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The

Big
Bach
Lutebook
Lute versions created by Clive Titmuss

Volume I:
BWV 995, 996, 997, 998, 999

Volume II:
Six Cello Suites BWV 1007--12

Volume III
Solo Violin Sonatas and Partitas
BWV 1000/1001, 1002, 1003, 1004, 1005, 1006/1006a

Updated November, 17 2009


The Big Bach Lutebook
Music by Johann Sebastian Bach
Volume I:
Suite pour la Luth par J. S. Bach, BWV 995, in the original key of G minor
Praeludio con la Suite aufs Lautenwerk, BWV 996, in E minor, transposed to F minor
[Partita in C minor], BWV 997, transposed to A minor
Praeludium, [Fuge, Allegro], BWV 998, in E flat
Praeludium pour la lute, BWV 999, in C minor

Volume II:
Six Suites for Cello, original title:
6 / Suites a / Violoncello Solo/ senza / Basso / composes / par / Sr. J. S. Bach,
Maitre de Chappelle

BWV 1007, G major, transposed to E flat


BWV 1008, in D minor, arranged for theorbo in A in the original key
BWV 1009, in C major, arranged for theorbo in A in the original key
BWV 1010, in E flat, transposed to B flat
BWV 1011, in C minor, transposed to A minor,
(a different arrangement from BWV 995 above)
BWV 1012 in D major tuning (upper six courses: f#, d, a, f#, d A)

Volume III:
Sonatas and Partitas for Violino senza basso:
Sonata I in G minor BWV 1001, Partita I in B minor BWV 1002,
Sonata II in A minor BWV 1003, Partita II in D minor BWV 1004
Sonata III in C major BWV 1005
all complete in the original keys,

Partita III in E major BWV 1006a, (Bachs own arrangement of BWV 1006,
transposed to F)

BWV 995/1011, 996, 998, 1000/1002, 1006a and 1012 have been prefaced with a foreword by
the editor

Lute tablature by Clive Titmuss, updated November 17, 2009


The Big Bach Lutebook
Preface by the editor:

The music of Johann Sebastian Bach is unique in western cultural history. No other composer has
demonstrated Bach's personal combination of sheer effort, mastery of numerous forms and media, his lyrical
and narrative gifts, and his unchallenged understanding of musical architecture. It was this combination that
first attracted me, while still a student of the guitar, to his music, and it was the promise of being able to play
it in something resembling its original form that induced me to play the lute. I acquired a lute before
beginning formal post-secondary music education, and soon after my first baroque lute, a 14-course lute by
Sandro Zanetti in the late 17th century tradition with two pegboxes. Almost immediately I started
transcribing the music of Bach into lute tablature after the shocked discovery that aside from a few pieces, no
tablatures existed.
My first efforts with the Prelude, Fugue and Allegro BWV 998 led to more shocked discoveries--
more and more of the music appeared to be written in a form not playable on the lute. The contemporary
tablatures had critical problems. After working through the idea, I came to the point where it became clear
that not only had Bach, as I then thought, misunderstood the lute, but he hadn't, according to my
understanding, written anything for it. Everything appeared to have insuperable difficulties. Even if one
could make the notes fit, by transposition, by judicious editing, one could only count success with actual
performance of the music. That was the test. You could make your lute version, but could you actually play
it convincingly. In no other medium in which Bach is played do musicians have to contend with this
conundrum. Can it be imagined that a violinist, cellist, or keyboard player would have to spend hours
fretting over his copy, then practising for literally years just to play even a relatively simple piece. They take
up the piece and play.
After graduating from my studies, I began another line of attack. Could the lute be the key? I ordered
a beautiful big Widhalm/Tieffenbrucker 13-course lute by Robert Lundberg, which I still play with great joy.
Later I began making lutes, trying this and that, single strings, theorbo tunings, smaller, bigger, various
spacings, copies of originals, unheard of things, to see whether the situation might be ameliorated by
ingenuity of lutherie. And to some extent, it has. I did find out that the choice of lute matters greatly. And
fortunately I have created a wall of lutes from which to choose.
Now more than thirty-eight years later, hundreds of concerts, some devoted entirely to the music of
Bach played on the lute, I have added more and more pieces to the group of tablatures which I began as a
student. Many of them have seen great changes since their initial versions. Sometimes I have thrown the
whole thing out, transposed to a new key (BWV 996 in D minor, then F minor: BWV 998 in D, 1006a in D;
BWV 997 in C minor, then A minor; BWV 995 in G minor, then A minor) only to return to the beginning.
With the advent of computer tablature typesetting and the web I have made individual pieces
available for some time, since 1996. Now I am making my versions of the usual suspects and my versions of
the cello suites (which make very fine lute music, as Bach himself realized) and some violin pieces available
in a singe printable and viewable edition. They are newly corrected, revised and compactly laid out to
minimize use of paper or screen and with minimal page turns, together with revised and extended forewords
for some of the pivotal pieces (BWV 996, the piece least likely to be for the lute, and BWV 995, the most
likely). I hope you will enjoy and benefit from my work.
Before I finish, heres a scenario imagined by one of my teachers, Eugen Dombois, from a comment
made by Agricola (which I have liberally embellished in the finest Baroque tradition). It may serve better
that the most exacting musicology to put the Bach and the lute into some sort of context:

One day a distinguished musician came to visit the Bach household in Leipzig. It was none
other that the famous lutenist, Sylvius Leopold Weiss, taking time from his posting in Dresden to
visit friends. A few letters had passed between them, and Bach, being a sociable and engaging
host, asked Weiss whether he would spend a few hours with the Cantor.
Bach was something of a practical joker. He liked the broad humour of the German people, he
enjoyed puns, and he often wrote funny things into his music. The quodlibet at the end of the
Goldbergs is a good example: "Cabbages and Turnips Have Driven Me Away" combined with
"You've Been Gone So Long". You can almost hear the guffaws. He decided to play a little joke on
Weiss. Meeting him at the door, he said:
"Well to tell the truth I've been trying to play the lute a little lately. I used to fool around on it
when I was a Bub, but the instrument always confounded me--all those strings! I got a much
better instrument from my dear friend Hofmann in the Lautenkrankenstrasse, and I've been
completely taken with it. I've been working night and day on one of my old suites to play for you,
to see if you have any suggestions. But I'm still a bit shy with it, an old man trying to do something
new, you know, it's a bit silly. So if you don't mind I'm going to go into my Schreibzimmer, just sit
here and listen.
With that he repaired to his composition room and went behind an old curtain that he had
dividing the room to keep his family out. When Bach was behind the curtain, he was
incommunicado. That was the rule. After a bit of tuning and few odd notes and chords the most
fantastic uninterrupted veil of flawless lute-playing erupted. Weiss instantly recognized the
signature tune of every student violinist in Saxony--the Prelude of the E major violin Partita. It
was incredible, without error, perfectly in tune, not even a mis-fretted "n" (the twelfth fret of the
lute). That piece quickly concluded, Bach began playing something entirely new.
"Here's something I've just been working on" he said, peering out from behind the curtain, and
from his room came the now utterly familiar strains of the beautiful opening bars of Prelude, Fugue
and Allegro in E flat.
Weiss expected him to stop, but the flow never ceased. Ten minutes later, as the last notes died
away, Weiss was plainly aghast. After all, Weiss had spent a lifetime playing the lute, struggling
with its idiosyncrasies, the tuning, strings, the pegs, the frets, the sheer uncertainty and
unpredictability, a spider's web of deceit, a device calculated to drive musicians madhere, the
great genius of music, old Bach himself--had managed to master the instrument after only a few
months of effort. How was it possible? Weiss was dumbfounded. Finally the portly master drew
aside the curtain.
"How do you like my new toy", said Bach and motioned to a three-manual lute-harpsichord
built by his uncle.
Weiss, true to his name, turned the colour of a sheet, and let out a sigh: He had been fooled.
"Du lieber Gott", he exclaimed, "you nearly gave me a heart attack.
After that they had a little belt of schnapps (well, maybe a couple of them) and started talking
about the ongoing rivalry between the soccer teams of the Dresden Frauen-Kirche and the
Leipzigs St.Thomas Schule.
Weiss took a copy of Bach's new piece home to see whether he might be able to make
something of it. Just to confound his student Lobkowitz, who was as dense as a plank of maple,
Weiss scrawled Praeludio per il Liuto at the top of the page.
This will keep him awake for a year, he chuckled to himself, exhaling a cloud of pfeffermint
vapour. D-flat in the basshah!
He wandered down the path into the town, tipsily singing a ditty from his student days:
Ich bin ein diplomierte Lautenisten,
Ich trage immer neunzehn lautenksten
Later, Wilhelm Friedemann Bach wrote to a friend: "Something very special in the way of
music was heard on that occasion!"

Clive Titmuss
www.clivetitmuss.com
Suite pour la Luth par J. S. Bach (BWV995), Suite a Violoncello Solo
senza Basso [V] in C minor (BWV1011)

Foreword:___________________________________________________
If there is a case for Bach as a composer for the lute, it rests principally on his own
arrangement (BWV 995) of the fifth cello suite (BWV 1011). The autograph
arrangement of this cello suite with its specific reference to the lute in the title is the only
authorial evidence that he was at all interested in setting himself the challenging task of
writing idiomatically for the instrument. Careful observance of way he transposed and
reworked earlier material with the lute in mind gives us a clear picture of Bach's
understanding of the lute's capacity for a mix of contrapuntal and free-voiced textures, its
dynamic capacities and its suitability to typical late 17th century dance forms and
rhythms. His interest in the exploitation of its sonority stems from his vantage point as a
composer of wide experience with an unsurpassed ear and social and musical contact
with professional players.

The Bach household owned a lute, listed in his Nachlass (the inventory of his possessions
is reproduced in English in The Bach Reader, 1945, revised edition 1966, Mendel and
David, editors). He knew a number of professional lutenists: Rudolf Straube, Johann
Ludwig Krebs; both his students, Sylvius Leopold Weiss, and M. Schouster (to whom
BWV 995 is dedicated). Jurist and lute-player Johann Christian Weyrauch, the identified
intabulator of Fuga BWV 1000 and movements of the [Partita in C minor] BWV 997,
was a close family friend. He may also have known with Adam Falckenhagen, who lived
in Leipzig and is credited (by P. Kiraly, T. Crawford, primarily on orthographic evidence)
with the intabulation of Bach's arrangement of BWV 1011.

Nevertheless, our picture of Bach as a composer of lute music is clouded by the


questionable attribution of other of Bach's works which were probably not intended for
the lute, but have historically been associated with it. The Suite in E minor BWV 996, the
C minor Partita BWV 997, Prelude, Fugue and Allegro BWV 998, the Little Prelude
BWV 999, and the Partita in E major BWV 1006a, have all been claimed with
anachronistic sensibility as legitimate repertoire for the lute, despite prescriptive additions
to the sourcesauf's Launtenwerk" for BWV996 and "por la luth. Cmbal for BWV
998and despite unidiomatic keys, technical impossibilities and obvious keyboard
stylistic traits.

It is the Suite pour la Luth in which Bach clearly applies himself practically to the
question of what is the lute capable in regard to texture, the use of its diatonic bass
courses, and its ability to ornament and fill out a basic texture as established in the cello
suite. Unlike the works above, in this piece our view is not clouded by a nagging
suspicion that we are looking at thin-textured keyboard music with a tenuous historical
connection to the lute.

With these doubts in mind we must ask whether Bach himself was technically equipped
to make a successful lute version of his own earlier work. Before dealing with this
question an examination and comparison of the two principal sources is rewarding. In
making his transcription, Bach set himself the task of filling a spare texture, transposing it
to a key more suitable to the tessitura and compass of the lute, adapting string music bris
textures to something more in line with contemporary lute practice, adding imitative
material in the lower voices while long notes are held, and creating a sense of drama,
continuity, and gestures consistent with the techniques favoured by lute composers in his
circle.

It should also be noted that in the 1740s, when Bach made his arrangement, he chose a
piece which he is likely to have written around 1720 with the rest of the suites for solo
cello. This would have been considered an atavistic work, hearkening back to the 17th
century. It is entirely French; there is little evidence of Italian influence. There are many
gestures typical of the young Bach, similarities with BWV 996 and other early works,
and a distinct preference for the aphoristic basso continuo lute style of Reusner or Bittner,
rather than the Italianate violinistic idiom of Weiss or Falckenhagen. We may wonder at
his choice of pieces for revival and arrangement. Was it a favourite work, like BWV
1006, BWV 1000 (with a violin, organ and lute version), or a choice made by the
dedicatee? By comparison, pieces written in the 1740s with a lute-influenced voice, such
as BWV 997 and 998, show many cognate passages with the empfindsam works found in
Das Wohltemprirte Clavier of 1744 or the published works of the Clavier-bung I, the
Six Partitas BWV 825-30, (1726-31) for harpsichord.

For example, in the long Prelude in French Ouverture style, Bach elected to compress
some rhythms, subdividing them further, perhaps in keeping with the quicker response
and rapid speech of a plucked instrument. He also employed a time-filling device in the
opening measures not often used by contemporary lutenists but common on the keyboard,
sounding a bass note, then its lower octave on the second beat. In the Allemande, he
compressed sixteenths tied to longer notes. The two Gavottes are altered mainly in their
texture, with chord tones added and a completion of the bass line. In the Gigue, Bach
filled the long note-values native to the cello by adding imitative activity in the lower
voice. Each of these additions makes a basic change to the rhetorical nature of the piece,
giving us a window into performance practice of the period, and into his thinking as it
relates to the lute.

Bachs use of rests is notable. Without a large inventory of lute tablature transcriptions
into pitch notation from the 18th century, its difficult to say how these would have been
handled by a musician familiar with the keyboard-to-lute conversion. Modern
transcribers usually notate the length of bass notes in keeping with metre, but Bach has
populated the bass with relatively short-duration tones followed by rests, a practice also
seen in Prelude, Fugue and Allegro BWV 998.

A casual perusal of the work of Weiss or Falkenhagen to find comparable passages will
confirm that Bach's choices were very personal solutions to the problem he set himself,
and they frequently rest on his experience as a composer of keyboard music. Despite
having titled the work "pour la Luth", Bach appears to have made a transcription better
suited to the lute-harpsichord, entirely in keeping with his other works in that genre.
In making a tablature version of Bach's arrangement, I was struck by the frequent feeling
of the work simply being to large for the instrument. There are often more chord tones in
rapid two-voiced passages than a contemporary lutenist would play, for example. The
bass line is often busier that we would expect from his contemporaries, particularly in the
Preludes Presto and the Courante. Some movements succeed more than others: the
Courante and Sarabande seem not quite to equal their models, while the Allemande,
Gavottes and Gigue are in many ways more rhythmically interesting and lively.

In order to play the work in Bachs version, I made a fourteen-course German-style


theorbo and played the work for many years in its original key of G minor, despite the
fact that such an instrument is a re-construction of something not found among the
instruments of the period as far as we are aware. (My original transcription is here, as
BWV 995 in G minor, for those who wish to make comparisons, while the A minor
version is here as BWV 995/1011)

In making that transcription my work was shaped by Falckenhagen's frequent


transposition of the bass into a lower octave, especially in the first three movements. But
having played the work many times I became increasingly unhappy with the impression
of a hippo dancing in a tutu. The lightness and rapidity of articulation that Bach's dance
movements imply was not well served by Falckenhagen's anachronistic emfindsam
sensibility. His addition of numerous ornaments struck me as impeding the forward
momentum, and his adaptation of the Gigue and Presto of the Ouverture is clumsy. The
disjunct harmonic motion of the bass in modulating passages is poorly suited to the open
diapasons of the baroque lute, and Bach's original lines are often more too light-footed to
be effectively rendered in the lower octave of the lutes range.

There is the question of the pitch. It was common for harpsichords and single manual
instruments of the period (1740's) to have their lowest tone extending to FF or GG. The
compass of several of the other works mentioned above is often no lower than C. This is
true for BWV 996, 999later arrangements stemming from the 1740s, Bachs Leipzig
period, while BWV 1006a, BWV 997 and BWV 998 include A or A flat as the lowest
tone. So-called short-octave tuning may have been used on a smaller keyboard to achieve
this. Bachs use of these low notes is much more restrained than that found in
contemporary lute sources. The highest note in Bach's arrangement is c', a fourth below
the highest notes used by Weiss. Increasing the range upward by adding frets to a lute's
body is simple, but adding courses below is more than a simple matter of alterations to
the pegbox and bridge.

Simply adding a note (GG) to the typical 13-course D minor lute is not really a viable
design solution, since the fundamental pitch, string length and size of the entire
instrument needs to be considered. J. C. Hofmann increased the size of the bodies of his
lutes when he added two courses in the bass to his standard eleven-course lute design,
already larger than the eleven-course lutes of his father Martin.
Taking this into consideration, it seemed a better idea to start with a "clean sheet of
paper" approach, to transpose the work up a tone, keeping the original bass line in
principle, thereby raising the highest note to d. The alteration of pitch makes the bass
line in original form more under the control of the left hand, and therefore more
articulate. Some of Bachs dramatic bass line chromaticism (Prelude, Allemande, and
Sarabande) is also more easily rendered in the original octave.

I also occasionally thinned the keyboard-style texture by taking out chord tones which
seemed to hold the piece back, especially in the Presto and Allemande and Courante, and
by reducing doubling (especially those chord tones already sounding as octave strings).
The biggest change I considered making was the return to an opening closer to the cello
original, altering the voicing of chords and changing the rhetorical emphasis by placing
the low chord tones on the first beat. Thus the player will find that the opening has been
entirely re-cast. The cello original is more generous with string-writing phrase marks, a
valuable interpretive indication, while with the exception of the Sarabande, Bachs
transcription has only a few.

My transcription has few if any slurring marks in order to highlight the original phrase
marks as provided by the composer. The player may also add slurs ad libitum. The
tablature placement of some notes is clearly chosen for slurring purposes. Note how often
in this and other cello and violin solos, Bach slurs over the accented beat in order to break
up the groupings. This feature may also be observed in the music of French composers
such as Couperin, Mouton, De Vise and others. It is also worth noting that in the lute
music of Weiss slurs often occur in descending passages rather less than ascending.

Clive Titmuss,
Kelowna, August, 2009
Suite pour la Luth par J. S. Bach: Prelude BWV 995

/ / / /
c c c c a a
b b a b b a bd
a bdb a b dbda b a b :a a :c d d d c
+ c b c c e c 5c c a c
a c eR a bda R b a
a a a G a a G a G

7 / / / / / / / / /
a c a a ff e c a a :b c
b a b a a c c a f c a
d b a bd d db a b d b a :b a a a c e e d b a b b
c c c e
a a a
a G a G C C C

13 / / / / / / / / / /
c a c a d c a a a :a a c e a f e c a
a c a g b a bda b b b b a a b a c a
a d c db a bd
a a c a a
a a a b
C d b a F
a G dE a G

19 / / / / / /
e a c c a a a a a c a c
c a c c [c] a c c
e a a d b a
c a a c a a a c e c a c
c d c a a c a c a
e
a G C a G

23 /
a c e c a a
a a c a c a c c c a a c
eQ eQ eQ a a b a b a c e e fef
cQ cQ c a a c a c a c aQ e
c c c a c c
a c e A a
a

c e f
a a b a a a b a a c
a a b d b d b a b a bd db a bda bda b a b
cQ b cQ c :b Q cQ
f
c Q a
C
tres viste
37
a e c e a c a a c ef fe a a c c a c
a c a cd a f a cd c a a bda b a b
p

c e f e h e a c da c d a b a bd d
p

aQ e e c c
c a c f a a
a d A
a

47
c e
a d a a b a a c
db a a R bd d a bda bda bda b a a bd b b b
c a c c b c c c c
a b Q aR a c e a a a
d dR b d b a b C
d a c a a d a

57
a c a c c a a c e f a c e
a a cd d a cd c a c a b a b
p

b a a a c e a b e a a bd d a bd
cQ aQ cQ c c c a a c c e c a c
a cda c a a
a e a D A
a d d a a

67
a c a a c c a c
a a b b a b a a b dbda b b a a a b
bd db db a db a b a b d aR b ad d b d
c c a c a c a
c c
E B D A BCB C a D a B D B
d

77
a a a a c c c c a a f f f e e e c c c
a a b a b a b a f d b
p

b a b dd
: d aQ cQ d
Q d b d f g d f b d
c a c e f f f
Q
A B C BA E

87
c b b c e f a
a c a a a c e f b
d d d d bda a d b d cd
b c b b c b c b c e
b b a a a c a a c
d b d db a b d d b d
a c

-1-
97
c a a a f e c e a c a a a
a a a a c c c b b b a a c a cd c
d
Q bQ aQ bQ bQ bQ bQ d bQ aQ aQ aQ bQ d
Q ef
a
a c a
c e
a a a

107
b e
c a a a a a b b a
e c e a c a a a a c da c da X Z efef d d d d d
e c a c e a a c a c a c a a c f e
a a c c a b a b f eQ f eR a
A a C e D C
a a a

117
a a a a b a
b a bda b b a bda c dcd c d d d a
c bde b c c a a c
dbd b b a bda b a bda b a b
c a c da cd
a

127
a cda c da a dc a c a a a
a b a b a a bd b a b b a a b a b a b a a Y
cd dcd d ad c d d cd c a c W cda c c
cX a
b b
C D B a d d A A B D A A A A B A a
d a

137
c a a e e
b b b b a a a b a X a b a a e e
d d a d a dada d db d b b b b db db adb d
c c eR a aQ aQ a cR c W c c c e
R a b b e
D d A a a A a
d d a a B

147 X
c e f c b c
a b a Z W a c e f c a a b a
d db a b b bd f d b a da
eR e bW c a c e f c b
e eQ e a a a b aR a c a a
dR b d b a b d b d
a a c

157 Y X
c a af e c a c c fe W Y e
a a b a a b a f e b a ef
b a b ad b bda b a b da b a a b ad d db d d
c c c a c c c a c a
a a a c c d a a
b b d a d A d B a
a a d d

167 Z
Z Y X Z Y X Y Z X
fe e fe e fe R e fe e c b c c b e
a ef ef ef ef a b a a a b
p

gZ eX dbda b bdb ad d b bdb a a


e c
c a
d e CC C C B C BA
d

177
c b e :e a dc a
a a a b c afe f f f b a b b a b a b a
b d b d b a b a bd d d c da b db a
a b c c c b
c a
d D D E B DC B D C
a DC B a

187
c a a c c efe c e c b
b a a a c c c fe e e c a
p

b a b a ad dd b b b e e f
c c b b b b c c c c e
cda c c aQ a c a
e C b a F C [C] d
a a [D]
197
c dc b c
dbda b a a b a
d b d b a b efb a a
[c] [e] c c fd c b c b c
a b [c] [e] a c
b RdR f I e
adc f d bIeHbH e a D

207
a
a X a a
b a a bd a b W d c d da b b a db a
c c b a a c a a dc a c a c c b c a c c
a b a b b b a b b b a c a
C G G G G G G F E c

217 /

?
c fe c
ba c ef e a
p

db a aR f gef
ef e c
ef
D e C ef
Ca

-2-
Allemande BWV 995

/ / / / / / /
c c
a d b a b a a a
d a b a a d b a
+ c b c :b c b c c
a d b a b a a b
d a
a d
/ / / / /
a d a
4
b a a a b b a a
a d d b d a b a a b a b d d d d b
b b e c b c a
a c a e a a
C a C
/ / / / /
c c c a
7
d b a b a a d :b d a b b a
:c d d c d d b a b d a
c c c
a
B c D
/ /
:e e a h f a h
10
b a b f h f a
d b a c g g g
c a a
b a a b
B d d a

13 / / / / / /
a e c e f e c e
a b a a b a :c a a a c a a c d
d d
: b a 7b e e b a a c e e e e
c :a c e
c c f
H a
d b a G A [a]

17 / / / / / / / / /
e e e f c e f h
a c a c :c a a .. e f :e b a a a
a e a .. f d b a b d
a b c e e :b
a .. a
a C C
a

21 / / / / / / / /
f e :c a aS c a c a
a cR :c c a c c a c d b a a b a b
d d d b d b a d
c e c c e
f
a F
a d a

25 / / / / /
a a
b a a b :a a b b a :a
b a a d b a b d
: c d c d c c d
e c a c a a [c] [a]
a b d d b a b
C d b a a A
/ / / / / / /
a a e f e c e f
29
f a b a a b a a a
d d b a b h d d d b a b d
c h a :b c
[c]
I a
b a CB A

32 / / / / / / /
f e c c f e f h e
a f h e f e a b a e e c a f a :e f
d d b a a b d a e [f] a
c b c
c a
B C B C

36 / /

?
c
f a a .
d b a
c cR ..
a G

-3-
Courante BWV 995

/ / / / / /
c b c
a b a a b a

p
a b d d b d
8 b b a a a d b a d b :a
c c c c
b 8 c b c c c
a a a
a d
a d a d
/ / /
c a a a c a a c a a
5
a b b a c a a c a a c
b a a b d b d b a b d b a e
c c a c a c
a aQ c a
A a d b a
a d a
/ / /
e c c e f e c a a c e :a e
9
a e a c a a c :c a a a .
e c a e e a e f
7 d b a b a .
c e f c .
c c a a
a d a a a C
d a a
/ / / /
e f e a c d a c d c
13
a f e f a b a b a a a b
a f g d
: a d a d d b a :c d c
f f f e c c c d c a
a f c e a a
a a

17 / / / /
a f h :a a e :e e f a c a
b a a b b a a b b a b f f a b
d b b d d b g

p
c d c d c d a c
f g
d D A B CD C d a
d

21 / / / /

?
a c b c a c
b a a c a c :c a c
7 c b a a
d b d d :b :a b ..
e c c
e a a a a .
a a b d a d b d
d d a a DC a G

Sarabande BWV 995


d c c a
a f b h a b a d b b a
b s c d g d b b d a b a
b c g h b c a
B H C G a B A
b a d
/
a a d a c a a
. a a b c f e
. a b c d c d c d d b a f d
. c
E b C a D E F

?
f f e b c
f b a f e f a b a .
e a f e e c d d b d b .
b c b b c .
c [a] a
E B C I
[b] H
[b] a D C G

-4-
Gavotte I BWV 995


c a a c a a a
a b a b a b a a a b b a b a a
a d a b b d a a d b a b d c d d b a b
+ b c c c c
c e a
d A a f b d A b b
a d a

c d c f e a f e c a a c a c a f e a a c
b a b c c a c a c c a c a f a c a a . a a
f f e a e a . c d a c c
a a c . a c c
b a
d a Aa a C A
d a a

c c a a a a
a a b a a b a b a a
d c d d d c d d b a b a a b d a b b d b d d
c c c c c a a a
b b a a
B c d D A G F a
a a

c a a c a c a a c
b a b a b b b a a a c a c a c e
d b d b d a b b a b a d b d b a b b d d
c a c a a a
b b a a
BC D d a A E d a c d
d d d

c e c c f e c c b c a
e e e a b a c a b a
b a a d d b b da b d a a b a d b a b
c c a c c b c c
a b a
e X C C B D E

b a .
a b ada bda b d b a .
c c c c c b c c b c .
D B C D E D C a G

Gavotte II en Rondeau BWV 995

\ \
a a b a a a a b a a .. b a bdb a
d d db a bdb a a a d d db a bdb a a .. c
+ c c c b c b c b c c ..
a a
d H J D E F E D C
a b a a a G

a a c a a fe a
a b a a c c c a f c a a c a a a b a a
b d d db a bd ad e d d db a bdb a
c a c c
b a a a
d A a e a F C dbda a d H
d a a b a

c e b c a
a a b a aR S a d b a b b a
a a d d d b a b d b a a b
S d
b c b c b c c cR
a a aR aQ
C D E F E D C bR b C BD A H
a aQ Q b

c a
a a a a a b a b a
c d a c d c d d c d b b c d d c d c d d c d d d c
c d c d d c a c a b
c c d
A B a G
a a b a

b c e c e b c a
a b a b b a b a a a b a a .
d d db db a a a d d db a bdb a .
c b c b c b c e c .
a a a
D [d] b d e a d C
D d d a G

-5-
Gigue BWV 995

/ / / / / / / / / /
a a b a
f b d b a b d a b a b a d b a b d b
c c c c b c
a d b a b a a a
d a C a a
/ / / / / / / / / /
c e 6f d c a c a
b d b a a b b a b a
d a d b d d b a
a c
a a a b
A d d A H
c d d d c a c AB
/ / / / / / / / / /
a a e a c
b a a b a d c a c a a c
d a b b .. .. b d a b a d e e a
[a] .. c c a c e
[a]
C A dCA E
/ / / / / / / / / / /
e c a a e c f e c a a d a c
c a a a a c a a a
d a b e a e f c
c a c e a c
a c a a
a C a a F C c
a d a
/ / / / / / / / / /
c a a c :b e
b a b b b a a :c c a e
d c d b a d d b a b d b a b d b d
a
a b a a
d d d a A d d a d
d a
/ / / / / / / / /
c f e h f g
: g h f e e c
a a h h e f :e f a d b a
a a
f f a a a
H C g g d a d b a b a
d a b a a H
a B a
/ / / / / / / / /
b a b a .
d c d b a a d a b .
c b b c b c .
b a a a a [a]
d d b a d d b a b a C [b]
d a a EC [a]
G

lute version by Clive Titmuss 2004

-6-
Praeludio con la suite da Gio. Bast. Bach aufs Lautenwerk (BWV 996)

Foreword:________________________________________________________

The Lautenwerk suite is one of the earliest surviving pieces from the composer in keyboard notation,
supposed to have been composed before 1712. Its style is in keeping with other keyboard works by
Bach written in this period, including the Toccatas BWV 910-916 and the Capriccio on the Departure
of His Beloved Brother BWV 992. An examination of those works will reveal many similarities to
BWV 996. Bach exhibited great stylistic growth in his lute-influenced keyboard style, culminating in
BWV 997 and 998 from the mid-1740s.

There is little reason to suppose that BWV 996 was written with the lute in mind. The inscription is
supposed to have been added by Johann Gottfried Walther, who prepared many keyboard sources of
Bach's works. The work gradually assumed its present spurious identity as Lute Suite No. 1
supported in print by the advocacy of influential German scholars Wilhelm Tappert, Albert Schweitzer,
Hans Neeman and F.G. Giesbert, who for more than a generation promulgated the concept of a Bach
who played and composed for the lute. BWV 996 was first published Leipzig in 1866.

In his article War Johannn Sebastian Bach Lautenspieler? (1964), Hans Radke attempted to reverse the
characterization of Bach as the composer of four lute suites whose organization is comparable to the
suites for violin, cello or harpsichord. But the image--as a composer conversant with the lute's idiom,
and its technical and musical potential as a vehicle of large-scale suite composition--has remained.

Beginning in the 1950s Walter Gerwig, Michel Podolski and later Eugen Mueller-Dombois and
Michael Schaeffer began playing Bach on the lute, and in the 1980s and 90s complete lute music
recordings on the lute began to appear, beginning with Narcisco Yepes. Subsequently, other lutenists
have weighed in on the matter with recorded versions, but so far nobody has really managed to dispel
the confusion about Bach and the lute.

A recently-written reference work, the dictionary-style Oxford Composer Companion guide to J. S.


Bach, edited by Malcolm Boyd, follows the precedent of the Bach-Gesellschaft and Neue Bach
Ausgabe, listing the suite, along with BWV 995, 997, 998, 999, 1000 and 1006a, as being among Bach's
lute works. A commendably even-handed assessment of the personalities, arguments and evidence
about Bach's lute-related repertoire in this volume by T. Crawford throws light on the traditional
classification.

Several makers now offer reconstructions of the Lautenwerk and recordings of Bachs music (including
BWV 996, 997, 998 and 999) have appeared on what is probably the intended instrument. The
Lautenwerk is a keyboard instrument with which Bach is closely associated. Bach certainly owned one,
(listed in his possessions after his death) and his uncle Johann Nikolaus made them. Its general
specifications are well documented by authoritative sources (Jacob Adlung in Musica Mechanica
Oganoedi, 1768, Johann Christoph Fleischer, 1718), though 18th century instrument has survived.

Bach also appears to me to have observed the strictures and exploited the advantages in his other writing
for the instrument, BWV 997, 998, possibly also 999 and 1006a. In these pieces one hears single-note
bass lines very far separated from the alto and soprano voices which they accompany, more freedom in
form (da Capo Fugues for example), inherent or implied block dynamic changes, a loosening of the
strict counterpoint familiar to us from Bachs other keyboard works, liberal use of rests in the left hand,
and occasionally striking dramatic and rhetorical devices usually found only in his later music.

If we adopt the view that the lute had only marginal influence on Bach's musical thinking in this suite
(and in several others), it frees us from the view that we don't understand the lute or its music
adequately, widely echoed or implicit in practical modern guitar editions of the piece. This was
probably the case when the work was included in the first Bach complete publication Bach Gesellschaft
(1936), or the Neue Bach Ausgabe, (V/10, 1982, T. Kohlhase ed.). The latter publication rationalized
the earlier speculative grouping by titling the revised publication with a uniquely German-language
compromise: Werke fr Lauteninstrumente. Normally a keyboard instrument would not be considered
to be in the lute family, whatever its tone-colour and stringing.

Since its initial appearance in the Bach Gessellschaft edition (in its E minor and A minor versions, the
latter transposition intended for the harpsichord) the suite has been widely published in many guitar
transcriptions, appearing first in Bruger's transcription for guitar/lute hybrid with additional basses and
subsequently in guitar transcriptions by Stingl, Wensieki, Bream, Bellow, Willard, Scheit, Teuchert,
Koonce, et. al. Julian Bream's foreword to BWV 996, for example, referred to "...bold figurations so
characteristic of the lute". None of these publications has discredited the widespread perception that
Bach wrote this piece and the other suites specifically for the lute, and in fact most of them do not
question this assumption. Paradoxically the piece seems easier to play on the guitar overall, partly
because of the suitable key, with a tuning dominated by fourths, partly because the guitar is well-
adapted to music dominated by the left-hand, unencumbered by open bass strings.

Though there are clear passages of luthe style (arpeggiated presentation of a fundamentally chordal
texture), particularly in the Allemande and Courante, the other movements are obviously outside
contemporary lute practice in their thick texture (including three and four voice counterpoint, parallel
thirds in the bass line) and uncharacteristic elaborations and ornamentation. The uncomfortable key, ill-
suited to the standard D minor tuning of the baroque lute, is the greatest obstacle to playing the piece.

D. Rhodes published possibly the first modern lute tablature transcription (self-published) of BWV 996
(transposed to G minor) in 1976 in which he speculatively argues for lute origins: "...the profundity of
technical skills which this excessively difficult work demands points to an extraordinary player, as we
know S. L. Weiss to have been..." The tablature transcription puts sections of the Gigue and Praeludio
into uncomfortably high positions on the fingerboard, in addition to transposing many bass notes into
the lower octave. His adventurous solutions include a change of pitch, single stringing and a mid-stream
re-tuning. But the piece in this form is difficult to perform even for experienced and technically
accomplished players.

In making this arrangement, I have adopted the view that the work is an early experiment written
specifically for the Lautenwerk, textually and stylistically within Bach's usual keyboard practice. The
piece is emphatically not written to imitate the lute, but freely uses textures current in the keyboard
traditions of the period which would have sounded convincing on an instrument intended to mimic the
sonority of the lute. The piece employs a thicker texture than was the contemporary lute practice, a
small compass of C' to c", standard keyboard ornament signs, a rhythmically active contrapuntal bass
line, including chromaticism and figuration impossible on the lute, and a key rare among lute
composers.

Without resorting to anachronisms, judicious, even radical, editing is necessary in order to make the
work playable on the lute within the confines of observed contemporary practice in a manner which I
see as being technically and musically feasible in performance. Where there are octave doublings of the
bass in the tenor or alto, I have eliminated them since they are taken care of by the octave stringing of
the lute. When the texture or disposition of notes made the piece unwieldy and unidiomatic, I have been
guided by contemporary models in finding a performable solution. What results is obviously a personal
answer to the problems, which lays no claim to authority by being faithful to the text.

Most importantly perhaps, I have moved the entire work to a tessitura more comfortable for the lute,
transposed to F minor. In keeping with the original, I have been conservative with the use of open bass
notes, transposing the bass into the lower octave only where necessary to intensify the effect of their
use, and maximizing the possibility of articulation by the left hand. I have set the piece for eleven
course lute, (with bracketed suggestions for 13-course realization) since the adoption of the thirteen
course lute in 18th century Germany can easily be dated to 1719, well after the composition of the piece.
For more details on this matter, refer to S. L. Weiss' dated pieces of the British Museum MS.
Particularly troublesome are the impossibilities of bass line of the Gigue and some chords in the
Passagio and Presto. Even if the notes are arranged in a more playable manner, the musical effect on
the lute is scrambled and frantic. In the Passagio I altered the mode of chord repercussion and in the
Presto removed parallel sixths and some doubling. In the Gigue, I adopted a similar procedure and have
reduced the bass line especially at the end to an essentially homophonic re-enforcement of the upper
voices.

The tuning of the sixth course to B flat was a common scordatura for the lute in the late 17th c. The
suites by Esias Reusner, found in his collections Delitiae Testitudinis and Neue Lauten-Fruchte,
provided a model for the transcription, ornamentation and chord disposition. An early F minor suite by
Weiss in the British Museum MS (copied into the Dresden MS) is another model, though the tuning is
conventional.

There seems to be little point in trying to accurately reproduce keyboard ornamentation on the lute.
Lute-style ornamentation may be added freely, including appogiaturas or trills, slides (or coules),
measured or arpeggiated separes, mordents, turns, the note-bending known to clavichord players as
bebung and idiomatic chord filling. The half cross found in the bass at the end of the Presto is used to
notate a rest, not normally found in lute tablatures of the period. For stopped notes the left hand is
simply lifted; for open ones, the thumb is used.

Clive Titmuss, Kelowna, August 2009


Praeludio con la Suite auf's Lautenwerk
J.S.Bach (BWV 996)
Passagio
W
h f fh cd
f g cd d

p
de g d e a b db
* a c df a c dc a c
a cdc d c dZ Y c Y
a c a c c H c a
a b a b dH aI
cH bIe
/ / / / /
c a
4
gfg h c c cd b a bdb a

p
d b bd edb dcdc c c
[d] c d cd dc a c a c c c c
cd 5 c [] a a
a c cR H c
b a bR a A H
a
H
a
/ / / / / / /
c a c fd a a
8
a bd a b a b e b b5b b :a bd edc b a
d cd a a a b edb a bde d e e e e d
c a a a a a a a c cR aR
d
I cR I cRJ a a a a a
a a a c b
/ / / / / / / / / /
f a c d hf aT a aS a c d.
12
a a c5 c d gf a cR a c c
b dY : d d dd dd dd
g ed : d c c d5 gR S a bdb b d c dd ..
a c c c d c c hQ a a c c d c ca .
[c] aR c d .
H I H H H d
d a b b a a a I a D
Presto
c h h f d d c d a f f d c a c d d c a f
f f b
d d e e d e
f
g e d d b d
d
e e d e Y
f
c Q


a a a a a
23
Y g
i
fg f
h
a
h
b a a
d
a
b
b b
e d
b a b

hQ a h h f d d c d a f f d c c a c d c d a c
b
c

30
a
c a c d
c cQ a c a
c c a c d d b a a a b b d b a
c c c c a d c
a d b b a b H
a d d R b R H
c H a aI
c H a b b a b H
a d d b d a

h h f d d c d a f f h a h
37
d d
p

b d e e d e a
p

d c d c d a f a
c d f h f h
c c a c d c d a c g
b


i fY a c a c d d c f d c d c d a c h f h
44
f b d g
p

[a] e R
f f h fX d
b
f I J D c a c d d d a I
a a b f a
Z
f a a a c d f hZ X d d a
50
f b b gf b a a a b b
p

e e e d g e dX Y fdd b e
d f Y d c d a f c c a c
gW Y b
f c a c d d c d a I fI
a H
a a a

a a a a a
57
c a c
d d b d e e d e d d d e b e d d
d a f f d c d a c a a a
f
H c c a a
a c c a c H
a d d c a c c a c H
a

b d b h h a f f d d f f
64
d c d df b a a a b b d a a
e b h h e g d d d e
d d d c c H
d d
H aH a
dH aH dH aH
/

?
h h c d f c a a
71
d c
p

g h h Xe d b a
p

a
a H a
fH d a H
a D H
a

Allemande BWV 996



a a c adc
b d c dc a c d b
p

p
d d edb d d d d de g edb b b

p
dc d c a f d dc
d d c a c d
Ab c c a c A f A a d

a
4
d b a a b
p

d ed de g ed dbd d d d
p

cd fd a d adc c f dfd a c
bd f a c f a a
c dfd fd f d f c b c
b f
/
c hf a hf a
7
gf b a .. c c gf a
p

d d c dd5 c d a cd d h h
c a c d c a c .. .. c hf
b a c c a c c gf
D A A c D c
a b a

a h fd a a cdc a
10
g d f a a b bdb b a a :a
p

d g db b edb dcdcd c d
ad dc a c c dc a c
g b b a a b
c b c c
a a

a
13
b
d d d e e b b d d d
p

dc a a e a f c d c a c c
p

c d b b c c
c dc a c A d c a a H f H c c
c d b a df dHcHaIb a
/

?
f a
16
d af c a c d b .
p

d e d d a bde b a
d d f c c adc a a c c a ..
d d c [] :c d []
Ab c d
d c a
b
a D A dc a c
c
A
Courante BWV 996
/ / / /
c a
d f :c c d f
b b b d d e d d :b
, a a c :c a c d c d c c d f d c

7 c
H d H
a b aJ
a I a D

d c a a a5
4
b b b
b e d e e d e g d
: b e d b b d
c d f d a c a c d :c d
d f b d b b
H dJ I
a a aJa DJa I
a H
aJa I
a

c d Xb a d h
7
b d :a
b d e c d d d :c d d a c d .. ..
5d dY cQ W
Y a c d a :a c a c a c ..
a b a d b a b a c a c
H c c c c H c D
b a a a a a

h f X f fd a
11
g g f fg d f d
p

g g e d e h h g e gd
: d e g e d a a b
f hY iZ i h f h h f e e f f f a a
g e e b
[F] H a f d
f a
[D]

a a c d ff f h Z a c h
15
b a b a f d X g c c d
b e gd
: d e e gX gX W Y d
R
b a f f fd fd d d c a c
b d gQ iQ Q Q Q c Q
c a a H a a
c a aH
a I
aJa DJa a
/ / / / / /
d f h h f d f h i c a a c d a
19
c d f c a b c d
e d b
a d c
aQ
H B J D a a D J
a a b a
/
c d fd c a a c :c a c e f a
21
c d c c .
d a .
c a c a .
cQ c
I H a D H
a a a
Sarabande BWV 996
/ /
dfd
fd b a c
d e d e d b d e d b d e d d
fd
: f a c d c :a a c c
fd f c
H c H
a a a b a
/ W Y
a dc a d c a i :h f f hf
7

b db b d ed . .f a b a d W Y Z i l [l] g
dcda cdc d
: . . g c c
d
d
e

i l m i g
a
g
d c dc . . f
H b c a
aIa J
a D f D C DJ
a I
a
/ / / / /
g
: g h f a c a a cd hf a
13
fh f gf T a d :c a a 7b g f :c
f gR S :c d :c d d d a a b
h hQ cd c c c a c
c b
H I eQ c I d
a a a [D] a
/ /

?
i hf d h fdf h a5 d df a c d :c a a5 c a
19
d gf :c [c] f :c [c] .
:c c d5 d db a .
dc a c hZ fd c f cd a .
a d d c
g cH H
Q a a

Boure BWV 996



a c dY c a a c a c
c a c d b
p

d e d b b d b
+ d c d d c a
H a c a a c a
dX H
c H
a b a H
a a b b D H
a H d H
c H c
/
d c a a c d a
5
c a c d b .. d b b b
d e d b b e d dZ eZ d b
d :c d d .. .. d
b b
H a c a H d I c c d b a
a b a a a b a b b a b

d a f a c a
11
b b b a b a
8
a b d e d b Xb b d d e d :c d
a a a c
a b
a H a cY a W c d a b c
a b a I
a b c a

h a f a d c a d b a f a 8
c a a
16
f h f b b a c
d d dZ
a
a c a b
c b c f a d c d c a c d c a
f b a L c
21 /L

e Z g Z dZ e Z d .
a f d fY cd
8 c a a c 6d c a a .
f cd a c c .
a H a c a c H
b a a a
Gigue BWV 996

a c h
c fgf X X

p
d dedb d i g ede g ed ded
a cd da dc a f d fff d

p
db c [a] ff f
dc a a c d [g] A
b aA a b D d

a c dfd c a a cdc a
3
b a b b
a b c dedb b d e
c d c a dc d dc a c d dc a
c d a b a c dc
dc a cA c da
b aA B A a

d a fa c d a
5
d a b b b b b
p

p
dgd g e e b b b d edb b d e
d d d c d dc d
d b b d d
H d a B d dc a a
d b b b a AB

a i hf a c dc a
7
g gfgf b dc a b

p
e d d b b db edb d ed
a a dc dc a
b d c a c
C B A B A A c da a c A
a b b a b
/
c a c d a
9
a a b c d c d c :a df c a c .

p
c c d b d d d c .
c c d c d c d c a c c c d d df c a c .
c d
D A a c D D c
a

a fh i h f fh d d
11
. fg g gf fg f d
p

p
. c i g g i g i d e
. a cd a fh i i h f h i d
a c fg g
c Aa b a cd a B A
f

a a fh a
13
f f d d c b a b b fg
p

g d e d a b e d bde b
p

f d d f c a a c d fh c
f d f c a b g g
B d c a d a d B
b

d c af h fd i h f d
15
b d a gf f f d b f d
p

d e g h e d
p

d d f f h d
d a a f d d
c d d f f d d
b f d

if h h afa f d f c d if i a a c
17
f fg g f f g d d f c c d f c a c
h h g g e d e d
a c
a c
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a E [E] b a

19 /

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d a
b d .
p

bde b de g g e d b ba
d a cd fdc a c a c a a ..
c d d c c[]
A BC c a d H c D cAc cdad Ad c a c a cc
d d
A
lute version by Clive Titmuss 2004
[Partita]: Fantasia
J. S. Bach (BWV 997)

de e de e de e c
c c c dc a
a cd a cd a cd dc a c f
+ de a
c
a H I J D J I
a a a a a a

a a a c a
5
c a c a a a c a c a
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a
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c c c a a
7
c a c c a c c c c a
p

c a c d c d f d f d c a
a c d b d d d
c
D D d c I
a

e h c e b b
9
c c e e c c b c

p
dcd h g e g h dc a c g cd c cdb

p
c h g c f
e c e g h b
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a
Z X
c c b e :h g Y
12
c e c e f :e c a h
p

c cd c dc a c a cd d a c a
f c d a c
b c cR c bR
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15 Z Y Y W

W X

g c b
fh fe c b c b c c b b c c b c c
p

h e c c e a c c
p

p
f cQ f bQ c b c c
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a a a a
19
b c c a
c d c a c d c
p

c c b e c b c eZ c e c
c e c b c e c b c e
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a a a a

a
22
a c a c a c a d c a
a d c a a c d d c d c a a c d d d
d d a
a
H c a d a
a b

a a c f e c e c a e e e c
24
a c a a c d c c d a a c a c
e e c e e
a
c I e H a
a a a a

a a a e c a c a
26
c a c a c a a c c c
d b a b b b d d b a a a a
c
a
J H I J D d H I J D
a a a a a a a a
28
a a a d c c
d b d b a f e c a
c a c c c f e c
a c c d f f d c
a H I e a F e e
d a a a

-1-
30
a c a
e c a f e c a e c a d c b
d f d c d c a a d c a
b d b a b
F e a
e H
Ia a a a

c a a e f d e
32
b a a c a a a c d c b c
e a a b d a
c d c b c d
a a
I H a e d c d
d a aJa F J
a J
a D D

c
35
d c a a c c c a
d c a c d c d c d a a c a c
d e a d b d d
c a c
E I F d
a
37
c a a
d c a c d d d c a a c c d c
e c a a a c c c a
c a c a c c c
a F J d c a D c a
a a a

a g a a g a
39
c a c a c a c a
a a a d c a
c a c a d d
c b G G Gb
H I J D E e F H Q I I I
a a a b a a a

e e
41
c c
e b a b a g f g f g f g f
c c f e c f e c h h h h
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F F e J J J
F a a a

c c
43
a a
p

c e d e d e d e d
d c a d c a d c a d c a f f f f
c c
c D D D
a a a
45
ad a Y
e a a cd a c Y ada c a c
e c e a d
R a a bd a d a
cR
Q a dc a X c Z c b c cX bW
H c c I e d I
X X
I
a b a b cW a b a
X Z
a g h g Z a c
48
Z Y Y a c a hZ h a c a c a
adcd c hY eW b a d a
X a X h d
cX c b c X dc a
a I
X
I a H J I H I J D E I
a W b a a a a a a a a
51 /
a Y Z
b a a d c a a c d ad c a Y W a
d c b c e b e c b
d c b c d c b c a c [b]X c b
dfd c d E D d aJ H a E
F a bW
54 /

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a e d T e
a c a c a
a cd dc a d
dX d da
cR c e c [c] c a c
p

c D dH c I F
C b cQ aJ a a
lute version by Clive Titmuss 2004

-2-
Fuga BWV 997

Y
a c W c
cd W a W a dX c a c a
e a b Xc Y d Z dbd eY cX Wb cX c b
cW a dc a c c e c b

p
d cX a c dc d cX a
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Z Z Z Z
c e g c g d e c c
7
c e W a Z Y Xb Z W c cX b b e c X X dc
p

p
c d eZ Wb d c a c b c e dc
p

p
c e gZ eX cW c b a
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a a
Z
13 W W e c c a
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e f dcd c a cd a c d c a c a a Z d c X d c Y a
e f eY a c e e c dbd e eZ e
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a a a H
bW
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a c c ge
a Z Y a Z X a cX a a c dc c e fe

p
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p
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25 Z
Y Wb

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p

c e e c d d c a c
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a a a a aI aH a a W a
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32
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p

a c e e a c a a
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c a dc a da d :c a dcd dc a a c
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a c d f hY f f d c dX d c a d c 9c
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a
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Y
X Z
c a e eZ e c Y g c
Z c a fe e c h e c
p

b a a dc a cX d c a g fd c d e e e
a cX c a c c hY h h
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d dI H a d e g a a a
a a a b e d d d
Z Z
h g e c b X c Z Z W Z Y
58
Y c c c e c b c Y c b c b a
p

gg g g a c a X X Y dc c a
p

c c b ede dbd
e c e c
d d d eY cX bW c
p

e e e E Ia H bW a H b b

-3-

X a W
62
Z Z X c a Z X a Z c a Z a c a
e d c a a c a c d c d c d c d a f e e c e

p
[e] e c W d b a d c
c bW X c a a c c a Y X a a cW
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66 Z
e X Z
a a c a a Z a Y a X Z
a a e c e Y c e a a ad Y W X a
a e c a c a a c a a c b b c b b

p
a cW a cd c c c a c c
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a b a a a a a H b a
70
Y Z X Z X Y Z
c a Z a c h g h
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p
d c a c d c a c X d c a c d c a c a
cW a c W c hY
a cW a a
d cW D d c a
a a Y
73 Y Z W Z W
a g a g e c e
a c a a h f f Z a d c d cX d c d X Y a d Y
d a c d c a c a Y W Z c
p

a gX h a a d b d
f a a a
c a hY a H c c
a a a W
76 Z dX eZ Z
X

X

Y g b
c e X Z a Z b c c b cY b
d Y Z e c a d c a Z c

p
X W e cW f a e cX a cX bW c bW
c c a c a a a a cW c
dX cW a a cY a c da c
b cW H dW a Ha a Y E
80 Y
c b b c X Y X e
c b c c a a Z X Y c e c b c b efe Y
p

p
X c c Y fd a dcd X dc a c c fd c g h dc
p

W W Z b e c c bW bW e bW
W c b c b eX cW a c c cX b W
I c a c a W
I d c E I a J D E
a X Y a a a a a
85 Z Z Z
c egX Z e c X Z X b b b d d d e WY W X a cW
c e fX b c e c b a c a c a c c c c b Y a c c c cW a Y
p
p

a d c e e e d d c c c d d c a e
p

cY e c bW Y X
c c cW a
E c c a a F a a F a a F a eY cX a
bW H bW I a F
90
Y

a a a a a W
a X X ad c
Z c Z c c c c a a a Y a Z a X a
c a da X db a c Y X c a d dZ d d a d cW
c X c a d a e a a
a c cW a
J d cW a D d c a cW a F a a H
a Y a Y a H a E bW H bW I a a I a J a
Y Z Z Y Z Z X
de g a eghZ a eZ dX c
94
c a a c a Z X Z X W Z
cW d f a d f h d d c d c a X a a a a a c c c e e e
d X X d W X Y de e d c c c bW b b a a a W
X cW a a a a a a [c] [c] a [c]
I I I eY cW a J J J
a a a a a a

Y Z X Z course
X split
99
a X b Z c d e e X g h g
a Z b a W a Y X [c] c g h g
d bW ad b a cX d c a
X a a a g
a c a cW c a a a g h g
p

J d b d d h I a h I
a Z W X a a J a
103 X Z X
Wc Z X Z Z X X

g Y a c e c a
hgh hf a dcd Y dc a c c c a aX X a Z Y
p

h hf dX a d cW cW a dc a a cY d c d c a Z d
a cW d de
c a
D f a d a c dX
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107
Z
Z Z Y Y
X
c a Z Y d
X
c a X X Y b bde Y X a
ed e
a c
p

dX c a dY c Z d dc a c a cd
a a a a b b b dd d d e e e
a a a bW b b cW c Y c d Y dW dY cX b c
I a F
dal segno al Fine

-4-
Sarabande BWV 997
/ X Z / /
g h g a Y gY Z X a
h ZY h Z gX h a a c a h g a

p
:
h X f c c f h
h hY gW h a Y a
W gX
a F F a c d c a a F F
b b
X Z Y
a c d e d
4
X a c c Z Y a a

p
d c d c a a c d e b a a e dX
c c c a a W
c c d c a c
a a F F a F F
Z Z
e c c f f
7
W e c c c d f h
a d c Yd c d f

p
b d
X eY
Ze
c b Y b W cQ a d c
a e F F I a H
a a a

f c Z a c c c a c c c
10
ff c c c

p
h h dd b b a b a b ddd e e a a
c a c c a c
c c a c
I d e a e
a
13 Z
a a c Y e :c a
a c c a c d c :a

p
a c d c a d :c a a c d d c d d
a a c c c
c a c
f J I H a c d a I H
a a a a a a a a
16 / / / W Z
W X a c a X b Y c/ e g e c
Z
e
. c c a Z a a c e c a
p

d . d a d a c d
c . cc c cW a Xc b e
c cX a c a a
D D D E E F D d D D d d c a Wc d

21 Z Z Z X Z
g e e c c b b c e X e c c W
a Y fX e e cY c W c b c eY e c e b
p

d c d
e
c
cW
Y a
c
dZ
e
c Z eZ p
a e Y cW bW c e
cI D c
a a a W a c
25 Y Z Z
c c c f e c a
c d c c c a Z c c c
p

c b b a e e e c a a a e e
c e c
c cX a a c c cW c
I e e a e e e a
a
28 X a
a a a e c
[c] c a a a a d c a c c a Z d c
Y
p

fd c c c a c c d c a
p

c c c d e c
a a a a c
J c c c dY dX a
a a
31 Y Z
X d e X W
/
a W X
a a c d b c a .
d c a a d :c a . a
a d d e . 7e
c a Y c c c
J d c c d F F E E D
a I a H a I a J a E D Ia c F

-5-
Gigue BWV 997
/ Z / / /
X e W X X Y
c :a Z c W c W c c dfd c a a X X c c X c
d d c :c Y d c c dfd c a a a Z c a
d e d
a H D J I a cW d Y c a I H
a a a a a b

Z / / Z
Z Y / X X Z X Y W W Z Y Y

6 Y W e d e g h e d g g h d d e X Z e e g
Z X c Z X c
Yh c c d e e f b
X X Y

p
d c fd X c e e f
d a
c eW gW a cW e
a H J I a c dW eY a c a
b a a a a
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Z Z
Y d dX e Z W Y g Y
g h e g h g c e c g W g Z X g
b c X c cd c c b b c e e e c h g dc
c cd a c ..
d d .
c c
c
a H aI a J a D Hb a E I a I a b

Y/ / Z Y
19 Y c e f :e W a cX a X a Z Z Y ff e X
X W f a c c [c] c a a d Y W d d d c
f e X e d c d
f e a e c a
a a c c a c
a e Xd a a c d
a
24 W Y
X Z X X Y
X Z a c a c a
b b c
c a W d c
c a c a
c
a c W
h
c d d fd b a
a c c c c c
a a c c
c d a c E D J I H
a X a a a
X Z / / / Z Y Z
g g h e Z X e X Z e c h c
29
h g h fe d a cd c :c a g h c cd
fd gf dc d d
c dc c
g e c c a a c
a f c d d dc a e
Y a eW
35 / /
a e
Y Z a Z a c a d c d
X c a c :a c c c
e f a a b d c a a c d d c :c
a d d d e
cX a c
d cX I a H I H a H D
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40 / / /
X

c e c a
c dfd c a a c c d Y Z a a c X Z
d: c c dfd c a e e f a a b c c d Y
b b c d
a c a
J I a c e a J a c d
a a a I aH a H b a d W Y
45
X Z

X
/ / /
W c cd a cd c .
X Z e efa a b a a Z a c dfd c c a .
de d d .
c cd a Y c
d a e c d a a
W d a H a Z Y I a D I a F

Double

a e aT
c a c c c c c a d c a
d da ad da a d da a aT d S d c a d c
d d d d
a Sc
a H
a D aR J
a I
a

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a
4
b c b c a a c a
dc a a a a c cdc a ad dc a c dc a
d d d
c c a a a
a d d c a Ic H ad I a H J
a b b a a a
X Y Y Z
g k Zh g X h Y a a
8
a g hgh fi hf c a a c a X Y
p

c h h i e a cd d c a c a
d
R d c b c a c a
c a c
I c a D J H cW
a a a a

b c e b ge e c
12
a b b c b fe e c

p
Z a c dc a cd ad ad dc a h g
d bd d d
c a c c b
D dcd Ia E a
c
/ Z X X X
16
hg Wg W aga fe c a
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p

p
Sd . hgh dc e a X h Z Y
e a
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cQ cR gW f c a c a
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a a a a a I a
X W
a c a a c b
21
c a a a a c d a c c a

p
e a a ad c d ad c d
a a c c efc efc f a
a a cda c da a
c d d d d a
a
W Y
c a g a c e c
25
a f a c d c c a h

p
c d d dcd d d d d b a a
a c c b c c c c c a
Y a c d
a c
d H
cd
d
a e H
a I
a a

g c
29
a f efh e a a b a c c a
p

p
h i dcd a g d dc a cd c c df d c
d c dc a cda c e c
g c c a c a c c
a a c
a
Z X Z Y Z
h g Z a d e c a
33
h g c a c a c a
d
T c e a a a e d c a
S c f cR cQ d
R d a a c d d a
d R a W e d d e J I
R D a a
36
a a e
a c a c a c a c c c c
c adc d d c a d da ad da a d da a aT d S
a db d d d
a c b5 c Sc
H a d I a D aR
b b a b I a a H
a
40
aT a a c a a
c a c a c c a a b a
dc a dc dc a a b e e a cd d c a c a
d d c c b c a c a
c a c
J I a J H c
a a a a a
44
a a
a b db a a a cd c
c c a a c a ad d a da
c a c c a c c a c d a c a
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a
d
F
c e a ef
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a
48 /
c .
a cd da c a .
bd d .
c c c
d a I a d aID F
a a
lute version by Clive Titmuss 2004

-7-
Prelude pour la luth . Cmbal par J. S. Bach
[Prelude, Fugue and Allegro in E flat, BWV 998]

Foreword:___________________________________________________
This piece occupies a special place among the works commonly thought to have been
composed for the lute or a lute-imitative keyboard instrument. A product of Bachs later
years, it was composed in the last decade of his life. The works the triptych layout--
including a rare example of a da Capo fugal movement in cantus firmus style--
empfindsam features and harmonic novelty make it one of the most performed pieces in
the lutes repertoire. The title inscription "Prelude pour la Luth . Cmbal par J.S. Bach"
is not in J.S. Bach's own hand, but may have been added by C.P.E. Bach, who owned the
MS after his father's death. The other two movements are left untitled in the MS.

In order to play the piece on the lute without resorting to transposition or changes of
tuning other than the normal alteration of open-string basses to the key of the piece, some
adjustments have to be made. These include altering the tuning of the sixth course to A
flat (used also by J. C. Weyrauch in his transcription of the Fantasia, Sarabande and
Gigue of BWV 997 in C minor), changing the octave in which the bass is played and
using notes stopped on the seventh and eighth courses. Occasionally I have reduced the
texture by eliminating octave doubling if that note is heard as an open octave-string.
Some of the bass notes have been transposed into a more usual or convenient octave (up
or down) without marking them as such. In this way it is entirely possible to play the
piece convincingly in its original key with little compromise.

I have expanded on the original use of dynamic markings in the [Allegro]. The use of
dynamic markings is evidence that the work was designed either for the lute or to imitate
it, but Bach did use such dynamic indications in two-manual harpsichord music. In the
Italian Concerto (BWV 971) for example, dynamics markings are used to indicate
manual changes from 8' + 8' to a solo stop on the other manual, in keeping with the
appearance of soloistic material within the concerto/ripieno structure.

Since Bach's uncle Johann Nikolaus Bach was known to have made three-manual
Lautenwerke (lute-harpsichords), it is possible that these indications are intended to
clarify the registration. Bach ran out of paper at the end of the [Allegro] and completed
the piece using New German organ tablature, so it seems that the piece was probably
intended for Bach's own use at the Lautenwerk. For more information on this instrument,
see Howard Ferguson's article Bach's Lauten Werck, Music and Letters, 48, 1967 p.p.
259-64. Refer to my foreword to BWV 996 for more on the Lautenwerk and Bach's
writing technique for it.

Clive Titmuss Kelowna 2004


Prelude pour la luth. Cmbal par J.S. Bach BWV 998

Z Y Y
lkl i h h f f d d cac c a a afa c ca
i fg g g fd d a b b a b b b

p
g g df b d ba a adb dbd b a d
c c
I
a I
a I
a I
a C D A

Y Y
fe f d c c a adc f c
6
a d ab b dbd a b b a a c c

p
b b d ad d b e b ed d b e b edb
c adc dc a c da c d
c
[c] c c c a e
E a

Y
a a a cd c a a hgh a d ca c a a
11
c ba a bab a Y X f a a a bd b fi g d ba a

p
d b c d dg d adc c h d d dc
d d c
a
H a c B a e C A d D D
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16
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b d b d a b d da ad d b b d
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21
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26
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[Fuga] BWV 998

X Z X
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bab a b ab b a ba a c a b db a a Y g
bd b W d d eb d d fZ dZY g
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gZ fY b b e e d a Z c e ed eZdX
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g gf a b W b X X W aff W a a b
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h h h h h h h h f f f f W f f f f dZ c X a
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d e A D D e
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a e Z bW eZ e b c dc
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dX d dZ d dY d d d dc a d c
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p

fZ c c fZ fc fZ d d d c a c b bW Y c b
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c a
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a b c W Z c X Y Z c b b a b
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c c fdX c f fZd c fZ fZ d c
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a f f f f dZ d cY c c a
62
b a a b a a
p

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ded fdf b b b b dZ d d bX b d d b W
p

dfdf fZ W fd c cY d d d cY c c dZ
fY fd bQ bQ bQ W b
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p

p
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B A d cX C B A E A d e D
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d d d d c c c c
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a
dal Segno al Fine
[Allegro] BWV 998

b adb dZ cY d b dZ c a ba bab ab a bd
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p
Z Y b bd db b b d b a bda d a d
a c a cd d c d cd c a c c a
a bab b bW a b
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b A dY B H a a d E B C D B D A BC A C

X a cZ X Y
a c X W Z a a fe c a c a
6
a a b b ab df ab ab Z ab a ba ba
bd b b d b a dg a bd b a Y dfg W ad d ad
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b b b a a a a
AB e e e c c c e e e
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a c a c ef hf a a c da
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p

b a bd bd ba bd a g d b a bdb bab b bab b db


c a a e
b b
e
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[forte]
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16
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f. b g f g b bd b Y bd e b e ede d
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bW
B DA E E C E D C E B A a a B a B A a B a
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p
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.
B
b a bdb
[mf/piano]
c
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.
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Praeludium pour la lute J. S. Bach (BWV 999)


Xc c d d

p
b b b b b b b d d d d d d
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p
a a a a a a a b b b b
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p

p
b b b b
d d d d d d d d d d d d d a a
c c c c c c c c c c eY Z e e e e e e e b
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a bW
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17
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p
d d d d d d Xb b b b a dX d d d d
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21
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p

f f f e e e f f f h Z
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a
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29
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a
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a

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37
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p

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No. 6 of Sechs Kleine Prludien
d d d c c c da c
p

b b b b b c c collected by Johann Peter Kellner


b
dY lute version by Clive Titmuss 2009
a a a
The Big Bach Lutebook
Music by Johann Sebastian Bach
Volume II

Six Suites for Cello, original title:


6 / Suites a / Violoncello Solo/ senza / Basso / composes / par / Sr. J. S. Bach,
Maitre de Chappelle

BWV 1007, G major, transposed to E flat


BWV 1008, in D minor, arranged for theorbo in A in the original key
BWV 1009, in C major, arranged for theorbo in A in the original key
BWV 1010, in E flat, transposed to B flat
BWV 1011, in C minor, transposed to A minor,
(a different arrangement from BWV 995 in Volume I)
BWV 1012 in D major tuning (upper six courses: f#, d, a, f#, d A)

Lute tablature by Clive Titmuss, updated October 31, 2009


J.S Bach (BWV 1007)
Cello Suite I: Prelude

c a c c c a c c dcd d dcd d dcd d dcd d
a a a a a a
b b b b b b d d d d d d
*
I
a I
a I
a I
a I
a I
a

cac c cac c cac a a a a a afefa a a a
4
b b b b b a bab bab b b b b b b b a b a b a
d d ba aQ b db
cQ c
I I I a
a a a c

fe a faf a a c
8
bab b bab b ba f b a a a ba c c c

p
a bdb a d d bd db ede ede
c c c c c c ca f f
Q f f f f f
c D c a c

12 Zd

d Y a a a a a
Z
df d Y df d a a a a a a a a ba bab aba
p

d d d fd c c c c d db b b b b b b
d fd cQ dc d d d d d d
Q db
c D J J
a a a

16
dcd d dcd d cac
a a a a a a ba
ede e ede e dbd d dbd d b db
c c c c c c d d d d d d dc a
ba
I I I I I I I ca
a a a a a a a

ae f a a c da df
20
ab ab ab ab a a a a a ab a ab a bdf
d d d d bd bd bd bd b bd bd
a a a a a a cd
a
c c b b b

24 Y
gfeffd dda a cda c c e a a a a efe
f a a b bd b e e edc babb b
p

db b b Z b da W d
a cd a dc Z c c c e X
a bd b dY Z
a a I a H
a a c

28
fa a dc dc a ca a aS a a a a a a a a a a a a
a a a db a ba ba db a ba a a b a b a b
d b ba db db db db d bR d d b d b d
a ca d dc dc a
a ba
c a a a a a

33
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a a bW dW f df g f gZ i Zf g f g f f a b a b a a b c d e
b d i i g i g i d bde
f
Q X f
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a a a a a a

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gW h i k l l l l l l l l l l l l k k k k k k l
fW g h i g g g g g g g g

a a a a a a a a
l
a
l l l l
a
l l l i
a
i i i
a
i i i
a
l
a I
a
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Allemande BWV 1007
X
f a a a cda
f f fg fW a a f g a a a b
g i gfg fg i gY g g g g g b
* f fh hf fh h a
gfg
I I H a
a a a a
/ / /
c c d c a a c da a d c a a
b b b b a b b a b b a
b b :c dd d
c c c c c
b b a a b b
B D c c
a

e e a a a a f
a a a a :a a a a fg f f a a fh
g g g g g g [g] g g g g g
h a hQ hQ aQ f
Q h f
Q h
Q f
Q f f h
H a I D
a a
X Y / /
a f af a h fa a a
h h f h fh a a b
g f g g b b b
h h a a hf h f dc d c
:
a g f db d b a
a
:
H
a I
a
/ / / /
a h a l l k k a a a a f h a a e fa a
a b h i l i i a gf f a h a a a .
a bd a g g b a 7b b b
:
a c f h a a .
b [i] .
D H E a I H a
a a a
X
a a a a c df a Z X W f d d df da c ad c a
a a b a b a b a b f f f 5c a c
bd b b g ed e d d b d
d c d d dcd
:
a d
Qf a
:
a I H D H
a a [d] a
/ / /
3f c fd c 5d c a X a df a c X X a c :c a
e e c d c
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df f fd d
f d c f
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a a a
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:
db b g X
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a g a
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a
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a g a b a b b d a g a f i
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a
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a
fa
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f
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b
a
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db d
d
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a
a
gf
g
a
f[a]
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aQ
g g
f
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f
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f
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g l
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I a
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Courante BWV 1007

c dfd c a c a c c d c a c
b b b b d d b a a b
b b d b b d
, d
b b
I I a
a a b
/
d c d d c d d c a c a c c a c c a fZ a
d d b b b d Z :a 7b f a
b fY W fg g
a a c h f
a fY
I D a a I
a a

h a c e f f e c a f a
h f a b a b b a b b a a
fd d d d fdf fdf d b
f aQ f f
H D H a I
a a a a

fe c afe c a eS f
b a d f S b a b :a
d d
R ff
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S fd f
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f
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H [a] D
a c E

Z c a a a f a cdc a f
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b :a 7b . bd db f Z
a . d df d cQ
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a a a

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g gf gd d e d e e d e
a a
I D a
a e
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c d :c d d e de edb d bde d
d d
a I
a a D a b

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b b b b b b a a a a a a f
de ed
f f
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d
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a a
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a I
a H
a
a I
a b
a
a
B
c .
.
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Saranbande BWV 1007
/ / / /
c 6d c c d :c f dc a c
ad db a b :a G a bd b a
b d b ed b d db b b d b :a a bd
, a dcd a d :c c a c
b b b
I a J I I H
a a b a a a a
/ /
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h h a a . :a a a b a b db a a
g g g a 7b . db b d :c d d
h f fh . a aR a
D J I H a a [a] I J b H
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d :c d d :b d
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G
7 . c a c da c .
. b c .
D H J I a I
a b a a a b a
Reprise

Sarabande (simple) BWV 1007


/ / / / / /
cdc da c f a c a hf da c a c a a
a b a b a bd a a a a a a a b
bd b ed b b a b g a5 b b 7 d :c
a d a dc hf aR a
b b
B a J a a [a] B C b A
a b a B B A D CB A E a
/ /
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b a fda b a b
c d
c
D
bd
c
b
a b
c
A
d b
dc
CB b a B
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Menuet I BWV 1007

c a cd c a da f :c a d c df d c a a a c
b a b b a a b a a bdb a a . a b
b b d b d d 7b . b
, a aQ a .
b c
a B a I a H a a
a a
Y X
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Z
b a a cd f d fd f d f b a b
d b fY d d c d
7 db b bde e bd
d dd c
a H I
W
a a e a b H a a D a
X X Z /
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c
d d d b
a
a ..
a
I
a
d
Y a
a
d c :a
a I
c
a
.
.
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Menuet II BWV 1007

b b a a b a b a a dgf
d b a b b a b a b b a . a
b c b b b c b .
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b b
d b a d b a a

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lute version by Clive Titmuss 2009
Cello Suite II: Prelude J. S. Bach (BWV 1008)
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theorbo version by Clive Titmuss 2004


J. S. Bach (BWV 1009)
Cello Suite III: Prelude
Z
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43
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50
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57
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64
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theorbo version by Clive Titmuss 2004

-1-
Allemande

a d c a
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a
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16
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18
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20
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22
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24
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49
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64
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Boure I da Capo

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24
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45
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88

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Se e c a aQ R a a a a a a a a df g f d b a a a df g f
a a G G G G G G G a G a a a a

99
a a da b a d
cd cdb a a b d a .
a b a .
a a a a .
db a a a da cda fa c
G G a d C B A cR a A B B
C DBa
a a a a a Q

theorbo version by Clive Titmuss 2004

-5-
Cello Suite IV: Prelude J. S. Bach (BWV 1010)


f a f a d a d a c c
da a da a da a da a b b b b b

p
b b b b b b b b dad a
* a a a a c c
b b d b
a a a a a a a
E [E] [E]

f f fc fc c
8
b a a faf a fa f a c c c
dad a b b b b d d
a a a a f f aR cf f
d b a a cQ c
a a
[E] d c c a a A D

e a d a d d a c c
15
d d d a da a b b b b Xb

p
d d d d b b b b b b b a a X
e d a d c c Wb b b
a
A AB BC a B BC C D
W cY

Z W
e X e f f
22
b b b Z b b e b f f f f

p
d d d d d d d ad d ad f f f f
p

c c b cY c X b b f f
b a b b e Y a f f
a c H [C]
d c c a [b] a a

gY g h c c d a a a
29
f f f f fb b b da a a a b Y Z Y
f f f f d c d cd d c c cd
gX g c adZ Wb c
f b
A A AB b bW cX c
a b

a c c f c
36
b b b b a a a p c c a a
d d dad ad a d b b b b e e b b
c c a a a a a a a c c
b a aQ c a
a c a aQ
d c cQ Q ^
43
f c e a a a a a
c c c c a a a a a a a a a a c
e e a a a a a a a a c c e
cfc c e a a a a a de
c a a a a a
d c a
c b

a a a c e cfe c a a c a c c a
50
c a a a c c a c c c a a c c c c a a
e c c e e e e e e a a
de e e a
c c a
c c c
[F]

a d d d d a a a a
55
a a dcd dcd dcd dc a a a a a a a a a
a a eQ e e e c c a c
a d
Q db cdc a c
a Q d
Q db
c cH
/ / /
f e c a e c a a a a e d a
59
c c a a dc a a c a a c c a a a a a da a
e e c a a c e f
G f e f c :e a a a d c
c c a a e a a a
cR c a a a
C d
cH b Gc

-1-
65
d c c e fc c cf eba aeba ab b
a b b b c c c c db a b db a

p
c c c d d d d d d e e
d a c c f c f cf a
a b c c
B A

a a b fb b
72
b b b b b

p
g ede g ed e c b a b e c b a b b d e e e

p
a b b ef fef fe
b b b c
A a
a

77 /
c f f b f a
c c d d d bcbcecec b b da a
p
ed e ede ede ed e e e e e c ece e e c b a b :a b b
f f f f f R a a
d d
A BH c a
A [E]

f a d a d a c c
83
da a da a da a b b b b a b a b

p
b b b b b b b a a bd d
a a a c c a c a c
b b
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89

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a c e cfe :e af
ab db a a
a bd a bd db a b
ac ca a
ba a Q
A c aQ Q

-2-
Allemande BWV 1010


a fe a d c c a
a f b a bdb a X a b a
db a Y bd db a bda a b db a b a
* c a c a a c a c
a W b
a c c A I
a C B D C

a
b db a a a b a a a c da c a
a db db adb da b db a a bd d dbd db a a bd ad
a c c a c c
a b
a c A a A a b c
c d d[E] c d

c a e c a fe h f a k hf a
c a c a a hf hf a a
db a a b d a bd h a g db a b db
a c a c a
a c f c
d a D c

/
a a c a
a b b a a c c a ..
a a a b a a bd db a a bd db a a .. dZ
c a c c a c a c c a c a c c ..
dc a c d c dc
A c a c A c A
a d

a a e c c efe c a
c a a b a a b a b e c a a e b a
a db a bdb a bd d b a a bd d a bd db
a c a c b c

Q Y b a a a e
c
a c c d a a
W
c c :b c S hfhfafa a afefe
f f f a c e
b a fh R RX h hf a cd
db a Y W db a da b hQ hQ hQ e
c b c b e c
cX c a b a
D C c a
a

e a c a a a c d d a a a c a c a a
a c a c c a c a c a f f b b a a a b b b a b a
b b a e e f7 d dc d c d
a c a e e c
c a a
B D c
a

a efefe fe a a c d d
b a a b f f b a a b b a a b
db a bd dbdb a d a bd d
c a c
a a
A c A A a c
a c


c a c hf fhf a af f a d dc a
b a b h hf b a a hfh hf b a a b a b a
a d d db a a a b
c a c c a a c
b a f d b a
c a c B
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c c a ef
b a db a a b a b a a f b a a .
db a d db a d d db ed ad a g .
c a f hfh a .
b a c
D C a c A A a a
d [E]

-3-
Courante BWV 1010

\ \ \ \ \ \
a a
a a c a c a b a
b b a b a bd d d b a b a bd a bd
a c a c a a c c a c
b aR db a bd
c a B C
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a c a a a e
a b a a a c Z a c Z c Gc a a c a
d db b a 7b a b a bd b a Y Y c a bdbd d b a a a bd d db
a a c c c
a a
A a b W c X
D dY C
c d
X \ \ \ \ \ \
c Wc f e e h f f f Z a X a c c a f f f hX kZ k hf
c a d c a f h h X f c a c c c fh fh hf
d
Q h fW
R d R h h
h a f
f
c a DH
a
\ \ \ /
a c a a a
h a c c a a a c .. a
d a d db a a b dd a .. d da b d a a b a bd
a a a c c a .. a c
d
7 c
R
a c A c D A A

f f f f f f a Z
a b a a efefh h f hfh h h h h f f f f f
b d b h i g f hQ Y f i g f
b c hQ hQ f h f h
h
a

f aX a
a e f h e f
7 a a b b a
g g g g g a d d d d d g a c a cd d
h f f e c b c b c
hQ fd e c a a c
D C bW
a a
\ \ \ \ \ \
c a a
b a a b a b a b b a a
dd b a a a bdbd d db b a d db a b a
c a c c c a c a c a
b b a b a
c A a B A c
c

fa da d dc a c c a a a c
b a b a b a b a b a b b a a c
db db d dc db a db a b b e
aR c
aQ b a c
a c A a D
c a a
\ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \
a c cY a a e
a b b a b b a a a a b df
a a b d dYZ a b d a d dZ d b d a 7b a b a bd bd
a a c e W c a a c

R R aR
A B c D A a
cX d B A

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f
a
d
: b b .
a a ..
a
A a
[E]

-4-
Sarabande BWV 1010

/ / / / / / / / / / / / / / /
a cd da c a d c k a a h a k a
a db a a b b a b ad d k c a h h
b d d b ad d d db a h h
e a c a c
a CB A a B a b D a

/ / / / / / / / / / /
a c d d a 7c a d6 c k a
a a db a a 7b 5b a 7b ad d k c a
h a b dZY
G d 7b ad d d db
hQ f f e a c a c
f db a
D A c a CB A a B a b D
/ / / / / / / / / / / /
a h a k a f c c e b 7c
h h a b b a
. . d a h a c e a a b
a h h h a . . e ad db a f e a d c d c d a
hf fRf . . h c c a c
R f c a
a D A f AB C D a

/ Y / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /
e :e W c ef f e h a
f 5f a a f a ad af b a
b d g4 d 5b ad b a 7b a dbda
c a a c a f4
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afa c f Ye e h a
R fZ a e f5
a a b a a .
b b e d dX R b db b a b a b .
c a e a .
c a
B C BA a
a [E]

Boure I BWV 1010


a c a c a a
a b b a b a b a bd a a b b b a a b
bd d a bd d b bd a bd dbdbd
+ a c a a e
b a a a
b c D c [a] a [a] a A
cH [E]

a c c ef c c e f :e e a a c a
b b a cd cd cd cd f a c c ..
a bd d b ddf df b d .. a b
a c a a e a .. a c
a
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a

a e e c k h
a a b a e a e c e i h
d bd d b db adb a ad db a b a
c b e c c b c
e c a a a c
a a a c
cA a c
Y
fe c a c c X Z c bW c c a fe c a f a c
i fef b a b b a e b b a a b a a b a a b
db a d a a cd d d bd b
cR c
bW a a
B c a cX b c A C B
a c a c a

-5-

a a cd a a cdc a c a a a
a b a b a b a b a b a b b a a b
b a a a b da b d a b da b d bd bd c
c a a c a c c
a b a
A c


a X a a f c a c c a
a b b a b b a a b a a b a a b a b a b b a
d db a b db a b d d db a b d
c a
b a b a
bW c D a D b c D
a [E]

hfe f a c fe f a c dc a c Z X
b a fd a b fd a b dbdb a
d db adb a a g bd b b a a bd b b b
c a h c a
a b a b
B A bW

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af e fa a
b a a a b a b a a a a
d dbdb a b a b da bd a b da b d d db b ..
c a a a a a c a c .
b a
c a [a] a
d c d CB A

Boure II BWV 1010


a a c a a
a .. a b a b b b a
b bd a bd b bd a b .. b b a b db a b bd a
+ a c a a .. a c a
a b a b db a b
a

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a .
bd b [b]d a b
c a a ..
a b
a
Boure I da capo

-6-
Gigue BWV 1010

/
a a
a a a a b a a a a b a a a
b b a b a b a b d b a b a 7b dbd d bd dbd d b d
a c a c
a a a
c c
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c a c a e a e a e Wa e a
6
c c a c c c c a c c c c Z c a a c
b a b d d b a b d d a a b a b dbd d
c
c c A a
a a a cX
/ /
a a a a a a e c e a a a e e c e e
10
. c a c c c a c
7 b a b
b a b b b b ad ad . d d dbd d
c a a .
c a c e
c A A
a

e c e c
15
b a b b ad b
dbd ad b a b b d b a a a b a ad
b c c c a a c a c c c
b b
a AB A BC B CD

e c c b c b c b c b cfef c cfe a
19
a e a a c fef a Z e c
X c c f c a a Y

p
a db a e a e
b fh Y f Q e Y
a fQ a
C a a

a a a a c c c c c c c c
23
a a a a a a T
Sc f e c
p

e e e a a e b a b e R Q cQ cQ eQ f Q Q eQ
f cQ cQ eQ
c a c c eQ eQ eQ
c
C A a c
/
a a a
27
c a a a a a a a b a a a a b a a a
e a b b a b a b a b d b a b a b dbd d bd dbd d bd
a a c a c
aQ a
C a a a
c H c c
[F] [E]

a af a af
32
fg f f f fg f f f
g i g i g i g i ede b a b b ede b a b b
c a c c c a c c
c cQ
C B C B

36 X
ad Z Z b a
a a a b X Y Y ad Y c ad
c a a d c a c c c a a a c Z a a
Wb b b a
c bW
a Y b a b
c
b Z X Y
c
bW
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/

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X af a
40
a a a a b a b b b b a a .
a b a b a b a b d b a a .
a a c a c c a f
Q .
aS a b a b b
c D C B A a
dR
lute version by Clive Titmuss 2004

-7-
Suite pour la Luth par J. S. Bach: Prelude BWV 995/1011
/ / /
a a a e e
a a c a a a a
* a c eda cd dcda c
R
d c d
c
a
e
a c d c c e a
a
a F F a b a A aB A F A
/ / / / / / /
e e c a c a a c e c c
6
a c df a a a c c a c e e c
a f dcd dc d fd c dd : c c c eg

c a c c
F a e a a
b F a B
11 / / / / / / / / / / / / /
h hg d e e c e f f e c a a c a c a c :c a
h hfef a c c efc a c c cd
g dcd d c e f
c c
B I a B Ba C BA a a D E c
17 / / / / / / / / / /
a g h ge g b c e e c c
c a a c fh f fe e c e e c
dcd h h g a c c fd c
c c b c b e c c c
c b c e c e
D d F a F a B

c c e c e
22
f e e b c b c e b c e
c a a a c a cda cd a a a
c b c b c b c b c b
c b c
a F c e
Tres viste/Presto
/ /
c eg e b a a
25
ce fe f e c b c c b c cc cac a ac a a a
c eg c c ac d d dcda cd dc d cd c
c bd e d
c
a FE B
35
eg h cgeg e c c egh hge ce ce c e c a
c ce c f b c e c ef fe c e e c cd c a
dcd a e h g c c efc e a cda
cb e g
c e c a
c a

46
a e c g a
ac a ca c ac a a a a a cac e
cd dc a ac d a d cd c d c d d d c a cd d d
c a de
a c cac a eg c c
d c dcda c a B a d a
a
57
c bceb cebce c c g h a ace g
b c c e ce h ac ac a
dc c ce a a cda c a cd a cd
e c e e ec c c c
c e c e b c b c a
a c d d a c a
a
67
ac e ca a c e a e c c a a ac e
c ac ca ca a ca d c a cac ac
d d dc a dc a dc a d c adc d
c b c e c a a
c a
d A C H c d
b a ABA C
77
c c ca a e e e e c c h h h g g g e e e
aa cac f a c a c d c h f d
dc a ac d d d c e d f h i f h d f
c
a B Aa A D
87
ed d e g h b d e c a
c e c c a a c a a a a a a
d c c a a ad c e
a de d d d b d
dc a c a a a ce a c ac
d dcda c d
97
e c a c h g g c c ce b
c c c c e e e d d ca f h f h e c e ebc b b
f d c d d d df d c c c d h ce a
e f c
h eg a a a a

108
a ga
c b c c a a acac a g a a a
c ac cc ca a c e c e a cda cdcd c f h d cd c d c
c cc c a c ecac a de ede d
c c c a c
a c B a B a
a
119
a ac a
a a ac a cac a c ac c ca ac
dcd c e a e e ac e e
e cac a c c a c c
dcd c a a cd c dcd
ece c e B CA a
129
a c e fc e f c a c a fe c e a c ca a c a a
a c c c a c a cd c c a a a a a
c fe ef e c e a e a a c c c
a e c a c e a
a a a a
d A B a A a a C
a a a a a a
139
a eca a ca g g a
a a ca ca ca c c ca a a c a g g ca ca
c c d dada dada d dc d c c c dc
c c a a e d d d
c c
c c dB d a c c
a a a A
149
eg h bd e ed e a e
c ec c ac a c a
d ad df h ac d a dc c d c adc d d c d c ad
c a d e c
c cac a ec a a c c c c
a d dcda c d a d d a

160
c a
h g a hg g a hg g a hg g hg g
a a c a ca ca f h g hf h h a gh gh gh gh
a cd c a c ad c d h h h g
b e c c a
a e a a a e
c dB h
a a f f e f
170
gh g e d e g a a
gh a a c a a dc a c a hg cac a ac a
d c d d d c d d h ac d d dcda c d
g h g aa bd e
c aa c a
g I a
aB B B B B B Aa C BA
181
gg a a fe a a a
hg hg h h hf a f c ca ca a dc c a a
kh h e cda dc d c a dc a c d
d bc db db d
a c b c
C D AC B A a B a B b

ecc e ghg g ed e c c a
191
c ee e h h hg g g ec d c cac a
d d g g h d
e e e e g a
c e a ca c
a d B h d adcf d H
e e bHebe

fede
202
dc b c a c a
dcda dc adb a a a c dc a cd cd a eba
d bd e d cac a aca c c
bc c c c c
a C B a F F F F
/

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c a e hg a d e
212
a a ca c ca e gh bc a c
a eba a cda dc a dc a dc h cd a c
a aca c c a d db e g d
c c a bc
F F F c e g h B a
Allemande BWV 995/1011
/ / / / / / /
e e
c fd c d a c c c a
c d
7 :c c a a d c a
+ d e c d d
d c d a c c d
a c
/ / / / /
a a f
4
a a c a a a c a c f d c a c a f
c c d c d c a a c d c d d
d d d c
c e c c
B a B
/ / / / /
e a e c :a c a e c a
7
f d c a c a a c c a c a a
:e a e a a d c d c
[c] a
A e
/ /
a a g g k h g a a k
10
:
a a c a h f h f
d c a i h
a c a a c
c a c a
c
/ /
a c :b g
13
c d c a c c :a c b c b c
d c d
7 g d c a a c e
d e :c
e
d a a
a
/ / / / / /
e g h g g b g
16
e c b c e f h b c e c e c c .
g c c c a a c .
e c d .
e c
a E B
/ / / / / / /
g g h a e g h k h g :e c c e
19
g h g
: c a c a e
h d c d h h
g d
: e
h a
/ / / / / /
:b b c e b :b b c c a a a
22
a a c c a c :a a c a c a
a [c] d d a c d c c
e
d c E
/ / / /
a a a
25
a c c :c :a a a c
c d c a c fd c d e e
c c a c :c c c a a
c c c
b a
/ / / / /
c a c e c c a a
28
a c :c a a e c a a c a c c a a
e e a f d c d d c d
c
H a c
b a
/ / /
/ / / /
g h g h g h g g d a
31
h c a h g h a c c a a
a h h d c a a c d c
d e d
c
a BII A
b d
/ / / / / /

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d e d e h h k e
34
e c k k g: h h a c
g 7h h d c a ..
a g e .
e
h B a F
Courante BWV 995/1011
/ / / / / /
a a e d e
a c