You are on page 1of 21

Mgmt 120

Management of Operations

Technique Review for Unit 4 ­ Allocation of Scarce
Resources

This section contains study problems for the following topics. 

• Project Management

•Linear Programming Formulation

•Linear Programming Output Interpretation

Answers to these problems are found in the back of this section. 
1. Draw the network for the following projects: 

a. the project contains the following activities: 
Activity      Immediate Predecessor
A none
B none
C A
D A
E A
F B,C
G D
H E
I F
J G,H,I

b. Activity      Immediate Predecessor 
A none
B A
C B
D B
E A
F C
G D
H E

Project Management ­ 2
2. The following information is available about a project. 

   Time
 Activity     
   Imm. Pred. 
        
   (days)
A none 2
B none 5
C A 3
D A 4
E B 4
F B 3
G C, D 2
H D, E, F 6
I G, H 4

a. Draw the network diagram for this project
b. Find the critical path and the early and late start and finish times for each activity.  

Project Management ­ 3
3. An advertising project manager has developed the network diagram shown below 
along with time information for each of the activities.  

Finish
A E
Start G
B C

Activity optimistic most likely pessimistic


A 1 2 3
B 4 6 8
C 3 3 3
D 2 8 10
E 3 6 9
F 1 8 15
G 4 5 6

a. compute the expected times and variances for each of the activities.
b. calculate the activity slack times and the determine the critical path.
c. what is the probability of completing the project within 18 weeks? (consider only 
the critical path, not other paths that are near critical) 

Project Management ­ 4
4. The four activities described in the table below are on the critical path.  Times are 
in days.  (Other paths are not close to the critical time and can be ignored)

Activity optimistic most likely pessimistic


A 4 7 10
B 8 10 14
E 2 4 6
G 7 8 9

a. What is the probability of completing the project in 32 days?

b. For what due date can one be 90% sure of completion on time? 

Project Management ­ 5
5. Information concerning a project is given below.  Indirect project costs amount to 
$250 per day and the late penalty for the contractor is $300 per day late.  The due date is 
day 15.  

 a. Find the minimum cost schedule.

Activit Imm. Normal Normal Crash time Crash cost


y Pred time cost
A none 4 $1000 3 $1100
B none 6 800 3 2000
C A,B 3 600 2 800
D B 2 1500 1 2000
E C,D 5 700 3 1200
F E 2 1300 1 1400
G E 1 900 1 900
H G 4 100 2 900

b. find the minimum time schedule that costs the least.

Project Management ­ 6
6. The Olmsted Center is planning to make cookies for sale to students.  They will 
make two kinds of cookies: "plain" cookies and "sweet" cookies.  Both will use the same 
ingredients, but in different proportions.  The requirements for a batch of plain cookies 
and a batch of sweet cookies are shown below.  The Center makes a profit of 50¢ on each
batch of plain cookies and 90¢ on each batch of sweet cookies.  They have 7 pints of 
milk, 12 lb. of flour and 150 oz of sugar on hand.  How many batches of each type of 
cookies should be produced to maximize profit?  Formulate this as a linear programming 
problem.

plain sweet
Milk 1 pt 1 pt
Flour 2 lbs 1 lb
Sugar 10 oz 30 oz

7. The Philadelphia Casting Co. turns our small replicas of the Liberty Bell to sell to 
tourists.  They are planning to make a run of lead bells and a run of pewter bells.  They 
have two hours (120 minutes) of production time available for this run.  To make a set of 
pewter bells takes 30 mins. of production time.  To make a set of lead bells takes 10 
mins. of production time.  Either set of bells takes two lb. of lead.  A set of pewter bells 
requires 2 lbs of tin in the alloy.  Lead bells require no tin.  Philadelphia Casting has 
earmarked 16 lbs of lead and 6 lbs of tin for this project.  How many sets of lead bells 
and how many sets of pewter bells should they make to maximize their total profit if they
make $6 on a set of lead bells and $5 on a set of pewter bells?  Formulate this as a linear 
programming problem.

LP Formulation ­ 7
8. The Barclay Company produces industrial gases.  The process which creates their 
desirable x1 gas, also produces an undesirable noxious chemical, x2.  In fact the amount 
of x2 produced is never less than one fifth of the amount of x1 created.  Although a unit 
of x1 makes a net contribution to profit of $10.00, it costs the company $1.00 to dispose 
of each unit of x2 turned out.  
The monthly demand for x1 will be no less than 8,000 units.  The production 
department has 300 refining hours per month available to supply this demand.  Each 1000
units of x1 produced requires 20 refining hours.  Each 1000 units of x2 produced requires
15 refining hours.  What is the optimal production policy for the Barclay Company?  
Formulate this as a linear programming problem.

9. An old woodworker has just 2 years left until he plans to retire.  He plans to work a
total of 4500 hours total in those two years.  During the time he wants to use only the 
wood that he still has on hand, namely 25 oak boards, and 30 pine boards.  He will stick 
to his two specialty pieces, rocking chairs and coffee tables.  Each rocker uses .2 of an 
oak board and .05 of a pine board.  Rockers take 50 hours of work time.  End tables use .
2 of an oak board and .3 of a pine board and take only 15 hours of the woodworkers time.
The woodworker has also already accepted orders for 10 rockers.  The revenue made on 
the sale of the rockers is $400 and the revenue made on the sale of tables is $200.  
Formulate a linear programming model to determine how many tables and how many 
rockers to make so as to maximize the woodworker's revenue.  

LP Formulation ­ 8
10. Answer these questions using the output on the following page.  

a. What are the optimum amounts of pipe type 1 and 2 to make?

b. Of the three resources, which one would not entirely be consumed with the suggested 
production quantities?

c. If it were possible to schedule overtime to obtain more extrusion hours, but the cost of the 
overtime was $12 per hour, would it be profitable to do so?

d. Suppose that the profit contribution of type 2 pipe dropped from $40.00 to $35.00, would 
this mean that the current solution is still best? 

e. Does the computer printout tell us what to do if 5 more packaging hours became available?

f. How much would the profit increase with 2 more hours of packaging time?
 

g. How much would you be willing to pay for additional additive mix?

11. Answer the following questions based on the second output following.  The Trim­Look 
Company makes several lines of skirts, dresses, and sport coats for women.  Recently it was 
suggested that the company reevaluate its South Islander Line and allocate its resources to those 
products that would maximize contribution to profits and overhead.  Each product must pass 
through the cutting and sewing departments.  In addition, each product in the South Islander line 
requires the same polyester fabric.  The following data were collected for the study.
Processing  Time (hr)  Material
Product Cutting Sewing (yd)
Skirt 1 1 1
Dress 3 4 1
Sport Coat 4 6 4

a. What is the optimum number of each kind of garment to produce?

b. How much would the profit of skirts have to increase before the optimal solution would 
recommend making them?

c. What is the profit if the optimal number of garments is made?

d. What resources limited the solution from being any higher?

e. Suppose extra material could be obtained at $2 per yard,  would it be worthwhile to obtain 
extra material at this price?

LP Output Analysis ­ 9
f. Suppose that the profit margin of dresses went up by $4, how would that effect the optimal 
solution?
 

LP Output Analysis ­ 10
Output for problem 10 
A B C D E F G H
1 Pipe problem
2 Decision is how many hundred feet of pipe to make of each of two types of pipe
3 Type 1 Type 2
4 Amount 3 6 Total
5 Profit per 34 40 342
6
7 Resources total used available
8 Additive mix 2 1 12 16
9 Extrusion hours 4 6 48 48
10 Packaging hours 2 2 18 18

Microsoft Excel 8.0e Answer Report

Target Cell (Max)


Cell Name Original Value Final Value
$E$5 Profit per Total 0 342

Adjustable Cells
Cell Name Original Value Final Value
$C$4 Amount Type 1 0 3
$D$4 Amount Type 2 0 6

Constraints
Cell Name Cell Value Formula Status Slack
$E$8 Additive mix total used 12 $E$8<=$F$8 Not Binding 4
$E$9 Extrusion hours total used 48 $E$9<=$F$9 Binding 0
$E$10 Packaging hours total used 18 $E$10<=$F$10 Binding 0
$C$4 Amount Type 1 3 $C$4>=0 Not Binding 3
$D$4 Amount Type 2 6 $D$4>=0 Not Binding 6

Excel 8.0e Sensitivity Report

Adjustable Cells
Final Reduced Objective Allowable Allowable
Cell Name Value Cost Coefficient Increase Decrease
$C$4 Amount Type 1 3 0 34 6 7.333333333
$D$4 Amount Type 2 6 0 40 11 6

Constraints
Final Shadow Constraint Allowable Allowable
Cell Name Value Price R.H. Side Increase Decrease
$E$8 Additive mix total used 12 0 16 1E+30 4
$E$9 Extrusion hours total used 48 3 48 6 8
$E$10 Packaging hours total used 18 11 18 2 2

LP Output Analysis ­ 11
Output for problem 11
A B C D E F G
1 Clothing prob.
2 Decision is how many items of each clothing type to make
3 skirts dresses coats
4 Number made 0 20 10 Total
5 Profit 5 17 30 640
6
7 Resources used total used available
8 cutting time 1 3 4 100 100
9 sewing time 1 4 6 140 180
10 cloth 1 1 4 60 60

Microsoft Excel 8.0e Answer Report

Target Cell (Max)


Cell Name Original Value Final Value
$F$5 Profit Total 0 640

Adjustable Cells
Cell Name Original Value Final Value
$C$4 Number made skirts 0 0
$D$4 Number made dresses 0 20
$E$4 Number made coats 0 10

Constraints
Cell Name Cell Value Formula Status Slack
$F$8 cutting time total used 100 $F$8<=$G$8 Binding 0
$F$9 sewing time total used 140 $F$9<=$G$9 Not Binding 40
$F$10 cloth total used 60 $F$10<=$G$10 Binding 0
$C$4 Number made skirts 0 $C$4>=0 Binding 0
$D$4 Number made dresses 20 $D$4>=0 Not Binding 20
$E$4 Number made coats 10 $E$4>=0 Not Binding 10
Microsoft Excel 8.0e Sensitivity Report

Adjustable Cells
Final Reduced Objective Allowable Allowable
Cell Name Value Cost Coefficient Increase Decrease
$C$4 Number made skirts 0 -2.5 5 2.5 1E+30
$D$4 Number made dresses 20 0 17 5.5 9.5
$E$4 Number made coats 10 0 30 38 7.333333333

Constraints
Final Shadow Constraint Allowable Allowable
Cell Name Value Price R.H. Side Increase Decrease
$F$8 cutting time total used 100 4.75 100 32 40
$F$9 sewing time total used 140 0 180 1E+30 40
$F$10 cloth total used 60 2.75 60 40 26.66666667

LP Output Analysis ­ 12
12. Answer the following questions based on the output on the following page. The 
problem is the Old Woodworker case from problem 4.  

a. What is the optimum number of rockers to make?

b. How much money will be made on tables?

c. How much wood is left over?

d. What does the surplus on the orders constraint  signify?

e. Suppose that oak boards cost $150.  Would it be worthwhile for the woodworker to
buy some?  

f. How much would the woodworker be willing to pay an assistant who could 
perform work at the same rate as he himself?

g. Suppose that the price of tables increased by 100 dollars, would that change the 
optimal solution?
                   

LP Output Analysis ­ 13
Output for problem 12
A B C D E F
1 Woodworker problem
2 Decide how many tables and how many rockers to make.
3 rockers tables
4 Amount 75 50 Total
5 profit 400 200 40000
6
7 Resource use total used available
8 oak boards 0.2 0.2 25 25
9 pine boards 0.05 0.3 18.75 30
10 labor hours 50 15 4500 4500
11 min rockers 1 0 75 10

Microsoft Excel 8.0e Answer Report

Target Cell (Max)


Cell Name Original Value Final Value
$E$5 profit Total 0 40000

Adjustable Cells
Cell Name Original Value Final Value
$C$4 Amount rockers 0 75
$D$4 Amount tables 0 50

Constraints
Cell Name Cell Value Formula Status Slack
$E$8 oak boards total used 25 $E$8<=$F$8 Binding 0
$E$9 pine boards total used 18.75 $E$9<=$F$9 Not Binding 11.25
$E$10 labor hours total used 4500 $E$10<=$F$10 Binding 0
$E$11 min rockers total used 75 $E$11>=$F$11 Not Binding 65
$C$4 Amount rockers 75 $C$4>=0 Not Binding 75
$D$4 Amount tables 50 $D$4>=0 Not Binding 50

Microsoft Excel 8.0e Sensitivity Report


Adjustable Cells
Final Reduced Objective Allowable Allowable
Cell Name Value Cost Coefficient Increase Decrease
$C$4 Amount rockers 75 0 400 266.6666667 200
$D$4 Amount tables 50 0 200 200 80

Constraints
Final Shadow Constraint Allowable Allowable
Cell Name Value Price R.H. Side Increase Decrease
$E$8 oak boards total used 25 571.4285714 25 5.526315789 7
$E$9 pine boards total used 18.75 0 30 1E+30 11.25
$E$10 labor hours total used 4500 5.714285714 4500 1750 1575
$E$11 min rockers total used 75 0 10 65 1E+30

LP Output Analysis ­ 14
Answers:
1.  a
E H
J
D G
A

C
I
B F

   b.
C F
B
D G end
A

E H

Answers ­ 15
2. 

2 C 5
10 3 13
0 A 2 6 G 8
3 2 5 13 2 15
2 D 6 15 I 19
Start Finish
5 4 9 15 4 19

9 H 15
9 6 15
5 E 9
0 B 5 5 4 9
0 5 5

5 F 8
6 3 9

 activity          
   slack
A 3
B 0
C 8
D 3
E 0
F 1
G 7
H 0
I 0

Critical path is B ­ E ­ H ­ I 

3. a.
Activity te 2
A 2 .1111
B 6 .4444
C 3 0
D 7.3333 1.7778
E 6 1
F 8 5.444

Answers ­ 16
G 5 .1111

b.

2 D 9.3

0 A 2 12.7 7.3 20
7 2 9
9 E 15
Start 9 6 15
Finish
15 G 20
15 5 20
6 C 9
0 B 6 6 3 9
0 6 6

6 F 14
7 8 15

Critical path is B ­ C ­ E ­ G

c.   mean time for critical path is 20
variance is .444 + 0 + 1 + .1111 = 1.555
standard deviation of path time is = 1.25.
z = = ­1.60
P(z) = .0548
About a 5.5% chance of completing by day 18.  

4. 
Activity te 2
A 7 1
B 10.333 1
E 4 .444
G 8 .111

a. critical path mean time is = 29.3 days

z = = = 1.69

P(z) = 95%

Answers ­ 17
b. 90% => z = 1.28, from normal table;    = = 1.60

T = 29.3 + 1.28 (1.60) = 31.3 days.

5.  
Activity days cost to cost per
crashable crash day to
crash
A 1 100 100
B 3 1200 400
C 1 200 200
D 1 500 500
E 2 500 250
F 1 100 100
G 0 ­ ­
H 2 800 400
a. 
Paths:    Normal Time    Crash C by 1  Crash E by 2
ACEF 14 13 11
ACEGH 17 16 14
BCEF 16 15 13
BCEGH 19 18 16
BDEF 15 15 13
BDEGH   18 18 16

Longest path is BCEGH , time =19.  C is the cheapest to crash.  Cost to crash is 200 per 
day.  Savings is 300 + 250.  Crash it by 1.

Longest paths are BCEGH and BDEGH.  Crashing D won't help.  G can't be shortened.  
Of B, E, and H, E is the cheapest to crash.  Cost = 250 per day. Savings is 300 + 250.  
Crash it by 2.

Longest paths are still BCEGH and BDEGH.  B and H can be crashed, both for a cost of 
400.  Savings to crash by 1 is 300 + 250.  After this, the project is not late and further 
crashing will only save $250.  Thus, crash either B or H  by 1.   

b. If all activites are crashed:
  Paths:       all crashed        uncrash D by 1   uncrash F by 1
ACEF   9   9 10
ACEGH 11 11 11
BCEF   9   9 10
BCEGH 11 11 11
BDEF   8   9 10
BDEGH   10 11 11

Answers ­ 18
ABCEGH are critical.  D and F are not.  D is more expensive, uncrash it.  Then uncrash F

6.  Let plain = the number of batches of plain cookies to make
Let sweet = the number of batches of sweet cookies to make
Maximize 50plain + 90 sweet
Subject to
1 plain + 1 sweet   < 7   (milk)
2 plain + 1 sweet   < 12    (flour)
10plain + 30sweet < 150  (sugar)
plain,sweet > 0

A B C D E F
1 Problem 1 - Olmsted Cookies
2 Plain Sweet
3 Batches to Make: 3 4 Total
4 profit 0.5 0.9 5.1
5
6 Availabl
Constraints: Used e
7 Milk 1 1 7 7 pints
8 Flour 2 1 10 12 lbs
9 Sugar 10 30 150 150 oz
10

Formulas:
D4 =SUMPRODUCT($B$3:$C$3,B4:C4)
D7 =SUMPRODUCT($B$3:$C$3,B7:C7)
D8 =SUMPRODUCT($B$3:$C$3,B8:C8)
D9 =SUMPRODUCT($B$3:$C$3,B9:C9)

Solver settings:
Target cell: D4
Changing cells: B3:C3
Constraints: D7:D9 <= E7:E9
Options: Assume linear
Assume non-negative

7.  Let lead = the number of sets of lead bells
Let pewter = the number of sets of pewter bells
Maximize 6 lead + 5 pewter  (profit)
Subject to
10lead + 30pewter < 120 (production time)
2lead  +  2pewter   < 16 (leadmatl)
               2pewter   <  6 (tin)
lead,pewter > 0

Answers ­ 19
A B C D E F
1 Problem 2
2 lead pewter
3 Number made 8 0 Total
4 profit 6 5 48
5
6 Availabl
Constraints Used e
7 production time 10 30 80 120 minutes
8 lead material 2 2 16 16 lbs
9 tin material 0 2 0 6 lbs
10

Formulas
=$B$3*B4+
D4 $C$3*C4
=$B$3*B7+
D7 $C$3*C7
=$B$3*B8+
D8 $C$3*C8
=$B$3*B9+
D9 $C$3*C9

Solver
settings
Target cell: D4
Changing cells: B3:C3
Constraints: D7:D9 <= E7:E9
Options: Assume linear
Assume non-negative

8.  Let x1 = thousands of units of x1 gas
Let x2 = thousands of units of x2 gas.
Maximize 10,000x1 ­ 1000x2
Subject to
x2 > 1/5x1 (mix)
x1 > 8 (demand in 000s)
20x1 + 15x2 < 300 (production)
x1, x2 > 0

9.  Let rocker = the number of rocking charis to make
Let table = the number of tables to make
Maximize 400 rocker + 200table  (profit)
Subject to
.20rocker + .20table < 25 (oak)
.05rocker + .30table < 30  (pine)
50rocker + 15table   < 4500  (hours)

Answers ­ 20
   rocker                    > 10 (orders)
rocker,table > 0

10.  a. 3 (100s of ft) of type 1,  6 (100s of ft of pipe) of type 2. 
b. the additive
c. the shadow price indicates that an extra hour of extrusion time would increase 
profits by $3, thus spending $12 would be too much
d. yes, same optimal solution, 35 is within the range of optimality.  
e. not exactly, the range of feasibility for the packaging hour constraint only goes up 
by 2 hours, if more hours became available it would be necessary to rerun the 
program.
f. 2 * 10.999 = $22.  
g. nothing, we already have extra (slack).

11.  a. 20 dresses and 10 coats, no skirts.
b. by 2.5 dollars a skirt
c. $640
d. cutting time and material
e. yes, the shadow price is 75¢ more than this.
f. It would still be optimal to make 20 dresses and 10 coats, but the resultant profit 
would go up to 20*(17+4) + 10*(30) = $720

12.  a. 75

b. 50*200 = $10,000

c. 11.25 pine boards, no oak.

d. that we have more than satisfied this requirement.  We were required to make at 
least 10 rockers, but the optimal solution says to make 65 more than that 
requirement.  
e. yes, profit could increase by 571 ­ 150 for each board purchased, up to 5.5 more 
boards.

f. something less than $5.71

g. no, the allowable increase is 200 for the price of tables. 

Answers ­ 21