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GCSE

English Language
Paper 2 Writers’ viewpoints and perspectives

An Account of the first radio signal sent across the Atlantic Ocean – Guglielmo
Marconi 16 Marks • 25 Minutes

Shortly before midday I placed the single earphone to my ear and started listening. The receiver on
the table before me was very crude- a few coils and condensers and a coherer – no valves, no
amplifiers, not even a crystal. But I was at last on the point of putting the correctness of all my beliefs
to the rest.

The answer came at 12:30 when I heard, faintly but distinctly, pip-pip-pip. I handed the phone to
Kemp: "Can
͞ you hear anything?"͟ I asked. "Yes,
͞ "͟ he said. "The
͞ letter S."͟ he could hear it. I knew then
that all my anticipations had been justified. The electric waves send out to space from Poldhu had
traversed the Atlantic – the distance, enormous as it seemed then, of 1,700 miles-
unimpeded by the curvature of the earth. The result meant much more to me than the mere
successful realization of an experiment. As Sir Oliver Lodge has stated, it was an epoch in history. I
now felt for the first time absolutely certain that the day would come when mankind would be able to
send messages without wires not only across the Atlantic but between the farthermost ends of the
Earth.

Traversed: Travel across


Unimpeded: not obstructed
Poldhu: A town in Cornwall
epoch: a distinct period in history

1.Select four true statements from the list below. 4 marks

A. The radio signal originally would not send


B. The signal was travelling a short distance
C. The signal was sent to space first, and then across to America
D. This transmission was proof that wireless messages could be sent any distance
E. Sir Oliver Lodge felt the transmission marked a significant change
F. The equipment used was highly sophisticated
G. Marconi felt this transmission was a success and a tremendous achievement
H. Marconi felt this transmission was a culmination of his work and proof of his hypothesis

2. How does the writer use language here to describe the transmission? 12 marks
24 Marks • 30 Minutes

Source A - Lady Constance: Account of being force fed whilst imprisoned for her feminist protests

Tuesday, January 18, I was visited again by the Senior Medical Officer, who asked me how long I had been
without food. I said I had eaten a buttered scone and a banana sent in by friends to the police station on Friday
at about midnight. He said,"Oh, then, this is the fourth day; that is too long, I shall have to feed you, I must feed
you at once,"͟ but he went out and nothing happened till about 6 o͛clock in the evening, when he returned with, I
think, five wardresses and the feeding apparatus. He urged me to take food voluntarily. I told him that was
absolutely out of the question, that when our legislators ceased to resist enfranchising women then I should
cease to resist taking food in prison. He did not examine my heart nor feel my pulse; he did not ask to do so, nor
did I say anything which could possibly induce him to think I would refuse to be examined. I offered no resistance
to being placed in position, but lay down voluntarily on the plank bed. Two of the wardresses took hold of my
arms, one held my head and one my feet. One wardress helped to pour the food. The doctor leant on my knees
as he stooped over my chest to get at my mouth. I shut my mouth and clenched my teeth. I had looked forward
to this moment with so much anxiety lest my identity should be discovered beforehand, that I felt positively glad
when the time had come. The sense of being overpowered by more force than I could possibly resist was
complete, but I resisted nothing except with my mouth. The doctor offered me the choice of a wooden or steel
gag; he explained elaborately, as he did on most subsequent occasions, that the steel gag would hurt and the
wooden one not, and he urged me not to force him to use the steel gag. But I did not speak nor open my mouth,
so that after playing about for a moment or two with the wooden one he finally had recourse to the steel. He
seemed annoyed at my resistance and he broke into a temper as he plied my teeth with the steel implement. He
found that on either side at the back I had false teeth mounted on a bridge which did not take out. The
superintending wardress asked if I had any false teeth, if so, that they must be taken out; I made no answer and
the process went on. He dug his instrument down on to the sham tooth, it pressed fearfully on the gum. He said
if I resisted so much with my teeth, he would have to feed me through the nose. The pain of it was intense and at
last I must have given way for he got the gag between my teeth, when he proceeded to turn it much more than
necessary until my jaws were fastened wide apart, far more than they could go naturally.
Sham: fake, false

Source B - Solitary confinement is inhumane. I should know – I spent 30 days there by Chandra Bozelko

The isolation of solitary confinement – getting away from the shouts and chaos of the general inmate population
– is almost a relief, for about the first 20 minutes.

Then you realize that the horror-film cliche “no one can hear you scream” has come true. When I spent a month
there in 2008 during my six-year sentence at York Correctional Institution, the staff thought it was funny to push
the white, take-out style boxes that my meals came in off the tray slot before I could catch it, causing food to spill
on the floor. And there was nobody to tell that I was starving.

Solitary confinement cells don’t get cleaned regularly or completely. Tumbleweeds of female hair – mine and
others – skittered around the floor and mixed with the food. As trays were dumped over two weeks, the residue
of meals would build up – the only way I could clean the mess was to scoop the food up and flush it, while my
toilet still worked. I had one towel for my thrice-weekly showers, and scant toilet paper, and I wasn’t going to
waste them wiping up liquid shepherds pie.

1. You need to refer to Source A and Source B for this question:

Use details from both Sources. Write a summary of the differences between Lady Constance and
Chandra Bozelko. 8 marks

2. For this question, you need to refer to the whole of Source A, together with Source B.
Compare how the two writers convey their different attitudes to their experience in prison.
In your answer, you could:
• compare their different attitudes
• compare the methods they use to convey their attitudes
• support your ideas with references to both texts. 16 Marks
24 Marks • 30 Minutes

Source A -Excerpts from "The Cruelest Journey" by Kira Salak Excerpt from Chapter 1
In the beginning, my journeys feel at best ludicrous, at worst insane. This one is no exception. The idea is to
paddle nearly 600 miles on the Niger River in a kayak, alone, from the Malian town of Old Ségou to Timbuktu.
And now, at the very hour when I have decided to leave, a thunderstorm bursts open the skies, sending down
apocalyptic rain, washing away the very ground beneath my feet. It is the rainy season in Mali, for which there
can be no comparison in the world. Lightning pierces trees, slices across houses. Thunder racks the skies and
pounds the earth like mortar fire, and every living thing huddles in tenuous shelter, expecting the world to end.
Which it doesn't. At least not this time. So that we all give a collective sigh to the salvation of the passing storm
as it rumbles its way east, and I survey the river I'm to leave on this morning. Rain or no rain, today is the day for
the journey to begin. And no one, not even the oldest in the village, can say for certain whether I'll͛ get to the end.
"Lets͛ do it,"͟ I say, leaving the shelter of an adobe hut. My guide from town, Modibo, points to the north, to further
storms. He says he will pray for me. It's ͛ the best he can do. To his knowledge, no man has ever completed such
a trip, though a few have tried. And certainly no woman has done such a thing. This morning he took me aside
and told me he thinks Im ͛ crazy, which I understood as concern and thanked him. He told me that the people of
͛
Old Ségou think I'm crazy too, and that only uncanny good luck will keep me safe.

Apocalyptic: complete destruction

Source B - Alice Jackson’s tragic story: When Hurricane Katrina ravaged the Mississippi coast

On Friday night (Aug. 26), some of us boarded up our houses. Others in town were saying that they didn’t want
to “overreact” to the hurricane forecasts. But I was running around like crazy, yelling, “This is a (category) four!”

Saturday, I evacuated to my friend’s house with my 81-year-old mother, my 28-year-old niece and my sister-in-
law. We packed clothes, food and water – plus axes, an extension ladder and flares. That way we could cut our
way out through the roof if necessary. As a reporter, I’d covered too many hurricanes where people drowned in
their attics because they couldn’t escape the rising water.

All night I’d been watching a giant pine tree in a neighbor’s yard. It had been bending mightily, but had stayed
rooted. Suddenly I heard a deafening crack, and I yelled, “Run!” Seconds later the tree smashed through the
house. We had escaped to the master bedroom closet in the center of the house. My sister-in-law hauled a
mattress off the bed and leaned it on top of my mother and my niece. Then we noticed that the walls were
heaving, so we raced around the house, opening windows to relieve the pressure build-up.

Looking outside, we watched in horror as the house behind us turned into what looked like a living, breathing
monster. The roof would lift, the house would expand, and then the roof would fall. Finally, the house exploded.

You need to refer to Source A and Source B for this question:

Use details from both Sources. Write a summary of the differences between Kira Salak and Alice
Jackson. 8 marks

2. For this question, you need to refer to the whole of Source A, together with Source B.
Compare how the two writers convey their different attitudes to the weather.

In your answer, you could:

• compare their different attitudes


• compare the methods they use to convey their attitudes
• support your ideas with references to both texts. 16 Marks
20 Marks • 25 Minutes

Source A: Down and Out in Paris – George Orwell

ON the way to Edbury I told Paddy that I had a friend from whom I could be sure of getting money,
and suggested going straight into London rather than face another night in the spike. But Paddy had
not been in Edbury spike recently, and, tramp-like, he would not waste a nights͛ free lodging. We
arranged to go into London the next morning. I had only a halfpenny, but Paddy had two shillings,
which would get us a bed each and a few cups of tea. The Edbury spike did not differ much from the
one at Romton. The worst feature was that all tobacco was confiscated at the gate, and we were
warned that any man caught smoking would be turned out at once. Under the Vagrancy Act tramps
can be prosecuted for smoking in the spike—in fact, they can be prosecuted for almost anything; but
the authorities generally save the trouble of a prosecution by turning disobedient men out of doors.
There was no work to do, and the cells were fairly comfortable. We slept two in a cell, one up, one
down͛—that is, one on a wooden shelf and one on the floor, with straw palliasses and plenty of
blankets, dirty but not verminous. The food was the same as at Romton, except that we had tea
instead of cocoa. One could get extra tea in the morning, as the Tramp Major was selling it at a
halfpenny a mug, illicitly no doubt. We were each given a hunk of bread and cheese to take away for
our midday meal.

Spike: hostel for the homeless


palliasses: a straw mattress

1.Select four true statements from the list below. 4 marks

A. Orwell had financial reasons for visiting Edbury


B. At the Edbury Spike they had the same confiscation rules as Romton Spike
C. Orwell found the Edbury Spike to be pleasant
D. The sleeping arrangements were crammed and overcrowded
E. Vermin lived in the straw
F. It was possible to obtain more tea by buying it unofficially
G. Lunch was given to the users of the Spike
H. You could purchase a lunch of bread and cheese.

Source B - London is the world’s greatest city; we cannot sit back and do nothing about the
rough sleeping crisis by Sadiq Khan (Mayor of London)

I am committed to tackling London’s housing crisis in whatever form it takes – and the rise in rough
sleeping over recent years is a growing source of shame that we have a moral imperative to stop.

People end up on the street for many different reasons – leaving care or hospital, problems with debt,
unemployment, mental health, family breakup – and so the help they need is varied too. We can
support some rough sleepers, particularly when they have become homeless recently, through
programmes such as No Second Night Out.

In more entrenched cases, a more intensive intervention may be needed, as a one-size-fits-all


approach does not always work. We can promote innovative approaches by making our funding
conditional on achieving results – an approach that has proved successful in helping people access
and remain in stable accommodation.

2. For this question, you need to refer to the whole of Source A, together with Source B.
Compare how the two writers convey their different experiences of homelessness.
In your answer, you could:
• compare their different experiences
• compare the methods they use to convey their attitudes
• support your ideas with references to both texts. 16 Marks
'UN Speech Launching He for She' - Emma Watson • 16 Marks • 20 Minutes

When at 14 I started being sexualized by certain elements of the press. When at 15 my girlfriends started
dropping out of their sports teams because they didn͛t want to appear muscly.
͞ When
͟ at 18 my male friends
were unable to express their feelings. I decided I was a feminist and this seemed uncomplicated to me.
But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word.

Apparently I am among the ranks of women whose expressions are seen as too strong, too aggressive,
isolating, anti-men and, unattractive. Why is the word such an uncomfortable one?

I am from Britain and think it is right that as a woman I am paid the same as my male counterparts. I think
it is right that I should be able to make decisions about my own body. I think it is right that women be
involved on my behalf in the policies and decision-making of my country. I think it is right that socially I am
afforded the same respect as men. But sadly I can say that there is no one country in the world where all
women can expect to receive these rights. No country in the world can yet say they have achieved gender
equality.

1.Select four true statements from the list below. 4 marks

A. Emma Watson was encouraged to become a feminist


B. Emma Watson is concerned about the impact of sexist behaviour upon her male friends
C. The word 'feminist' can have negative associations
D. Pay, health and political representation are concerns of Watson
E. There are many countries that treat men and women equally
F. Watson blames the press entirely for the inequality she experienced
G. Watson believes the press are wrong for representing underage girls in a sexual way
H. Watson believes she is anti-man

2. How does the writer use language to describe her decision to become a feminist? 12 Marks
'I am the Secret Footballer' - The Secret Footballer • 16 Marks • 20 Minutes

A few years ago, I seriously considered giving up football. Sometimes, when the games are coming thick
and fast, and you don't see your family, you aren't playing wonderfully well and the results are poor, it gets
on top of you. I would later come to realise this was depression knocking at the door. But standing in the
tunnel before a match against Liverpool at Anfield, I had a brush with something that Marcel Proust
describes as "a remembrance of things past". As our coach gave each player a ball, I lifted mine up to my
nose and sniffed it. Don't ask me why – I had never done it before as a professional, or since. The ball was
brand new and looked so inviting. The smell took me right back to my council estate and the moment
when my mum and dad bought me one of my first full-size footballs. It suddenly filled me with all the
reasons I'd ever wanted to play the game – it smelled of happy times and familiarity. As the noise outside
grew louder and the opening notes of You'll Never Walk Alone made their way through the tunnel, I told
myself to keep that moment at the front of my mind for as long as possible.

1.Select four true statements from the list below. 4 marks

A. At this point in his career, the footballer was experiencing high levels of success
B. This extract describes a moment in the changing room after a match
C. The footballer cannot explain exactly why he decided to sniff the football
D. The footballer grew up on a council estate
E. The memory made the footballer incredibly sad
F. Sniffing the football evoked memories of his childhood, and his original motivation to play
G. The scent of the football recalled memories of being encouraged by his parents to play
H. This moment encouraged the footballer to not quit his job

2. How does the writer use language to describe how he changed his mind about quitting football? 12
Marks
'Maiden Speech in House of Commons' - Jo Cox • 16 Marks • 20 Minutes

I am sure that many right hon. and hon. Members will claim that their constituencies consist of two halves
or numerous parochial parts; I am another in that respect, and Batley and Spen is very much that kind of
constituency. It is a joy to represent such a diverse community.

Batley and Spen is a gathering of typically independent, no-nonsense and proud Yorkshire towns and
villages. Our communities have been deeply enhanced by immigration, be it of Irish Catholics across the
constituency or of Muslims from Gujarat in India or from Pakistan, principally from Kashmir. While we
celebrate our diversity, what surprises me time and time again as I travel around the constituency is that
we are far more united and have far more in common than that which divides us.

My constituency is also home to Fox’s Biscuits and Lion Confectionery, so I am sure you will not think it an
indulgence, Mr Speaker, if I describe Batley and Spen as a constituency with an industrial heart wrapped
in a very rich and pleasant Yorkshire landscape—geographical, historical and cultural.

However, what many of our businesses are lacking is confidence: confidence to expand; confidence to
borrow; confidence to grow; and the confidence to fuel a real economic recovery that benefits everybody,
offering decent jobs, paying decent wages and bridging the skills gap. Key to changing that situation is a
fundamental shift in attitude towards regional economic regeneration. It is time to give city and county
regions the powers and resources they need to promote growth, and I will happily work with all of those
who are genuinely committed to building an economic powerhouse in the north.

1.Select four true statements from the list below. 4 marks

A. Cox is proud of the mixture of nationalities that contribute to her constituency


B. Cox's constituency is in Wales
C. Although her constituents are originate from a range of geographical locations, she believes
that they are actually very similar
D. Batley and Spen is a manufacturing constituency
E. Cox believes that no other MP can make these claims
F. Cox believes she has a difficult and tiresome job
G. The businesses in her constituency are worried about borrowing money because interest rates
are so high
H. Cox wants to work to help the businesses in her constituency to be able to borrow money to
assist their expansion

2. How does the writer use language to describe how she wants to help businesses in her constituency?
12 Marks
'Maiden Speech in House of Commons' - Jo Cox • 16 Marks • 20 Minutes

I am sure that many right hon. and hon. Members will claim that their constituencies consist of two halves
or numerous parochial parts; I am another in that respect, and Batley and Spen is very much that kind of
constituency. It is a joy to represent such a diverse community.

Batley and Spen is a gathering of typically independent, no-nonsense and proud Yorkshire towns and
villages. Our communities have been deeply enhanced by immigration, be it of Irish Catholics across the
constituency or of Muslims from Gujarat in India or from Pakistan, principally from Kashmir. While we
celebrate our diversity, what surprises me time and time again as I travel around the constituency is that
we are far more united and have far more in common than that which divides us.

My constituency is also home to Fox’s Biscuits and Lion Confectionery, so I am sure you will not think it an
indulgence, Mr Speaker, if I describe Batley and Spen as a constituency with an industrial heart wrapped
in a very rich and pleasant Yorkshire landscape—geographical, historical and cultural.

However, what many of our businesses are lacking is confidence: confidence to expand; confidence to
borrow; confidence to grow; and the confidence to fuel a real economic recovery that benefits everybody,
offering decent jobs, paying decent wages and bridging the skills gap. Key to changing that situation is a
fundamental shift in attitude towards regional economic regeneration. It is time to give city and county
regions the powers and resources they need to promote growth, and I will happily work with all of those
who are genuinely committed to building an economic powerhouse in the north.

1.Select four true statements from the list below. 4 marks

A. Cox is proud of the mixture of nationalities that contribute to her constituency


B. Cox's constituency is in Wales
C. Although her constituents are originate from a range of geographical locations, she believes
that they are actually very similar
D. Batley and Spen is a manufacturing constituency
E. Cox believes that no other MP can make these claims
F. Cox believes she has a difficult and tiresome job
G. The businesses in her constituency are worried about borrowing money because interest rates
are so high
H. Cox wants to work to help the businesses in her constituency to be able to borrow money to
assist their expansion

2. How does the writer use language to describe how she wants to help businesses in her constituency?
12 Marks
24 Marks • 30 Minutes

Source A - Extract from: Every Man for Himself ͛ by Beryl Bainbridge By Bill Hodgson

The orchestra had decamped to the deck outside. And in spite of the cold the cellist wore no gloves and I
marveled that he managed to hold his bow so steady on the strings. There was terrible confusion below, the
passageways jammed with people, their possessions stowed in pillowcases slung across their shoulders. In the
public lounge an untidy circle of men and women surrounded a priest reciting the rosary.

Coming to a bend in the passage near the dormitories, we had to flatten ourselves against the tiled wall as a
dozen or more stokers, faces black with grease and some carrying shovels, swept headlong past. I couldn't help
contrasting their subterranean hell with the Eden above, where, under the twinkling stars, they paced to the
swoon of violins.

subterranean: below the surface

Source B - Upton Rehnberg, 72 Flight: United Airlines flight 232 Crash landing: Sioux City, Iowa

I'd changed on to flight 232 at the last minute in the hope of getting home from a business trip for my son's ninth
birthday. I usually ask for a seat at the back, but 9A, a window seat by the left side emergency exit, had been
one of the last available. If I'd taken my usual seat, I would be dead.

I was sitting in front of a flight attendant and, just over an hour into our journey, I leaned over to her and said
quietly, "The pilot is flying this plane in a very strange way." There had been a loud explosion, but an
announcement had reassured us that we had lost only one engine and everything seemed to return to normal.
The attendant said, softly, "Hydraulics." I didn't know that everything on that plane worked off the hydraulic
system, and it had lost all power.

The flight attendants gave every appearance of business as usual. Then, 30 minutes after the explosion, they
told us to adopt the brace position. They said we should be prepared for the worst.

You need to refer to Source A and Source B for this question:

Use details from both Sources. Write a summary of the differences between Bainbridge and
Rehnberg. 8 marks

2. For this question, you need to refer to the whole of Source A, together with Source B.
Compare how the two writers convey their different experiences of crashes.

In your answer, you could:

• compare their different experiences


• compare the methods they use to convey their experiences
• support your ideas with references to both texts. 16 Marks
16 Marks • 20 Minutes

Source A - A PERSONAL ACCOUNT OF EVACUATION by Alan Day

I woke up that morning feeling fearful of the events to come. I was young to be evacuated. Up to then I had not be
anywhere without my parents except for one or two Sunday school outings. My clothes had been packed in my
regulation rucksack; it was the deluxe version, crudely made of sacking but water- proofed and green coloured supplied
by the school at the cost of 9d, the ordinary ones were brown, sack colour, not water-. proofed and cost 6d. I don’t
remember the journey to school but my mother came with me. I don’t even remember my farewell to my Dad and Sister
but they went off to work as usual. Not many east end dads could afford to lose a day’s work in those days.

At school those of us who were going away assembled in the hall, the other children stayed in the classroom. Each of
us in the hall had our rucksack, our gas-mask in a cardboard box and hung round our necks by a piece of string. Our
hands clasped a paper bag containing the prescribed iron rations, a bar of chocolate, some raisins and an orange. The
lonely fear was soon replaced by a group excitement, just like going on a school outing, but none of us had ever
experienced that. None knew what to expect. Where we were going or how long we would be away. I supposed that
none of us realised what was really happening.

We were grouped into classes and at the appointed hour we marched out of the school, single file and across the road,
it was a main road and the traffic had been stopped by a policeman while a crocodile of several hundred kids crossed
over, there must have been a big hold up for the traffic. There were lots of mums outside the school gates and along the
200 yards of road to the station - my mum was there but I didn’t notice her. I do not remember any kids crying.

Source B - Hamed Shurbaj's account of leaving Syria

His third and final attempt was the most bizarre and horrible of them all. On a two-level boat, the smugglers this time
managed to cram in more than 730 people. "We did not expect to see this many people all at once on the same boat,"
Hamed said.

"They segregated us this time. They put all the African people in the lower level where the engine was located, and on
the upper level they put all the Palestinians, Syrians, and Lebanese," Hamed explained.

Hamed described the situation of this trip as disastrous. "After few hours of sailing in sea, the boat started to sink and
water started to leak inside the boat. We started to bail the water out using buckets for at least 24 hours non stop."

A few hours later, they noticed a helicopter in the horizon. It circled around them in the air for few minutes then left.
"Right after that, we saw a ship with a Danish flag approaching us fast," Hamed said. "While we tried to get close to it,
the big ship hit the nose of our boat and made it sink even faster." He added "People started to jump off the boat, and
for 30 minutes of chaos, there wasn't any kind of rescue happening... After I jumped off the boat, I started to swim
toward the ship. When I finally reached it, I looked back and saw this horrifying scene of all these people fighting for
their lives."

A rescue team had been deployed. It took at least five hours to rescue people, and then only with the aid of the Maltese
coast guard. Nevertheless, for some it was too late. Nine people drowned and 30 others who were in the lower level of
the boat suffocated to death from the smoke from the engine and died, Hamed explained.

The rescue boat dropped them off in Catania, Sicily, where they were put in a camp and warned that they would be
fingerprinted the next day. But early in the morning the very next day, Hamed and a few others managed to escape the
camp to a train station. Hamed was able to make it all the way to Milan, Italy.

1. For this question, you need to refer to the whole of Source A, together with Source B.
Compare how the two writers convey their different experiences of leaving home.

In your answer, you could:

• compare their different experiences


• compare the methods they use to convey their experiences
• support your ideas with references to both texts. 16 Marks
Section B
20 marks (12 content, 8 SPAG) 25 Minutes
1 "School cafeterias space should be rented out to fast food companies, and sell different options like a
food court in a shopping centre."

Write a letter to the parents of your school expressing your point of view on this statement.
2 "In our increasingly global society, modern foreign languages should be given as much teaching time
as English or Maths."

Write an article for your school newspaper expressing your point of view on this statement.
3 "It is impossible to police the use of performance enhancing drugs in sport, therefore we should lift all
bans."

Write an article for a broadsheet newspaper explaining your opinion on this statement.
4 "Students use computers so much in their time outside of school, it is a waste of resources for
schools to pay for computers inside schools for students."

Write a letter to your headmaster explaining your opinion on this statement.


5 "Teenagers should have the option of deleting their online footprint at the age of 18, and erasing all
posting history from the internet."

Write an article for a magazine aimed at parents expressing your point of view on this statement.
6 "The taking of photographs and videos on mobile devices has overtaken the value of real life
interaction; more time is spent recording the moment, rather than enjoying the moment."

Write a blog aimed at teenagers expressing your point of view on this statement.
7 "Driving on U.K. roads is far more dangerous today than 50 years ago, therefore the age to be
allowed to drive should be raised to 21 to reflect the higher risk."

Write an article for a broadsheet newspaper expressing your point of view on this statement.
8 "To cope with budget cuts in education, schools should drop to a four hour teaching day, with the last
hour of each day being used as an American style 'Study Hall' to save money."

Write a letter to the parents of your school expressing your point of view on this statement.
9 "The subjects studied in classrooms have not changed since the 1970s. New subjects need to be
introduced to reflect the change in society."

Write a letter to the headteacher of your school expressing your point of view on this statement.
10 "The only way to make our everyday lives safer would be to arm all police officers."

Write an article for a broadsheet newspaper expressing your point of view on this statement.