturday May 8 th , 7:30a.m.to Evening
Leaders: Ken & Nell Batker
The trip will begin by walking the Nisqually trail on
the refuge followed by a sack lunch (bring your
own). The Nisqually portion is usually done by
around 11:00a.m. Following the Nisqually walk, we
will carpool to Gray’s Harbor National Wildlife
Refuge and from there to Ocean Shores. The day
ends with dinner in Aberdeen to recap the day’s
counts and activities. Participants are welcome to
When: Saturday and Sunday May 16 and 17th,
5:30am Saturday until Sunday afternoon
Leaders Marcus Roening and Heather Ballash
Marcus and Heather lead an exciting trip from
Tacoma to the Potholes in Moses Lake. The trip will
cover 15 habitat zones, with special emphasis on
migratory birds in the Columbia Basin sage, pinelands
and wetlands. Expect to see at least 120 species in
one fast-paced day. Meet at 5:30am and arrive in
Moses Lake at 8:30pm, where we will stay over-
night. We’ll take a leisurely return through favorite
When: Sunday May 23 rd , 8:30a.m.to 11:00a.m.
Leader: Betty Jones
Identify birds in the oak woodlands, grasslands and
Waughop Lake. This is a very fun trip where you
may see up to 50 bird species. Meet at the barn at
Ft. Steilacoom Park, in Lakewood, or for anyone
interested, meet Better earlier at the little dam at
the mouth of Chambers Creek on Chambers
Creek road. Get an early start on this fun day!
Meet at 7:30am and then join up with the rest of
the group at Ft. Steilacoom!
April 2010
www.tahomaaudubon.org
Page 9

Together Green

Join us for our next

What: Together Green work & pizza party Where: Adriana Hess Wetland Park 2917 Morrison Road West

What:

Together Green work &

pizza party Where: Adriana Hess Wetland Park 2917 Morrison Road West University Place. When: April 24th 2010 from 9:00am – 1:00pm. Bring: Work clothes, empty stomach, good attitude, water bottle!

work party

will come together to host

Last year, this event was

in our community com-

from our accomplishments

focused on two sites that are in desperate need of careful restoration and mainte- nance: Adriana Hess Wetland Park, and an undeveloped City of University Place prop- erty, located on 67th Street West. Last year, volunteers at Adriana Hess Wetland Park spread wood chips, maintained trails, and added over 318 plants to our native plant garden! We anticipate this year’s event to be equally exciting and active as we look to build seating for our outdoor education shelter, fix up rain barrels and compost bins, wash park benches, and weed out in- vasive species! Last year, volunteers also made major progress at the 67th Street

unteer Center cordially invite you

ham Taylor for further details about

On April 24th, 2010 the Tahoma Audu- bon Society, University Place Parks and Recreation, and the University Place Vol-

unteer Center

property, clearing two dumpsters of debris

and invasive species out so that space may be designated for recreation and wildlife. Thus, Tahoma Audubon, the City of Uni- versity Place, and the University Place Vol-

to join

the Together Green Volunteer Day in Uni-

versity Place.

an excellent example of volunteer-based

organizations

us for our next Earth Day celebration work and pizza party on April 24th 2010! Bring work clothes, your trusty water bottle, and a good attitude, and together we will keep

ing together to encourage and support the

preservation and restoration of urban open

space. Judging

our community green! Please contact Gra-

this ex-

and turnout last year, we expect this year’s Together Green Volunteer Day to be just as successful!

cellent group volunteer Earth Day celebra-

tion work party: gtaylor@tahomaaudubon. org or (253) 565-1884.

Our organizations will be specifically

Photos/Diane Yorgason-Quinn By Shep Thorp Editor’s note: Shep Thorp has been doing the regular Wednesday Nisqually
Photos/Diane Yorgason-Quinn
By Shep Thorp
Editor’s note: Shep Thorp has been doing the regular
Wednesday Nisqually walks with Phil Kelley for some
time and fills in as leader in Phil’s absences. Shep led a
combo Tahoma Audubon/Rainier Audubon walk at
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday,
March 6, 2010, and this is his report:
Twenty-one of us enjoyed a sunny cool morning
at the refuge. We met at the visitor center pond
overlook, the temperature was 47 degrees
Fahrenheit, and the light was fabulous. The pond
had many Ringed-Necked Ducks, Mallard Ducks,
Canada Geese and a pair of Hooded Mergansers.
We also saw Red-Winged Blackbirds, European
Starlings and Song Sparrows.
Across the parking lot and between the access
road and the entrance road, the water retention
ponds provided distant looks at Northern Shovelers
and Northern Pintails. Later in the morning, as the
temperature became warmer, we had better
close-up views of the Northern Shovelers turning
rapidly in tight circles as they fed from the surface
of other ponds. There is a small earth dike,
between the retention ponds, which had several
Killdeer. Some appeared to be pairing up.
Along the access road, we scanned the fields
and flooded fields southwest. Large numbers of
Turdus migratorius were doing that thing they do
so well: Run, stop, feed. Many males were
brightly colored. Numbers may be down, but we
viewed a lot of waterfowl including Green-Winged
Teal, American Wigeon, and Bufflehead. A pair of
Wood Ducks was spotted, several Gadwalls, and a
Eurasian Wigeon. Golden-crowned Sparrows fed
along the gravel road. We had fly-overs by
Double-crested Cormorants and Mew Gulls. In
the snag tree at the corner between the parking
lot, access road, and southern entrance to the
boardwalk we saw both male and female Pileated
Woodpeckers foraging for food. A single Dunlin
was seen.
An American Bittern was located in the reeds
along the boardwalk. Initially hunkered down, the
Bittern did stand and fly across the pond, providing
continued good looks and silhouettes with the
sunlight from behind. A large 10-inch diameter
pond turtle basked in the sun on a log at our first
viewpoint. We also saw a Ruby-Crowned Kinglet.
A Great Blue Heron greeted us at the second
boardwalk viewpoint, a mature adult. Our quiet
group of 21 walked by within 15 feet of this
confident bird roosting in a tree at eye level.
Making our way towards the Twin Barns, we also
saw Bewick’s, Winter and Marsh Wrens, Downy
Woodpecker, and Black-capped Chickadees.
Tree Swallows were present in large numbers,
perched and flying, and best viewed at the Twin
Barns overlook. We’ve seen the Tree Swallows at
the refuge the last three weeks. Two weeks ago
a couple of Violet-Green Swallows were seen, but
we could not find them this walk. We also saw
Northern Harrier, Northern Shrike,
Rock Pigeon and two more Dunlin.
Our first pass by the fallen nest
tree of the Great Horned Owl was
unsuccessful. We had nice looks at
Common Mergansers, Hooded
Mergansers and Common
Goldeneyes at the Nisqually River
overlook. Heading out on the new
dike, we saw River Otter on the
inside and a male American Kestrel
on the outside in the restored
riparian area. Additional waterfowl
species in the ponds on the inside of
the new dike were Lesser Scaup and
American Coot, and we saw good
numbers and variety of previous listed
ducks. Large numbers of Canada and
Cackler Geese flew into the refuge.
Another Northern Harrier was seen, a
few Red-tailed Hawks, and several
Bald Eagles. Many Great Blue Herons
were apparent in the new tidal zones
between the new dike and the
demolished old dike. Several Glaucous-
Winged Gulls and American Crows
were seen. Scoping McAllister Creek
we saw Red-Breasted Mergansers,
and another male Common Merganser
was seen submerging his face and
paddling quickly forward in what we
speculated was a feeding behavior.
Fortunately on our way back, the Great Horned Owl
had returned to the nest tree, providing good looks.
Some of our group had to leave earlier and sadly
missed this terrific bird.
Along the old Nisqually River dike, we saw a pair
of Bushtits, heard Goldfinches, and had great
looks at Spotted Towhee and Brown Creepers.
We ran into an interesting cluster of birds including
our first female Rufus Hummingbird of the season
following a Red-breasted Sapsucker after working
the tree. Our presumption was that the
hummingbird was feeding from the sapsucker’s
holes, very interesting behavior to observe! We
also saw Dark-Eyed Junco, Golden-crowned
Kinglet and a Coyote. A number of Yellow-rumped
Warblers, Audubon’s form, were seen at the
Riparian overlook.
It seems spring has arrived early at the Nisqually
Wildlife Refuge and there is a lot of wildlife
observation to enjoy. Many wonder what the
Great Horned Owls are up to, and I think the next
several weeks will be very interesting. Thanks to
everyone for contributing to a fun bird walk. I
counted 54 species in total!

Page 10

www.tahomaaudubon.org

April 2010

from page 1 times of the year. All the students and their families were invited. The

from page 1

times of the year. All the students and their families were invited. The house was full of the spicy scent of warm Christmas punch, and multitudes of candles glowed. There were duets galore, often with bells and tambourine effects provided by the lit- tlest pupils, and the program would end with the pupils playing carols and all would sing along. Then they would adjourn to the other room to enjoy cookies and the wassail bowl full of Christmas Cheer, and to admire the table-top Christmas tree decorated with musical ornaments. Christmas was a busy time of year for Thais, because at the same time she was organizing and hosting the Christmas recital for her pupils, she was organizing and participating in area Christmas Bird Counts – for Thais had discovered another passion, ornithology, when she joined a Seattle Audubon field trip in 1968. Through Audubon activi- ties, she met Zella Schultz. In later years, Thais always credited Zella, a noted ornithologist, teacher, writer,

from page 1 times of the year. All the students and their families were invited. The

and artist, with being the key influence that got her into birding. Along with Zella and Eleanor Stopps, Thais became an advocate for the preservation of bird nesting habitat. Her dis- covery and monitoring of the Great Blue Heron colo- ny on Peasley Canyon Rd. inspired her to mount a campaign to stop the Hwy. 18 and 167 interchange that was in the works at

the time and which would have cut right through the colony. Her campaign was successful and the inter- change at Peasley Canyon Rd. was redesigned, pre- serving the herons’ nesting habitat. As the colony lay halfway between Seattle Audubon’s territory and Ta- homa Audubon’s territory, the momentum from Thais’ efforts to preserve this marsh led to the carving out and founding of a South King County Audubon chapter, which came to be known as Rainier, in 1984. Thais also joined Zella in working to preserve a place

from page 1 times of the year. All the students and their families were invited. The

now known as Protection Island Refuge near Port Townsend, which provides nesting habitat for 21,000 pairs of sea birds. Other of Thais’ conservation efforts led to the pres- ervation of Dumas Bay Park, Gog-le-hi-te wetland, and West Hylebos Wetlands. Thais became a charter member of Tahoma Audu- bon in 1969, volunteering countless hours leading field trips, teaching bird identification classes, and coordinat- ing and participating in annual Christmas Bird Counts and Breeding Bird Surveys. She coordinated the Ta-

homa CBC Area 2 until 2007 when she finally retired at

age 90. Thais

from page 1 times of the year. All the students and their families were invited. The

was a pro- lific writer and record keeper. She wrote many articles and letters relat- ed to birds. In 1975, she started the monthly sightings column, “Word on Birds,” for the Tahoma Audubon Towhee, and continued to write it for 22 years. She was a sub-regional editor for North American Birds from 1975-1985. She enjoyed challenging our knowledge of birds with her birding quiz, “The Quizzical Owl,” published monthly in both the Rainier and Tahoma Audubon newsletters. She kept detailed journals of her birding field trips and travels to places all around Washington state, the west coast, Alaska, the Rockies, Michigan, Ohio, Texas, and the southwest, the Florida Keys and Dry Tortugas, Canada, and England.

from page 1 times of the year. All the students and their families were invited. The

The

mark

of

a great teacher is one who has a passion for learning and the gift for sharing that knowledge in a way that en- gages the student in the process. Thais Bock had this gift. She was a friend, mentor, pianist, master birder, and teacher who enjoyed sharing her passions for classical music, birds, and nature with everyone around her.

Reprinted, with permission, from The Heron Herald; Raineir Audubon Society

Join us in parks throughout Pierce County as we give back to the earth

We’ll trim limbs, groom grounds, comb beaches and plant more flowers and trees.

FUN FOR ALL AGES!

Families & Friends • Schools • Businesses • Individuals • Living Groups • Grandparents • Non-Profits • Youth Clubs •

Senior Centers • Block Parties • Book Clubs • Church Groups • Students & More!

Pick a Park! • Saturday, April 24, 9AM – 12PM

Participating parks listed at: www.parksappreciationday.net Information: (253) 305-1014 or

richardm@tacomaparks.com

Contact Organizations

Citizens for a Healthy Bay • Jeanine Riss • (253) 383-2429

City of Bonney Lake • Gary Leaf • (253) 862-8602 City of Gig Harbor • Terri Reed • (253) 851-6170 City of DuPont • Amy Walker • (253) 912-5245 City of Fife • David Cantlin • (253) 606-8877 City of Fircrest • Jeff Grover • (253) 564-8177 Key Pen Parks • Chad Harvell • (253) 884-9240 City of Lakewood • Suzi Riley • (253) 983-7758

9th Annual
9th Annual
T ogether Gr ee n Join us for our next What: Together Green work & pizzay celebra- tion work party: gtaylor@tahomaaudubon. org or (253) 565-1884. Our organizations will be specifically Photos/Diane Yorgason-Quinn By Shep Thorp Editor’s note: Shep Thorp has been doing the regular Wednesday Nisqually walks with Phil Kelley for some time and fills in as leader in Phil’s absences. Shep led a combo Tahoma Audubon/Rainier Audubon walk at Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, March 6, 2010, and this is his report: Twenty-one of us enjoyed a sunny cool morning at the refuge. We met at the visitor center pond overlook, the temperature was 47 degrees Fahrenheit, and the light was fabulous. The pond had many Ringed-Necked Ducks, Mallard Ducks, Canada Geese and a pair of Hooded Mergansers. We also saw Red-Winged Blackbirds, European Starlings and Song Sparrows. Across the parking lot and between the access road and the entrance road, the water retention ponds provided distant looks at Northern Shovelers and Northern Pintails. Later in the morning, as the temperature became warmer, we had better close-up views of the Northern Shovelers turning rapidly in tight circles as they fed from the surface of other ponds. There is a small earth dike, between the retention ponds, which had several Killdeer. Some appeared to be pairing up. Along the access road, we scanned the fields and flooded fields southwest. Large numbers of Turdus migratorius were doing that thing they do so well: Run, stop, feed. Many males were brightly colored. Numbers may be down, but we viewed a lot of waterfowl including Green-Winged Teal, American Wigeon, and Bufflehead. A pair of Wood Ducks was spotted, several Gadwalls, and a Eurasian Wigeon. Golden-crowned Sparrows fed along the gravel road. We had fly-overs by Double-crested Cormorants and Mew Gulls. In the snag tree at the corner between the parking lot, access road, and southern entrance to the boardwalk we saw both male and female Pileated Woodpeckers foraging for food. A single Dunlin was seen. An American Bittern was located in the reeds along the boardwalk. Initially hunkered down, the Bittern did stand and fly across the pond, providing continued good looks and silhouettes with the sunlight from behind. A large 10-inch diameter pond turtle basked in the sun on a log at our first viewpoint. We also saw a Ruby-Crowned Kinglet. A Great Blue Heron greeted us at the second boardwalk viewpoint, a mature adult. Our quiet group of 21 walked by within 15 feet of this confident bird roosting in a tree at eye level. Making our way towards the Twin Barns, we also saw Bewick’s, Winter and Marsh Wrens, Downy Woodpecker, and Black-capped Chickadees. Tree Swallows were present in large numbers, perched and flying, and best viewed at the Twin Barns overlook. We’ve seen the Tree Swallows at the refuge the last three weeks. Two weeks ago a couple of Violet-Green Swallows were seen, but we could not find them this walk. We also saw Northern Harrier, Northern Shrike, Rock Pigeon and two more Dunlin. Our first pass by the fallen nest tree of the Great Horned Owl was unsuccessful. We had nice looks at Common Mergansers, Hooded Mergansers and Common Goldeneyes at the Nisqually River overlook. Heading out on the new dike, we saw River Otter on the inside and a male American Kestrel on the outside in the restored riparian area. Additional waterfowl species in the ponds on the inside of the new dike were Lesser Scaup and American Coot, and we saw good numbers and variety of previous listed ducks. Large numbers of Canada and Cackler Geese flew into the refuge. Another Northern Harrier was seen, a few Red-tailed Hawks, and several Bald Eagles. Many Great Blue Herons were apparent in the new tidal zones between the new dike and the demolished old dike. Several Glaucous- Winged Gulls and American Crows were seen. Scoping McAllister Creek we saw Red-Breasted Mergansers, and another male Common Merganser was seen submerging his face and paddling quickly forward in what we speculated was a feeding behavior. Fortunately on our way back, the Great Horned Owl had returned to the nest tree, providing good looks. Some of our group had to leave earlier and sadly missed this terrific bird. Along the old Nisqually River dike, we saw a pair of Bushtits, heard Goldfinches, and had great looks at Spotted Towhee and Brown Creepers. We ran into an interesting cluster of birds including our first female Rufus Hummingbird of the season following a Red-breasted Sapsucker after working the tree. Our presumption was that the hummingbird was feeding from the sapsucker’s holes, very interesting behavior to observe! We also saw Dark-Eyed Junco, Golden-crowned Kinglet and a Coyote. A number of Yellow-rumped Warblers, Audubon’s form, were seen at the Riparian overlook. It seems spring has arrived early at the Nisqually Wildlife Refuge and there is a lot of wildlife observation to enjoy. Many wonder what the Great Horned Owls are up to, and I think the next several weeks will be very interesting. Thanks to everyone for contributing to a fun bird walk. I counted 54 species in total! Page 10 www.tahomaaudubon.org April 2010 from page 1 times of the year. All the students and their families were invited. The house was full of the spicy scent of warm Christmas punch, and multitudes of candles glowed. There were duets galore, often with bells and tambourine effects provided by the lit- tlest pupils, and the program would end with the pupils playing carols and all would sing along. Then they would adjourn to the other room to enjoy cookies and the wassail bowl full of Christmas Cheer, and to admire the table-top Christmas tree decorated with musical ornaments. Christmas was a busy time of year for Thais, because at the same time she was organizing and hosting the Christmas recital for her pupils, she was organizing and participating in area Christmas Bird Counts – for Thais had discovered another passion, ornithology, when she joined a Seattle Audubon field trip in 1968. Through Audubon activi- ties, she met Zella Schultz. In later years, Thais always credited Zella, a noted ornithologist, teacher, writer, and artist, with being the key influence that got her into birding. Along with Zella and Eleanor Stopps, Thais became an advocate for the preservation of bird nesting habitat. Her dis- covery and monitoring of the Great Blue Heron colo- ny on Peasley Canyon Rd. inspired her to mount a campaign to stop the Hwy. 18 and 167 interchange that was in the works at the time and which would have cut right through the colony. Her campaign was successful and the inter- change at Peasley Canyon Rd. was redesigned, pre- serving the herons’ nesting habitat. As the colony lay halfway between Seattle Audubon’s territory and Ta- homa Audubon’s territory, the momentum from Thais’ efforts to preserve this marsh led to the carving out and founding of a South King County Audubon chapter, which came to be known as Rainier, in 1984. Thais also joined Zella in working to preserve a place now known as Protection Island Refuge near Port Townsend, which provides nesting habitat for 21,000 pairs of sea birds. Other of Thais’ conservation efforts led to the pres- ervation of Dumas Bay Park, Gog-le-hi-te wetland, and West Hylebos Wetlands. Thais became a charter member of Tahoma Audu- bon in 1969, volunteering countless hours leading field trips, teaching bird identification classes, and coordinat- ing and participating in annual Christmas Bird Counts and Breeding Bird Surveys. She coordinated the Ta- homa CBC Area 2 until 2007 when she finally retired at age 90. Thais was a pro- lific writer and record keeper. She wrote many articles and letters relat- ed to birds. In 1975, she started the monthly sightings column, “Word on Birds,” for the Tahoma Audubon Towhee, and continued to write it for 22 years. She was a sub-regional editor for North American Birds from 1975-1985. She enjoyed challenging our knowledge of birds with her birding quiz, “The Quizzical Owl,” published monthly in both the Rainier and Tahoma Audubon newsletters. She kept detailed journals of her birding field trips and travels to places all around Washington state, the west coast, Alaska, the Rockies, Michigan, Ohio, Texas, and the southwest, the Florida Keys and Dry Tortugas, Canada, and England. The mark of a great teacher is one who has a passion for learning and the gift for sharing that knowledge in a way that en- gages the student in the process. Thais Bock had this gift. She was a friend, mentor, pianist, master birder, and teacher who enjoyed sharing her passions for classical music, birds, and nature with everyone around her. Reprinted, with permission, from The Heron Herald; Raineir Audubon Society Join us in parks throughout Pierce County as we give back to the earth We’ll trim limbs, groom grounds, comb beaches and plant more flowers and trees. FUN FOR ALL AGES! Families & Friends • Schools • Businesses • Individuals • Living Groups • Grandparents • Non-Profits • Youth Clubs • Senior Centers • Block Parties • Book Clubs • Church Groups • Students & More! Pick a Park! • Saturday, April 24, 9AM – 12PM Participating parks listed at: www.parksappreciationday.net Information: (253) 305-1014 or richardm@tacomaparks.com Contact Organizations Citizens for a Healthy Bay • Jeanine Riss • (253) 383-2429 City of Bonney Lake • Gary Leaf • (253) 862-8602 City of Gig Harbor • Terri Reed • (253) 851-6170 City of DuPont • Amy Walker • (253) 912-5245 City of Fife • David Cantlin • (253) 606-8877 City of Fircrest • Jeff Grover • (253) 564-8177 Key Pen Parks • Chad Harvell • (253) 884-9240 City of Lakewood • Suzi Riley • (253) 983-7758 9th Annual Metro Parks Tacoma • Richard Madison • (253) 305-1014 Milton Parks & Rec. • Brent Thompson • (253) 517-2751 PenMet Parks • Eric Guenther • (253) 858-3400 x222 Pierce County Parks • Cara Cross • (253) 841-8515 Puget Creek Restoration Society • Scott Hansen • (253) 779-8890 City of Puyallup • Dick Weber • (253) 841-5517 City of University Place • Paul Barnes • (253) 460-6493 www.ParksAppreciationDay.net Saturday, April 24, 2010 9AM – 12PM Big backyard potluck picnic Summer Solstice Time - Thurs, June 24, 6-9 p.m. Displays by Pierce County outdoor and environmen- tal allies: Audubon, Mountaineers, Foothills Trail, Native Plant Society, Cascade Land Conservancy, Si- erra Club, Citizens for A Healthy Bay, Carbon River Corridor, Chambers-Clover Watershed Council, Puget Creek Restoration Society, Student Conservation As- sociation and more. At the Engle Garden , 4011 Alameda Avenue, University Place, south of Fircrest. Featuring : The displays by our friendly groups plus, licensed falconers with their live birds, native plants for sale, Entertaining program, music and Earth- friendly ideas for kids of all ages. Children and grand- children are MOST welcome. And don't forget how great the food is at these events! We Furnish : Coffee & punch. Beer & wine is BYO. You Bring : A hot or cold entree, PLUS a salad or dessert; PLUS your own TABLE SERVICE and a ‘situpon.’ No RSVP necessary. Rain does not cancel. Membership C9ZY020Z Tahoma Audubon is the Pierce County chapter of National Audubon. As an Introductory member of Tahoma Audubon you also receive a National Audubon membership and Audubon Magazine for one year. Renewing your Chapter Membership ensures that we can continue to do our work in Pierce County. Chapter membership includes: Towhee newsletter sub- scription, free family events, birding trip invitations, class & book dis- counts, conservation activities, annual celebrations and more. Joint TAS/ National Audubon membership includes: Chapter membership, National membership, annual Audubon Magazine subscription, and support of Important Bird Areas (IBA) and state and national conservation agendas. City Phone: home ___________________ Introductory (first year) Joint National/Tahoma Audubon Chapter member renewal Other Contributions _____________ ___ ___ ___ ___ $20 $50 $30 Membership Fee: Member(s) Name: _______________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________ ______________________________ business Zip __________________ _________________ e-mail: ________________________________________________ Member #: (office use only) Checks payable to: Tahoma Audubon 2917 Morrison Rd. W. University Place, 98466 Tahoma Audubon Society, established in 1969, is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. Donations are tax deductible. April 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 11 " id="pdf-obj-5-160" src="pdf-obj-5-160.jpg">

Metro Parks Tacoma • Richard Madison • (253) 305-1014 Milton Parks & Rec. • Brent Thompson • (253) 517-2751 PenMet Parks • Eric Guenther • (253) 858-3400 x222 Pierce County Parks • Cara Cross • (253) 841-8515 Puget Creek Restoration Society • Scott Hansen • (253) 779-8890 City of Puyallup • Dick Weber • (253) 841-5517 City of University Place • Paul Barnes • (253) 460-6493

www.ParksAppreciationDay.net Saturday, April 24, 2010 9AM – 12PM

T ogether Gr ee n Join us for our next What: Together Green work & pizzay celebra- tion work party: gtaylor@tahomaaudubon. org or (253) 565-1884. Our organizations will be specifically Photos/Diane Yorgason-Quinn By Shep Thorp Editor’s note: Shep Thorp has been doing the regular Wednesday Nisqually walks with Phil Kelley for some time and fills in as leader in Phil’s absences. Shep led a combo Tahoma Audubon/Rainier Audubon walk at Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, March 6, 2010, and this is his report: Twenty-one of us enjoyed a sunny cool morning at the refuge. We met at the visitor center pond overlook, the temperature was 47 degrees Fahrenheit, and the light was fabulous. The pond had many Ringed-Necked Ducks, Mallard Ducks, Canada Geese and a pair of Hooded Mergansers. We also saw Red-Winged Blackbirds, European Starlings and Song Sparrows. Across the parking lot and between the access road and the entrance road, the water retention ponds provided distant looks at Northern Shovelers and Northern Pintails. Later in the morning, as the temperature became warmer, we had better close-up views of the Northern Shovelers turning rapidly in tight circles as they fed from the surface of other ponds. There is a small earth dike, between the retention ponds, which had several Killdeer. Some appeared to be pairing up. Along the access road, we scanned the fields and flooded fields southwest. Large numbers of Turdus migratorius were doing that thing they do so well: Run, stop, feed. Many males were brightly colored. Numbers may be down, but we viewed a lot of waterfowl including Green-Winged Teal, American Wigeon, and Bufflehead. A pair of Wood Ducks was spotted, several Gadwalls, and a Eurasian Wigeon. Golden-crowned Sparrows fed along the gravel road. We had fly-overs by Double-crested Cormorants and Mew Gulls. In the snag tree at the corner between the parking lot, access road, and southern entrance to the boardwalk we saw both male and female Pileated Woodpeckers foraging for food. A single Dunlin was seen. An American Bittern was located in the reeds along the boardwalk. Initially hunkered down, the Bittern did stand and fly across the pond, providing continued good looks and silhouettes with the sunlight from behind. A large 10-inch diameter pond turtle basked in the sun on a log at our first viewpoint. We also saw a Ruby-Crowned Kinglet. A Great Blue Heron greeted us at the second boardwalk viewpoint, a mature adult. Our quiet group of 21 walked by within 15 feet of this confident bird roosting in a tree at eye level. Making our way towards the Twin Barns, we also saw Bewick’s, Winter and Marsh Wrens, Downy Woodpecker, and Black-capped Chickadees. Tree Swallows were present in large numbers, perched and flying, and best viewed at the Twin Barns overlook. We’ve seen the Tree Swallows at the refuge the last three weeks. Two weeks ago a couple of Violet-Green Swallows were seen, but we could not find them this walk. We also saw Northern Harrier, Northern Shrike, Rock Pigeon and two more Dunlin. Our first pass by the fallen nest tree of the Great Horned Owl was unsuccessful. We had nice looks at Common Mergansers, Hooded Mergansers and Common Goldeneyes at the Nisqually River overlook. Heading out on the new dike, we saw River Otter on the inside and a male American Kestrel on the outside in the restored riparian area. Additional waterfowl species in the ponds on the inside of the new dike were Lesser Scaup and American Coot, and we saw good numbers and variety of previous listed ducks. Large numbers of Canada and Cackler Geese flew into the refuge. Another Northern Harrier was seen, a few Red-tailed Hawks, and several Bald Eagles. Many Great Blue Herons were apparent in the new tidal zones between the new dike and the demolished old dike. Several Glaucous- Winged Gulls and American Crows were seen. Scoping McAllister Creek we saw Red-Breasted Mergansers, and another male Common Merganser was seen submerging his face and paddling quickly forward in what we speculated was a feeding behavior. Fortunately on our way back, the Great Horned Owl had returned to the nest tree, providing good looks. Some of our group had to leave earlier and sadly missed this terrific bird. Along the old Nisqually River dike, we saw a pair of Bushtits, heard Goldfinches, and had great looks at Spotted Towhee and Brown Creepers. We ran into an interesting cluster of birds including our first female Rufus Hummingbird of the season following a Red-breasted Sapsucker after working the tree. Our presumption was that the hummingbird was feeding from the sapsucker’s holes, very interesting behavior to observe! We also saw Dark-Eyed Junco, Golden-crowned Kinglet and a Coyote. A number of Yellow-rumped Warblers, Audubon’s form, were seen at the Riparian overlook. It seems spring has arrived early at the Nisqually Wildlife Refuge and there is a lot of wildlife observation to enjoy. Many wonder what the Great Horned Owls are up to, and I think the next several weeks will be very interesting. Thanks to everyone for contributing to a fun bird walk. I counted 54 species in total! Page 10 www.tahomaaudubon.org April 2010 from page 1 times of the year. All the students and their families were invited. The house was full of the spicy scent of warm Christmas punch, and multitudes of candles glowed. There were duets galore, often with bells and tambourine effects provided by the lit- tlest pupils, and the program would end with the pupils playing carols and all would sing along. Then they would adjourn to the other room to enjoy cookies and the wassail bowl full of Christmas Cheer, and to admire the table-top Christmas tree decorated with musical ornaments. Christmas was a busy time of year for Thais, because at the same time she was organizing and hosting the Christmas recital for her pupils, she was organizing and participating in area Christmas Bird Counts – for Thais had discovered another passion, ornithology, when she joined a Seattle Audubon field trip in 1968. Through Audubon activi- ties, she met Zella Schultz. In later years, Thais always credited Zella, a noted ornithologist, teacher, writer, and artist, with being the key influence that got her into birding. Along with Zella and Eleanor Stopps, Thais became an advocate for the preservation of bird nesting habitat. Her dis- covery and monitoring of the Great Blue Heron colo- ny on Peasley Canyon Rd. inspired her to mount a campaign to stop the Hwy. 18 and 167 interchange that was in the works at the time and which would have cut right through the colony. Her campaign was successful and the inter- change at Peasley Canyon Rd. was redesigned, pre- serving the herons’ nesting habitat. As the colony lay halfway between Seattle Audubon’s territory and Ta- homa Audubon’s territory, the momentum from Thais’ efforts to preserve this marsh led to the carving out and founding of a South King County Audubon chapter, which came to be known as Rainier, in 1984. Thais also joined Zella in working to preserve a place now known as Protection Island Refuge near Port Townsend, which provides nesting habitat for 21,000 pairs of sea birds. Other of Thais’ conservation efforts led to the pres- ervation of Dumas Bay Park, Gog-le-hi-te wetland, and West Hylebos Wetlands. Thais became a charter member of Tahoma Audu- bon in 1969, volunteering countless hours leading field trips, teaching bird identification classes, and coordinat- ing and participating in annual Christmas Bird Counts and Breeding Bird Surveys. She coordinated the Ta- homa CBC Area 2 until 2007 when she finally retired at age 90. Thais was a pro- lific writer and record keeper. She wrote many articles and letters relat- ed to birds. In 1975, she started the monthly sightings column, “Word on Birds,” for the Tahoma Audubon Towhee, and continued to write it for 22 years. She was a sub-regional editor for North American Birds from 1975-1985. She enjoyed challenging our knowledge of birds with her birding quiz, “The Quizzical Owl,” published monthly in both the Rainier and Tahoma Audubon newsletters. She kept detailed journals of her birding field trips and travels to places all around Washington state, the west coast, Alaska, the Rockies, Michigan, Ohio, Texas, and the southwest, the Florida Keys and Dry Tortugas, Canada, and England. The mark of a great teacher is one who has a passion for learning and the gift for sharing that knowledge in a way that en- gages the student in the process. Thais Bock had this gift. She was a friend, mentor, pianist, master birder, and teacher who enjoyed sharing her passions for classical music, birds, and nature with everyone around her. Reprinted, with permission, from The Heron Herald; Raineir Audubon Society Join us in parks throughout Pierce County as we give back to the earth We’ll trim limbs, groom grounds, comb beaches and plant more flowers and trees. FUN FOR ALL AGES! Families & Friends • Schools • Businesses • Individuals • Living Groups • Grandparents • Non-Profits • Youth Clubs • Senior Centers • Block Parties • Book Clubs • Church Groups • Students & More! Pick a Park! • Saturday, April 24, 9AM – 12PM Participating parks listed at: www.parksappreciationday.net Information: (253) 305-1014 or richardm@tacomaparks.com Contact Organizations Citizens for a Healthy Bay • Jeanine Riss • (253) 383-2429 City of Bonney Lake • Gary Leaf • (253) 862-8602 City of Gig Harbor • Terri Reed • (253) 851-6170 City of DuPont • Amy Walker • (253) 912-5245 City of Fife • David Cantlin • (253) 606-8877 City of Fircrest • Jeff Grover • (253) 564-8177 Key Pen Parks • Chad Harvell • (253) 884-9240 City of Lakewood • Suzi Riley • (253) 983-7758 9th Annual Metro Parks Tacoma • Richard Madison • (253) 305-1014 Milton Parks & Rec. • Brent Thompson • (253) 517-2751 PenMet Parks • Eric Guenther • (253) 858-3400 x222 Pierce County Parks • Cara Cross • (253) 841-8515 Puget Creek Restoration Society • Scott Hansen • (253) 779-8890 City of Puyallup • Dick Weber • (253) 841-5517 City of University Place • Paul Barnes • (253) 460-6493 www.ParksAppreciationDay.net Saturday, April 24, 2010 9AM – 12PM Big backyard potluck picnic Summer Solstice Time - Thurs, June 24, 6-9 p.m. Displays by Pierce County outdoor and environmen- tal allies: Audubon, Mountaineers, Foothills Trail, Native Plant Society, Cascade Land Conservancy, Si- erra Club, Citizens for A Healthy Bay, Carbon River Corridor, Chambers-Clover Watershed Council, Puget Creek Restoration Society, Student Conservation As- sociation and more. At the Engle Garden , 4011 Alameda Avenue, University Place, south of Fircrest. Featuring : The displays by our friendly groups plus, licensed falconers with their live birds, native plants for sale, Entertaining program, music and Earth- friendly ideas for kids of all ages. Children and grand- children are MOST welcome. And don't forget how great the food is at these events! We Furnish : Coffee & punch. Beer & wine is BYO. You Bring : A hot or cold entree, PLUS a salad or dessert; PLUS your own TABLE SERVICE and a ‘situpon.’ No RSVP necessary. Rain does not cancel. Membership C9ZY020Z Tahoma Audubon is the Pierce County chapter of National Audubon. As an Introductory member of Tahoma Audubon you also receive a National Audubon membership and Audubon Magazine for one year. Renewing your Chapter Membership ensures that we can continue to do our work in Pierce County. Chapter membership includes: Towhee newsletter sub- scription, free family events, birding trip invitations, class & book dis- counts, conservation activities, annual celebrations and more. Joint TAS/ National Audubon membership includes: Chapter membership, National membership, annual Audubon Magazine subscription, and support of Important Bird Areas (IBA) and state and national conservation agendas. City Phone: home ___________________ Introductory (first year) Joint National/Tahoma Audubon Chapter member renewal Other Contributions _____________ ___ ___ ___ ___ $20 $50 $30 Membership Fee: Member(s) Name: _______________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________ ______________________________ business Zip __________________ _________________ e-mail: ________________________________________________ Member #: (office use only) Checks payable to: Tahoma Audubon 2917 Morrison Rd. W. University Place, 98466 Tahoma Audubon Society, established in 1969, is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. Donations are tax deductible. April 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 11 " id="pdf-obj-5-167" src="pdf-obj-5-167.jpg">
T ogether Gr ee n Join us for our next What: Together Green work & pizzay celebra- tion work party: gtaylor@tahomaaudubon. org or (253) 565-1884. Our organizations will be specifically Photos/Diane Yorgason-Quinn By Shep Thorp Editor’s note: Shep Thorp has been doing the regular Wednesday Nisqually walks with Phil Kelley for some time and fills in as leader in Phil’s absences. Shep led a combo Tahoma Audubon/Rainier Audubon walk at Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, March 6, 2010, and this is his report: Twenty-one of us enjoyed a sunny cool morning at the refuge. We met at the visitor center pond overlook, the temperature was 47 degrees Fahrenheit, and the light was fabulous. The pond had many Ringed-Necked Ducks, Mallard Ducks, Canada Geese and a pair of Hooded Mergansers. We also saw Red-Winged Blackbirds, European Starlings and Song Sparrows. Across the parking lot and between the access road and the entrance road, the water retention ponds provided distant looks at Northern Shovelers and Northern Pintails. Later in the morning, as the temperature became warmer, we had better close-up views of the Northern Shovelers turning rapidly in tight circles as they fed from the surface of other ponds. There is a small earth dike, between the retention ponds, which had several Killdeer. Some appeared to be pairing up. Along the access road, we scanned the fields and flooded fields southwest. Large numbers of Turdus migratorius were doing that thing they do so well: Run, stop, feed. Many males were brightly colored. Numbers may be down, but we viewed a lot of waterfowl including Green-Winged Teal, American Wigeon, and Bufflehead. A pair of Wood Ducks was spotted, several Gadwalls, and a Eurasian Wigeon. Golden-crowned Sparrows fed along the gravel road. We had fly-overs by Double-crested Cormorants and Mew Gulls. In the snag tree at the corner between the parking lot, access road, and southern entrance to the boardwalk we saw both male and female Pileated Woodpeckers foraging for food. A single Dunlin was seen. An American Bittern was located in the reeds along the boardwalk. Initially hunkered down, the Bittern did stand and fly across the pond, providing continued good looks and silhouettes with the sunlight from behind. A large 10-inch diameter pond turtle basked in the sun on a log at our first viewpoint. We also saw a Ruby-Crowned Kinglet. A Great Blue Heron greeted us at the second boardwalk viewpoint, a mature adult. Our quiet group of 21 walked by within 15 feet of this confident bird roosting in a tree at eye level. Making our way towards the Twin Barns, we also saw Bewick’s, Winter and Marsh Wrens, Downy Woodpecker, and Black-capped Chickadees. Tree Swallows were present in large numbers, perched and flying, and best viewed at the Twin Barns overlook. We’ve seen the Tree Swallows at the refuge the last three weeks. Two weeks ago a couple of Violet-Green Swallows were seen, but we could not find them this walk. We also saw Northern Harrier, Northern Shrike, Rock Pigeon and two more Dunlin. Our first pass by the fallen nest tree of the Great Horned Owl was unsuccessful. We had nice looks at Common Mergansers, Hooded Mergansers and Common Goldeneyes at the Nisqually River overlook. Heading out on the new dike, we saw River Otter on the inside and a male American Kestrel on the outside in the restored riparian area. Additional waterfowl species in the ponds on the inside of the new dike were Lesser Scaup and American Coot, and we saw good numbers and variety of previous listed ducks. Large numbers of Canada and Cackler Geese flew into the refuge. Another Northern Harrier was seen, a few Red-tailed Hawks, and several Bald Eagles. Many Great Blue Herons were apparent in the new tidal zones between the new dike and the demolished old dike. Several Glaucous- Winged Gulls and American Crows were seen. Scoping McAllister Creek we saw Red-Breasted Mergansers, and another male Common Merganser was seen submerging his face and paddling quickly forward in what we speculated was a feeding behavior. Fortunately on our way back, the Great Horned Owl had returned to the nest tree, providing good looks. Some of our group had to leave earlier and sadly missed this terrific bird. Along the old Nisqually River dike, we saw a pair of Bushtits, heard Goldfinches, and had great looks at Spotted Towhee and Brown Creepers. We ran into an interesting cluster of birds including our first female Rufus Hummingbird of the season following a Red-breasted Sapsucker after working the tree. Our presumption was that the hummingbird was feeding from the sapsucker’s holes, very interesting behavior to observe! We also saw Dark-Eyed Junco, Golden-crowned Kinglet and a Coyote. A number of Yellow-rumped Warblers, Audubon’s form, were seen at the Riparian overlook. It seems spring has arrived early at the Nisqually Wildlife Refuge and there is a lot of wildlife observation to enjoy. Many wonder what the Great Horned Owls are up to, and I think the next several weeks will be very interesting. Thanks to everyone for contributing to a fun bird walk. I counted 54 species in total! Page 10 www.tahomaaudubon.org April 2010 from page 1 times of the year. All the students and their families were invited. The house was full of the spicy scent of warm Christmas punch, and multitudes of candles glowed. There were duets galore, often with bells and tambourine effects provided by the lit- tlest pupils, and the program would end with the pupils playing carols and all would sing along. Then they would adjourn to the other room to enjoy cookies and the wassail bowl full of Christmas Cheer, and to admire the table-top Christmas tree decorated with musical ornaments. Christmas was a busy time of year for Thais, because at the same time she was organizing and hosting the Christmas recital for her pupils, she was organizing and participating in area Christmas Bird Counts – for Thais had discovered another passion, ornithology, when she joined a Seattle Audubon field trip in 1968. Through Audubon activi- ties, she met Zella Schultz. In later years, Thais always credited Zella, a noted ornithologist, teacher, writer, and artist, with being the key influence that got her into birding. Along with Zella and Eleanor Stopps, Thais became an advocate for the preservation of bird nesting habitat. Her dis- covery and monitoring of the Great Blue Heron colo- ny on Peasley Canyon Rd. inspired her to mount a campaign to stop the Hwy. 18 and 167 interchange that was in the works at the time and which would have cut right through the colony. Her campaign was successful and the inter- change at Peasley Canyon Rd. was redesigned, pre- serving the herons’ nesting habitat. As the colony lay halfway between Seattle Audubon’s territory and Ta- homa Audubon’s territory, the momentum from Thais’ efforts to preserve this marsh led to the carving out and founding of a South King County Audubon chapter, which came to be known as Rainier, in 1984. Thais also joined Zella in working to preserve a place now known as Protection Island Refuge near Port Townsend, which provides nesting habitat for 21,000 pairs of sea birds. Other of Thais’ conservation efforts led to the pres- ervation of Dumas Bay Park, Gog-le-hi-te wetland, and West Hylebos Wetlands. Thais became a charter member of Tahoma Audu- bon in 1969, volunteering countless hours leading field trips, teaching bird identification classes, and coordinat- ing and participating in annual Christmas Bird Counts and Breeding Bird Surveys. She coordinated the Ta- homa CBC Area 2 until 2007 when she finally retired at age 90. Thais was a pro- lific writer and record keeper. She wrote many articles and letters relat- ed to birds. In 1975, she started the monthly sightings column, “Word on Birds,” for the Tahoma Audubon Towhee, and continued to write it for 22 years. She was a sub-regional editor for North American Birds from 1975-1985. She enjoyed challenging our knowledge of birds with her birding quiz, “The Quizzical Owl,” published monthly in both the Rainier and Tahoma Audubon newsletters. She kept detailed journals of her birding field trips and travels to places all around Washington state, the west coast, Alaska, the Rockies, Michigan, Ohio, Texas, and the southwest, the Florida Keys and Dry Tortugas, Canada, and England. The mark of a great teacher is one who has a passion for learning and the gift for sharing that knowledge in a way that en- gages the student in the process. Thais Bock had this gift. She was a friend, mentor, pianist, master birder, and teacher who enjoyed sharing her passions for classical music, birds, and nature with everyone around her. Reprinted, with permission, from The Heron Herald; Raineir Audubon Society Join us in parks throughout Pierce County as we give back to the earth We’ll trim limbs, groom grounds, comb beaches and plant more flowers and trees. FUN FOR ALL AGES! Families & Friends • Schools • Businesses • Individuals • Living Groups • Grandparents • Non-Profits • Youth Clubs • Senior Centers • Block Parties • Book Clubs • Church Groups • Students & More! Pick a Park! • Saturday, April 24, 9AM – 12PM Participating parks listed at: www.parksappreciationday.net Information: (253) 305-1014 or richardm@tacomaparks.com Contact Organizations Citizens for a Healthy Bay • Jeanine Riss • (253) 383-2429 City of Bonney Lake • Gary Leaf • (253) 862-8602 City of Gig Harbor • Terri Reed • (253) 851-6170 City of DuPont • Amy Walker • (253) 912-5245 City of Fife • David Cantlin • (253) 606-8877 City of Fircrest • Jeff Grover • (253) 564-8177 Key Pen Parks • Chad Harvell • (253) 884-9240 City of Lakewood • Suzi Riley • (253) 983-7758 9th Annual Metro Parks Tacoma • Richard Madison • (253) 305-1014 Milton Parks & Rec. • Brent Thompson • (253) 517-2751 PenMet Parks • Eric Guenther • (253) 858-3400 x222 Pierce County Parks • Cara Cross • (253) 841-8515 Puget Creek Restoration Society • Scott Hansen • (253) 779-8890 City of Puyallup • Dick Weber • (253) 841-5517 City of University Place • Paul Barnes • (253) 460-6493 www.ParksAppreciationDay.net Saturday, April 24, 2010 9AM – 12PM Big backyard potluck picnic Summer Solstice Time - Thurs, June 24, 6-9 p.m. Displays by Pierce County outdoor and environmen- tal allies: Audubon, Mountaineers, Foothills Trail, Native Plant Society, Cascade Land Conservancy, Si- erra Club, Citizens for A Healthy Bay, Carbon River Corridor, Chambers-Clover Watershed Council, Puget Creek Restoration Society, Student Conservation As- sociation and more. At the Engle Garden , 4011 Alameda Avenue, University Place, south of Fircrest. Featuring : The displays by our friendly groups plus, licensed falconers with their live birds, native plants for sale, Entertaining program, music and Earth- friendly ideas for kids of all ages. Children and grand- children are MOST welcome. And don't forget how great the food is at these events! We Furnish : Coffee & punch. Beer & wine is BYO. You Bring : A hot or cold entree, PLUS a salad or dessert; PLUS your own TABLE SERVICE and a ‘situpon.’ No RSVP necessary. Rain does not cancel. Membership C9ZY020Z Tahoma Audubon is the Pierce County chapter of National Audubon. As an Introductory member of Tahoma Audubon you also receive a National Audubon membership and Audubon Magazine for one year. Renewing your Chapter Membership ensures that we can continue to do our work in Pierce County. Chapter membership includes: Towhee newsletter sub- scription, free family events, birding trip invitations, class & book dis- counts, conservation activities, annual celebrations and more. Joint TAS/ National Audubon membership includes: Chapter membership, National membership, annual Audubon Magazine subscription, and support of Important Bird Areas (IBA) and state and national conservation agendas. City Phone: home ___________________ Introductory (first year) Joint National/Tahoma Audubon Chapter member renewal Other Contributions _____________ ___ ___ ___ ___ $20 $50 $30 Membership Fee: Member(s) Name: _______________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________ ______________________________ business Zip __________________ _________________ e-mail: ________________________________________________ Member #: (office use only) Checks payable to: Tahoma Audubon 2917 Morrison Rd. W. University Place, 98466 Tahoma Audubon Society, established in 1969, is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. Donations are tax deductible. April 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 11 " id="pdf-obj-5-169" src="pdf-obj-5-169.jpg">

Big backyard potluck picnic

Summer Solstice Time - Thurs, June 24, 6-9 p.m. Displays by Pierce County outdoor and environmen- tal allies: Audubon, Mountaineers, Foothills Trail, Native Plant Society, Cascade Land Conservancy, Si- erra Club, Citizens for A Healthy Bay, Carbon River Corridor, Chambers-Clover Watershed Council, Puget Creek Restoration Society, Student Conservation As- sociation and more. At the Engle Garden, 4011 Alameda Avenue, University Place, south of Fircrest. Featuring: The displays by our friendly groups plus, licensed falconers with their live birds, native plants for sale, Entertaining program, music and Earth- friendly ideas for kids of all ages. Children and grand- children are MOST welcome. And don't forget how great the food is at these events! We Furnish: Coffee & punch. Beer & wine is BYO. You Bring: A hot or cold entree, PLUS a salad or dessert; PLUS your own TABLE SERVICE and a ‘situpon.’ No RSVP necessary. Rain does not cancel.

T ogether Gr ee n Join us for our next What: Together Green work & pizzay celebra- tion work party: gtaylor@tahomaaudubon. org or (253) 565-1884. Our organizations will be specifically Photos/Diane Yorgason-Quinn By Shep Thorp Editor’s note: Shep Thorp has been doing the regular Wednesday Nisqually walks with Phil Kelley for some time and fills in as leader in Phil’s absences. Shep led a combo Tahoma Audubon/Rainier Audubon walk at Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, March 6, 2010, and this is his report: Twenty-one of us enjoyed a sunny cool morning at the refuge. We met at the visitor center pond overlook, the temperature was 47 degrees Fahrenheit, and the light was fabulous. The pond had many Ringed-Necked Ducks, Mallard Ducks, Canada Geese and a pair of Hooded Mergansers. We also saw Red-Winged Blackbirds, European Starlings and Song Sparrows. Across the parking lot and between the access road and the entrance road, the water retention ponds provided distant looks at Northern Shovelers and Northern Pintails. Later in the morning, as the temperature became warmer, we had better close-up views of the Northern Shovelers turning rapidly in tight circles as they fed from the surface of other ponds. There is a small earth dike, between the retention ponds, which had several Killdeer. Some appeared to be pairing up. Along the access road, we scanned the fields and flooded fields southwest. Large numbers of Turdus migratorius were doing that thing they do so well: Run, stop, feed. Many males were brightly colored. Numbers may be down, but we viewed a lot of waterfowl including Green-Winged Teal, American Wigeon, and Bufflehead. A pair of Wood Ducks was spotted, several Gadwalls, and a Eurasian Wigeon. Golden-crowned Sparrows fed along the gravel road. We had fly-overs by Double-crested Cormorants and Mew Gulls. In the snag tree at the corner between the parking lot, access road, and southern entrance to the boardwalk we saw both male and female Pileated Woodpeckers foraging for food. A single Dunlin was seen. An American Bittern was located in the reeds along the boardwalk. Initially hunkered down, the Bittern did stand and fly across the pond, providing continued good looks and silhouettes with the sunlight from behind. A large 10-inch diameter pond turtle basked in the sun on a log at our first viewpoint. We also saw a Ruby-Crowned Kinglet. A Great Blue Heron greeted us at the second boardwalk viewpoint, a mature adult. Our quiet group of 21 walked by within 15 feet of this confident bird roosting in a tree at eye level. Making our way towards the Twin Barns, we also saw Bewick’s, Winter and Marsh Wrens, Downy Woodpecker, and Black-capped Chickadees. Tree Swallows were present in large numbers, perched and flying, and best viewed at the Twin Barns overlook. We’ve seen the Tree Swallows at the refuge the last three weeks. Two weeks ago a couple of Violet-Green Swallows were seen, but we could not find them this walk. We also saw Northern Harrier, Northern Shrike, Rock Pigeon and two more Dunlin. Our first pass by the fallen nest tree of the Great Horned Owl was unsuccessful. We had nice looks at Common Mergansers, Hooded Mergansers and Common Goldeneyes at the Nisqually River overlook. Heading out on the new dike, we saw River Otter on the inside and a male American Kestrel on the outside in the restored riparian area. Additional waterfowl species in the ponds on the inside of the new dike were Lesser Scaup and American Coot, and we saw good numbers and variety of previous listed ducks. Large numbers of Canada and Cackler Geese flew into the refuge. Another Northern Harrier was seen, a few Red-tailed Hawks, and several Bald Eagles. Many Great Blue Herons were apparent in the new tidal zones between the new dike and the demolished old dike. Several Glaucous- Winged Gulls and American Crows were seen. Scoping McAllister Creek we saw Red-Breasted Mergansers, and another male Common Merganser was seen submerging his face and paddling quickly forward in what we speculated was a feeding behavior. Fortunately on our way back, the Great Horned Owl had returned to the nest tree, providing good looks. Some of our group had to leave earlier and sadly missed this terrific bird. Along the old Nisqually River dike, we saw a pair of Bushtits, heard Goldfinches, and had great looks at Spotted Towhee and Brown Creepers. We ran into an interesting cluster of birds including our first female Rufus Hummingbird of the season following a Red-breasted Sapsucker after working the tree. Our presumption was that the hummingbird was feeding from the sapsucker’s holes, very interesting behavior to observe! We also saw Dark-Eyed Junco, Golden-crowned Kinglet and a Coyote. A number of Yellow-rumped Warblers, Audubon’s form, were seen at the Riparian overlook. It seems spring has arrived early at the Nisqually Wildlife Refuge and there is a lot of wildlife observation to enjoy. Many wonder what the Great Horned Owls are up to, and I think the next several weeks will be very interesting. Thanks to everyone for contributing to a fun bird walk. I counted 54 species in total! Page 10 www.tahomaaudubon.org April 2010 from page 1 times of the year. All the students and their families were invited. The house was full of the spicy scent of warm Christmas punch, and multitudes of candles glowed. There were duets galore, often with bells and tambourine effects provided by the lit- tlest pupils, and the program would end with the pupils playing carols and all would sing along. Then they would adjourn to the other room to enjoy cookies and the wassail bowl full of Christmas Cheer, and to admire the table-top Christmas tree decorated with musical ornaments. Christmas was a busy time of year for Thais, because at the same time she was organizing and hosting the Christmas recital for her pupils, she was organizing and participating in area Christmas Bird Counts – for Thais had discovered another passion, ornithology, when she joined a Seattle Audubon field trip in 1968. Through Audubon activi- ties, she met Zella Schultz. In later years, Thais always credited Zella, a noted ornithologist, teacher, writer, and artist, with being the key influence that got her into birding. Along with Zella and Eleanor Stopps, Thais became an advocate for the preservation of bird nesting habitat. Her dis- covery and monitoring of the Great Blue Heron colo- ny on Peasley Canyon Rd. inspired her to mount a campaign to stop the Hwy. 18 and 167 interchange that was in the works at the time and which would have cut right through the colony. Her campaign was successful and the inter- change at Peasley Canyon Rd. was redesigned, pre- serving the herons’ nesting habitat. As the colony lay halfway between Seattle Audubon’s territory and Ta- homa Audubon’s territory, the momentum from Thais’ efforts to preserve this marsh led to the carving out and founding of a South King County Audubon chapter, which came to be known as Rainier, in 1984. Thais also joined Zella in working to preserve a place now known as Protection Island Refuge near Port Townsend, which provides nesting habitat for 21,000 pairs of sea birds. Other of Thais’ conservation efforts led to the pres- ervation of Dumas Bay Park, Gog-le-hi-te wetland, and West Hylebos Wetlands. Thais became a charter member of Tahoma Audu- bon in 1969, volunteering countless hours leading field trips, teaching bird identification classes, and coordinat- ing and participating in annual Christmas Bird Counts and Breeding Bird Surveys. She coordinated the Ta- homa CBC Area 2 until 2007 when she finally retired at age 90. Thais was a pro- lific writer and record keeper. She wrote many articles and letters relat- ed to birds. In 1975, she started the monthly sightings column, “Word on Birds,” for the Tahoma Audubon Towhee, and continued to write it for 22 years. She was a sub-regional editor for North American Birds from 1975-1985. She enjoyed challenging our knowledge of birds with her birding quiz, “The Quizzical Owl,” published monthly in both the Rainier and Tahoma Audubon newsletters. She kept detailed journals of her birding field trips and travels to places all around Washington state, the west coast, Alaska, the Rockies, Michigan, Ohio, Texas, and the southwest, the Florida Keys and Dry Tortugas, Canada, and England. The mark of a great teacher is one who has a passion for learning and the gift for sharing that knowledge in a way that en- gages the student in the process. Thais Bock had this gift. She was a friend, mentor, pianist, master birder, and teacher who enjoyed sharing her passions for classical music, birds, and nature with everyone around her. Reprinted, with permission, from The Heron Herald; Raineir Audubon Society Join us in parks throughout Pierce County as we give back to the earth We’ll trim limbs, groom grounds, comb beaches and plant more flowers and trees. FUN FOR ALL AGES! Families & Friends • Schools • Businesses • Individuals • Living Groups • Grandparents • Non-Profits • Youth Clubs • Senior Centers • Block Parties • Book Clubs • Church Groups • Students & More! Pick a Park! • Saturday, April 24, 9AM – 12PM Participating parks listed at: www.parksappreciationday.net Information: (253) 305-1014 or richardm@tacomaparks.com Contact Organizations Citizens for a Healthy Bay • Jeanine Riss • (253) 383-2429 City of Bonney Lake • Gary Leaf • (253) 862-8602 City of Gig Harbor • Terri Reed • (253) 851-6170 City of DuPont • Amy Walker • (253) 912-5245 City of Fife • David Cantlin • (253) 606-8877 City of Fircrest • Jeff Grover • (253) 564-8177 Key Pen Parks • Chad Harvell • (253) 884-9240 City of Lakewood • Suzi Riley • (253) 983-7758 9th Annual Metro Parks Tacoma • Richard Madison • (253) 305-1014 Milton Parks & Rec. • Brent Thompson • (253) 517-2751 PenMet Parks • Eric Guenther • (253) 858-3400 x222 Pierce County Parks • Cara Cross • (253) 841-8515 Puget Creek Restoration Society • Scott Hansen • (253) 779-8890 City of Puyallup • Dick Weber • (253) 841-5517 City of University Place • Paul Barnes • (253) 460-6493 www.ParksAppreciationDay.net Saturday, April 24, 2010 9AM – 12PM Big backyard potluck picnic Summer Solstice Time - Thurs, June 24, 6-9 p.m. Displays by Pierce County outdoor and environmen- tal allies: Audubon, Mountaineers, Foothills Trail, Native Plant Society, Cascade Land Conservancy, Si- erra Club, Citizens for A Healthy Bay, Carbon River Corridor, Chambers-Clover Watershed Council, Puget Creek Restoration Society, Student Conservation As- sociation and more. At the Engle Garden , 4011 Alameda Avenue, University Place, south of Fircrest. Featuring : The displays by our friendly groups plus, licensed falconers with their live birds, native plants for sale, Entertaining program, music and Earth- friendly ideas for kids of all ages. Children and grand- children are MOST welcome. And don't forget how great the food is at these events! We Furnish : Coffee & punch. Beer & wine is BYO. You Bring : A hot or cold entree, PLUS a salad or dessert; PLUS your own TABLE SERVICE and a ‘situpon.’ No RSVP necessary. Rain does not cancel. Membership C9ZY020Z Tahoma Audubon is the Pierce County chapter of National Audubon. As an Introductory member of Tahoma Audubon you also receive a National Audubon membership and Audubon Magazine for one year. Renewing your Chapter Membership ensures that we can continue to do our work in Pierce County. Chapter membership includes: Towhee newsletter sub- scription, free family events, birding trip invitations, class & book dis- counts, conservation activities, annual celebrations and more. Joint TAS/ National Audubon membership includes: Chapter membership, National membership, annual Audubon Magazine subscription, and support of Important Bird Areas (IBA) and state and national conservation agendas. City Phone: home ___________________ Introductory (first year) Joint National/Tahoma Audubon Chapter member renewal Other Contributions _____________ ___ ___ ___ ___ $20 $50 $30 Membership Fee: Member(s) Name: _______________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________ ______________________________ business Zip __________________ _________________ e-mail: ________________________________________________ Member #: (office use only) Checks payable to: Tahoma Audubon 2917 Morrison Rd. W. University Place, 98466 Tahoma Audubon Society, established in 1969, is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. Donations are tax deductible. April 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 11 " id="pdf-obj-5-184" src="pdf-obj-5-184.jpg">

Membership

C9ZY020Z

Tahoma Audubon is the Pierce County chapter of National Audubon. As an Introductory member of Tahoma Audubon you also receive a National Audubon membership and Audubon Magazine for one year. Renewing your Chapter Membership ensures that we can continue to do our work in Pierce County. Chapter membership includes: Towhee newsletter sub- scription, free family events, birding trip invitations, class & book dis- counts, conservation activities, annual celebrations and more. Joint TAS/ National Audubon membership includes: Chapter membership, National membership, annual Audubon Magazine subscription, and support of Important Bird Areas (IBA) and state and national conservation agendas.

City Phone: home ___________________ Introductory (first year) Joint National/Tahoma Audubon Chapter member renewal Other Contributions _____________
City
Phone: home ___________________
Introductory (first year)
Joint National/Tahoma Audubon
Chapter member renewal
Other Contributions _____________
___
___
___
___
$20
$50
$30
Membership Fee:
Member(s) Name: _______________________________________
Address: _______________________________________________
______________________________
business
Zip
__________________
_________________
e-mail: ________________________________________________
Member #:
(office use only)
Checks payable to: Tahoma Audubon 2917 Morrison

Rd. W. University Place, 98466 Tahoma Audubon

Society, established in 1969, is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit

organization. Donations are tax deductible.

April 2010

www.tahomaaudubon.org

Page 11

Calendar Morse Wildlife Preserve Open Trails APRIL PROGRAM Unless otherwise stated - To register for field
Calendar
Morse Wildlife Preserve Open Trails
APRIL PROGRAM
Unless otherwise stated -
To register for field trips, call (253)
565-9278 To register for education
classes, call (253) 591-6439
See further descriptions inside.
Check out our calendar online at
http://www.TahomaAudubon.org
for more information and updates
Apr 11 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Location: Morse Wildlife Preserve
Call 253-591-6439 for more info.
Bird Walk at Adriana Hess Wetland Park
Mon Apr 12 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
lissa Sherwood. Bring a lunch. Hosts will
serve coffee and dessert by the fireplace.
Bring good beach shoes; we can walk quite
a distance. Call 253-565-9129. This is a
fundraising Field Trip for Birdathon
Budding Scientists "The Marine Scene"
Homeschool Advanced Science
"Marine Ecosystems"
APRIL 2010
Wed Apr 14 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM and
3:15 PM to 4:45 PM
Location: Adriana Hess Center
Ages 5-7, $9.00 per student
Register at least two days prior to the ses-
sion by calling 253-591-6439.
TGIF Restoration Activity
Fri Apr 2 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Fri Apr 9 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Fri Apr 16 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Fri Apr 23 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Fri Apr 30 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Location: Adriana Hess Wetland Park
Come enjoy the outdoors and help beautify
the grounds at Adriana Hess Wetland Park!
Beginning Homeschool Science
"It's a Salty Life" Thu Apr 15 9:30 AM to
Thu Apr 29 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Lab Fri Apr 30 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Location: Tacoma Nature Center
Register Early. Note - topics are repeated
during the month, so select class appropri-
ate for your child's knowledge and abilities.
Contact Margie for more information at
591-6439 or marjories@tacomaparks.com.
Ages 12-15, $15 per student.
Regular membership meeting on
Friday, April 9, from 7:30 PM to 9 PM
at Tacoma Nature Center, 1919 S.
Tyler St.
“Feathered Architects: The
Fascinating World of Bird Nests,by Idie
Ulsh. From eagles to hummingbirds,
Idie Ulsh will explore with us how and
where birds make nests, nest
configurations and relate interesting
facts about their construction.”
Check web site for updates: www.
TahomaAudubon.org and click on the
Calendar tab.
11:30 and 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Location: Tacoma Nature Center
Register Early. Contact Margie for more
information at 591-6439 or marjories@ta-
comaparks.com.
Sumi Painting Class for youth
Nisqually and/or Ocean Shores
Birdathon Field Trip
Sat May 8 2010 from 7:30 AM to 8:30 PM
Nature Alphabet "Y is for You"
Adriana Hess Park Photography class
Mon Apr 5 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Location: Adriana Hess Park
An adult program encouraging people to
appreciate nature and how they can incor-
porate it into their photography. Call Dixie
Harris for details 564-6373.
Fri Apr 16 1:30 PM to 2:30 PM
Location: Tacoma Nature Center
Adult participation is reccommended, chil-
dren under four require an adult present.
Please note alternating times. Register by
the saturday before class. 253-591-6439.
Thu Apr 29, from 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM
Location: Tacoma Nature Center
Ages 8-15, $12 per student
All materials are provided and participants
will take home several finished pieces. Class
taught by members of the Puget Sound
Sumi Artists.PRE-REGISTRATION IS
REQUIRED. call 253-591-6439.
Leaders: Ken & Nell Batker
Call TAS 565-9278 to sign up for this Bir-
dathon Field Trip!
Int'l Migratory Bird Day Count
Nature alphabet "Z is for Zebra"
Sat May 8 8:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Ft. Lewis Birding Field Trip
Weekly Bird Walks at Nisqually
Wed Apr 7 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM
Wed Apr 14 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM
Wed Apr 21 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM
Wed Apr 28 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM
Location: Nisqually National Wildlife
Refuge. Leader: Phil Kelley. Bring: Good
walking shoes or boots, raingear, water,
snacks, and $3 for entry fee unless you
have a pass. Scopes are welcome. Meet: At
the Visitor's Center Pond Overlook. Direc-
tions: Take I-5 south from Tacoma and exit
to Nisqually NWR at exit 114. Take a right
at the light. Sign-up: Call or email Phil Kel-
ley to confirm details. Phil Kelley, Lacey,
(360) 459-1499, scrubjay323@aol.com.
(pending permission)
Sat April 17 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Location: End of 176th Street (Area 9)
More information will be made available
soon. Leader is Betty Jones
Fri Apr 30 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM
Location: Tacoma Nature Center
Adult participation is recommended, chil-
dren under four require an adult present.
Please note alternating times. Register by
the Saturday before class. 253-591-6439.
Location: Crescent Valley, Gig Harbor
Details TBD.
Morse Wildlife Preserve Open Trails
Sun May 9 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Location: Morse Wildlife Preserve
Call 253-591-6439 for more information.
MAY 2010
Ohop Creek Field Trip
Bird Walk at Adriana Hess Park
Sun Apr 18 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Location: Ohop Creek
Join volunteers on a field trip to a site un-
dergoing major habitat restoration on Ohop
Creek, near Eatonville, WA. Registration is
available by calling 360-832-7166 or email-
ing reserve@nwtrek.org
Birdathon Field Trip - Foulweather Bluff
Plant Walk at Adriana Hess Park
Sat May 1 7:00 AM to 2:00 PM
Leader: Rolan Nelson
Bring rain gear and lunch or you can buy
supplies at the Hansville Store.Meet at the
Purdy Park and Ride off Highway 16 at
7:00a.m. Call Tas 565-9278 to sign up for
this Birdathon fundraising field trip!
Mon May 10, from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
We will use this walk as a fundraising bird
count for Birdathon.
Conservation Committee
Tue May 11 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM
Location:
Pacific
Lutheran
University,
Rieke 112, Parkland WA
TAS Board Meeting
Mon Apr 19 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM. Enjoy a
guided plant walk through the park!
Adriana Hess Park Photography Class
Budding Scientists "Yard Guardians"
Mon May 3 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Thu Apr 8 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM
Advanced Birder's Class
Call Dixie Harris for details 564-6373.
Location: Adriana Hess Audubon Center.
Monthly Meeting of the Tahoma Audubon
Board. Guest Welcome, please call ahead
at (253) 565-9278.
Tue Apr 20 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Tue Apr 27 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Location: Tacoma Nature Center. Ken
Brown, Instructor
Titlow Park Birdathon Field Trip
Membership Meeting
Intermediate Homeschool Science
Tue May 4 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Leaders: Rosanne Becker and Joann Sims
Meet at the Lodge at Titlow Park which is
at the west end of 6th Avenue in Tacoma.
Wed May 12, 2010 from 10:30 AM to
12:00 PM and 3:15 PM to 4:45 PM
Location: Adriana Hess Audubon Center
Ages 5-7, $9.00 per student
Register at least two days prior to the ses-
sion by calling 253-591-6439.
Fri Apr 9 7:30 PM to 9:00 PM
Beginning Homeschool Science
Location: Tacoma Nature Center, 1919 S.
Tyler Street. Monthly membership meeting
"Tidepools to Deep Waters"
Thu Apr 22, 2010 from 9:30 AM to 11:30
Call TAS to sign up for this Birdathon Field
Trip 565-9278.
of Tahoma Audubon.
All welcome. Check
Advanced Birder's Class
web site for program - www.TahomaAudu-
"City Critters"
Thu May 13 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM and
1:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Location: Tacoma Nature Center
bon.org. Call (253) 565-9278
Conservation Committee
Tue Apr 9.
Call Krystal Kyer for location and details:
Register Early. Note - topics are repeated
during the month, so select class appropri-
ate for your child's knowledge and abilities.
Contact Margie for more information 591-
6439 or marjories@tacomaparks.com ..
(253) 565-9278
AM and 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Location: Tacoma Nature Center
Register Early. Note - topics are repeated
during the month, so select class appropri-
ate for your child's knowledge and abilities.
Contact Margie for more information at
591-6439 or marjories@tacomaparks.com.
Ages 10-12, $12 per student.
Tue May 4 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Tue May 11 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Tue May 18 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Tue May 25 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Location: Tacoma Nature Center. Ken
Brown, Instructor
Morse Wildlife Preserve
Birds & Brunch
Nature Storytime "Salty Waters""
Weekly Bird Walks at Nisqually
Sat Apr 10, from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Location: Adriana Hess. Special Event for
major donors and donor prospects.
Sage Grouse Lek Fieldtrip
Sat April 10 3 PM to Sun April 11 7 PM
Yakima Training Center, Yakima/Kittitas/
Douglas County
Leader: Ryan Wiese, 206-730-3485, rwi-
ese@wamail.net
Meet 3:00 pm, Sat. April 10, at the I-5 & SR
512 Park N Ride, 10617 S Tacoma Way
Bring sack lunches for Sunday. Expect to
return by about 7:00 pm on Sunday. Please
send your email address and phone num-
ber as details may change depending on
the best chances to find our target species.
Limit of 15 people. If the limit has been
reached there will be a waiting list. Bring
scopes if you have them. Call the Tahoma
Audubon to sign up (253) 565-9278.
Thu Apr 22 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM
Location: Adriana Hess Center, U.P.
Ages 2-6, $6 per child, $3 Audubon mem-
ber, free to adults and U.P residents. Adults
are welcome with the children. Space is lim-
ited to the first 20 registered guests (adults
and children). call 253-591-6439.
Wed May 5 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM
Wed May 12 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM
Wed May 19 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM
Wed May 26 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM
See Previous Month
Birdathon Field Trip. Fri May 14 9:00 AM
to 11:00 AM. Location: Morse Wildlife
Preserve, Graham. Leader: Betty Jones
Ask for directions when you sign up and
call TAS to register, 565-9129.
TGIF Restoration Activity
Parks Appreciation Day
Sat Apr 24, 2010 (see page 11 for details.)
Earth Day Extravaganza
at Tacoma Nature Center
Fri May 7 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Fri May 14 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Fri May 21 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Fri May 28 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Location: Adriana Hess Wetland Park
Nature Alphabet
"A is for Amazing Animals"
Sat Apr 24 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Fri May 14 1:30 PM to 2:30 PM
Location: Tacoma Nature Center
Adult participation is recommended, chil-
dren under four require an adult present.
Please note alternating times. Register by
the Saturday before class. 253-591-6439.
Family Walk at Adriana Hess Park
Birdathon Field Trip Summit to Shore
Sun Apr 25 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Call Dixie Harris for details 564-6373
Birdathon Field Trip-Lakebay
Thu April 29 9:30 AM to 1:00 PM
Leaders: Dee and Wayne Knight, and Me-
Purdy To Paradise (Pierce County Big
Day) Birdathon Field Trip
Sat May 8 5:00 AM to 8:00 PM
Location: Purdy Spit to Paradise
Leader: Bruce LaBar
Meet at the far end of Purdy Spit at 5:15a.m.
Call TAS 565-9129 to sign up for this Bir-
dathon Fundraising Field Trip.
Fri for May 14 1:30 PM to May 15, 2010
at 5:00 PM
Location: Summit to Shore
Meet at the I-5 and Hwy 512 Park & Ride
Friday May 14 at 1:30 PM.
For additional information:Tahoma Audubon - 253-565-9278; or www.tahomaaudubon.org Or The Tacoma Nature Center:253-591-6439 or www.metroparkstacoma.org