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COURSE OUTLINE
Instructor: Jeannine Stanko Semester/Session: Fall 2017

Course Number: ENG101


Course Title: English Composition 1
Course Credits: 3
Lecture hours: 3 Lab hours: Other hours:
Pre-requisite(s): English Placement Test or ENG100 and Reading Placement Test
or successful completion of DVS101 or DVS103
Co-requisite(s): NONE
Course Description:
This is a course that introduces or continues to familiarize students with critical thinking, the principles of academic
writing, and rudimentary research skills. Through the writing process, students refine topics; develop and support
ideas; investigate, evaluate and integrate appropriate sources; edit for effective style and usage; and determine
appropriate approaches for a variety of contexts, audiences, and purposes.
Students must earn a “C” grade or better to register for the next course in this discipline or to use this course as a
prerequisite for a course in another discipline.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:


• Write academic essays that
o Develop a thesis
o Create an organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience and context
o Make valid inferences
o Support ideas with relevant explanation and substantial evidence details
o Integrate and cite information from relevant print and/or electronic sources
o Provide a coherent introduction and conclusion
• Revise drafts to develop or support ideas more clearly, address potential objections, ensure effective transitions
between paragraphs, and correct errors in logic
• Edit and proofread, using standards for formal written English

LISTED TOPICS
Review as Needed:
1. Using standard written English
2. Writing process from prewriting to rewriting
3. Developing ideas and supporting them with details
4. Creating introductions and conclusions
5. Using primary and secondary sources
6. Quoting, summarizing, paraphrasing sources

Further Develop:
1. Evaluating basic library and Internet sources
2. Using examples to clarify ideas vs. proving an idea
3. Avoiding 'cut and paste,' plagiarism and fabrication
4. Revising to accommodate differences in audience, tone, persona
5. Comparing and contrasting
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Introduce:
1. Distinguishing observations, inferences & value judgments
2. Summarizing or reporting a position vs. arguing for or against a position
3. Problem-solving techniques
4. Critiquing the informational or argumentative weaknesses of a document

The student will produce five to seven reading based multi-paragraphed expository and argumentative essays of
increasing difficulty, totaling 15-20 pages for the semester.

REFERENCES, RESOURCES OR LEARNING MATERIALS:


(May be unique to each class)
Current recognized texts, handouts, videos, study sheets, Internet resources and multi-media

Section Dates Days Time Room


Class Section(s) Time & Location: BC85 10/17-12/14 T/H 3:15-5:45PM N311

Instructor: Jeannine Stanko Office Hours: Thursdays 6-7PM


Telephone: 724-396-4158 Office Location: Writing Lab
E-Mail Address: jstanko@ccac.edu

Materials and Resources:


Required Text(s): Reinking, James and Robert Von Der Osten, Strategies for Successful Writing:
Concise Edition.11th ed., Boston: Pearson, 2016.

ISBN# 0-13-411951-7
Required Materials: flash drive, internet access, BlackBoard access, CCAC computer login
Recommended binder or some other form of organization
Material(s): #keepallhandouts
Open Lab, Tutoring, etc. The Learning Assistance Center (N406) provides free tutoring to registered
CCAC students. Students must schedule an appointment to see a tutor
regarding a specific subject.

The Learning Commons (North Wing, 5th floor) is a free service on a walk-in
basis.

Help with Blackboard at 412-237-8700 or help@servicedesk.ccac.edu

Computers available in Computer Lab (S588)

Books and research assistance available in Boyce Library (N411)

Assistance in obtaining or changing I.D.(s)./password(s) in Computer Lab


(S588)

Online grammar and composition resources:


OWL (Online Writing Lab of Purdue University)
dianahacker.com/rules
The Nuts and Bolts of College Writing

Teaching Methods:
The course will include direct instruction in the form of lectures; guided practice to include whole, small, and
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flexible group discussions, in-class writing, in-class grammar activities; and independent practice through
homework assignments, essays, quizzes, and examinations.

In order to be successful in this course, each student should plan to spend 1.5 to 2 hours on classroom
preparation for each hour of class. If the student is in class 3 hours a week, the student should plan to
spend approximately 4.5 to 6 hours per week preparing for class.

Communication:
This course will use BlackBoard. All PowerPoints and handouts will be available on BlackBoard. Grades can
also be accessed via this learning management system. It is the student’s responsibility to secure his or her
login information.

Evaluation Plan:
Your final grade will be determined by dividing the points you have earned by the total points possible to
earn. Rubrics will be given with each assignment to provide a clear understanding of how writing will be
evaluated. Every essay will be thoroughly marked to give as much feedback as possible. Please remember
that students must earn a “C” grade or better in this course in order for it to count as a prerequisite
for another course.

The grading scale is as follows:


100-90% - A; 89-80% - B; 79-70% - C; 69-60% - D; 59-0% - F

Assignment values are as follows:


Exams, Homework, Attendance Newsletters Essays
30% 20% of final grade 47% of final grade
Grammar Final – 100 pts.
Writing Final – 100 pts. Newsletter #1 – 90 pts. Narration – 100 points
Attendance – TBD (min. 100 pts.) Newsletter #2 – 110 pts. Comparison – 100 points
Homework – 30 pts. Causal – 100 points
Argument – 100 points
Mock Works Cited – 70 points

Total – 330 points Total – 200 points Total – 470 points

Attendance:
Students are expected to attend every class. Each class is worth a portion of your final grade. Rough
drafts, in-class work, and quizzes cannot be made up. Any homework assignments due the day of
absence will not be accepted. If absent for a quiz, the mulligan is forfeited. If an essay is submitted
after its due date, the mulligan is forfeited. If you choose to come to class unprepared, you will be
marked absent. For example, in order to participate in the peer review process, you must have a
completed rough draft. In order to earn credit for a rough draft, you must participate in the peer
review process during your class time. You will be considered absent if you are not in class. You will be
considered late if you arrive after I have taken roll. Lateness or early departure of 20 or more minutes
counts as a complete absence. After three late entries or early departure, coming in late or leaving early will
count as an absence. After 2 classes, the final grade will drop 1 letter grade for each subsequent
absence. One class constitutes one hour of instruction.

In accordance with Title IX of the Educations Amendments of 1972, absences due to pregnancy or related
conditions, including recovery from childbirth, shall be excused for as long as the absences are determined
to be medically necessary. Students will be provided with the opportunity to make up any work missed as a
result of such absences, if possible. The College may also offer the student alternatives to making up
missed work, such as but not limited to, retaking a semester, taking part in online instruction, or allowing the
student additional time in a program to continue at the same pace and finish at a later date. For more
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information or requests for accommodations, students should information their instructor(s) and/or contact
Sumana Misra-Zets, Title IX and ADA/504Coordinator, at 412-237-4535 or smisra@ccac.edu.

Homework:
Homework will be assigned periodically, as needed. Late homework will not be accepted.

Newsletters:
After receiving a series of grammar instruction, the newsletters will be submitted with corrections completed
to the covered topics. This process will be completed 2 times throughout the semester. Newsletters must
follow MLA formatting guidelines. Newsletters are cumulative. Newsletters are to be downloaded from
BlackBoard.

Essays:
Essays must follow MLA formatting. Any essay submitted without a rubric forfeits its mulligan. Rubrics are
distributed in class and are available on BlackBoard. Essays must be submitted at the beginning of the
class period to be on time. Due dates for all work are listed on the course plan. No late papers will be
accepted for full credit except in the case of an emergency. Problems with a computer are not an
emergency situation; CCAC has computers for student use.

If you miss class the day a paper is due, email your essay to me as an attachment and copy/paste it into the
body of the email for full credit. The email must be sent prior to the beginning of your class time. I will
not accept essays for full credit when you return to class. When I receive your essay, I will respond to let
you know that it was received. If you do not receive acknowledgement from me, you know that I did not
receive the essay! It is your responsibility to ensure that I receive your essay. Do not wait until the next class
period to resolve this because I will not accept the essay.

Quizzes & Exams:


If absent on the day of a quiz, the mulligan for that quiz is forfeited. Exams may not be made up. If an
emergency arises, it is your responsibility to contact me within 24 hours to make arrangements.

Mulligans:
For each essay one mulligan or do-over will be offered. Any assignment submitted without a rubric
forfeits its mulligan. All mulligans are due before the next assignment in the course outline sequence. Any
essay submitted after the mulligan due date will not be accepted. The mulligan is forfeited if absent on the
day of the original assignment’s due date as listed in the course outline.

When submitting an essay mulligan, the essay showing corrections, the original essay, and its
rubric must be submitted.

Plagiarism:
A plagiarized essay will result in an automatic failure for the assignment. Plagiarism is representing
someone else’s research, writing, or ideas as your own. Depending on the severity of the offense, a
plagiarized essay or assignment may result in course failure and/or academic dismissal from the college.

Miscellaneous:
All electronics (cell phones, iPods, etc.) must be turned off and put away during class. Texting or engaging
in any electronic social networking will result in a class absence. If class is held in a computer lab, students
who choose to engage in internet or computer activities without instructor consent will receive an absence
for that class period.

Students should not be receiving personal calls nor taking restroom breaks during class time. If there is an
emergency or medical problem, please let me know ahead. Otherwise, plan to stay in the room for the
entire time.

Please be aware that it is very disruptive when students talk in class while the instructor is teaching or other
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students are asking questions. Every student should have a copy of the Student Handbook which outlines
acceptable and unacceptable behavior. Any student who demonstrates an inability to conform to acceptable
social conduct will be subject to the disciplinary policies and procedures of the college.

Please remember, it is school policy that children are not permitted in classes.

Drop/ Add/ Withdrawal


Notifying the instructor of your intention to drop or withdraw does NOT count as an official withdrawal from
a course. Procedures for drop/add/withdrawal can be found at www.ccac.edu/registration-services/.
Students receiving financial assistance through grants, loans, and veteran’s benefits should consult with
the Financial Aid or Military and Veterans Service Center before dropping, adding, or withdrawing from
class. Students’ aid may be impacted by a change to the total number of credits in which the student is
enrolled, or by receiving a W grade in one or more classes.

Consult the Academic Calendar on MyCCAC portal for these important deadline dates. Note that courses
that do not meet within the standard 16- and 14-week terms have unique drop/withdrawal deadlines.
Failure to process these forms with the Registration office by the published deadline may result in F
grades and have financial consequences.

Accommodations for Individuals with Disabilities:

The college recognizes its responsibility to provide academic and nonacademic services and programs
equally to individuals with and without disabilities. To this end, the college provides reasonable
accommodations for qualified students and employees with documented disabilities consistent with the
requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, sections 503 & 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and other
federal, state and local laws and regulations. The college maintains an Office of Supportive Services at
each campus location to receive, review and evaluate requests from students who require an
accommodation with respect to their educational program. Students’ requesting reasonable
accommodations due to a documented disability must first register with their campus’ Supportive Services
Office and obtain an official letter identifying approved accommodations to be distributed to their faculty
members.

Attendance Procedure for Pregnancy & Pregnancy Related Conditions:


In accordance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, absences due to pregnancy or related
conditions, including recovery from childbirth, shall be excused for as long as the absences are
determined to be medically necessary. Students will be provided with the opportunity to make up any
work missed as a result of such absences, if possible. For more information or requests for
accommodations, students should inform their instructor(s) and/or contact the Civil Rights Compliance
Officer/Title IX Coordinator, at 412.237.4535 or smisra@ccac.edu.

Attendance Procedure for Religious Observance


The college will make reasonable efforts to accommodate students who must be absent from classes or
miss scheduled exams in order to observe a religious holiday or participate in some other form of
religious observance. Students shall be provided, whenever possible, reasonable opportunity to make up
academic assignments missed due to such absences, unless doing so would create or impose an undue
burden on other students or the College. It shall be the students’ responsibility to provide written notice
via the Request for Accommodation for Religious Observances Form (accessible at
https://www.ccac.edu/nondiscrimination/) to every instructor for each course in which an accommodation
is being requested. For more information contact the Civil Rights Compliance Officer/Title IX Coordinator,
at 412.237.4535 or smisra@ccac.edu.

Chosen First Name Procedure for Students


Many individuals use names other than their legal first name to identify themselves for a variety of
personal and/or cultural reasons. The college seeks to provide an inclusive and non-discriminatory
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environment by making it possible for students to use a chosen first name on college records when a
legal name is not required. Chosen first names may not be applicable in certain programs due to the
requirements of accreditation organizations and clinical sites. For more information, please see the
Student Handbook (accessible at https://www.ccac.edu/Academics/Academic-Rules-and-
Regulations/CCAC-Student-Handbook/).

MyCCAC Portal and Academic Email


The MyCCAC portal provides access to all course, grade and administrative information at
https://my.ccac.edu. All email correspondence regarding your academic work is to be conducted to and
from your CCAC academic email account.

Access your course information, email, Student Handbook, incident


reporting and college services at:
https://my.ccac.edu

Course Outline Corrections:


During the semester/session, reasonable changes to the course outline may be academically appropriate.
Students will be notified of these adjustments by the instructor in a timely manner.
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The following is the tentative class schedule for the Fall 2017 semester. In the event of canceled or shortened days due to severe
weather or emergencies, the schedule may be modified.

Course Plan:

Class
Lesson or Topic Learning Activities Assignments Evaluation
Week/Date
Syllabus Review Introduction, Pair Share Thoroughly read syllabus Grammar Pre-test
Tuesday, Grammar Pre-test
October 17

Writing: A First Look, Lecture, group work Read chapter 1 (pgs. 2-18), Writing Pre-test
Planning and Drafting chapter 3 (pgs 35-56), chapter 4
Your Paper: Exploration, (pgs. 57-81), chapter 5 (pgs.
Thursday,
Revising and Editing 82-103)
October 19
Your Paper: Courageous
Transformations,
Paragraphs, MLA
MLA, Narration: Lecture, group work, Read chapter 21 (pgs. 395- Mock Works Cited
Tuesday, Relating Events, shifts in-class writing 421), Read chapter 8
October 24

Active verbs, Group work, lecture, Read pgs. 607-719, Dan Literature Analysis
prepositions, pronouns discussion Greenburg’s “Sound and Fury,” paragraph Final Copy
Reading discussion, run- Maya Angelou’s “Momma’s
Thursday,
ons, fragments, Encounter,” and Marta Salinas’
October 26
conferences “The Scholarship Jacket” (pgs.
464-474), chapter 6 (pgs104-
116), handbook (pgs. 607-719)
Writer’s workshop, Peer review, lecture, Read chapter 6 (pgs104-116), Narrative Analysis
Tuesday, sentence variety discussion handbook (pgs. 607-719) Rough Draft
October 31

Comparison: Showing Group work, lecture, Read chapter 13 (pgs. 219- Narrative Analysis Final
Relationships, Reading discussion 231), Copy
Thursday,
discussion,
November 2
capitalization, writer’s
conferences
Comparison Reading Jigsaw discussions, Read Chris Lee’s “Invasion of Comparison Analysis
Discussion, lecture, discussion the Body Builders,” Richard Rough Draft
Capitalization, Writer’s Rodriquez’s “Private Language,
Tuesday, conferences Public Language,”
November 7 or Henry Jenkins’s “Art for the
Digital Age” (pgs. 527-537),
chapter 6 (pgs104-116),
handbook (pgs. 607-719)
Writer’s workshop, Peer review, lecture, Read chapter 14 (pgs. 232- Newsletter #1 due
who/whom, apostrophes, discussion 246), chapter 6 (pgs104-116), Comparison Analysis
Thursday,
Cause and Effect: handbook (pgs. 607-719) Final Copy
November 9
Explaining Why,
quotation punctuation
Tuesday, Cause & Effect reading Group work, lecture, Read Caroline Knapp’s “Why Causal Analysis Rough
November 14 discussion, commas, discussion We Keep Stuff,” Chris Draft
writer’s conferences Mooney’s “The Science of
Why We Don’t Believe
Science,” or Luscombe &
Stinchfield’s “Why We Flirt”
(pgs. 543-557), chapter 6
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Class
Lesson or Topic Learning Activities Assignments Evaluation
Week/Date
(pgs104-116), handbook (pgs.
607-719)
Writer’s workshop, Peer review, lecture, Read Chapter 16 (pgs. 263- Causal Analysis Final
Thursday, semicolons, colons, discussion 301), chapter 6 (pgs104-116), Copy
November 16 Argument: Convincing handbook (pgs. 607-719)
Others

Reading discussion, Group work, lecture, Read Marissa Brown’s Argument Analysis
other punctuation, discussion “Teacher Natalie Munroe Has a Rough Draft
writer’s conferences Right to Call Kids Lazy and
Rude,” Jonathan Zimmerman’s
Tuesday, “When Teachers Talk out of
November 28 School,” Byron York’s “A
Carefully Crafted Immigration
Law in Arizona,” or Conor
Friedersdorf’s “Immigration
Policy Gone Loco” (pgs. 579-
588), chapter 6 (pgs104-116),
handbook (pgs. 607-719)
Writer’s workshop, Peer review, lecture, Read chapter 6 (pgs104-116), Argument Analysis
Thursday, parallelism, misplaced discussion handbook (pgs. 607-719) Final Copy
November 30 and dangling modifiers,
numbers

Homophones, commonly Lecture, group Read chapter 6 (pgs104-116), Newsletter #2 due


confused words, discussion, Review handbook (pgs. 607-719),
Tuesday,
appropriate language, activities Review activities
December 5
exact words,
streamlining, cumulative
grammar review
Cumulative grammar Testing Study Grammar Final
Thursday, assessment
December 7

Tuesday, December 12 @ 3:00-5:00PM Writing Final & Grammar Final corrections

wjp10/24/06

Approved by Academic Deans 10/24/2006


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Newsletter Corrections #1

Directions: Following in-class direct instruction and practice, proofread the newsletters. The
newsletters can be downloaded from Blackboard in Word format. The purpose of this assignment is to
practice proofreading skills by systematically applying grammar rules to correct and refine the
newsletters. This assignment should also show students the importance of following grammar rules in
every major.

A – 10 pts. B – 8 pts. C – 7 pts. D – 6 pts. F – 5 pts.


All 1 2 3 4 or more
MLA format characteristics characteristic characteristics characteristics characteristics
apparent is weak or are weak or are weak or are weak or
missing missing missing missing
All 1 2 3 4 or more
Active verbs characteristics characteristic characteristics characteristics characteristics
apparent is weak or are weak or are weak or are weak or
missing missing missing missing
All 1 2 3 4 or more
ending characteristics characteristic characteristics characteristics characteristics
prepositions apparent is weak or are weak or are weak or are weak or
missing missing missing missing
All 1 2 3 4 or more
shifts characteristics characteristic characteristics characteristics errors in
apparent is weak or are weak or are weak or grammar and
missing missing missing mechanics
Pronoun & All 1 2 3 4 or more
Antecedent characteristics characteristic characteristics characteristics characteristics
Agreement apparent is weak or are weak or are weak or are weak or
missing missing missing missing
All 1 2 3 4 or more
Fragments characteristics characteristic characteristics characteristics characteristics
apparent is weak or are weak or are weak or are weak or
missing missing missing missing
All 1 2 3 4 or more
Run-ons characteristics characteristic characteristics characteristics characteristics
apparent is weak or are weak or are weak or are weak or
missing missing missing missing
All 1 2 3 4 or more
Sentence characteristics characteristic characteristics characteristics characteristics
Variety apparent is weak or are weak or are weak or are weak or
missing missing missing missing
All 1 2 3 4 or more
Capitalization characteristics characteristic characteristics characteristics characteristics
apparent is weak or are weak or are weak or are weak or
missing missing missing missing
EARNED:
90 Points Total
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Newsletter Corrections #2

Directions: Following in-class direct instruction and practice, continue to proofread the same newsletters used in the first
submission. The newsletters can be downloaded from Blackboard in Word format. The purpose of this assignment is to
practice proofreading skills by systematically applying grammar rules to correct and refine the newsletters. This
assignment should also show students the importance of following grammar rules in every major. Since this is a cumulative
assignment, all previous topics such as MLA format, active verbs, ending in prepositions, shifts, pronoun & antecedent
agreement, fragments, run-ons, sentence variety, and capitalization will be assessed in addition to the following topics.

A –20 pts. B – 16 pts. C – 14 pts. D – 12 pts. F – 10 pts.


All 1 characteristic 2 characteristics 3 characteristics 4 or more
Previous characteristics is weak or are weak or are weak or characteristics
grammar apparent missing missing missing are weak or
components missing

A – 10 pts. B – 8 pts. C – 7 pts. D – 6 pts. F – 5 pts.


All 1 characteristic 2 characteristics 3 characteristics 4 or more
Who/whom characteristics is weak or are weak or are weak or characteristics
apparent missing missing missing are weak or
missing
All 1 characteristic 2 characteristics 3 characteristics 4 or more errors
Apostrophes characteristics is weak or are weak or are weak or in grammar and
apparent missing missing missing mechanics
All 1 characteristic 2 characteristics 3 characteristics 4 or more
Quotation characteristics is weak or are weak or are weak or characteristics
punctuation apparent missing missing missing are weak or
missing
All 1 characteristic 2 characteristics 3 characteristics 4 or more
Commas characteristics is weak or are weak or are weak or characteristics
apparent missing missing missing are weak or
missing
All 1 characteristic 2 characteristics 3 characteristics 4 or more
Semicolons & characteristics is weak or are weak or are weak or characteristics
colons apparent missing missing missing are weak or
missing
All 1 characteristic 2 characteristics 3 characteristics 4 or more
Parenthesis, characteristics is weak or are weak or are weak or characteristics
brackets, apparent missing missing missing are weak or
ellipses, slashes, missing
dashes &
hyphens

All 1 characteristic 2 characteristics 3 characteristics 4 or more


parallelism characteristics is weak or are weak or are weak or characteristics
apparent missing missing missing are weak or
missing
Misplaced & All 1 characteristic 2 characteristics 3 characteristics 4 or more
dangling characteristics is weak or are weak or are weak or characteristics
modifiers apparent missing missing missing are weak or
missing
Homophones, All 1 characteristic 2 characteristics 3 characteristics 4 or more
commonly characteristics is weak or are weak or are weak or characteristics
confused words, apparent missing missing missing are weak or
numbers, missing
appropriate
language, exact
words,
streamlining
EARNED:
110 Points Total
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THINK PINK. THINK AGAIN!

You wake up and on your morning commute the city skyline is illuminated in pink. You walk into the office and your
coworkers are sporting hot pink shirts and buttons. At lunch you see those same coworkers munching way on KFC
from a pink bucket and washing it down with pink bottles of Pepsi. After lunch your boss calls a team meeting
because Katherine was just diagnosed with breast cancer, the third coworker this year, so he rallies the troops to
support her by “baking a dozen for the cure” and wearing even morepink tomorrow. you come home exhausted from
the day and put on Monday night football to sell all of your favorite athletes, wearing what other than pink. You say to
yourself “If I didn’t know better I think I have been pink washed”.

The Pink Campaign is in the Epicenter of a Bad Health Paradigm

When you believe that the human body was created with flaws, that we are destined for suffering and cancer, then
your approach to health comes from the defensive and not the offensive. If you believe that more pink is the solution
to our countries cancer epidemic you are participating in this flawed thinking. Here is the problem with pink – it
represents all that is wrong with allopathic western medicine and the theory that you will get cancer, there is nothing
you can do – so find it early keep your fingers crossed and hope for the best. The majority of money outside of
marketing and huge salaries for their top personnel (I bet their checks are even pink) goes to early detection of cancer
with mammograms and treatment with drugs and surgery. One of those drugs, Tamoxifen, created by AstraZeneca
(whom the pink campaign owns stock in) has a black label listing because it is a known to cause uterine cancer.
http://ww5.komen.org/BreastCancer/Tamoxifen.html Studies have shown that women whom receive the most
mammograms have he highest incidence of breast cancer because of the high amount of concentrated radiation
directly into breast tissue. Susan G. Komen also has a very close financial tie to EG and lists them as million dollar
contributer on their website http://ww5.komen.org/MeetPartners.aspx GE just so happens to make mammography
machines. http://pubs.rsna.org/doi/full/10.1148/radiol.10100570 The money to fund such a campaign comes from
corporations whom pink up their products like a bucket of fried chicken from KFC and beauty products with known
carcinogens on the ingredient list. Fighting cancer with known carcinogens-insane – however justified by believing in
a flawed health paradigm that the body was created unintelligantly with flaws and we are destined for suffering
disease and cancer.

Maximized Living The Health Paradigm That is Sweeping the Nation

Now to the other end of the health paradigm that is centered around the belief that the human body is a self
regulating self healing mechanism and needs no help to survive and thrive – just no interference with its ability to do
so. What causes the interference in the body’s ability to heal? Subluxation in the spine choking off the brain from the
body, a poor diet, lack of oxygen to the cells from a sedentary life style, a toxic overload of our cells and organs from
living in such a toxic world, and the belief in the wrong health paradigm – sound familiar? When we participate in the
correct paradigm of health – we no longer need to be afraid. We understand that cancer is not caused by a lack of
mammograms, chemo and radiation – cancer is caused by a body that is unable to heal itself. We no longer need to
surround ourselves in pink to feel safe from cancer; because we innately understand that we are destined for health
not disease. Our model of health is your gateway to a long and fruitful life far from the oncology ward.

Let’s put an end to this pink washing madness and create a community of Cancer Killers. Someone once said that a
“small group of determined individuals can change the world”.
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A Guide to be “Healthy for Holidays”!
And so it begins November has arrived and we are officially in the “Holidays”, that exciting time of the year when we
get to spend time with family, friends and loved ones – but let’s be honest, that time is usually spent overindulging in
food, drink, and spending. Add the stress of picking the perfect gift with little or no time to do so and we have created
the perfect storm for a health disaster! We tend to celebrate the holidays from October 31 st until the first week of
January for simplicity sake let’s consider that a total of 60 days celebrating. Add another 30 days throughout the year
celebrating birthdays, anniversaries, national holidays, national doughnut day etc. and you have spent a total of 90
days – an entire 25% out of your calendar year neglecting your health! If you add all those “Holidays” up an entire 10
years of your first 40 on earth are spent overindulging during the holiday season – no wonder we suffer from the
most heart disease, cancer and diabetes than any other people on the face of the planet!

Research shows that the average American will gain between 1-5lbs over the Holidays that they will never loose. Add
up a decade of this behavior and you have watched your weight increase 10, 20, 30, 40, 50lbs in a decade’s time!
Much of your middle aged weight gain can be a direct result of what you have done during a lifetime of celebrating
the Holiday season.

The Holidays are a designated time out of our year to celebrate and appreciate God’s blessings upon us. Today the
holidays have resulted in a time dedicated to decreasing your life expectancy as well as your God given potential.
Clearly a misrepresentation of what the Holidays are all about.

Of the thousands of people I have consulted with about their health not one of them had said, “”I wish I would have
spent less time focusing on my health.” In fact when I sit down and get eye to eye and heart to heart with someone in
the middle of a health crisis they undoubtedly make the realization that they had spent too much time focusing on
the things that didn’t matter – getting a cookie recipe just right, serving the right bottle of wine at a party, finding the
perfect gift, and having the tree look better than last year. Not that there is inherently anything wrong with the above
list – but when that gets the attention and your health gets put on the back burner people get hurt. Ask any child
what they would rather have, mom and dad, grandma and grandpa wound for an extra ten Christmas’s, or the perfect
ham, cookie, outfit or toy – and I believe you will have your answer to what is important this holiday season.

Here is the secret to a happy holiday season – enjoy it! Spend 6-12 days celebrating and overindulging (I will) not the
60 days the rest of America will be celebrating. After your overindulgent days make sure to exercise, follow the
advanced plan for a week by cutting all sugars and refined carbohydrates while focusing on increasing high quality
saturated fats, get plenty of rest simply scheduling a 20 minute power nap can drastically improve your health and
cognitive function, take extra supplements, vitamin D3 at 10,000 IU’s will keep your immune system strong and
curcumin and Indian gooseberry will aid in decreasing inflammation caused by “holiday foods” both curcumin and
Indian Gooseberry can be found in our Daily Defense formulation. Most importantly schedule extra adjustments (I
will). Like I said, I never hear, “I wish I would have spent less time focusing on my health.” I almost always hear, “I wish
I would have met you years ago.” The perfect gift is the gift that keeps on giving a true health care system that
empowers an individual to extend their years and live out their God given potential. Give that gift to someone you
care about this holiday season.
Page 13 of 13
Proofreading Guide
1. Circle all “be” verbs.
2. Circle the prepositions that end sentences.
3. Check the verb tenses to ensure that none of the verbs shift.
4. Ensure that there aren’t any shifts from a statement to a question or vice versa.
5. Underline all pronouns. Check the pronoun’s antecedent to ensure that it exists. Ensure that the
pronoun and antecedent align in singularity and plurality.
6. Double check that there aren’t any fragments or run-ons. Ensure the existence of sentence variety.
7. Check the application of capitalization rules.
8. Test the homophones their/there/they’re, you’re/your, two/to/too
9. Cross out any inflated phrases, meaningless phrases (ie. due to the fact that), and clichés. Check for
offensive and sexist language.
10. Ensure that all apostrophes are used correctly. Remember – apostrophes show only possession or
omission.
11. Look for dependent and transitional words (ie. When, therefore, secondly). Ensure that commas are
used after the dependent phrase or word. Do the inversion test.
12. Look for multiple adjectives describing a noun. Use the And Test to determine whether or not
commas are needed between the adjectives.
13. Look for extra information not needed for understanding the sentence. Use commas, dashes, or
parenthesis to offset this extra information.
14. Highlight all of the FANBOYS. If the FANBOY is between two complete sentences, make sure that a
comma is before the FANBOY. If the FANBOY is not between two complete sentences, ensure that a
comma is not used before the FANBOY.
15. Look for colons. Make sure that a complete sentence is before the colon. After the colon should be
either another complete sentence or a list.
16. Look for semicolons. Make sure that the semicolon is between two complete sentences or is used to
separate items in a list already containing commas.
17. Check hyphen usage. Hyphens are used when two or more words are used together as an adjective
before a noun; between fractions and numbers; prefixes all-, ex-, self-; the suffix –elect; and between
double or triple letters.
18. Are all quotation marks used in pairs? Make sure that any shorter works like short stories, poems, and
songs are surrounded by quotation marks. Make sure that all direct quotations are placed inside
quotation marks as well.
19. Check for parallelism in all items in a series, in items with conjunctions, in items with correlative
conjunctions. Make sure that all function words (by, to, that, because) are repeated to clarify parallels.
20. Look for limiting modifiers (only, even, almost, just, nearly) and place in front of the verb only if it’s
the word being modified. Make sure that modifying words and phrases are placed adjacent to the
words being further described. Check for split infinitives, dangling modifiers, and squinting
modifiers.
21. MLA